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Difference Between Type1 And Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms

Differences Between Type 1 And Type 2

Differences Between Type 1 And Type 2

Tweet Whilst both type 1 and type 2 diabetes are characterised by having higher than normal blood sugar levels, the cause and development of the conditions are different. Confused over which type of diabetes you have? It's not always clear what type of diabetes someone has, despite what many people think. For instance, the typical assumption is that people with type 2 diabetes will be overweight and not inject insulin, while people with type 1 diabetes will be, if anything, underweight. But these perceptions just aren't always true. Around 20% of people with type 2 diabetes are of a healthy weight when diagnosed, and many of them are dependent on insulin. Similarly, people with type 1 diabetes will in some cases be overweight. Because both types of diabetes can be so varied and unpredictable, it's often difficult to know which type of diabetes someone has. It's not safe to assume that an overweight person with high blood glucose levels has type 2 diabetes, because the cause of their condition might in fact be attributable to type 1. In some cases, when the type of diabetes is in doubt, your health team may need to carry out specialised tests to work out which type of diabetes you have. This way, they can recommend the most appropriate treatment for your diabetes. Common differences between type 1 and type 2 diabetes Despite the uncertainty that often surrounds a diagnosis of diabetes, there are a few common characteristics of each diabetes type. Please note that these differences are based on generalisations - exceptions are common. For instance, the perception of type 1 diabetes isn't strictly true: many cases are diagnosed in adulthood. This table should be seen as a rough guide to the differences between type 1 and type 2 diabetes, rather than hard and fast rules. Co Continue reading >>

The Difference Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes

The Difference Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes

Diabetes is the condition that occurs when a person’s blood glucose (blood sugar), which is the body’s main source of energy, is too high. Glucose is made in the liver and muscles, and also comes from the foods a person eats. The blood transports glucose to all the body’s cells for use as energy. The pancreas, which is situated between that stomach and the spine, makes a hormone called insulin that it releases to assist the blood with carrying the glucose to all the cells. In diabetes, the pancreas either does to make enough insulin or the insulin that it does make is not as functional as it needs to be. When this happens, glucose stays in a person’s blood rather than being dropped off in his or her cells. This leads to prediabetes or prediabetes, and can cause serious health problems. How Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes differ Type 1 diabetes most frequently develops in young people, hence its former name of juvenile diabetes, but can also develop in adults. In type 1 diabetes, the immune system in a person’s body has attacked and caused destruction of the cells that make insulin, causing too little insulin got be made or none at all. Type 1 diabetes symptoms may come on suddenly and may include: • Rapid, deep breathing • Dry mouth and skin • Reddened, flushed face • A breath odor that has a fruit smell • Vomiting, nausea, and trouble keeping fluids down • Pain in the stomach • Feeling very thirsty or very hungry or both • Feeling exhausted continually despite getting enough rest • A blurring of the eyesight • Feet that tingle or go numb • Unexplained weight loss • Frequent urination both day and night Treatment for Type 1 diabetes includes: • Depending on the severity, either insulin shots or oral insulin • Changing the diet to a healt Continue reading >>

Type 1 Vs Type 2 Diabetes Similarities Differences (cont.)

Type 1 Vs Type 2 Diabetes Similarities Differences (cont.)

What are the differences between the signs and symptoms of type 1 vs. type 2 diabetes? Signs and symptoms of diabetes, whether type 1 or type 2, do not differ. Early diabetes may not produce any symptoms at all. When symptoms do occur, the age of onset is typically different, with type 1 diabetes being diagnosed most often in younger people (in a child, for example), while type 2 diabetes is diagnosed more commonly in adults. However, this is not always the case. The increasing incidence of obesity among children and adolescents has caused a rise in the development of type 2 diabetes in young people. Further, some adults with diabetes may be diagnosed with a form of late onset type 1 diabetes. How are the signs and symptoms similar? There isn't a difference between the symptoms of either disease. The "classic" symptoms are the same for both diabetes type 1 and type 2: Increased urine output (polyuria) Increased thirst (polydipsia) Increased hunger (Polyphagia ) Unexplained weight loss For both type 1 and type 2, early symptoms of untreated diabetes arise due to elevated blood sugar levels and the presence of glucose in the urine. High amounts of glucose in the urine can cause increased urine output and dehydration. Dehydration, in turn, causes increased thirst. A lack of insulin or an inability of insulin to work properly affects protein, fat and carbohydrate metabolism. Insulin normally encourages storage of fat and protein, so when there is inadequate insulin or poorly functioning insulin, this eventually leads to weight loss despite an increase in appetite. Some untreated diabetes patients also experience generalized symptoms like fatigue, nausea, and vomiting. People with diabetes are also at risk for infections of the bladder, skin, and vaginal areas. Changes in bl Continue reading >>

What’s The Difference Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes?

What’s The Difference Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes?

Reading or hearing the words ‘Type 1 diabetes’ and ‘Type 2 diabetes’ can be quite confusing if you are unfamiliar with the disease. Knowing the differences between the two types will help you better understand how the disease affects your body or the body of a person you care about. Plus, learning more about Type 1 and Type 2 can give you insight on prevention and care. Remember, knowledge is power. According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), “Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes have different causes. Yet, two factors are important in both. You inherit a predisposition to the disease then something in your environment triggers it.” Simple descriptions of Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes: Type 1 diabetes typically is diagnosed in children and young adults; it earlier had been referred to as juvenile diabetes or insulin-dependent diabetes. Interestingly, only 5 percent of people with diabetes have this type of the chronic disease. For people with Type 1 diabetes, their body’s pancreas produces little or no insulin ““ a hormone within the body that converts sugar, starches and other food into energy needed for daily life. At this point, there is no known way to prevent Type 1 diabetes. And treatment requires the use of insulin. Type 1 diabetes can come on suddenly. It may be diagnosed when a person goes to the doctor with symptoms of hyperglycemia (high blood sugar). A test at a doctor’s office or laboratory would be administered to confirm the diagnosis. Symptoms include excessive thirstiness, dry mouth, increased urination, unusual hunger or weight loss ““ even though the person eats a normal diet or increases food intake. Other symptoms are blurred vision, pain or tingling in the hands or feet, and frequent infections or ones that do not heal. While r Continue reading >>

What Is The Difference Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes?

What Is The Difference Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes?

First, What Exactly Is Diabetes? Diabetes is a disease that occurs when the blood sugar, or glucose, is too high. Blood glucose is the body’s main source of energy, and it comes from the food we eat. The pancreas makes a hormone, insulin, which helps glucose from the foods you eat get into your cells, to be used for energy. Some people’s bodies don’t make enough – or any – insulin, or don’t utilize insulin well. When that happens, glucose stays in your blood and doesn’t reach your cells. This is diabetes. Over time, high glucose levels in your blood can cause some very serious health problems, so any diagnosis of diabetes needs constant monitoring and medical attention. The Difference Between Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes People whose bodies are unable to produce any insulin at all are referred to as having type 1 diabetes. If your body makes too little insulin, or it cannot use insulin effectively, then you are classified as having type 2 diabetes. What Happens in a Person with Type 1 Diabetes? People who have type 1 diabetes (formerly called juvenile-onset or insulin-dependent diabetes) account for 5-10% of all people who have diabetes. In type 1 diabetes, the body’s own immune system attacks and destroys the cells that release insulin. Eventually, this auto-immune disorder eliminates all insulin production from the body. Without insulin, cells cannot absorb the sugar they need to produce energy. Symptoms for type 1 diabetes usually begin in childhood or young adulthood. When a young person becomes seriously ill from sudden symptoms of high blood sugar, they often seek medical attention. Type 1 diabetics will also have episodes of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). But the biggest difference between type 1 and type 2 diabetes, is that type 1 diabetes cannot Continue reading >>

What’s The Difference Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes?

What’s The Difference Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes?

Do you really know the key difference between Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes? The truth is that diabetes, in itself, can be a confusing term. More often than not, you’ll read and hear a lot about “diabetes” in general, without any mention of the type. While both type 1 and type 2 diabetes are characterized by a higher than normal blood sugar level, the cause, the development, and often, the preferred treatment aren’t the same. It’s not always clear what type of diabetes someone has. It’s not safe to assume that an overweight middle-aged person will have Type 2 diabetes, just like all teens don’t always suffer from Type 1 diabetes. Since both types can have varied and unpredictable symptoms, it may be difficult to differentiate between the two. Let’s see 6 differences that are very common among T1D and T2D patients. Continue reading >>

What Is The Difference Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes?

What Is The Difference Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes?

Find the differences between type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus as given below. (I) Type 1 diabetes mellitus: It is also known as Insulin-dependent DM (IDDM) or Juvenile-onset DM and is seen in childhood. It results from absolute deficiency of insulin due to destruction of beta-cells. (II) Type 2 diabetes mellitus: It is also known as Non-insulin dependent DM (NIDDM) or Maturity-onset DM and is seen in middle age persons/adults (>40 years). It results from either relative deficiency of insulin (due to dysfunction of beta-cells) or insulin resistance. It is most common type of diabetes. In type 1 diabetic patients, the acute complication of uncontrolled diabetes is keto-acidotic coma, which may lead to death, whereas in type 2 diabetic patients, the acute complication of uncontrolled diabetes is hyper-osmolar coma. Differences between type 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus are given in following table. Ref: Textbook of Biochemistry with Biomedical Significance by Prem Prakash Gupta, CBS Publishers New Delhi, second edition Continue reading >>

The Differences & Similarities Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes

The Differences & Similarities Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes

“Oh, you have diabetes? That’s where you can’t eat sugar and have to poke yourself with needles and stuff because you ate too much candy as a kid…right?” *sigh* Wrong. Most people have no clue what diabetes is let alone that there is more than one type of diabetes. Type 1, type 2, LADA, MODY, and gestational are just some classification examples of diabetes. All have a range of differences and similarities but the two most common forms are type 1 and type 2 diabetes. As type 1 and type 2 diabetics [should] know, there are a few major differences between the two conditions which, all too often, get confused and misconstrued by the public. Yet, there are also a few similarities that get overlooked even among people in the diabetic community. Take a look at these two major forms of diabetes and make sure you can not only distinguish the differences but also share the similarities. Similarities Symptoms The symptoms for both type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes are identical in most ways. Both conditions involve three distinct symptoms prior to diagnosis: Polyuria – excessive urination often due to high blood sugar Polydipsia – excessive thirst Polyphagia – excessive hunger In type 2 diabetes, symptoms tend to be more gradual than type 1 but they both still share these symptoms along with the other usual byproducts of diabetes like high and low blood sugar, increased agitation, shaky/sweaty blood sugar reactions, as well as the more severe hypoglycemic events that can lead to seizures, coma, and death. Complications People often ask “so, do you have the bad kind of diabetes” and it kind of makes my ears bleed. There is no “good kind” of diabetes and anyone who thinks there is either doesn’t understand diabetes or is living in a warped world of “th Continue reading >>

What Is Diabetes?

What Is Diabetes?

Diabetes is a disease that occurs when your blood glucose, also called blood sugar, is too high. Blood glucose is your main source of energy and comes from the food you eat. Insulin, a hormone made by the pancreas, helps glucose from food get into your cells to be used for energy. Sometimes your body doesn’t make enough—or any—insulin or doesn’t use insulin well. Glucose then stays in your blood and doesn’t reach your cells. Over time, having too much glucose in your blood can cause health problems. Although diabetes has no cure, you can take steps to manage your diabetes and stay healthy. Sometimes people call diabetes “a touch of sugar” or “borderline diabetes.” These terms suggest that someone doesn’t really have diabetes or has a less serious case, but every case of diabetes is serious. What are the different types of diabetes? The most common types of diabetes are type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes. Type 1 diabetes If you have type 1 diabetes, your body does not make insulin. Your immune system attacks and destroys the cells in your pancreas that make insulin. Type 1 diabetes is usually diagnosed in children and young adults, although it can appear at any age. People with type 1 diabetes need to take insulin every day to stay alive. Type 2 diabetes If you have type 2 diabetes, your body does not make or use insulin well. You can develop type 2 diabetes at any age, even during childhood. However, this type of diabetes occurs most often in middle-aged and older people. Type 2 is the most common type of diabetes. Gestational diabetes Gestational diabetes develops in some women when they are pregnant. Most of the time, this type of diabetes goes away after the baby is born. However, if you’ve had gestational diabetes, you have a greater chan Continue reading >>

How To Understand The Difference Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes

How To Understand The Difference Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes

According to the American Diabetes Association, there are approximately 1.4 million cases of diabetes diagnosed each year. Nearly eighty-six million people in the United States with prediabetes are on their way to becoming diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Although there are several forms of diabetes, there is much confusion about the difference between type 1 and type 2. Here is a look at the differences between the two most common forms of a disease that is becoming a global problem. What Is Type 1 Diabetes? Human Diabetic Primary Cells - Cells For Scientific Research Human Diabetic Endothelial, Epithelial Cells, Fibroblasts, Smooth Muscle Cells cellbiologics.com Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune condition that occurs when the body’s immune system attacks the beta cells living in the tissue of the pancreas. This causes the pancreas to produce little to no insulin, which is a hormone that allows cells to use glucose for energy. Insulin makes sure the body’s blood sugar levels do not get too high or too low. People with type 1 diabetes do not have a properly functioning pancreas and cannot properly distribute glucose to cells in the body. The causes of autoimmunity are unknown. Experts have linked several triggers to autoimmunity, such as stress, a diet high in refined sugars and carbohydrates, a lack of physical exercise, poor sleeping habits, and excessive smoking or drinking. Certain genetic factors may also increase the risk of autoimmunity. Autoimmune conditions tend to run in the family. A person with a family history of any autoimmune disorder, not just type 1 diabetes, may be at an increased risk. Certain viruses or illnesses may also be linked to type 1 diabetes. 3 Foods to Throw Out Cut a bit of belly bloat each day, by avoiding these 3 foods nucific.com Up t Continue reading >>

Video: What's The Difference Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes?

Video: What's The Difference Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes?

While they're both technically under the umbrella of diabetes, type 1 and type 2 are very different conditions which require a distinct set of treatments. We've looked at some of the main questions people have around each. Play Video Play Mute 0:00 / 0:00 Loaded: 0% Progress: 0% Stream TypeLIVE 0:00 Playback Rate 1x Chapters Chapters Descriptions descriptions off, selected Subtitles undefined settings, opens undefined settings dialog captions and subtitles off, selected Audio Track Fullscreen This is a modal window. Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window. TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaque Font Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall Caps Reset restore all settings to the default valuesDone Close Modal Dialog End of dialog window. What's the difference between type 1 and type 2 diabetes? Dr Sarah Jarvis, GP There are several different kinds of diabetes, but two main ones. Type 1 diabetes is nothing to do with lifestyle. It's what's called an auto-immune disease. We think that you inherit tendency to have type 1 diabetes and then a trigger in your environment (possibly a virus infection, and there may well be lots of them) triggers your body to start recognising the beta cells of the pancreas as an enemy and start attacking them so that they can no longer make insulin. Type 2 diabetes on the other hand is largely to do with lifestyle. You can inherit a t Continue reading >>

What Exactly Is The Difference Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes?

What Exactly Is The Difference Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes?

We hear about diabetes all the time, so it’s easy to forget that there are two very different types of the condition. Both involve problems with insulin, but they deviate from there. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease where, in general, people have a complete lack of insulin. People with type 2 diabetes are unable to use their own insulin effectively, either because they don’t make enough or because their cells are resistant to the insulin they do make. (These are the silent signs you might have diabetes.) “Type 1 is largely a genetic condition, but since not all identical twins get diabetes, we do think that exposure to an additional environmental factor may trigger an immune response that ultimately destroys the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas,” says Sarah Rettinger, MD, board-certified endocrinologist at Providence Saint John’s Health Center in Santa Monica, California. “On the other hand, type 2 diabetes has a stronger genetic component, caused by a complicated interaction of genes and environment. A person with a first degree relative with type 2 has a 5 to 10 times higher risk of developing the disease than a person the same age and weight without the same family history.” According to the 2014 National Diabetes Statistics Report, 29.1 million Americans have the disease. Of these people, one in four of them are undiagnosed and unaware of their condition. The prevalence is twice as high in non-Hispanic black, Hispanic, and American Indian/Alaska Native adults than non-Hispanic white adults, and higher in individuals aged 65 and older (1 in 4). The incidence of both type 1 and type 2 is increasing worldwide, and type 2 accounts for 95 percent of all diagnosed cases in adults. Type 2 is rare in children (5,000 youths diagnosed each year, c Continue reading >>

What’s The Difference Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes?

What’s The Difference Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes?

Diabetes is a serious and lifelong condition, typically associated with abnormally high levels of glucose, or sugar, in the blood. ��Although there are numerous similarities between type 1 and type 2 diabetes, it���s important to note that they are two very distinct conditions, each with its own symptoms and treatments. By understanding these differences and learning the correct treatment strategies for your specific condition, you should be able to manage it more effectively. Here are the main differences between the two most common forms of diabetes. Causes Type 1 diabetes, also known as juvenile diabetes, is a chronic illness in which the pancreas is unable to produce insulin ��� a hormone that enables cells to absorb sugar and convert it into energy. Although it can occur at any age, type 1 diabetes is typically diagnosed in younger people. The disease can be caused by a range of factors, including genetics and contact with certain viruses. Similar to type 1, type 2 diabetes is related to the body���s inability to use insulin effectively. Individuals with type 2 diabetes can produce insulin, but it is either resisted by the body or produced at insufficient levels. This is, by far, the most common form of the disease, accounting for roughly 95 percent of all diabetes cases, according to the American Diabetes Association. Although the exact cause is unknown, excess weight and poor diet are thought to contribute to its development. Symptoms While both types of diabetes exhibit similar symptoms, there are a few small, noticeable differences. Like those with type 1 diabetes, type 2 sufferers may experience increased thirst, hunger and frequent urination, as well as weight loss, fatigue and blurred vision. However, while these symptoms often develop Continue reading >>

Differences Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes

Differences Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes

Despite sharing a name, type 1 and type 2 diabetes are quite different. Understanding the key differences in type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes is critical for research into finding a way to cure, treat and prevent diabetes, but also for caring for someone with diabetes and managing your own diabetes. How these diseases begin, how they affect the body and how they are treated are all quite different. What is Type 1 Diabetes? Type 1 diabetes is the result of the human immune system mistaking the body’s beta cells, which produce insulin, for foreign cells and causing their destruction. Insulin is a protein that allows the transport of sugar into cells to provide energy. When sugar can’t get from the blood into the cells, the cells have no access to the glucose they need and cannot function correctly. The composition of our blood also gets off balance, with high blood sugar levels leading to detrimental effects on other organs of the body. Injecting synthetic insulin solves this problem because it keeps blood glucose levels in the right range and helps glucose reach our cells. What is Type 2 Diabetes? Although type 2 diabetes is much more common than type 1, the causes for it aren’t fully understood. What doctors and scientists do know is that excess weight, inactivity, age and genetic makeup contribute to development of the disease. Patients with type 2 diabetes make insulin, but the cells in the body cannot respond to it adequately so they cannot take up glucose. Later on, especially when treatment fails, type 2 diabetes is aggravated by exhausted beta cells, decreasing their insulin production resulting in further increases in blood sugar levels. Since beta cells aren’t killed off in type 2 diabetes, at least initially, blood sugar levels often become elevated Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Differences Between Type 1 And 2 - Topic Overview

Diabetes: Differences Between Type 1 And 2 - Topic Overview

In general, people with diabetes either have a total lack of insulin (type 1 diabetes) or they have too little insulin or cannot use insulin effectively (type 2 diabetes). Type 1 diabetes (formerly called juvenile-onset or insulin-dependent diabetes), accounts for 5 to 10 out of 100 people who have diabetes. In type 1 diabetes, the body's immune system destroys the cells that release insulin, eventually eliminating insulin production from the body. Without insulin, cells cannot absorb sugar (glucose), which they need to produce energy. Type 2 diabetes (formerly called adult-onset or non-insulin-dependent diabetes) can develop at any age. It most commonly becomes apparent during adulthood. But type 2 diabetes in children is rising. Type 2 diabetes accounts for the vast majority of people who have diabetes-90 to 95 out of 100 people. In type 2 diabetes, the body isn't able to use insulin the right way. This is called insulin resistance. As type 2 diabetes gets worse, the pancreas may make less and less insulin. This is called insulin deficiency. How are these diseases different? Differences between type 1 and type 2 diabetes Type 1 diabetes Type 2 diabetes Symptoms usually start in childhood or young adulthood. People often seek medical help, because they are seriously ill from sudden symptoms of high blood sugar. The person may not have symptoms before diagnosis. Usually the disease is discovered in adulthood, but an increasing number of children are being diagnosed with the disease. Episodes of low blood sugar level (hypoglycemia) are common. There are no episodes of low blood sugar level, unless the person is taking insulin or certain diabetes medicines. It cannot be prevented. It can be prevented or delayed with a healthy lifestyle, including maintaining a healthy wei Continue reading >>

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