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Diet For Gestational Diabetes During Third Trimester

Losing Weight In 3rd Trimester?

Losing Weight In 3rd Trimester?

I have been on the GD diet for two weeks now and I lost 1.5 lbs the first week and another 3 lbs this week. I am 36 weeks pregnant. I started out overweight (150 lbs at 5 ft) and have only gained 8 lbs this pregnancy. My md seems happy about the weight loss but I can't help be a little concerned. Baby is supposed to be gained .5 lb/week at this point and I am worried this is being jeopardized. Fundal height only put me at 31 weeks at appointment today. Am I over reacting? Your weight gain or loss does not have anything to do with the baby's weight gain, so put that out of your mind! These babies take what they need from us and leave us with whatever is left over. So, with the inherent calorie restrictions on the GD diet, that kiddo is taking what he/she needs to grow healthy and strong, and that might not leave you with much of a surplus, hence the weight loss. Many people lose weight on the GD diet and I've yet to hear a provider say it's a bad thing. You're a smaller than average woman, so it makes sense to have a smaller than average baby. Do you get to have a growth u/s any time soon? That should be able to put your mind at ease. I have not gained a single pound through my entire pregnancy, currently 36 weeks. I had a growth ultrasound earlier this week and my baby is measuring big. I wouldn't be too concerned about the weight loss. Thanks ladies that makes me feel a little better. I did have a few growth ultrasounds this pregnancy although since the last one was only a week after diet and I don't have any more us scheduled it's hard to see actual impact. He was measuring 40 percentile. I think I am just sensitive to baby's weight because my daughter is super tiny and at 2.5 is on the .01 percentile for weight I'm overweight and was diagnosed early and lost 30lbs d Continue reading >>

Real Food For Gestational Diabetes: What You Need To Know

Real Food For Gestational Diabetes: What You Need To Know

Note From Mommypotamus: When I wrote about natural alternatives to the glucola test, many of you asked what to do if gestational diabetes is diagnosed and confirmed. Today I am so excited to welcome Lily Nichols, RDN, CDE, CLT, a registered nutritionist and gestational diabetes educator, who will be filling us in on how to take a real food approach to GD. Lily is the author of Real Food for Gestational Diabetes, a thoroughly researched guide filled with practical guidance and easy-to-follow instructions. It is, hands down, the best resource on the subject that I have found so far. If you or someone you know is looking for information on managing GD with real food, I highly recommend it! Gestational diabetes is never part of any mom’s plan . . . But it is the most common complication of pregnancy, affecting up to 18% of pregnant women. Yet there are many misconceptions about this diagnosis, both in conventional health care and the integrative medicine world. As a registered dietician/nutritionist and certified diabetes educator who specializes in gestational diabetes, I’m going to clear up some of the confusion for you today. Whether or not you have gestational diabetes, this post will help you understand how it develops and why it’s important to maintain normal blood sugar (for all pregnant women, really). I’ll also be sharing why the typical gestational diabetes diet fails and why a real food, nutrient-dense, lower carbohydrate approach is ideal for managing gestational diabetes. What is Gestational Diabetes? Gestational diabetes is usually defined as diabetes that develops or is first diagnosed during pregnancy. However, it can also be defined as “insulin resistance” or “carbohydrate intolerance” during pregnancy. I prefer to rely on the latter descrip Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes Diet

Gestational Diabetes Diet

Gestational diabetes, which causes higher-than-normal blood sugar levels to be present, occurs during pregnancy. Gestational diabetes testing usually occurs between 24 and 28 weeks of pregnancy. If you have risk factors for diabetes, your doctor may recommend testing earlier in the pregnancy. If you receive a gestational diabetes diagnosis, you’ll need testing 6 to 12 weeks after giving birth to see whether the diabetes is still present. Gestational diabetes usually resolves after you deliver, although you’re at higher risk for developing type 2 diabetes later in life. According to Johns Hopkins Medicine, gestational diabetes affects 3 to 8 percent of pregnant women in the United States. Gestational diabetes increases the risk of having a large baby, which may cause problems with delivery. It also increases the risk of having a baby born with hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). Respiratory distress, jaundice, and low calcium and magnesium levels are also more common in babies whose mothers have gestational diabetes. There’s a higher risk of your baby developing diabetes later in life as well. Changing your diet is generally the first method of treatment for gestational diabetes. The amount of calories you should consume each day depends on a number of factors, such as your weight and activity level. Pregnant women should generally increase their calorie consumption by 300 calories per day from their prepregnancy diet. Doctors recommend three meals and two to three snacks per day. Eating smaller meals more frequently can help you keep your blood sugar levels stable. Your doctor will likely recommend that you monitor your blood sugar levels to help manage gestational diabetes. Testing your blood sugar after meals tells you how that meal affected your blood sugar. Your d Continue reading >>

Sample Diet For Gestational Diabetes

Sample Diet For Gestational Diabetes

This sample diet for gestational diabetes is only an example of what is practical. Talk to your health care team for more specific details about the correct diet for you. The goal is to provide enough nutrients to support your body and meet the needs of your growing baby. At the same time, the diet must maintain proper blood glucose levels. Your calorie requirements will change during your pregnancy. For example, you would need extra 300 calories per day during the second and third trimester. The following diet plan is an example only. The purpose is to show you some variations and ideas. Every woman is unique and so are her dietary requirements. Therefore, it is vital that you follow a diet plan designed for you personally. Speak to your health care team to model a diet plan that is appropriate for you. Meal planning should focus on eating several small meals throughout the day. Small, frequent meals support the stabilization of blood glucose levels better than larger, infrequent meals. The combinations of foods are also very important. The age-old saying is "An apple a day keeps the doctor away." Eating seven apples on Sunday is a bad thing, where one per day is good. Another non-negotiable rule is to drink at least eight glasses of water every day. Adding to the examples below, drink at least eight glasses of water per day. A glass of water with every meal and snack, and you have had six glasses already. Drinking plenty of water is important in building body fluids, digestion and blood circulation. Extra water also aids the kidneys in expelling the extra sugar from the blood. Find out more about portion sizes at: Gestational Diabetes Menu. Sample Diet for Gestational Diabetes for Monday Breakfast. 2 Scrambled eggs. 1 slice of whole wheat bread, plain or toast. 1 teas Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes Diet Regulations And Menu Plan

Gestational Diabetes Diet Regulations And Menu Plan

If you have gestational diabetes, your practitioner has probably already told you that you'll have to pay extra attention to your diet. Not sure how to best go about that? It'll help to talk to a certified diabetes educator (CDE) who has experience in gestational diabetes and who will be able to show you how to select the right foods and design the best eating plan for your needs. Some key points to remember each day: Choose complex carbohydrates (such as whole grains and beans) over simple ones (like white rice and white bread) Opt for lean proteins over fatty ones Eat lots of fruits and veggies Stick to fat-free or low-fat dairy foods whenever possible Eat snacks throughout the day (to maintain your blood sugar level) Steer clear of processed sugars The following is an example menu of what you might eat in one day to meet your nutritional needs if you have gestational diabetes. The total number of calories comes out to 2089, and it features a moderate amount of diabetes-friendly carbohydrate foods, such as whole grains, legumes, and fruits and has many snacks sprinkled throughout the day. Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a condition of abnormally raised blood sugar levels that may occur in the second part of the pregnancy and goes away once the baby is born. Some women with gestational diabetes may need no treatment, some need a strict diet and others may need insulin injections. As GDM is a condition that occurs during pregnancy, it is not the same as having pre-existing diabetes during your pregnancy. Between 5% and 10% of pregnant women develop gestational diabetes, usually around the 24th to 28th week of pregnancy. Typically, women with gestational diabetes have no symptoms. Most women are diagnosed after special blood tests Some women with gestational diabetes (about 30%) have larger than average babies. As a result, they are more likely to have intervention in labour such as a caesarean birth. But the baby will not be born with diabetes. Studies have suggested that women who develop gestational diabetes have an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes later in life. Testing for gestational diabetes All women are screened for gestational diabetes at their 24 to 28 week routine check up. Women who are at higher risk may be tested more often. You are at higher risk of developing gestational diabetes if you: are overweight over the age of 25 years a family history of type 2 diabetes come from an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander or some Asian backgrounds have had gestational diabetes before have had a large baby before. The tests available for gestational diabetes are: Glucose challenge test There is no fasting required and you are given a 50g glucose drink (equivalent to 10 teaspoons of sugar) with a blood test taken one hour after. This is a screening test only and if the result is above a certain level, you will be advised to have a gl Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes definition and facts Risk factors for gestational diabetes include a history of gestational diabetes in a previous pregnancy, There are typically no noticeable signs or symptoms associated with gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes can cause the fetus to be larger than normal. Delivery of the baby may be more complicated as a result. The baby is also at risk for developing low blood glucose (hypoglycemia) immediately after birth. Following a nutrition plan is the typical treatment for gestational diabetes. Maintaining a healthy weight and following a healthy eating plan may be able to help prevent or minimize the risks of gestational diabetes. Women with gestational diabetes have an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes after the pregnancy What is gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes is diabetes, or high blood sugar levels, that develops during pregnancy. It occurs in about 4% of all pregnancies. It is usually diagnosed in the later stages of pregnancy and often occurs in women who have no prior history of diabetes. What causes gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes is thought to arise because the many changes, hormonal and otherwise, that occur in the body during pregnancy predispose some women to become resistant to insulin. Insulin is a hormone made by specialized cells in the pancreas that allows the body to effectively metabolize glucose for later usage as fuel (energy). When levels of insulin are low, or the body cannot effectively use insulin (i.e., insulin resistance), blood glucose levels rise. What are the screening guidelines for gestational diabetes? All pregnant women should be screened for gestational diabetes during their pregnancy. Most pregnant women are tested between the 24th and 28th weeks of pregnancy (see Continue reading >>

Sample Diet For Gestational Diabetes

Sample Diet For Gestational Diabetes

If you have gestational diabetes, you may need to change how you eat. The following sample diet is designed to serve as a framework for your daily meal plans. Gestational diabetes can be completely and effectively controlled with diet alone. Most oral hypoglycemic medications are not recommended during this delicate time, so it is important to discuss your diet plans with a nutritionist or your healthcare provider. Using Diet to Control Blood Glucose Levels During pregnancy, it is critical to maintain healthy blood sugar levels throughout the day and evening. According to MedlinePlus , doctors typically conduct screening for gestational diabetes between the 24th and 28th week of pregnancy. Your fasting glucose needs to be less than 95 milligrams/deciliter, and a two-hour postprandial (after meal) reading needs to be less than 155 milligrams/deciliter. If your doctor tells you that your blood glucose level is too high, you may need to make healthy eating habits and smart food choices even more of a priority during your pregnancy. While caloric requirements are highly individualized, the average women with an appropriate weight prior to conception needs an additional 100 to 300 calories during the second and third trimester. For any pregnant woman, these calories need to contain quality nutrition loaded with essential vitamins and minerals to support a healthy pregnancy and outcome. If you have gestational diabetes, you'll need to eat to keep your blood sugar at the level your doctor recommends. Keep these additional tips in mind as you follow your doctor's recommended diet for controlling your gestational diabetes: If you have gestational diabetes, you should also include plenty of fluid as part of your diet. While fruit and vegetable juices are acceptable, it is best n Continue reading >>

37 Weeks Pregnant With Gestational Diabetes

37 Weeks Pregnant With Gestational Diabetes

By week 37 of pregnancy, a woman has likely been managing her gestational diabetes for about nine weeks. Blood tests for the condition are performed at the beginning of the third trimester, around 28 weeks. Although gestational diabetes does place women in a higher pregnancy risk category, the condition can be managed with careful vigilance. The American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists says that between two and 10 percent of women are diagnosed with gestational diabetes annually. The ACOG defines gestational diabetes as excess levels of glucose in the blood. Excess glucose occurs when the body does not produce enough insulin to convert glucose into energy. The condition comes and goes with pregnancy. Women who develop gestational diabetes with one pregnancy are more likely to develop it in subsequent pregnancies. The ACOG says that up to one half of them will develop type 2 diabetes later in life. Diet, exercise and, occasionally, medication are key to gestational diabetes control. Patients need to avoid refined carbohydrates, sugar and caffeine and maintain a regimen of either swimming, walking or prenatal yoga. Insulin shots are sometimes necessary. If gestational diabetes is not controlled, serious complications may occur. They include premature birth; preeclampsia, or abnormally high maternal blood pressure; respiratory distress syndrome, or difficulties with baby’s breathing at birth; birth defects; and macrosomia, or an extremely large baby. According to Midwifery Today, the baby can go into diabetic shock and die during birth in cases of improper disease management. By 37 weeks, women with gestational diabetes will be checked weekly. Because of the risks of preeclampsia and macrosomia, these women have a slightly higher chance of delivering their ba Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes Diagnosed In Third Trimester Pregnancy And Pregnancy Outcome.

Gestational Diabetes Diagnosed In Third Trimester Pregnancy And Pregnancy Outcome.

Abstract BACKGROUND: The clinical significance of gestational diabetes diagnosed in the third trimester is unclear. A prospective observational study was performed on a cohort of women without pre-existing gestational diabetes or other medical disorders to examine the effect of gestational diabetes on pregnancy complications and infant outcome. METHODS: Four hundred and eighty-nine consecutive women were assessed at 28-30 weeks by random glucose screening and/or a 75 g oral glucose tolerance test. The subsequent management was according to established departmental protocols. The outcome of pregnancy was compared among the groups with negative screening, positive screening but normal glucose tolerance, and gestational diabetes which was controlled with diet therapy. RESULTS: Women with gestational diabetes (n=67 or 13.7%) had significantly increased maternal age, pre-pregnancy weight and body mass index, hemoglobin levels at booking and at 36-38 weeks, and incidences of parity >1, pre-eclampsia, and female infants, while the gestational age was shorter and there was no significant difference in the birthweight outcome or neonatal morbidity. CONCLUSIONS: Despite diet treatment, gestational diabetes diagnosed in the last trimester is associated with increased risk of pre-eclampsia and shorter length of gestation, and this is likely to reflect a pathological process rather than the physiological effect of pregnancy on maternal glucose tolerance. Continue reading >>

How To Control Gestational Diabetes Through Diet

How To Control Gestational Diabetes Through Diet

How to beat Gestational Diabetes with Food minus Sugar First things first, I am sorry that I have been away for a bit (first time since the inception of this blog), trust me it seemed so long! And while I was away let me just say, I have realized that “Health” is hands-down the number one wealth. Though I am happy to be back, especially to bring this post that is so close to my heart to you, I just can’t cease to ponder about the recent concurrent catastrophic tragedies in Japan brought about by the tsunami. It is hard to miss the humbling truth that no matter how rich or powerful a nation, is miniscule in front of the forces of nature. In spite of the advancement of science and technology, nature time and again has shown man who’s in control. Although it is almost impossible to even fathom the turmoil the Japanese are enduring, my heart goes out to them. I certainly hope and pray for all those at loss and in pain for strength and resilience and count my blessings and hold my family near. The harshest truth of it all however callous it sounds, whatever happens life must go on and isn’t it amazing how it does? This post is dedicated to my dear friend Breva (name changed), on whose suggestion it was born. So you’ve been handed the dreaded verdict. As if pregnancy was not heavy-duty enough to handle, the added sugar on top? Now what? I know pregnancy is not exactly the right time for a bad joke like gestational diabetes, but hey! If there was a litmus test that told us what we are in store for two to three decades later if we don’t wake up to a lifestyle change, bet this one is. I don’t mean to be harsh, only forthright I guess. You got the drift. I have been there, done that. So I’d say, it should rather be “so what?” Three years back, I was sailing Continue reading >>

Meal Planning For Pregnant Women With Diabetes

Meal Planning For Pregnant Women With Diabetes

Your meal plan for diabetes needs to be modified when you are pregnant. The total calories you need are based on your prepregnancy weight, age, activity level, and whether you are carrying more than one baby. Dieting to lose weight during pregnancy is not recommended, because you may not receive enough nourishment for you and your baby, and it may increase your risk for premature delivery. Follow these guidelines for your meal plan during pregnancy. Carbohydrate Inadequate carbohydrate intake can result in low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) for women taking insulin and in ketone production for women who have gestational diabetes. Excessive carbohydrate intake can result in elevated blood sugar levels. Make sure your meal plan contains: Complex carbohydrate, especially foods high in fiber, such as oatmeal, brown rice, bran cereal, whole wheat bread, whole wheat pasta, and beans. Fresh fruits. Milk. Fresh or frozen vegetables. Limit these carbohydrate foods in your diet: Refined sugar and foods with a high content of refined sugars (sweets) Refined starches, such as highly processed breakfast cereals, instant potatoes, instant rice, or instant noodles Fruit juice Protein If your kidney function is impaired, your protein allowance may be lowered. Fat Monounsaturated fats and omega-3 fats, rather than saturated fats, should continue to be the primary source of fat in your diet. Fiber Get enough fiber each day. Fiber can help stabilize your blood sugar levels and relieve constipation, which is common during pregnancy. Most people get far more sodium than they need. Talk to your doctor about how much sodium you should eat. Vitamins and minerals Take a prenatal vitamin with folic acid and iron to meet your body's increased need for these micronutrients. Folic acid is needed for th Continue reading >>

What Can I Eat If I Have Gestational Diabetes? Food List And More

What Can I Eat If I Have Gestational Diabetes? Food List And More

Gestational diabetes is diabetes that only occurs in pregnant women. That means you can't get gestational diabetes unless you’re pregnant. You may develop gestational diabetes for the first time during pregnancy or you might have a mild undiagnosed case of diabetes that gets worse when you’re pregnant. During pregnancy, the way your body uses insulin changes. Insulin is a hormone that breaks the foods you eat down into glucose, or sugar. You then use that glucose for energy. You’ll naturally become more resistant to insulin when you’re pregnant to help provide your baby with more glucose. In some women, the process goes wrong and your body either stops responding to insulin or doesn't make enough insulin to give you the glucose you need. When that happens, you’ll have too much sugar in your blood. That causes gestational diabetes. If you have recently been diagnosed with gestational diabetes, or are curious about what will happen if you are diagnosed with it, keep reading to learn more about maintaining a healthy pregnancy. Eat protein with every meal. Include daily fruits and vegetables in your diet. Thirty percent or less of your diet should be made up of fat. Limit or avoid processed foods. Pay attention to portion sizes to avoid overeating. If you have gestational diabetes, maintaining a healthy, balanced diet may help you manage your symptoms without needing medication. In general, your diet should include protein plus the right mix of carbohydrates and fats. Once you are diagnosed with gestational diabetes, ask your doctor about working with a registered dietitian or nutritionist. They can help you plan your meals and come up with an eating plan that will keep you and your baby healthy. Aim to base your meals around protein. Include lots of fresh foods a Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes: Causes, Symptoms And Treatments

Gestational Diabetes: Causes, Symptoms And Treatments

Gestational diabetes has become one of the most common pregnancy complications in the US, with about 7 percent of pregnant women developing the condition. But just because it’s more widespread doesn’t mean it comes without risks. So what is gestational diabetes—and how can you minimize your chances of getting it? In this article What is gestational diabetes? What causes gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes symptoms Gestational diabetes treatment How to prevent gestational diabetes What Is Gestational Diabetes? Gestational diabetes means your body can’t properly regulate your blood sugar levels while you’re pregnant—either because you don’t produce enough insulin or your body can’t properly use the insulin it does produce. That causes your blood sugar levels to spike when you eat, leading to a condition called hyperglycemia. Most moms-to-be diagnosed with gestational diabetes experience diabetes only during pregnancy, and the condition clears up soon after birth. But 5 to 10 percent of women continue to have type 2 diabetes after pregnancy, and those whose diabetes clears up after childbirth are still at a 20 to 50 percent risk of developing type 2 diabetes within the next 10 years. So why are doctors so concerned about this condition? “Gestational diabetes puts the mom and baby at increased risk for pregnancy complications,” says Sherry A. Ross, MD, a Santa Monica, California-based ob-gyn and author of She-ology: The Definitive Guide to Women’s Intimate Health. Period. For moms, those include: High blood pressure Preeclampsia Preterm labor C-section Gestational diabetes effects on baby can increase the risk of: Higher birth weight Shoulder dystocia (when the shoulders get stuck in the birth canal) Congenital malformations (such as abnormal sp Continue reading >>

How To Eat Paleo During Pregnancy: A Guide To Every Trimester

How To Eat Paleo During Pregnancy: A Guide To Every Trimester

How to eat Paleo during Pregnancy: A guide to every trimester Wow! Almost there...if you're like like most women you're starting to nest and get ready to meet this new little person who's been growing inside you for months. Your baby is growing and displacing your organs including your stomach. This means that you're likely not able to eat very much in one sitting. There are a lot of hormonal changes going on and you're body's insulin response is rapidly changing...curious? Well then, let's jump right into this next post and chat about what to eat in the third trimester. As I mentioned before, your tummy is being displaced by your growing baby and eating large meals just isn't an option anymore. If you haven't done so already, it's time to shift your focus from food quantity to food quality. I know that the idea of grazing or eating multiple mini meals is contrary to what many in the paleo world endorse, however, pregnancy is different. Intermittent fasting with infrequent large meals has no place in a healthy pregnancy. You should aim for 4-6 small meals spread through the day and night. Here's an interactive video that shows you where all your organs go! Sounds gross but it's really cool (or at least I think so). Many women also find that they are waking up A LOT through the night. Perhaps you have to pee every few hours or you just wake up rather randomly your body is preparing you to be up feeding a baby every 3-4 hrs and is just trying to ease you into this rhythm. Many women find themselves hungry when they wake up...please eat! Subtle drops in blood sugar can actually wake you up out of a deep sleep. Include some carbohydrate in your snack to help boost serotonin levels and help you get back to sleep. Sweet potato, warm apple with cinnamon, mashed pumpkin, chia Continue reading >>

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