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Diet For Glucose Intolerance

I've Been Told I Have Glucose Intolerance, Not Diabetes At 30 Wks. Anyone Know About This Condition?

I've Been Told I Have Glucose Intolerance, Not Diabetes At 30 Wks. Anyone Know About This Condition?

I've been told I have glucose intolerance, not diabetes at 30 wks. Anyone know about this condition? My 3 hour glucose tolerance test showed one reading with a slightly elevated result and the rest of the readings were normal. My doctor told me today that I don't have gestational diabetes, but that I'm glucose intolerant. She's having me meet with a dietitian and monitor my blood sugar as though I were diabetic. I'm just confused as to what the difference is and how it will affect my baby. Has anyone else had this happen and if so, what do you know about it? Thank you! There are ranges of blood sugar levels. You don't just go from normal to diabetic overnight, there is a path through the hazy area known as gloucose intolerance. It basically means your body is starting to not utilize insulin as well and your blood sugar is slightly elevated, but you have not reached the diabetic stage yet. I had gestational diabetes with my first child, then developed glucose intolerance about a year after she ws born, now at 10 weeks with my second I am already having to monitor like a diabetic and carefully watch my diet. So basically, glucose intolerance is a pre-cursor to diabetes and with careful attention to diet, exercise and sugars can generally be prevented from developing further, although with preganancy that may be a bit more challenging. I just received the same diagnosis, although they don't want to monitor me like a diabetic. I've been told to watch my carb intake though, so less pastas, rice and bread and more proteins and veggies. I was also diagnosed with"borderline" glucose intolerance with my first baby and will probably be same with my second as you have a good chance of having the same results if you have had them once. I have a great Doctor fortunately a Continue reading >>

If I Have This Glucose Intolerance, What Can I Eat

If I Have This Glucose Intolerance, What Can I Eat

If I Have This Glucose Intolerance, What Can I Eat Originally asked by Community Member Jennifer If I Have This Glucose Intolerance, What Can I Eat If I am glucose intolerant, how much sugar can I eat or do I need to cut it out entirely? Also, what is an acceptable level of salt intake if my blood pressure is elevated? Hello! Carbohydrates is what you have to pay attention too. Click here , it will take you to our diabetic diet section. You will learn about carb counting, meal exchange and how to manage your weight. There is one thing I learned about being a diabetic, moderation is the key. Dont quote me on this but the salt intake I was told should be about 1,800 grams a sodium per day. If you think about it, thats not much. Talk to your Physician or nutritionist, they will be able to tell you what the recommended amount of sodium should be. If you have any more questions, let me know. You should know Answers to your question are meant to provide general health information but should not replace medical advice you receive from a doctor. No answers should be viewed as a diagnosis or recommended treatment for a condition. Continue reading >>

My Doctor Has Told Me I Have Impaired Glucose Tolerance, What Should I Do?

My Doctor Has Told Me I Have Impaired Glucose Tolerance, What Should I Do?

My doctor has told me I have impaired glucose tolerance, what should I do? If you have been diagnosed with Impaired Glucose Tolerance (commonly known as pre-diabetes) you are at much greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Following a healthy lifestyle can help to reduce your chances of developing type 2 diabetes . If you are overweight , losing some weight (even just 5-7 percent of your current body weight) is important. This reduces stress on the body and can help make all body systems work more efficiently. To help with weight loss, try eating smaller portion sizes andbeing more physically active, and eating food and drink lower in kilojoules. Cooking more meals at home can also help you manage your weight better because you are in control of all of the ingredients. Healthy eating is important. Follow the Australian Dietary Guidelines and include low glycaemic index foods in your eating plan. Getting involved in moderate exercise for 30 minutes a day, on most or every day of the week will also help. An Accredited Practising Dietitian (APD) can help you develop a healthy eating plan that suits your individual lifestyle, maximising the variety of foods you are able to eat. Continue reading >>

A Free-choice High-fat High-sugar Diet Induces Glucose Intolerance And Insulin Unresponsiveness To A Glucose Load Not Explained By Obesity.

A Free-choice High-fat High-sugar Diet Induces Glucose Intolerance And Insulin Unresponsiveness To A Glucose Load Not Explained By Obesity.

Int J Obes (Lond). 2011 Apr;35(4):595-604. doi: 10.1038/ijo.2010.164. Epub 2010 Aug 17. A free-choice high-fat high-sugar diet induces glucose intolerance and insulin unresponsiveness to a glucose load not explained by obesity. Department of Neuroscience and Pharmacology, Rudolf Magnus Institute of Neuroscience, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands. [email protected] In diet-induced obesity, it is not clear whether impaired glucose metabolism is caused directly by the diet, or indirectly via obesity. This study examined the effects of different free-choice, high-caloric, obesity-inducing diets on glucose metabolism. In these free-choice diets, saturated fat and/or a 30% sugar solution are provided in an addition to normal chow pellets. In the first experiment, male rats received a free-choice high-fat high-sugar (HFHS), free-choice high-fat (HF) or a chow diet. In a second experiment, male rats received a free-choice high-sugar (HS) diet or chow diet. For both experiments, after weeks 1 and 4, an intravenous glucose tolerance test was performed. Both the HFHS and HF diets resulted in obesity with comparable plasma concentrations of free fatty acids. Interestingly, the HF diet did not affect glucose metabolism, whereas the HFHS diet resulted in hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia and in glucose intolerance because of a diminished insulin response. Moreover, adiposity in rats on the HF diet correlated positively with the insulin response to the glucose load, whereas adiposity in rats on the HFHS diet showed a negative correlation. In addition, total caloric intake did not explain differences in glucose tolerance. To test whether sugar itself was crucial, we next performed a similar experiment in rats on the HS diet. Rats consumed three times as mu Continue reading >>

Ask The Experts: Impaired Glucose Intolerance

Ask The Experts: Impaired Glucose Intolerance

Ask the experts: Impaired glucose intolerance Q: My doctor has told me I have impaired glucose tolerance, what should I do? A: Accredited Practising Dietitian Zoe Wilson responds: Impaired glucose tolerance means you have higher than normal blood sugar levels after youve eaten, but not high enough to be classified as diabetes. There is good news, and bad. The bad news is your body isnt able to cope with sugar in your blood as well as it should, which means you will need to make some adjustments to your diet and exercise regimen. The good news? Making these changes now will improve your glucose tolerance and reduce your risk of developing type 2 diabetes later in life. Take this as the perfect opportunity to do so. To slow the release of sugar into your blood after youve eaten and make it easier for your body to deal with, choose carbohydrate foods that have a low-glycaemic index. These include grainy bread, porridge or muesli, sweet potato and basmati rice. Serve them in small, fist-sized portions. Losing weight and being active will also help. Try to eat smaller portions at meals and snacks, choose mostly foods from the five food groups (fruit, vegies, reduced-fat dairy, lean protein and grains) and avoid processed foods high in sugar, saturated fat and energy like biscuits, cakes, takeaway foods and chips. Continue reading >>

Glucose Intolerance Induced By A High-fat/low-carbohydrate Diet In Rats

Glucose Intolerance Induced By A High-fat/low-carbohydrate Diet In Rats

, Volume 17, Issue3 , pp 185191 | Cite as Glucose intolerance induced by a high-fat/low-carbohydrate diet in rats We examined the time course of effects of a high-fat/low-carbohydrate (HF/LC) diet on the impairment of glucose tolerance in rats, clarified whether insulin secretion and sensitivity were impaired by the HF/LC diet, and investigated the relationship between the increased nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA) after HF/LC diet feeding and insulin secretion and sensitivity. We found that glucose tolerance and the postglucose-loading insulin secretion were impaired after 3 and 7 d on the HF/LC diet. The glucose intolerance was accompanied by a rise in the fasting plasma NEFA level. When stimulated with 15 mmol/L of glucose, the insulin secretion was impaired in pancreatic islets from rats fed the HF/LC diet. Rats fed the HF/LC diet showed insulin resistance in vivo. The glucose-stimulated insulin secretion was inhibited in the islets following 24-h culture with palmitic acid. The 24-h infusion of palmitic acid decreased whole-body insulin sensitivity. In summary, at least 3 d on a HF/LC diet is needed to induce glucose intolerance in rats, and the impairment may be induced by decreased insulin secretion and sensitivity, which is related to the increase in the plasma NEFA level. High-fat/low-carbohydrate dietglucose intoleranceinsulin secretioninsulin sensitivitynon-esterified fatty acids This is a preview of subscription content, log in to check access Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF. Ohmura, T., Ueda, K., Kiyohara, Y., Kato, I., Iwamoto, H., Nakayama, K., Nomiyama, K., Ohmori, S., Yoshitake, T., and Shinkawu, A. (1993). Diabetologia 36, 11981203. PubMed CrossRef Google Scholar Yoshiike, N., Matsumura, Y., Iwaya, M., Sugiyama, M., and Yamaguchi, M. ( Continue reading >>

The Development Of Diet-induced Obesity And Glucose Intolerance In C57bl/6 Mice On A High-fat Diet Consists Of Distinct Phases

The Development Of Diet-induced Obesity And Glucose Intolerance In C57bl/6 Mice On A High-fat Diet Consists Of Distinct Phases

Click through the PLOS taxonomy to find articles in your field. For more information about PLOS Subject Areas, click here . The Development of Diet-Induced Obesity and Glucose Intolerance in C57Bl/6 Mice on a High-Fat Diet Consists of Distinct Phases Affiliation Rowett Institute of Nutrition and Health, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, United Kingdom Affiliation Rowett Institute of Nutrition and Health, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, United Kingdom Affiliation Rowett Institute of Nutrition and Health, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, United Kingdom Affiliation Department of Animal Physiology, Faculty of Biology, Philipps University Marburg, Marburg, Germany Affiliation Rowett Institute of Nutrition and Health, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, United Kingdom Affiliation Rowett Institute of Nutrition and Health, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, United Kingdom Affiliation Musculoskeletal Research Programme, Institute of Medical Sciences, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, United Kingdom Affiliation Department of Food, Water and Cosmetics, Division of Environmental Medicine, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway Affiliation Department of Food, Water and Cosmetics, Division of Environmental Medicine, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway Affiliation Musculoskeletal Research Programme, Institute of Medical Sciences, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, United Kingdom Continue reading >>

Glucose Intolerance Diet

Glucose Intolerance Diet

When a person has been identified to be glucose intolerant, it is important to follow glucose intolerance diet. The diet will make sure that the condition does not blow up into full-fledged diabetes. Scroll down to know the changes, you will have to make to your diet. Glucose intolerance is a kind of digestive disorder. In this condition, the body finds it difficult to digest sugar from food items like carbohydrates and sweet meats. If the condition is not controlled, it can eventually give rise to insulin resistance and/or diabetes, however not necessarily always so. Over a period of time, the body's normal response to insulin in the body decreases. This condition is known as insulin resistance. Glucose intolerance symptoms include constant feeling of thirst, excessive hunger, fatigue, etc. If any of the symptoms are observed, it is important to have oneself checked for the same. At the same time, the diet will have to be modified and one should start following diet for glucose intolerance. With simple dietary changes and keeping blood sugar under control will ensure one is able to keep diabetes at bay. Blood sugar is created by breaking down carbohydrates. In case of glucose intolerance, the body is not able to make use of the energy efficiently, which causes the blood sugar levels in the body to go up. Hence, it is important to make sure that the person's diet has glucose intolerant foods. It is a well-known fact that fruits and vegetables are rich in dietary fiber. They help to keep blood sugar levels under control. Along with fruits and vegetables, food high in fiber include nuts, beans, peas, lentils, wheat bran, etc., should also be a part of ones diet to counter glucose intolerance. Fishes like tuna, cod, halibut, etc., are low on saturated fat and cholesterol, Continue reading >>

9 Symptoms Of Glucose Intolerance You Should Be Aware Of

9 Symptoms Of Glucose Intolerance You Should Be Aware Of

Could you be glucose intolerant? You’ll be surprised at some people who are without even realizing it. They suffer the common symptoms without ever thinking about them, believing them to be normal parts of life. It’s only when they suffer a major health problem that they realize those symptoms have never been good. You need to put your health first. It’s essential that you look out for common symptoms that indicate there is a major problem. These symptoms can be minor at first, but they will get worse over time. When it comes to glucose intolerance, you want to be aware of the following nine symptoms. Seek medical attention if you do have them. Glucose Intolerance Is Known as Prediabetes Most people right now will wonder what glucose intolerance is. Your body naturally creates this, so how could you possibly be intolerant to it? The medical term is impaired glucose intolerance (IGT) or prediabetes. It’s a term given to individuals who are at a higher than normal risk of developing diabetes at some point, especially if they continue with the current lifestyle that they have. This isn’t just about your diet, though. It could be that your body doesn’t produce enough insulin or that the normal hepatic glucose output is higher than it should be. Some doctors have linked the intolerance to the poor disposal of blood sugar from the system. Doctors wanted to remove the social stigma of having diabetes. At the same time, they needed a way to note if someone was a higher risk, as well as note those who were at a higher risk of developing cardiovascular disease. Now that you know more about what glucose intolerance is, it’s time to note the main symptoms. This will help you get an official diagnosis and help to avoid this issue turning into full-blown diabetes. Feeli Continue reading >>

Prediabetes, Glucose Intolerance: Meal Plans To Prevent Diabetes

Prediabetes, Glucose Intolerance: Meal Plans To Prevent Diabetes

When I started using your meal plans, I was taking 2 tablets of Metformin (500 mg) per day and I weighed 220 pounds (100 kg). Six weeks later, after scrupulously following your meal plans and cooking them myself, I now weigh 20 pounds (9 kg) less. I checked my blood glucose 4 times a day and stopped metformin after losing 12 pounds (5 kg). I still check my blood glucose as often and I stand by the standards of the Canadian Diabetes Association. In a month, I will have an HbAc and a lipidogram. I cannot wait to see if I managed to curb "metabolic syndrome". I am an ophthalmologist, and I know all too well the complications of diabetes. I am worried about treatments that over-medicate. Congratulations for your beautiful work! "Its now a well-documented fact that we can reduce the incidence of cardiovascular disease by about 80% if we adopt healthy lifestyle habits [...] And its also equally well known that diet modification is the most difficult challenge [...] SOS Cuisine is a tool of the highest quality to help you adopt and maintain a Mediterranean diet. The SOS Cuisine website is very professionally designed and it is convenient to use. We recommend the SOS Cuisine services to all our patients and everyone who wishes to improve their diet." Cardiologist, Director of Prevention (Montreal Heart Institute), Professor (Department of Medicine, University of Montreal) Subscribe to this meal plan for as little as $9.95/month! We have so much confidence in its effectiveness, that well reimburse you in the first 7 days if you arent entirely satisfied! Our Prediabetes Meal Plan comply fully with the recommendations of the experts in the field, the main ones being the following: Continue reading >>

Glucose Intolerant Diet & Meal Plans - What Does It Really Mean?

Glucose Intolerant Diet & Meal Plans - What Does It Really Mean?

Online Guide to Glucose Intolerant Meal Plans & Diets What does it really mean to be Glucose Intolerant? Well to start, there are many different variations of intolerance and each one is slightly distinct from the next. It is most commonly used in the classification of diabetes. The major branches of intolerance is Type 1 & 2, Gestational, Impaired glucose tolerance, Impaired fasting glucose and other specific types. Please keep in mind that not all cases are a one size fits all scenarios and usually can change over the course of time through diets, medication and other aspects. Glucose intolerance specifically is a very common problem than the average person is aware of. It is very crucial to know whether you fit the symptoms so that steps can be taken to deal with the issues. If the problem can diagnosed early on the better the chance of dealing with it and avoiding any side-effects of health related issues. What exactly is Glucose intolerance? Well to keep it simple, for those that are intolerant then they are in the first stages of pre-diabetes. To further explain, when you eat food, based on the ingredients and components of the food your blood glucose (sugar) levels in your blood pressure will increase. This is in direct results of the sugars and/or carbohydrates found in those foods. In our human body, our pancreas then produces insulin, a hormone that is responsible for absorbing this glucose into your blood which transforms into direct energy. In regular people, the glucose levels return back to normal levels a while after the food has been consumed, however for those individuals that are glucose intolerant there is a problem in the supply or the production of insulin in the blood stream. Basically this means that the blood sugar levels remain high in the bloo Continue reading >>

Daily Diet For Glucose Intolerance

Daily Diet For Glucose Intolerance

Diabetic testing blood sugar.Photo Credit: Stockbyte/Stockbyte/Getty Images Michelle Cimino is a writer of nutrition- and food-related articles. She authors a popular food blog and holds a Master of Science in nutrition and public health from Columbia University. Glucose intolerance is a medical condition that predisposes you to developing diabetes in the future. But this does not mean that diabetes is definite. Simple dietary changes that maintain proper blood sugar control can help you avoid a lifetime of blood sugar monitoring and diabetic complications. Glucose is a simple sugar.Photo Credit: peredniankina/iStock/Getty Images Glucose is a simple sugar that acts as the primary fuel source for your body. Without glucose, your body is forced to utilize muscle and fat instead. While that may seem like an instant weight loss strategy, this alternate energy producing pathway actually results in the accumulation of acidic ketones from the breakdown of fat. When these ketones become too abundant in your blood, the body reacts by shutting down into a coma. For optimal health and proper function, your body must utilize glucose to meet its energy needs. Blood sugar reading.Photo Credit: Tolga Sipahi/iStock/Getty Images Glucose intolerance or impaired glucose tolerance is a pre-diabetic condition that makes it difficult for your body's cells to fully and efficiently utilize glucose as a fuel. This condition predisposes individuals to developing Type 2 diabetes because it results in hyperglycemia or an abnormal accumulation of glucose in the blood. Controlling your blood glucose levels by preventing high blood sugars and keeping them within the normal range can reduce your risk of developing diabetes if you have been diagnosed with glucose intolerance. Sweet potatoes.Photo Cred Continue reading >>

Glucose Intolerance.....help With Diet Needed.?

Glucose Intolerance.....help With Diet Needed.?

Glucose intolerance.....help with diet needed.? At last a reason why I've felt so unwell for the last month...I've got my blood results that show I have glucose intolerance....this being coeliac has a lot to answer for!!!! As my diet is no processed foods....what do I have to change do I go on a low gi diet? I've been told to improve my diet...but how? I only eat white meat, veg and fruit and some oily fish...and the old slice of gf bread.... Janie, I am sorry that you have now got an extra problem to deal with. I am not sure what I am going to say will help you because I am in a similar position except I am not having a glucose tolerance test because the treatment is, according to my GP, change of diet and lifestyle changes. As I already eat healthy food and exercise 30 mins everyday I didn't see the point. I am already seeing a dietician who has told me to lose weight. I eat the same sort of stuff as you minus the gf bread and sent me away with several leaflets on lifestyle changing advice, how to avoid stuffing yourself with the wrong food and how to monitor times when you comfort eat etc etc. All very patronising and no help whatsoever. Did you explain to whoever told you to improve your diet that you already ate a healthy diet? If so what did they say? Given my experience with a dietician I am loath to suggest you ask for referral to a dietician as I think they may well give you prescriptive advice. Undoubtedly some people on this site have had a good experience with dieticians and indeed I found FODMAPs advice very good. But I am sure there is someone out there who can think outside the box and give you professional advice taking into account what you are eating now and how to address your glucose intolerance. A friend of mine has been diagnosed with glucose into Continue reading >>

The Insulin Resistance Diet Protocol

The Insulin Resistance Diet Protocol

Understanding the cellular mechanisms of insulin resistance helps us choose more effective therapeutic interventions for the treatment and prevention of prediabetes and type 2 diabetes. Insulin resistance is present in individuals who are obese and those with diabetes mellitus. Several studies have found that an insulin resistance diet protocol and exercise can alter insulin signaling pathways and delay the onset of insulin resistance. It’s estimated that the number of diabetes sufferers in the world will double from about 190 million to 325 million during the next 25 years. (1) It’s obvious that we need to pay more attention to our lifestyle habits and make some changes. An insulin resistance diet, similar to a diabetic diet plan, helps you lose excess weight and regulate your insulin and blood glucose levels in order to reduce your risk of developing prediabetes and diabetes. Insulin Resistance Diet Research suggests that the primary cause of insulin resistance is excess weight, especially excess fat around the waist. Fortunately, weight loss can help the body respond better to insulin. The Diabetes Prevention Program and other large studies indicate that people with insulin resistance and prediabetes can often prevent or delay developing diabetes by changing their diets to follow an insulin resistance diet, along with losing weight. Here are seven ways to start eating an insulin resistance diet. 1. Limit Carbohydrates Research published in Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity suggests that monitoring carbohydrate intake, whether by carbohydrate counting or experience-based estimation, remains a key strategy in achieving glycemic control. Although all carbohydrates can be incorporated into carbohydrate counting, for good health, carbohydrates from vegetables, Continue reading >>

Glucose Intolerance

Glucose Intolerance

Tweet Glucose intolerance is term for metabolic conditions which result in high blood glucose levels. Pre-diabetes, type 2 diabetes, impaired fasting glucose and impaired glucose tolerance are all conditions which fall under the term glucose intolerant. Glucose intolerance is defined by the World Health Organisation as: A blood sugar level of 6.0 mmol/l or above whilst fasting A blood glucose level of over 7.8 mmol/l 2 hours after consuming 75g of glucose The figures above are based on the assumption that people are not taking blood glucose lowering medication. The symptoms of glucose intolerance may not be so easy to spot. The symptoms may include: Feeling thirsty Being tired or lethargic Needing to urinate more than usual Itchiness around the genitals People with impaired glucose tolerance are more likely to notice symptoms after meals. Whereas people with impaired fasting glucose will notice the symptoms through other parts of the day including during the night. Glucose intolerance will often be diagnosed by a fasting plasma glucose test or by a glucose tolerance test. A plasma glucose test is when a blood sample is taken, usually from your arm, and the blood glucose levels measured. A glucose tolerance test involves taking a set amount of glucose orally, usually 75g of glucose, and then taking your blood glucose levels over regular periods of time over the next few hours. Glucose intolerance can be treated through diet and lifestyle changes or with assistance from anti-diabetic medication, such as tablets and/or insulin. Your doctor will measure your long term blood glucose control via an HbA1c test. Your doctor may also prescribe you with blood glucose testing supplies to allow you to make diet choices and to indentify and prevent high or low blood glucose levels. Continue reading >>

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