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Digestive Enzymes Diabetes

Best Digestive Enzymes Supplements | Baseline Of Health

Best Digestive Enzymes Supplements | Baseline Of Health

Breaking down carbohydrates -- a task for specialists Animal sourced enzymes VS vegetarian sourced enzymes Whether or not your formula is designed for the real world The importance of HCL -- and where it belongs All too often, nutritional formulas are designed by people who get their "expertise" from books, not real world experience. This makes for formulas that may look good on paper, but make no sense in the real world. Examples include formulas that contain 30 ingredients stuffed into a 500 mg capsule. On paper, it gives companies bragging rights to all of these great ingredients in their formula, which some people think is a good thing. But the reality is that if all the ingredients are equal in the formula, that means just 16.7 thousandths of a gram of each ingredient is present. In fact, the reality is usually worse, with the first few ingredients getting more and the rest getting as little as 4, or even 2, thousandths of a gram. Incidentally, a full gram is only 1/28 of an ounce. When you get down to 16.7 thousandths of a gram or less, you're talking pixie dust levels for a given ingredient. In fact, the ink identifying the ingredient on the label may weigh more than the ingredient in the capsule itself. So what does this have to do with enzymes? Well, it's hard enough to stuff all of the enzyme activity you need into a 500 mg capsule, even packing capsules full to the brim with the highest quality enzymes. And yet, so many enzyme formulas, stuff their enzyme capsules with more herbs than enzymes because it looks good on the label. For example, I went on the net and randomly pulled up a major selling enzyme formula. It has only a little over 100 mg of enzymes in each capsule. That's just one-fifth of the capsule by weight. What it does have is over 300 mg of her Continue reading >>

Treating Diabetes With Enzymes: What We Know Now.

Treating Diabetes With Enzymes: What We Know Now.

Treating Diabetes With Enzymes: What We Know Now. By: Dr. William Wong, ND, PhD. Up to a year ago, for anyone asking if systemic enzymes could help lessen the load of troubles that beset Type 1 diabetic patients, I would have told them about lowering pancreatic inflammation, and possibly helping with lower extremity circulatory issues. I would have never suggested that the use of enzymes could decrease the need for insulin, increase energy or reverse the seemingly myriad of things diabetics suffer from. Then we started getting information from Type 1 patients that amazed even me and that have subsequently sparked new research. Here are two typical case histories. Case History #1: A Type 1 diabetic Native American patient from Montana in his mid 40's, very insulin dependent, with peripheral neuropathy in the lower extremities (LE's) and presenting paresthesia as well in the upper extremities (UE's) radiating distally to the hand. Peripheral Vascular Disease (PVD) in the LE's had already caused several toes to be amputated. Patient began taking therapeutic doses of fibrinolytic systemic enzymes. Within weeks, circulation was opened in his feet and lower extremities. Skin there returned to a pink / flesh color. Remaining toes now have full circulation and are no longer candidates for amputation. Lower extremity and upper extremity pain became paresthesia (tingling and pins and needles), and as a result is much more bearable. The patient’s insulin needs were decreased. Case History #2: 86-year-old male Caucasian from Las Vegas history of Type 1 Diabetes for over 50 years. One below the knee amputation (left side) already done due to DVP, the other leg about to be amputated due to general lack of blood flow and arterial blockage. Poor circulation body wide and a gray / whi Continue reading >>

Digestive Enzymes: Side Effects And List Of Names

Digestive Enzymes: Side Effects And List Of Names

Are oral digestive enzymes available by prescription and over-the-counter (OTC)? Digestive enzymes are available over-the-counter (OTC) or by prescription. OTC products are not approved by the FDA and should not be used with the intent to cure or treat any aliments. OTC digestive enzymes are mainly used as a dietary supplements to help with digestion. OTC dietary supplements are not regulated by the FDA and may contain impurities and varying quantities of active ingredients. A person should speak to their doctor or pharmacist if he/she is interested in starting an OTC regimen. Prescription digestive enzymes come in various formulations and may contain different amounts of individual digestive enzymes. Therefore, prescription digestive enzymes are not clinically interchangeable and are not considered bioequivalent by the FDA. What are examples of prescription oral digestive enzymes available in the US? What formulations of oral digestive enzymes are available? Oral, delayed release capsules are enteric coated to help prevent the capsules from breaking down in the stomach. Enteric coating delays the release of the enzymes until it reaches the lower gastrointestinal tract where its activity is desired. Oral capsules are non-enteric coated capsules and must be taken with a proton pump inhibitor (PPI), a medicine that lowers stomach acidity that can destroy the enzymes. Digestive enzymes are also available as oral mini-microsphere delayed-release capsules, tablet, and powder. Are taking oral digestive enzymes during pregnancy or while breastfeeding safe? Oral digestive enzymes have not been adequately studied in pregnant women . Oral digestive enzymes should only be used during pregnancy if the potential benefits to the mother outweigh the potential risks to the unborn baby Continue reading >>

The Connection Between Epi And Diabetes

The Connection Between Epi And Diabetes

More than 25 million Americans have diabetes, and if you’re one of the millions living with the condition, you understand the crucial role your pancreas plays in producing insulin and preventing diabetes complications. But you might not know about exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, a condition that by some estimates could affect as many as half of people with insulin-dependent diabetes, as well as many of those with non-insulin-dependent diabetes. The pancreas has two basic functions. The first is to make insulin and other hormones as part of what's called its endocrine function. The cells that make insulin (islet cells) exist in the pancreas alongside those that carry out the second function of the pancreas, called the exocrine function, which is the production of enzymes that help with digestion. When you have exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, either your pancreas isn’t able to make needed digestive enzymes or important ducts in it are blocked, meaning that the enzymes can’t get to your digestive tract to break down food. A blockage in your pancreas can cause partial digestion of the pancreatic tissue itself, which in turn can damage the cells that produce insulin. There’s more to the link between diabetes and exocrine pancreatic insufficiency than proximity, but researchers aren’t exactly sure what it is — although it sounds a lot like the riddle of the chicken and the egg. “Diabetes can be caused by exocrine disease, and exocrine pancreatic insufficiency can be caused by diabetes," explains Philip D. Hardt, a physician and researcher with the University Hospital of Giessen and Marburg in Giessen, Germany, and author of a review on this topic published in Experimental Diabetes Research. "Both are possible.” Diabetes and Pancreatic Insufficiency: Poss Continue reading >>

Amylase: The Anti-diabetes Digestive Enzyme That Boosts Energy

Amylase: The Anti-diabetes Digestive Enzyme That Boosts Energy

It’s a lesser known fact that a growing number of health problems can be linked to nutrient malabsorption due to a lack of digestive enzymes. (1) Amylase, protease and lipase are the three main and most vital enzymes your body utilizes to digest food. Amylase has the responsibility of helping your body process carbohydrates into simple sugars while protease breaks down protein and lipase is in charge of fat break down. Why should you care about amylase? The role of digestive enzymes is to act as catalysts in speeding up specific, life-preserving chemical reactions in the body. Essentially, digestive enzymes assist in breaking down larger molecules into more easily absorbed particles that the body can use to survive and thrive. Without proper levels of amylase and other digestive enzymes, it really is impossible to have your health be at its best. 5 Amylase Health Benefits What are some of the ways that amylase can benefit your health? Well, aside from the most key and central function to properly digest carbohydrates, it also holds a lot of other valuable health benefits that will probably surprise you. 1. Improved Digestion Your mouth is the place where both the mechanical and chemical breakdown of your food occurs through the combined use of your teeth, jaws and saliva. Amylases are vital to your digestive process because they’re needed to process any starches in your diet, which are a main source from which people derive glucose, the primary sugar molecule the body uses for energy. It’s key that you combine your body’s natural amylase-producing ability with your natural ability to chew. Why is this important? Because if food is not properly broken down in the mouth, then your body has more work to do in order to digest and extract nutrients and energy from wh Continue reading >>

Enzyme Supplements That Help May With Diabetes

Enzyme Supplements That Help May With Diabetes

Home Disease Diabetes Enzyme Supplements That Help May With Diabetes Enzyme Supplements That Help May With Diabetes Most diabetics get remarkable results from juicing. If you have had diabetes for 10 years of more, however, it may be a good idea to take digestive enzyme supplements before you start juicing for your diabetes. The reason some diabetics need enzymes is a complication of diabetes known as gastroparesis. This relatively common condition is caused by damage to the vagus nerve. Just as years of uncontrolled high blood sugar levels can cause neuropathy, or nerve damage, in the hands and feet, they can also cause neuropathy in the nerves that control the muscles that help grind food in the stomach and push it down to the small intestine. Uncontrolled high blood sugar levels can also cause damage in the nerves that stimulate the release of digestive enzymes . The major problem in gastroparesis is that the sphincter at the top of the stomach, where it connects with the stomach, tends to stay open. This lets stomach acid up into your throat. The sphincter at the bottom of your stomach, the pyloric valve, tends to stay shut. This keeps food from passing into your small intestine where nutrients can be absorbed. If you have to use insulin, its effects become unpredictable because you don't know how soon your body will begin to absorb glucose after you eat, so you don't know when to take your insulin shot. If you are a type 2 diabetic , you may notice symptoms only occasionally at first. You might have heartburn after a big meal, and you might become constipated. You might suffer so much bloating that you lose your appetite, and the nerves that ordinarily can't keep your muscles active enough to prevent irregularity suddenly work so well that you get diarrhea. Burpin Continue reading >>

Digestive Enzymes For The Control Of Diabetes

Digestive Enzymes For The Control Of Diabetes

What a wonderful weekend it is for me. On Thanksgiving Day my blood glucose readings were between 5.2 to 6.3 (93.6 to 113.4) at varying times of the day. I did say it would be a wonderful Thanksgiving Day for me with lower readings than I have had in a long time. I am still giving God the praise for the gift of life and for this energy I now have and the improve health I am enjoying. We should send out praises every day and not just Thanksgiving day, so I encourage you to do that at this moment before you continue to read about digestive enzymes for the control of diabetes. What is Digestive Enzyme? Should we be Concerned about Digestive Enzymes? Here is why we need digestive enzymes: To break down foods into nutrients, which are then easily absorbed into the bloodstream. This is then used by our bodies. It generally improves digestion. Breaks down proteins. Improves circulation. Boost the Immune System. Makes us less inflamed. Reduces: Heartburn Belching Changes in bowel Nausea Bloating Kidney complications could be reduced. Helps us to get rid of wastes. Take nutrients around the body. The Three Major Digestive Enzymes Let us now take a look at the three major digestive enzymes. They are: Protease. This is found in the stomach, intestine and pancreas. They break down the protein found in the foods that we eat. Lipase. This is found in the pancreas and the stomach, but they break down the fats. Amylase. Again, this is found in the pancreas and the stomach and also our saliva. Sugar and carbohydrates are digested more easily thanks to Amylase. If you are diabetic or have some knowledge in the area, then you may be getting excited about the following keywords mentioned above: Pancreas Carbohydrates Sugar Fats Excitement Galore for Diabetics The big question is this: Are Continue reading >>

Digestive Enzymes: An Unexpected Diabetes Game Changer

Digestive Enzymes: An Unexpected Diabetes Game Changer

Diabetes Type 2 Rewound of Bellingham, Washington Digestive Enzymes: An Unexpected Diabetes Game Changer I crossed over into type 2 diabetes in 2005. In early 2015, I thought I had a urinary tract infection. I didnt. The next day, my doctors office informed me that my non-fasting blood glucose was 282 mg/dL, my A1c 9.9%, and that I needed to start taking metformin and a statin immediately. With my doctors support, I chose to try diet and walking again, then have the lab work repeated in six weeks. With the help of a lot of books beginning with Dr. Bernsteins Diabetes Solution, 4th edition, and many on the Low-carb Diet Forum at , all of my lab work is now within or just above normal range, except my fasting and post meal blood glucose levels. A1c at last check was 5.4%. Fasting glucose is typically in the 110 115 mg/dL range, 2-hour post meal levels are typically 10 30 mg/dL higher, lipid panel is the best it's been in my entire adult life. Despite following the low carb ketogenic diet, taking lots of thoughtfully chosen supplements, and walking regularly for the last 15 months, my blood glucose levels havent changed much beyond what they were within a month of beginning the low carb diet. That is, until recently. Id just finished reading Dr. Richard Maurers book, The Blood Code (2014) - (which is excellent, a must read for all type 2 diabetics) - and I decided to increase my intake of Alpha Lipoic Acid from 200 mg to 400 mg a day. At about the same time, I ran out of my whole foods B-complex, available only online, so I bought a different B-complex locally that also includes a variety of organic fruits and vegetables, enzymes, and probiotics. When my fasting blood glucose dropped into the 90s (mg/dL), I didnt think much about it as this occasionally happens. But one m Continue reading >>

Digestive Enzymes For Diabetes

Digestive Enzymes For Diabetes

Digestive enzymes are important for a variety of functions of your body and are best known for their role in breaking down the foods in nutrients that can be easily absorbed in the bloodstream and further used by your body. Digestive enzymes in supplement form can be used by diabetics to help improve the digestion and proper absorption and utilization of nutrients. Before taking any supplements, including digestive enzymes you should first consult your health care provider. Video of the Day There are three key digestive enzymes. Protease, found in the juices of the stomach, pancreas and intestine help break down the proteins from the food you eat. Lipase, also found in the stomach and pancreas help break down the fats. Amylase from saliva, pancreatic and stomach juices help digest the sugars or carbohydrates. Digestive Enzymes for Diabetics Diabetes does not only cause impairment in the metabolism of sugars but is also associated with abnormal metabolism of fats and proteins. Therefore all three key enzymes — lipase, protease and amylase — are important in managing diabetes because they will help digest all three groups of nutrients: proteins, fats and sugars. Enzyme Therapy for Diabtes and Its Complications In addition to a multivitamin and multimineral formula, supplementation with digestive enzymes is recommended by the author of “The Complete Book of Enzyme Therapy” for managing both type 1 and 2 diabetes. These enzymes will help improve digestion, as well as break down the fats, proteins and sugars. In addition, digestive enzymes may improve circulation, which is often poor in diabetics, boost the immune system, decrease inflammation, help the transportation of nutrients throughout the body, eliminate waste products and enhance overall wellness. Digestive e Continue reading >>

Digestive Enzymes Might Be Spiking Your Blood Sugar

Digestive Enzymes Might Be Spiking Your Blood Sugar

If you do take a digestive enzyme formula, please check the ingredients and make sure it doesn’t contain enzymes for digestion commonly listed as Amylases. The bad news is that most of them do. In fact, they play a leading role in most digestive enzyme formulas. Amylases are enzymes produced in the pancreas that are secreted into the small intestine to help break down dietary starches and sugar. Taking extra of these amylases can increase the speed with which the body breaks down carbohydrates, which can cause excess and rapidly-absorbing glucose into the bloodstream. This can cause dangerously high after meal blood sugar spikes and high blood sugar (1). So Beware! These are dangerous enzymes for digestion. Now, we have been told that as we age the ability to manufacture digestive enzymes declines and, yes, I have to admit there are studies to back this up. But why accept this without a fight? It is just not as simple as saying, if I take digestive enzymes and feel better, it means I need them for the rest of my life. Why not investigate why the body is not producing adequate enzymes for digestion in the first place? The most common reason that this happens is liver congestion. In the vast majority of humans, right before the bile duct enters the small intestine, it connects with the pancreatic duct (2). If the large intestine is constipated or inflamed, toxins will default back to the liver for processing and, over time, congest the liver and thicken the bile. A congested bile duct can block the flow of digestive enzymes from the pancreas in at least 91% of the population (2). In one study, 46% of patients with pancreatitis had extra thick and viscous bile, linking congested bile to pancreatic function. My Advice on Enzymes for Digestion: If you have blood sugar issu Continue reading >>

Inhibition Of Key Digestive Enzymes Related To Diabetes And Hyperlipidemia And Protection Of Liver-kidney Functions By Trigonelline In Diabetic Rats

Inhibition Of Key Digestive Enzymes Related To Diabetes And Hyperlipidemia And Protection Of Liver-kidney Functions By Trigonelline In Diabetic Rats

Go to: Diabetes is a serious health problem and a source of risk for numerous severe complications such as obesity and hypertension. Treatment of diabetes and its related diseases can be achieved by inhibiting key digestive enzymes related to starch and lipid digestion. The findings revealed that the administration of trigonelline to surviving diabetic rats helped to protect the pancreas β-cells from death and damage. Additionally, the supplement of trigonelline to surviving diabetic rats significantly decreased intestinal α-amylase and maltase by 36 and 52%, respectively, which led to a significant decrease in the blood glucose rate by 46%. Moreover, the administration of trigonelline to surviving diabetic rats potentially inhibited key enzymes of lipid metabolism and absorption such as lipase activity in the small intestine by 56%, which led to a notable decrease in serum triglyceride (TG) and total cholesterol (TC) rates and an increase in the HDL cholesterol level. This treatment also improved glucose, maltase, starch, and lipid oral tolerance. Trigonelline was also observed to protect the liver-kidney functions efficiently, which was evidenced by the significant decrease in the serum aspartate transaminase (AST), alanine transaminase (ALT), gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activities and creatinine, albumin, and urea rates. The histological analysis of the pancreas, liver, and kidney tissues further established the positive effect of trigonelline. Overall, the findings presented in this study demonstrate that the administration of trigonelline to diabetic rats can make it a potentially strong candidate for industrial application as a pharmacological agent for the treatment of hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia, and liver-kidney dysf Continue reading >>

Digestive Enzymes???

Digestive Enzymes???

I'm just curious about everyone's thoughts are about adding a feline digestive enzyme to my kitty's diet?? She's been unregulated for about 2 years, I've switched from Lantus to Levemir, followed tight regulation protocol, and still can't get her even close to regulated. I'm willing to try things like probiotics and digestive enzymes to see if these will make a difference. The only reason I know of to give digestive enzymes is if your cat is diagnosed with pancreatic insufficiency. If your kitty isn't losing weight despite eating like crazy (and isn't hyperthyroid), you don't need digestive enzymes. I think the issue with Juba's numbers is that you're holding doses too long and not increasing in 0.25u increments. Juba was on a 0.25u dose for a very long time. I would sooner see you intervene with food as soon as you have an inkling that numbers may be dropping and try to prevent a dose reduction than holding the dose that long. Holding a dose that isn't putting your cat in normal numbers can cause glucose toxicity -- your cat's body regards the higher range as the new "normal" and makes it harder to get the numbers to come down to a normal range. The other issue is that you're not always reducing the dose if numbers fall into dose reduction range. I believe @Marje and Gracie posted recently that all cats should take digestive enzymes. One of my civvies is often constipated. She seemed to improve on Fortiflora, but then some people here said bad things about Fortiflora. I stopped it. When I read Marje's post, I put all of them on Naturvet Digestive Enzymes and Probiotics. Yum's nadirs rose so I stopped it after 2 days (of course cause and effect for BG changes are great mysteries) . The Naturvet contains fructooligosaccharides. Naturvet had a scholarly article on their Continue reading >>

Scientists Have Way To Control Sugars That Lead To Diabetes, Obesity

Scientists Have Way To Control Sugars That Lead To Diabetes, Obesity

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. - Scientists can now turn on or off the enzymes responsible for processing starchy foods into sugars in the human digestive system, a finding they believe will allow them to better control those processes in people with type 2 diabetes and obesity. Bruce Hamaker, a professor of food science and director of the Whistler Center for Carbohydrate Research at Purdue University, said the four small intestine enzymes, called alpha-glucosidases, are responsible for generating glucose from starch digestion. Each enzyme functions differently, breaking down starches into different sugars at different rates. Someone missing one or more of those enzymes creates glucose improperly. Influx of glucose to the blood increases insulin release from the pancreas, which allows the body to remove the sugar. When the body's tissues cannot respond well to insulin, the blood sugar is not lowered, a situation seen in type 2 diabetics. Even in non-diabetics, excess sugars not burned by the body as energy may be stored as fat, an issue for people prone to obesity. "In diabetics, you don't want this roller coaster of blood-glucose levels. Their bodies can't regulate glucose that well," Hamaker said. "If you can selectively inhibit these enzymes, it opens up the possibility of moderating glucose to the body as well as directing glucose release into different parts of the small intestines for certain physiologic responses." Hamaker and Mario Pinto, professor of chemistry and vice president for research at Simon Fraser University in Vancouver, Canada, members of a starch research consortium, led the study. Their results were published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry. Hamaker's group did the inhibition studies on starch degradation products and the alpha-glucosidase enzymes, Continue reading >>

Can Digestive Enzymes Benefit Your Patients With Diabetes?

Can Digestive Enzymes Benefit Your Patients With Diabetes?

Can digestive enzymes benefit your patients with diabetes? Your patients with diabetes know how serious this chronically debilitating disease can often be. However, if we look at the national statistics for both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes , the stakes quickly escalate. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) estimated that more than 30 million Americans, or more than 9 percent of the population live with diabetes.1 Of those 30 million cases, almost 1.5 million will represent brand new cases of diabetes that are diagnosed for the first time in any given year. Furthermore, those 30 million Americans with diabetes represent an enormous medical cost of $327 billion per year. This breaks down into $237 billion for direct medical costs (such as needles, insulin and other diabetes medications, surgery, or wound care) and another $90 billion in reduced productivity as a result from sick days or personal time off from work for doctor visits.1 Overall, medical expenditures for people with diabetes are more than twice as high for those who do not have diabetes. Clearly, there must be a better and more cost effective way to treat diabetes. Stop to consider that by the time a patient with diabetes comes into your waiting room, theyve likely been to more than one specialist to treat their diabetes, but still have not gotten relief from their symptoms. Thats a great deal of time and money they have already spent, so it should not be surprising that they may not put much stock in your ability to help them. This is when your expert knowledge of nutritional supplements can be the answer to the ongoing problem of treating your patients with diabetes. Some interesting research seems to have shown some promise for digestive enzymes to do just this. How do digestive enzymes for diabetes hel Continue reading >>

Is It Safe To Take Supplements If You Have Diabetes?

Is It Safe To Take Supplements If You Have Diabetes?

You will find supplements for anything and everything these days. Even when you do not suffer from an ailment, supplements are suggested to keep you healthy and ailment-free. According to CDC, use of supplements is common among US adult population – over 50% adults used supplements during 2003-2006, with multivitamins/multiminerals being the most commonly used. So when you are a diabetic, especially if you have prediabetes and type-2 diabetes, you may find yourself confronting a large number of options for supplements that claim to support, reduce and even cure your diabetes. Diabetes is quite a frustrating disorder and you may find yourself tempted to try out these supplements one after another. But is it really safe to take supplements when you are a diabetic? Let us find out. But before that you need to understand what exactly supplements are. Defining Supplements As the name suggests, a supplement is anything that adds on to something. A dietary supplement is therefore something that one takes in addition to one’s diet to get proper nutrition. US Congress in the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act defines dietary supplements as having the following characteristics: It is a product that is intended to supplement the diet; It contains one or more dietary ingredients (including vitamins, minerals, herbs and other botanicals, amino acids, and other substances) or their constituents; It is intended to be taken by mouth as a pill, capsule, tablet, or liquid; It is not represented for use as a conventional food or as sole item of a mean or a diet; and, It is labeled on the front panel as being a dietary supplement. Now let us look at some general benefits and risks of taking supplements. We will discuss these in context of diabetes later in the article. Benefit Continue reading >>

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