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Difference Between Toujeo And Lantus

Lantus Vs Toujeo

Lantus Vs Toujeo

How much Lantus are you taking? Do you take any other diabetes medications? How are your bg values? All this is important information for determining if you should consider changing your medication. "My fitness trajectory in my senior years does not have to be a continuous downward slope-- I do have some control over that." --Chrysalis Dx T2; 2005-2014: A1c 6.5-7.0% (ave 6.7) with 2000 mg/day metformin + 40 U/day Lantus. Jan 2015: A1c 7.8%. Reduce carbs, begin exercise, stop Lantus, stop metformin and start Victoza. A1c 6.2%-6.4% since Nov 2015. D.D. Family Getting much harder to control Wish I had experience with it but do not. Some good questions were asked, some seem to love the med from what I have heard. What type of problem are you having with Lantus? Since Lantus and Toujeo are exactly the same medication (insulin glargine) and differ only in their concentration (Toujeo is more concentrated) why does your pharmacist think you would benefit by switching? Also, did you ever ask your doctor about testing you for Type 1 diabetes? If consistent low carb eating plus significant insulin does not bring your bg down, perhaps you are a Type 1 rather than a Type 2 diabetic. Any other type 2s had a problem with Lantus? My pharmacist recommended Tujeo. I need opinions First, I could go along with a pharmacist recommending a certain cough drop...but when it comes to advice regarding insulins...not so much. But, let's look into this. I see by your intro post that you're on 31 units a day of Lantus. If your particular "problem" with Lantus is that it's not bringing your blood sugars down to where you'd like them...that could be the amount of Lantus that you're using. Doctors will usually start you out low on insulin volume and titrate you up until your numbers come down to wher Continue reading >>

Is Toujeo The New Lantus?

Is Toujeo The New Lantus?

Sanofi hoping to convert patients to Toujeo as Lantus is due to lose U.S. patent protection. (Find the full prescribing info for Toujeo at the bottom of this article.)…. Toujeo is a more potent follow-up to the drugmaker’s top-selling Lantus insulin product, which accounts for a fifth of Sanofi sales. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration late last week approved the once daily, long-acting basal insulin to treat type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Analysts noted, however, that lower rates of hypoglycemia seen in clinical trials comparing Toujeo to Lantus, were not mentioned on the FDA-approved label. It also highlighted the need for higher doses to achieve the same level of blood glucose control as Lantus. The Toujeo label is probably going to be viewed as more undifferentiated than expected. Sanofi bought some patient conversion time with a patent infringement lawsuit filed last year against Eli Lilly and Co that keeps a cheaper Lantus generic off the market for 30 months. In addition to gaining patients through conversions, there are about a million new patients for basal insulin each and every year. Toujeo has the same active ingredient as Lantus, called insulin glargine, but at three times the concentration and with a design to release the insulin more gradually. Lantus is the world’s most prescribed insulin. Full Prescribing Information for Toujeo® Continue reading >>

Toujeo Vs Lantus Efficacy And Safety | Toujeo (insulin Glargine Injection) 300 Units/ml

Toujeo Vs Lantus Efficacy And Safety | Toujeo (insulin Glargine Injection) 300 Units/ml

In this PK/PD study of Toujeo vs Lantus (insulin glargine injection 100 Units/mL) Longer-lasting, glucose-lowering effect up to 36 hours1,2 This study describes the time course effect following product administration These PK/PD data do not support a comparison of the safety or efficacy of Toujeo and Lantus Once-daily Toujeo should be injected at the same time each day (N=30) Clamp Study I: The pharmacodynamics of Toujeo at steady state after 8 days of daily injections was evaluated against Lantus in a euglycemic clamp study of patients with T1DM (N=30) receiving injections of 0.4 U/kg once daily. The dose on day 8 was followed by a 36-hour euglycemic clamp.2 Toujeo is a long-acting human insulin analog indicated to improve glycemic control in adults with diabetes mellitus. Limitations of Use: Toujeo is not recommended for treating diabetic ketoacidosis. Important Safety Information for Toujeo (insulin glargine injection) 300 Units/mL Toujeo is contraindicated during episodes of hypoglycemia and in patients hypersensitive to insulin glargine or any of its excipients. Toujeo contains the same active ingredient, insulin glargine, as Lantus. The concentration of insulin glargine in Toujeo is 300 units per mL. Insulin pens and needles must never be shared between patients. Do NOT reuse needles. Monitor blood glucose in all patients treated with insulin. Modify insulin regimens cautiously and only under medical supervision. Changes in insulin strength, manufacturer, type, or method of administration may result in the need for a change in insulin dose or an adjustment in concomitant oral antidiabetic treatment. Changes in insulin regimen may result in hyperglycemia or hypoglycemia. Unit for unit, patients started on, or changed to, Toujeo required a higher dose than patients Continue reading >>

Toujeo...the Good, Bad And Ugly Please

Toujeo...the Good, Bad And Ugly Please

My experience with toujeo. I've been taking toujeo since January. I much prefer it to lantus. The lantus burned me very bad. The toujeo comes in a pen calibrated to deliver the dose you need. Taking 30 units of lantus is equivalent to taking 10 units of toujeo but the pen will say 30. I found I needed to go up just slightly to get the same results. There is also 450 units per pen instead of 300 so they last longer. Be prepared to add about 10% to 15% to your dose if you get a 3 month supply. Do not withdraw insulin from this pen into a syringe and take the same amount you dial into the top. You will get 3 times as much as you need. Toujeo 30 units, Victoza 1.2, Novolin R sliding scale, levothyroxine 150ug, Lisinopril 10 mg am, gabapentine 400 mg 3x daily, ..... HgbA1C: 2015 10 - 6.6; 2015 8 - 6.7 (home test); 2015 7 - 7.7; 2015 5 8.7 (home test); 2014 1 - 5.6; 2014 10 - 5.1; 2014 6 5.2; 2014 3 - 5.0; 2014 1 - 5.2 D.D. Family T1 since 1985, MM Pump 2013, CGM 2015 The toujeo comes in a pen calibrated to deliver the dose you need. Taking 30 units of lantus is equivalent to taking 10 units of toujeo but the pen will say 30. We really need to be clear about this everyone! A "unit" of insulin is not a measure of volume. It is a measure of insulin molecules. Toujeo is concentrated, so there are 3 times as many insulin molecules, a therefore 3 times as many units of insulin in the same volume of liquid. But 1 unit of insulin = 1 unit of insulin, whether it is a solution of U-20, U-40, U-80, U-100, U-300, or U-500 liquid. Think of it this way everyone: Lots of folks here take Synthroid (or the generic levothyroxine) for hypothyroid. It comes in many doses, from 25mcg up to 300mcg. However, as many know, all the pills are the same size. How do they accomplish that? They change t Continue reading >>

Insulin Glargine Injection For Subcutaneous Use

Insulin Glargine Injection For Subcutaneous Use

Toujeo (insulin glargine) Injection is along-acting insulin indicated to improve glycemic control in adults with diabetes mellitus. Common side effects of Toujeo include: cold symptoms upper respiratory tract infection allergic reactions injection site reactions itching rash swelling of extremities, and weight gain The recommended starting dose of Toujeo in insulin na�ve patients with type 1 diabetes is approximately one-third to one-half of the total daily insulin dose. The remainder of the total daily insulin dose should be given as a short-acting insulin and divided between each daily meal. As a general rule, 0.2 to 0.4 units of insulin per kilogram of body weight can be used to calculate the initial total daily insulin dose in insulin na�ve patients with type 1 diabetes. The recommended starting dose of Toujeo in insulin na�ve patients with type 2 diabetes is 0.2 units per kilogram of body weight once daily. Toujeo may interact with other antidiabetic drugs, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blocking agents (ARBs), disopyramide, fibrates, fluoxetine, monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), pentoxifylline, pramlintide, propoxyphene, salicylates, somatostatin analogs, sulfonamide antibiotics, antipsychotics, corticosteroids, danazol, diuretics, estrogens, glucagon, isonazid, niacin, oral contraceptives, phenothiazines, progestogens, protease inhibitors, somatropin, sympathomimetic drugs, thyroid hormones, alcohol, beta-blockers, clonidine, lithium salts, clonidine, guanethidine, and reserpine. Tell your doctor all medications and supplements you use. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant before using Toujeo. Insulin requirements may change during pregnancy. It is unknown if Toujeo passes into breast m Continue reading >>

Should My Insulin Dose Be Lower? Toujeo Vs Lantus

Should My Insulin Dose Be Lower? Toujeo Vs Lantus

Early in 2015 the FDA approved the first concentrated long-acting insulin known as Toujeo (insulin glargine), and it’s now available in pharmacies. While Toujeo is the first of its kind, the key word is “concentrated.” It actually contains the same active ingredient (insulin glargine) as Lantus—which is currently the #1 prescribed insulin in the US. To make things even more confusing: Toujeo comes in a 300 mg/mL dosage, while Lantus is 100 mg/mL. Knowing that Toujeo is concentrated, you might think that you can take a much smaller amount of Toujeo for a similar dose compared to Lantus. Believe it or not though, that isn’t the case. Lantus and Toujeo doses are converted 1:1. This means that if you are injecting 50 units of Lantus, you can essentially be switched over to Toujeo and instructed to inject the exact same amount, 50 units. In reality, some dose adjustments can be expected (according to clinical trial data), but it isn’t a matter of converting to a three times smaller dose. Surprisingly, patients who switch over to Toujeo are actually injecting higher doses compared to what they were using for Lantus. I see a lot of confusion around the different dosages, and a few common questions: Is it normal for my dose of Toujeo to be more than my Lantus dose? Yes. Although Toujeo has three times the concentration of insulin glargine, patients treated with Toujeo during clinical trials used more insulin than patients treated with Lantus in order to maintain the same level of blood sugar control. According to the manufacturer, Sanofi-Aventis, a higher dose can be expected with Toujeo and is completely normal. Why would Sanofi-Aventis make Toujeo if Lantus is the most-prescribed insulin? There is speculation that Sanofi-Aventis came up with Toujeo due to the upco Continue reading >>

You Have Other Sanofi Options To Help Meet Your Patients’ Blood Sugar Lowering Needs

You Have Other Sanofi Options To Help Meet Your Patients’ Blood Sugar Lowering Needs

Lantus® is a long-acting insulin analog indicated to improve glycemic control in adults and pediatric patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Lantus® should be administered once a day at the same time every day. Limitations of Use: Lantus® is not recommended for the treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis. Contraindications Lantus® is contraindicated during episodes of hypoglycemia and in patients hypersensitive to insulin glargine or one of its excipients. Warnings and Precautions Insulin pens, needles, or syringes must never be shared between patients. Do NOT reuse needles. Monitor blood glucose in all patients treated with insulin. Modify insulin regimen cautiously and only under medical supervision. Changes in insulin strength, manufacturer, type, or method of administration may result in the need for a change in insulin dose or an adjustment in concomitant oral antidiabetic treatment. Do not dilute or mix Lantus® with any other insulin or solution. If mixed or diluted, the solution may become cloudy, and the onset of action/time to peak effect may be altered in an unpredictable manner. Do not administer Lantus® via an insulin pump or intravenously because severe hypoglycemia can occur. Hypoglycemia is the most common adverse reaction of insulin therapy, including Lantus®, and may be life-threatening. Medication errors, such as accidental mix-ups between basal insulin products and other insulins, particularly rapid-acting insulins, have been reported. Patients should be instructed to always verify the insulin label before each injection. Severe life-threatening, generalized allergy, including anaphylaxis, can occur. Discontinue Lantus®, treat and monitor until symptoms resolve. A reduction in the Lantus® dose may be re Continue reading >>

Fda Approves New Basal Insulin Toujeo

Fda Approves New Basal Insulin Toujeo

The FDA has approved Sanofi’s once-daily basal insulin, but will it compete with Sanofi’s own Lantus? Quick Hits Sanofi, which has been bracing for increased competition for Lantus, has won the race to bring a new basal insulin to the marketplace. This week, the drug manufacturer announced the FDA has approved Toujeo, its new once-daily long-acting basal insulin. The new insulin is expected to go on sale in the U.S. by the start of the second quarter of this year. Studies found that Toujeo’s overall ability to control blood sugar levels matched that of Lantus. It also proved more effective at controlling nighttime hypoglycemia, according to a Bloomberg report. The biggest difference between the two basal insulins is that while Lantus contains 100 units/mL, Toujeo is more concentrated and triples Lantus’ capacity, yielding 300 units/mL. While Lantus is suitable for people with diabetes who are age 6 and up, Toujeo is only approved to treat patients who are 18 years and older. Interestingly, pharmaceutical market watchers weren’t overwhelmed by the news of Toujeo’s approval, according to a report in Fierce Pharma. One market analyst predicted that many Lantus users will not switch over to Toujeo because they will not see enough difference between the two insulins. Since Sanofi owns both products, you would think that would be good news, but Sanofi’s profit margin for Lantus has come under threat. Insurance payors are demanding a cut in the price of Lantus in 2015. Also, there is the pending threat of generic versions of Lantus flooding the marketplace. It’s believed that Sanofi must establish a strong foothold with Toujeo in the basal insulin marketplace if it is to maintain its profit margin. UPDATE – 3/5/15 – EU regulators have given Toujeo the green Continue reading >>

Lantus, Toujeo (insulin Glargine) Dosing, Indications, Interactions, Adverse Effects, And More

Lantus, Toujeo (insulin Glargine) Dosing, Indications, Interactions, Adverse Effects, And More

100 units/mL (Lantus SoloSTAR; Basaglar KwikPen; 3 mL disposable prefilled pens) 300 units/mL (Toujeo; 1.5 mL SoloStar disposable prefilled pen) 300 units/mL (Toujeo Max; 3 mL SoloStar disposable prefilled pen) Note: Recent studies have suggested that glargine-300 extends blood glucose control well beyond 24 hr Long-acting basal insulin indicated to improve glycemic control in adults with type 1 diabetes mellitus Start ~1/3 of total daily insulin dose; use remaining 2/3 of daily insulin dose on short-acting, premeal insulin Usual initial dose range: 0.2-0.4 units/kg; optimal glucose lowering effect may take 5 days to fully manifest and the first insulin glargine dose may be insufficient to cover metabolic needs in the first 24 hr of use Titrate insulin glargine per instructions, and adjust coadministered glucose-lowering therapies per standard of care See Dosing Considerations and Administration Long-acting basal insulin indicated to improve glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus Start 0.2 units/kg qDay; if necessary, adjust dosage of other antidiabetic drugs when starting insulin glargine to minimize the risk of hypoglycemia See Dosing Considerations and Administration Dose must be individualized based on clinical response; blood glucose monitoring is essential in all patients receiving insulin therapy Patients adjusting the amount or timing of dosage should do so only under medical supervision with appropriate glucose monitoring Titrate Toujeo dose no more frequently than every 3-4 days Use with caution in patients with visual impairment who may rely on audible clicks to dial their dose If changing from a treatment regimen with an intermediate- or long-acting insulin to a regimen with insulin glargine, the amount and timing of shorter-acting insulin Continue reading >>

Changing From Lantus To Toujeo

Changing From Lantus To Toujeo

Are these 2 insulins equal unit to unit? Im switching and Im not sure if I am supposed to take the same number of units of Toujeo as I normally take with Lantus. What do you think?? Units are standardized. 1u of toujeo = 1 u of lantus in terms of how much medication it is, it is just a different amount of liquid volume. (With the toujeo being 1/3 the liquid volume per unit) So yes unless your intention is to adjust your dose, you would take the same number of units. While a unit is technically a unit you may find that your basal needs with Toujeo are actually different than with Lantus. It is known that smaller volumes of injections absorb better, that would on average suggest that with Toujeo you might need less of a dose. I would recommend consulting with your doctor on how to start out with Toujeo and how to adjust to a proper dose. Doing a basal test is always advised. is known that smaller volumes of injections absorb better, that would on average suggest that with Toujeo you might need less of a dose. Would the logic that smaller doses absorb better extend after the first couple days? When clearly the same amount of basal insulin entering the body must equal the number exiting the body? Better absorption with smaller doses seems like a relative concept with basal and maybe is more meaningful with bolus-- where the speed of absorbtion is measured over a couple hours vs many? Anyway not trying to delve too far into the weeds. The short answer is 1u lantus is supposed to = 1u toujeo I switched from Lantus to Toujeo a little more than a year ago. I was told by my endo you almost always use up to 20% more Toujeo than Lantus. I started out using my normal basil amount (13u per day) and did need to up it to 15u per day. I love Toujeo, no more split doses, no late night Continue reading >>

Insulin Glargine Injection For Subcutaneous Use

Insulin Glargine Injection For Subcutaneous Use

TOUJEO (insulin glargine) Injection DESCRIPTION TOUJEO (insulin glargine injection) is a long-acting insulin supplied as a sterile solution for subcutaneous injection containing 300 Units/mL of insulin glargine. Insulin glargine is a human insulin analog produced by recombinant DNA technology utilizing a non-pathogenic laboratory strain of Escherichia coli (K12) as the production organism. Insulin glargine differs from human insulin in that the amino acid asparagine at position A21 is replaced by glycine and two arginines remain at the C-terminus of the B-chain. Chemically, insulin glargine is 21A-Gly-31B -32B -Di-Arg -human insulin and has the empirical formula C267H404N72O78S6 and a molecular weight of 6063. Insulin glargine has the following structural formula: Each milliliter of TOUJEO contains 300 Units (10.91 mg) insulin glargine dissolved in a clear aqueous fluid. The 1.5 mL SoloStar disposable prefilled pen presentation contains the following inactive ingredients per mL: 90 mcg zinc, 2.7 mg m-cresol, 20 mg glycerol 85%, and water for injection. The pH is adjusted by addition of aqueous solutions of hydrochloric acid and sodium hydroxide. TOUJEO has a pH of approximately 4. At pH 4, insulin glargine is completely soluble. After injection into the subcutaneous tissue, the acidic solution is neutralized, leading to formation of a precipitate from which small amounts of insulin glargine are slowly released. Continue reading >>

Insulin Glargine (rx)

Insulin Glargine (rx)

Dosage Forms & Strengths injectable solution 100 units/mL (Lantus; 10mL vial) 100 units/mL (Lantus SoloSTAR; Basaglar KwikPen; 3 mL disposable prefilled pens) 300 units/mL (Toujeo; 1.5 mL SolosStar disposable prefilled pen) Note: Recent studies have suggested that glargine-300 extends blood glucose control well beyond 24 hr Type 1 or 2 Diabetes Mellitus Lantus and Toujeo are recombinant human insulin analogs indicated to improve glycemic control in adults with type 1 or 2 diabetes mellitus Dosing Considerations Indicated for once-daily SC administration; exhibits relatively constant glucose-lowering profile over 24 hr May be administered at any time during the day; should be administered SC once daily at the same time every day Dose must be individualized based on clinical response; blood glucose monitoring is essential in all patients receiving insulin therapy Patients adjusting the amount or timing of dosage should do so only under medical supervision with appropriate glucose monitoring In patients with type 1 diabetes, insulin glargine must be used in regimens with short-acting insulin Should not be administered IV or via an insulin pump; IV administration of the usual SC dose could result in severe hypoglycemia As with all insulins, injection sites should be rotated within the same region (abdomen, thigh, or deltoid) from one injection to the next to reduce the risk of lipodystrophy; no clinically relevant difference in insulin glargine absorption after abdominal, deltoid, or thigh SC administration As with all insulins, the rate of absorption and, consequently, the onset and duration of action may be affected by exercise and other variables (eg, stress, intercurrent illness, changes in coadministered drugs, meal patterns) Type 1 diabetes mellitus: Starting dose sho Continue reading >>

Compare Toujeo Vs. Lantus

Compare Toujeo Vs. Lantus

Lowers blood sugar. Toujeo (insulin glargine) is a concentrated long-actin insulin that allows you to inject higher doses at lower volume compared to other long-acting insulins like Lantus and Levemir. Most effective medicine for controlling your blood sugar. Contains 3 times as much insulin as other long-acting insulins, which means that you can inject lower fluid volume. Can be used in patients 65 and older. Insulin is one of the most effective blood sugar-lowering medication and can lower your A1c (average blood sugar over time) by up to 2-3%. Lantus (insulin glargine) is a long-lasting insulin that provides consistent, all-day sugar control with just once or twice daily dosing. Dose can be easily adjusted to make a customized regimen that's tailored to your body's needs. Lantus (insulin glargine) can be used with liver or kidney problems. Not enough review data. 584 reviews so far Have you used Lantus (insulin glargine)? Leave a review Continue reading >>

Toujeo Launches In The Us – The Next Generation Lantus

Toujeo Launches In The Us – The Next Generation Lantus

Update (4/3/15): New basal insulin Toujeo (insulin glargine U300) has now launched in the US, around a month after its FDA approval. In what we think is fantastic news, Toujeo will be priced around the same as Lantus (insulin glargine U100) per unit. You can find a detailed injection guide for using the updated SoloStar pen for Toujeo on the website. We’re most excited for this product in terms of “next generation” combo products (more on that below). Based on clinical trial data, for some Toujeo may lead to nighttime hypoglycemia and/or weight loss benefits, although this is not technically on the label. The product also has an impressive COACH patient support program (available free to anyone with a Toujeo prescription) that provides live one-on-one phone calls with a COACH guide, online resources, tips via text message, and even diabetes educator-led in-person sessions. We can’t wait to see how this works in real life; if you’re using Toujeo’s COACH program, please let us know your impressions by e-mailing us. A savings card also allows patients with commercial insurance (but not Medicare/Medicaid/VA patients) to pay no more than $15 per prescription for the next year. Although many criticize the high price of insulin in the US, it’s good to see the availability of saving programs for Toujeo for people with insurance. Original Article (3/5/15): Twitter summary: [email protected]_FDA approves Toujeo, more concentrated version of basal insulin Lantus – our story on data, delivery, & a promising future In late February, Sanofi announced FDA approval of its once-daily, long-acting basal insulin Toujeo. Toujeo is the same type of basal insulin (glargine) as Sanofi’s blockbuster Lantus, but a stronger version. In Toujeo, each milliliter of liquid carries 300 units of Continue reading >>

Prescription Discounts Up To 75% Off

Prescription Discounts Up To 75% Off

Lantus is the most commonly prescribed insulin in the US, but with its patent set to expire in 2016, manufacturer Sanofi-Aventis has released a new alternative called Toujeo. Both Lantus and Toujeo contain the same active ingredient: the long-acting insulin glargine. Long-acting insulins are prescribed to people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes to lower blood glucose levels slowly and consistently for up to 24 hours. Lantus and Toujeo are both injected subcutaneously through a special insulin pen once a day, at the same time every day. Differences in Dosage While Lantus and Toujeo are very similar drugs produced by the same manufacturer, there are some key differences. It important for patients to know that Toujeo and Lantus come in different strengths. Toujeo is more concentrated, with 300 units of insulin glargine per mL compared to the 100 units/mL of Lantus. This makes it a good option for patients who require a larger amount of insulin per daily dose. Toujeo comes in a special SoloStar pen that delivers one third of the unit that patients who use Lantus get per click, meaning that if you switch from Lantus to Toujeo, your dosage (the number of clicks on the insulin pen) won’t change, even though Toujeo is more concentrated. Similarities and Differences in Effect Lantus and Toujeo work the same way to control blood sugar levels in adults and children with diabetes. The risk of adverse effects is relatively low for both forms, with the most common side effects being hypoglycemia (low blood sugar), allergic reactions, and injection site irritation. In clinical trials, Toujeo had slightly lower rates of hypoglycemia than Lantus, meaning that it may be a good choice for people who frequently experience low blood pressure as a result of taking Lantus. However, clinical t Continue reading >>

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