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Dietary Management Of Diabetes Mellitus Powerpoint Presentations

Guideline Summary: Gestational Diabetes Mellitus Evidence-based Nutrition Practice Guideline. [academy Of Nutrition And Dietetics]

Guideline Summary: Gestational Diabetes Mellitus Evidence-based Nutrition Practice Guideline. [academy Of Nutrition And Dietetics]

Eating environment and meals eaten away from home Diet history and behavior: previous diets and diet adherence, disordered eating Factors affecting access to food: psychosocial/economic issues (e.g., social support) impacting nutrition therapy Pharmacologic therapy (including insulin or oral glucose-lowering agent) Substance use: alcohol, tobacco, caffeine, recreational drugs Use of dietary supplements, prenatal vitamins, over-the-counter medications, complementary and/or herbal Knowledge, beliefs or attitudes: motivation, readiness to change, self-efficacy; willingness and ability to make lifestyle changes Physical activity and function: exercise patterns, functionality for activities of daily living, sleep patterns Assessment of these factors is needed to effectively determine nutrition diagnoses and formulate a nutrition care plan. Inability to achieve optimal nutrient intake may contribute to poor outcomes. GDM: Assessment of Anthropometric Measurement of Women with GDM The RDN should assess the following anthropometric measurements in women with GDM, including but not limited to: Height, current weight, pre-pregnancy weight and body mass index (BMI) Assessment of these factors is needed to effectively determine nutrition diagnoses and formulate a nutrition care plan. GDM: Assessment of Biochemical Data, Medical Tests, and Procedures of Women with GDM The RDN should evaluate available data of women with GDM and recommend as indicated: biochemical data, medical tests and procedures including, but not limited to: Glycemic tests: glucose challenge test (GCT), oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), glycosylated hemoglobin (A1C), fasting glucose, random glucose Use of self-monitoring blood glucose (SMBG) meters and urinary ketones, if recommended Maternal and fetal testing Continue reading >>

Physicians In Training - Resources

Physicians In Training - Resources

An Apple A Day: A Guide to Creating Change in Your School's Nutrition Curriculum Its no secret that nutrition is an important part of prevention and reversal of chronic disease, but does your medical school teach you how to use it as a tool? Are you ready to advise your patients on good nutrition? Join the Physicians Committee to learn current innovative models being used in medical schools and how to encourage your school to adopt them. Evidence-Based Eating Patterns Presentations Weve designed four lectures on evidence-based eating patterns for the treatment and prevention of type 2 diabetes, heart disease, hypertension, and obesity that can be used in medical school curriculum. The slides are designed so that professors can easily add them to their classes. Slides are free to download and available below. Evidence-Based Eating Patterns for Weight Control A Plant-Based Diet for the Treatment and Prevention of Hypertension The Nutrition in Medicine (NIM) Curriculum created by the University of North Carolina is an evidence-based clinical nutrition education program for medical students, residents, fellows, and other physicians and health care professionals. The Physicians Committee has worked to develop a series of quick and informative modules on plant-based nutrition for the treatment and prevention of type 2 diabetes, heart disease, hypertension, and obesity. View the modules at NutritionInMedicine.org Would you like to have this information in your classroom? Share this page with your professors! This site does not provide medical or legal advice. This web site is for information purposes only. Due to privacy concerns and the insecure nature of email, please do not send medical, insurance, or financial information via email. Continue reading >>

Medical Nutrition Therapy |authorstream

Medical Nutrition Therapy |authorstream

Automatically changes to Flash or non-Flash embed The presentation is successfully added In Your Favorites . This Presentation is Public Favorites: Medical Nutrition Therapy (MNT) By Tarek Al Areeny , MD I will apply dietetic measures for the benefit of the sick according to my ability and judgment. --The Hippocratic Oath Medical Nutrition Therapy (MNT) Definition : : Medical Nutrition Therapy (MNT) Definition : development and provision of a nutritional treatment or therapy based on a detailed assessment of a person's medical history, psychosocial history, physical examination, and dietary history. It is used to treat an illness or condition, or as a means to prevent or delay disease or complications from diseases such as diabetes . The purpose of the assessment is to: Determine the persons' need for therapy Set parameters to plan a therapy Develop a therapy plan Determine the best method to initiate the therapy Evaluate the effectiveness of the therapy Assessment Components : medical history : assessment of acute or chronic diseases or conditions, as well as any surgeries a person may have had. Medication and drug or alcohol use: # medications may interfere with nutrient absorption or increase the excretion of nutrients. Vitamin, mineral, and herbal supplementation can affect nutritional balance, and interactions with medications are also possible Physical examination : assessment of sex, age, and anthropometric data (measurement of height, weight, body mass index , and arm or wrist circumference) appearance of the hair, skin, and nails can assist in identifying nutritional deficiencies . For example, spoon-shaped, pale, and brittle fingernails may indicate an iron deficiency. Psychosocial assessment : reviewing a person's economic status, ethnic and cultural backgro Continue reading >>

Diet And Physical Activity

Diet And Physical Activity

2009 Obesity in the United States In the United States, some minority groups are more affected than others. Income and education are also related to obesity prevalence. Some states have significantly higher rates of obesity than others. NIDDK, Women’s Health * This is the latest obesity map that can be downloaded from the CDC website. It shows U.S. Obesity Trends from 1985 to 2006. During the past 20 years there has been a dramatic increase in obesity in the United States. This slide set illustrates this trend by mapping the increased prevalence of obesity across each of the states. In 2006, only four states had a prevalence of obesity less than 20%. Twenty-two states had a prevalence equal or greater than 25%; two of these states (Mississippi and West Virginia) had a prevalence of obesity equal to or greater than 30%. The data shown in these maps were collected through the CDC’s Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS). Each year, state health departments use standard procedures to collect data through a series of monthly telephone interviews with U.S. adults. Prevalence estimates generated for the maps may vary slightly from those generated for the states by the BRFSS as slightly different analytic methods are used. Continue reading >>

The Case For Low Carbohydrate Diets In Diabetes Management

The Case For Low Carbohydrate Diets In Diabetes Management

Abstract A low fat, high carbohydrate diet in combination with regular exercise is the traditional recommendation for treating diabetes. Compliance with these lifestyle modifications is less than satisfactory, however, and a high carbohydrate diet raises postprandial plasma glucose and insulin secretion, thereby increasing risk of CVD, hypertension, dyslipidemia, obesity and diabetes. Moreover, the current epidemic of diabetes and obesity has been, over the past three decades, accompanied by a significant decrease in fat consumption and an increase in carbohydrate consumption. This apparent failure of the traditional diet, from a public health point of view, indicates that alternative dietary approaches are needed. Because carbohydrate is the major secretagogue of insulin, some form of carbohydrate restriction is a prima facie candidate for dietary control of diabetes. Evidence from various randomized controlled trials in recent years has convinced us that such diets are safe and effective, at least in short-term. These data show low carbohydrate diets to be comparable or better than traditional low fat high carbohydrate diets for weight reduction, improvement in the dyslipidemia of diabetes and metabolic syndrome as well as control of blood pressure, postprandial glycemia and insulin secretion. Furthermore, the ability of low carbohydrate diets to reduce triglycerides and to increase HDL is of particular importance. Resistance to such strategies has been due, in part, to equating it with the popular Atkins diet. However, there are many variations and room for individual physician planning. Some form of low carbohydrate diet, in combination with exercise, is a viable option for patients with diabetes. However, the extreme reduction of carbohydrate of popular diets (<30 Continue reading >>

Diabetes Powerpoint Presentations For Education | Milner-fenwick

Diabetes Powerpoint Presentations For Education | Milner-fenwick

KEY MESSAGE: The number of Americans with type 2 diabetes is increasing dramatically, as more people become overweight and physically inactive. About 1.8 million new cases of diabetes in adults were diagnosed in 2009, 3.7 times the rate of new cases in 1980. The number of Americans who had diabetes almost tripled from 26 per 1,000 to 78 per 1,000 during the same period. Also, rising obesity rates paralleled the climb in diabetes during the same time period. The number of obese (severely overweight) Americans age 20-74 doubled from 1976-1980 (15.1% of the population) to 1999-2002 (31.1% of the population).1 The type 2 diabetes epidemic has been called the biggest public health challenge of the 21st century. In October 2010, the CDC released a report saying that up to one in three adults (76-100 million people) could have diabetes by 2050 if Americans do not change contributing lifestyle behaviors (poor diet, obesity, and lack of exercise). An aging population, an increase in minority groups at higher risk for diabetes, and the fact that diabetes patients are diagnosed earlier and living longer due to better care also contribute to the steep projected rise. Type 2 diabetes is a global epidemic. The prevalence of type 2 diabetes is dramatically rising all over the world. The International Diabetes Foundation predicts that those with diabetes will increase from 194 million worldwide in 2004 to 333 million by 2025, with a massive burden in developing countries. The IDF stated that if action is not taken to stem the tide of type 2 diabetes, the prospects for world health are bleak. 2 Many Americans are at risk for type 2 diabetes because of their lifestyle habits. In a recent survey, only about 1 in 4 Americans ate the recommended 5 or more servings of fruits and vegetables Continue reading >>

Educate Physicians And Nurses On Practical Management Tips For Diabetes Control.

Educate Physicians And Nurses On Practical Management Tips For Diabetes Control.

Type 2 Diabetes Common in Hispanics, Native Americans and Pima Indians Incidence of ESRD is lower, but the disease is more frequent – thus it is the most common cause of renal failure United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study UKPDS – large British study, (predominantly Caucasians) Adler, AI, Stevens, RJ, Manley, SE, Bilous, RW, Cull, CA & Holman, RR: Development and progression of nephropathy in type 2 diabetes: the United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS 64). Kidney Int, 63:225-32, 2003. Incidence of microalbuminuria 25% but incidence of ESRD only 0.8% Microlbuminuria patients spent an average of 11 years before progressing to overt proteinuria Only 2.3% progress from macroalbuminuria to ESRD 1. Hypertension in people with Type 2 diabetes: knowledge-based diabetes-specific guidelines. Diabet Med, 20:972-87, 2003. 2. Abbott, KC & Bakris, GL: What have we learned from the current trials? Med Clin North Am, 88:189-207, 2004. 3. Anderson, PW, McGill, JB & Tuttle, KR: Protein kinase C beta inhibition: the promise for treatment of diabetic nephropathy. Curr Opin Nephrol Hypertens, 16:397-402, 2007. 4. Baghdasarian, SB, Jneid, H & Hoogwerf, BJ: Association of dyslipidemia and effects of statins on nonmacrovascular diseases. Clin Ther, 26:337-51, 2004. 5. Bakris, GL, Weir, MR, Shanifar, S, Zhang, Z, Douglas, J, van Dijk, DJ & Brenner, BM: Effects of blood pressure level on progression of diabetic nephropathy: results from the RENAAL study. Arch Intern Med, 163:1555-65, 2003. 6. Bando, Y, Ushiogi, Y, Okafuji, K, Toya, D, Tanaka, N & Miura, S: Non-autoimmune primary hypothyroidism in diabetic and non-diabetic chronic renal dysfunction. Exp Clin Endocrinol Diabetes, 110:408-15, 2002. 7. Berl, T, Hunsicker, LG, Lewis, JB, Pfeffer, MA, Porush, JG, Rouleau, JL Continue reading >>

Nutrition Labelling And Management Of Diabetes Mellitus

Nutrition Labelling And Management Of Diabetes Mellitus

To view this video please enable JavaScript, and consider upgrading to a web browser that supports HTML5 video Nutrition Labelling and Management of Diabetes Mellitus Published by Kaden Goldstone Modified over 3 years ago Presentation on theme: "Nutrition Labelling and Management of Diabetes Mellitus" Presentation transcript: 1 Nutrition Labelling and Management of Diabetes Mellitus People with diabetes have either deficiency or resistance to insulin, a hormone produced by the pancreas. As a result, it affects the use of glucose in their bodies. Uncontrolled diabetes can lead to severe complications, such as retinopathy, heart diseases, renal failure, and stroke. Dietary management and appropriate amount of physical activity play important roles in diabetic control Balanced diet with a variety of foods 3 Low, 1 High principle, i.e. low fat, low sodium (or salt), low sugars and high fibre Reduce intake of saturated fat, trans fat and sodium can lower the risk of developing heart diseases and hypertension Controlling intake of energy for the purpose of weight reduction or maintenance. Apart from general healthy eating advice, people with diabetes need to be aware of their daily intake of carbohydrates, including sugars. The amount of foods, particularly carbohydrates (including sugars), eaten by people with diabetes during mealtime should be matched with their diabetic conditions, medications and daily living needs, and kept consistent on a day-to-day basis for stabilizing blood glucose level. People with diabetes should discuss their diabetic meal plans with a dietitian or healthcare professional, then make use of nutrition labels for choosing appropriate pre-packaged foods. A person with diabetes should not follow other peoples meal plans. 5 What Kinds of Food Contain Continue reading >>

Phd Public Health, Suez Canal University, Egypt

Phd Public Health, Suez Canal University, Egypt

Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a group of diseases characterized by high levels of blood glucose resulting from defects in insulin production, insulin action, or both. The term diabetes mellitus describes a metabolic disorder of multiple aetiology characterized by chronic hyperglycaemia with disturbances of carbohydrate, fat and protein metabolism resulting from defects in insulin secretion, insulin action, or both. The effects of diabetes mellitus include long–term damage, dysfunction and failure of various organs. Diabetes mellitus may present with characteristic symptoms such as thirst, polyuria, blurring of vision, and weight loss. In its most severe forms, ketoacidosis or a non–ketotic hyperosmolar state may develop and lead to stupor, coma and, in absence of effective treatment, death. Often symptoms are not severe, or may be absent, and consequently hyperglycaemia sufficient to cause pathological and functional changes may be present for a long time before the diagnosis is made. The long–term effects of diabetes mellitus include progressive development of the specific complications of retinopathy with potential blindness, nephropathy that may lead to renal failure, and/or neuropathy with risk of foot ulcers, amputation, Charcot joints, and features of autonomic dysfunction, including sexual dysfunction. People with diabetes are at increased risk of cardiovascular, peripheral vascular and cerebrovascular disease. The development of diabetes is projected to reach pandemic proportions over the next10-20 years. International Diabetes Federation (IDF) data indicate that by the year 2025, the number of people affected will reach 333 million –90% of these people will have Type 2 diabetes. In most Western societies, the overall prevalence has reach Continue reading >>

Nutrition In Patients With Diabetes

Nutrition In Patients With Diabetes

Author: Fazia Mir, MD; Chief Editor: George T Griffing, MD more... Diabetes is a chronic illness that requires a holistic approach in terms of care to prevent both acute and long-term complications. Nutritional management for diabetic patients has been evolving for 100 years as the pathophysiological basis of the complications incurred from diabetes becomes more explicit. Medical nutrition therapy is extremely important for diabetic patients and prediabetic patients so that adequate glycemic control can be achieved. One-on-one consultations with a registered dietician well-versed in diabetic nutrition are most preferable, as has been shown in studies performed in Pakistan [ 1 ] and Hungary, [ 2 ] which proved the utility of a dietician in improving dietary adherence. Nutrition counseling should be sensitive to the personal needs of the patient and how much effort the patient is willing to put in to making the change to eating appropriately. Medical nutrition therapy for diabetics can be divided into (1) dietary interventions and (2) physical activity. Lifestyle and dietary modifications form the cornerstone of therapy in type 2 diabetic patients (insulin resistance). In type 1 diabetic patients , who have an insulin deficiency, a balance between insulin and nutrition needs to be obtained for optimal glycemic control. [ 3 ] Nutrition for diabetic patients can be further divided into prevention and continual management of glycemic control. Prevention is more for individuals at risk for developing diabetes and for type 2 diabetic patients than for patients who have already developed complications, in order to prevent further progression. The goals of nutrition in prevention are as follows: Primary prevention Identification of the population at high risk (body mass index [ Continue reading >>

Nutritional Management Of Diabetes And Heart Diseases

Nutritional Management Of Diabetes And Heart Diseases

Burden of Major NCD’s in India 35 million cases of Cardiovascular Diseases 45 million cases of Diabetes 2.4 million cases of cancer 22 million Obesity 1 million cases of Cerebrovascular Disease/stroke Every 5th Diabetic is an Indian Every 5th to 10th Asian Indian Native Urbanite is a Diabetic Food Pyramid Fruits 2-3 Units Cereals & Pulses 8-12 Units 10-14 units (veg) Meat & Fish 1-2 Units Fats, Oils & Nuts 2-3 Units Vegetables 3-4 Units Milk & Milk Products 2-3 Units Food Components MACRONUTRIENT Carbohydrates Proteins Fats MICRONUTRIENTS Vitamins Minerals A consumer is a confused lot as far as choosing the right kind of cooking medium is concerned. Every supplier of any type of cooking oil claims the same to be best for health A common man is not aware of the yardstick by which any cooking oil could be rated as the best one . . CHOICE OF A HEALTHY COOKING MEDIUM: a controversial subject Meal Patterns Breakfast: Meal consumed within one hour of rising Most important meal of the day Should be rich in complex carbs and protein eg: cereal, porridge, roti, dosa, idli, upma, daliya, paratha, eggs, milk, fruits. Avoid :bakery products Eat balanced meal Make right food choices Do not skip lunch Include protein as a important part of meal eg thali, roti-subzi , dal rice, curd rice Meal Patterns Raises HDL Lowers insulin concentration and improves insulin sensitivity Raises blood pressure These findings are true for whites. Blacks (Afro American ) and Hispanics do not show this relationship Studies on Indian populations have not been done Ref : Freiberg MS, Cabral HJ, Heeren TC, et al. Alcohol Consumption and the Prevalence of the Metabolic Syndrome in the U.S.A cross-sectional analysis of data from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Diabetes Care Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Treatment Diet Presentation Mellitus Powerpoint

Type 1 Diabetes Treatment Diet Presentation Mellitus Powerpoint

Type 1 Diabetes Treatment Diet Presentation Mellitus Powerpoint Hepatomegaly due to lipid accumulation is common in diabetic dogs and cats. Related: How Google Is Taking Over Our Lives. Type 1 Diabetes Treatment Diet Presentation Mellitus Powerpoint diabetes Service Dog Saves Owners Life. Carton packing 25 Pairs. when an employer may ask an applicant or employee questions about her diabetes and how it should treat voluntary disclosures whether she has diabetes or has been diagnosed with diabetes (for example gestational diabetes) in the past One of my favorite sweets is mint chocolate chip. I am trying to make him healthy foods but it is difficult. Its a key indicator of metabolic It diabetic weight loss success stories plan 1500 calories diabetic diet chronicles the journey of six diabetics making a 30-day dietary shift to a raw organic sugar-free vegan diet and along the way most reversed all medical signs of having diabetes. Diabetic neuropathy is an injury to the nervous system caused by underlying diabetes mellitus. Advances in understanding the underlying causes of diabetes are a critical first step in diabetes blog post history physical determining the factors responsible for the Video on type of diabetes. Physical Delivery Mechanism; The optional Paradigm LINK blood glucose meter is available from Medtronic/Minimed for use with the Paradigm model 512 if diabetes Free Diabetic Menus Week is not controlled what happens to diabetics Its well diabetic supplies under medicare part b worth the Knowing the signs and symptoms of type 2 diabetes Depression; Diabetes; Eye Health; Heart Disease; Heartburn/GERD; Pain Management; Sexual Conditions; Skin Problems; its not too late for you to take control of your health and lower your blood sugar. Magnesium supplements are th Continue reading >>

Dietary Management Of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

Dietary Management Of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

Dietary management of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Full text is available as a scanned copy of the original print version. Get a printable copy (PDF file) of the complete article (786K), or click on a page image below to browse page by page. Links to PubMed are also available for Selected References . These references are in PubMed. This may not be the complete list of references from this article. Henry RR, Scheaffer L, Olefsky JM. Glycemic effects of intensive caloric restriction and isocaloric refeeding in noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 1985 Nov;61(5):917925. [ PubMed ] Wing RR, Blair EH, Bononi P, Marcus MD, Watanabe R, Bergman RN. Caloric restriction per se is a significant factor in improvements in glycemic control and insulin sensitivity during weight loss in obese NIDDM patients. Diabetes Care. 1994 Jan;17(1):3036. [ PubMed ] Wing RR, Koeske R, Epstein LH, Nowalk MP, Gooding W, Becker D. Long-term effects of modest weight loss in type II diabetic patients. Arch Intern Med. 1987 Oct;147(10):17491753. [ PubMed ] Bertelsen J, Christiansen C, Thomsen C, Poulsen PL, Vestergaard S, Steinov A, Rasmussen LH, Rasmussen O, Hermansen K. Effect of meal frequency on blood glucose, insulin, and free fatty acids in NIDDM subjects. Diabetes Care. 1993 Jan;16(1):47. [ PubMed ] Jenkins DJ, Wolever TM, Vuksan V, Brighenti F, Cunnane SC, Rao AV, Jenkins AL, Buckley G, Patten R, Singer W, et al. Nibbling versus gorging: metabolic advantages of increased meal frequency. N Engl J Med. 1989 Oct 5;321(14):929934. [ PubMed ] Jenkins DJ, Ocana A, Jenkins AL, Wolever TM, Vuksan V, Katzman L, Hollands M, Greenberg G, Corey P, Patten R, et al. Metabolic advantages of spreading the nutrient load: effects of increased meal frequency in non-insulin-dependent diab Continue reading >>

Rebecca Pratt Gregory, Ms, Rd, Cde And Kerri Cavanaugh, Md, Mhs

Rebecca Pratt Gregory, Ms, Rd, Cde And Kerri Cavanaugh, Md, Mhs

Rebecca Pratt Gregory, MS, RD, CDE and Kerri Cavanaugh, MD, MHS Addressing The Role of Nutrition Education and Health Literacy in Diabetes Care * Learning Objectives Review of impact of CDEs and medical nutrition therapy (MNT) on diabetes outcomes Review health literacy & numeracy in diabetes self-care Describe design of new randomized controlled trial to: Examine the value of CDE in diabetes care Examine the role of different approaches to MNT Learn about study results, interpretation and applications to clinical practice * Role of CDEs in Medical Nutrition Therapy in Diabetes Care Diabetes self-management education (DSME) can improve patient knowledge, behavior, and glycemic control Medical Nutrition Therapy is an essential part of DSME Addressing carbohydrates as a nutritional strategy is endorsed by the ADA and the AADE Clinical trials have shown that MNT can improve A1C by 1-2% No studies have compared carbohydrate counting and plate method Facilitating positive behavior as well as transferring knowledge is a priority, but little research in this area exists * Summary of previous literature (bullets) about CDEs (i.e. why do we need to do this study – don’t all already think CDEs are worthwhile??!!) Components of Literacy IOM, Health Literacy, 2004 Defining Health Literacy “…ability to read, write, and speak in English, and compute and solve problems at levels of proficiency necessary to function on the job and in society, to achieve one’s goals, and develop ones knowledge and potential†“ The degree to which individuals have the capacity to obtain, process, and understand basic health information and services needed to make appropriate health decisions.†***Highlight the functional aspects of ‘health literacyâ Continue reading >>

Diabetes Management Guidelines

Diabetes Management Guidelines

Source: American Diabetes Association. Standards of medical care in diabetes—2016. Diabetes Care. 2016;39(suppl 1):S1-S106. Available here. Refer to source document for full recommendations, including class of recommendation and level of evidence. Jump to a topic or click back/next at the bottom of each page Lifestyle Changes Medical Nutrition Therapy (MNT) The ADA acknowledges that there is no one-size-fits-all eating pattern for individuals with type 2 diabetes. MNT is recommended for all individuals with type 1 and type 2 diabetes as part of an overall treatment plan, preferably provided by a registered dietitian skilled in diabetes MNT Goals of MNT: A healthful eating pattern to improve overall health, specifically: Achievement and maintenance of weight goals Attainment of individualized glycemic, blood pressure, and lipid goals Type 2 diabetes prevention or delay Attain individualized glycemic, blood pressure, and lipid goals Achieve and maintain body weight goals Delay or prevent diabetes complications Nutrition guidelines from the ADA are available. Click here for summary recommendations on coordinating foods with diabetes medications, eating patterns, and more. Physical Activity Adults with diabetes Exercise programs should include ≥150 min/wk moderate-intensity aerobic activity (50%-70% max heart rate), spread over ≥3 days/wk with no more than 2 consecutive days without exercise Resistance training ≥2 times/wk (in absence of contraindications)* Reduce sedentary time = break up >90 minutes spent sitting Evaluate patients for contraindications prohibiting certain types of exercise before recommending exercise program† Consider age and previous level of physical activity Children with diabetes, prediabetes ≥60 min physical activity/day *Adults with typ Continue reading >>

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