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Diagnosis Prognosis And Treatment Of Impaired Glucose Tolerance And Impaired Fasting Glucose

Diagnosis, Prognosis, And Treatment Of Impaired Glucose Tolerance And Impaired Fasting Glucose [elec... | National Library Of Australia

Diagnosis, Prognosis, And Treatment Of Impaired Glucose Tolerance And Impaired Fasting Glucose [elec... | National Library Of Australia

Santaguida, Pasqualina.& United States. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. (2005). Diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of impaired glucose tolerance and impaired fasting glucose. [Rockville, Md.] : Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Santaguida, Pasqualina.and United States. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of impaired glucose tolerance and impaired fasting glucose [electronic resource] / authors, Santaguida, PL ... [et al.] Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality [Rockville, Md.] 2005 Santaguida, Pasqualina.& United States. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. 2005, Diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of impaired glucose tolerance and impaired fasting glucose [electronic resource] / authors, Santaguida, PL ... [et al.] Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality [Rockville, Md.] Please see Wikipedia's template documentation for further citation fields that may be required. {{Citation | title=Diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of impaired glucose tolerance and impaired fasting glucose [electronic resource] / authors, Santaguida, PL ... [et al.] | author1=Santaguida, Pasqualina | author2=United States. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality | year=2005 | publisher=Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality | language=English}} Continue reading >>

Glucose Intolerance: Practice Essentials, Pathophysiology, Etiology

Glucose Intolerance: Practice Essentials, Pathophysiology, Etiology

Author: Samuel T Olatunbosun, MD, FACP, FACE; Chief Editor: George T Griffing, MD more... Glucose intolerance is an umbrella term for a group of metabolic conditionsthat result in higher than normal blood glucose levels. Both theWorld Health Organization (WHO) and the American Diabetes Association (ADA) have released classification systems and diagnostic criteria fordiabetes mellitus (DM) and allied categories of glucose intolerance. [ 1 , 2 , 3 ] Although similiar, there are a number of variances in recommendations which may result in differences in an individuals classification. The major categories of the disorders of glycemia or glucose tolerance are as follows: Type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM)(due to autoimmune B-cell destruction, usually leading to absolute insulin deficiency) Type 2 diabetes mellitus(due to a progressive loss of B-cell insulin secretion frequently on the background of insulin resistance) Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) (diabetes diagnosed in the second or third trimester of pregnancy that was not clearly overt diabetes prior to gestation) [ 4 ] Specific types of diabetes due to other causes (such as neonatal diabetes and maturity-onset diabetes of the young, diseases of the exocrine pancreas, and drug- or chemical-induced diabetes) Impaired glucose tolerance (prediabetes/intermediate hyperglycemia) Impaired fasting glucose (prediabetes/intermediate hyperglycemia) Conditions secondarily associated with glucose intolerance also occur. Etiologic types and stages of the major disorders of glucose intolerance are shown in the image below. Etiologic types and stages of the major disorders of glucose tolerance. In most cases, the diagnosis of a type of diabetes or glucose intolerance is based on the patients condition at the time, but not all patients Continue reading >>

Impaired Glucose Tolerance Or Newly Diagnosed Diabetes Mellitus Diagnosed During Admission Adversely Affects Prognosis After Myocardial Infarction: An Observational Study

Impaired Glucose Tolerance Or Newly Diagnosed Diabetes Mellitus Diagnosed During Admission Adversely Affects Prognosis After Myocardial Infarction: An Observational Study

Impaired Glucose Tolerance or Newly Diagnosed Diabetes Mellitus Diagnosed during Admission Adversely Affects Prognosis after Myocardial Infarction: An Observational Study Affiliation: Department of Cardiology, Scunthorpe General Hospital, Scunthorpe, United Kingdom Affiliation: Department of Cardiology, Castle Hill Hospital, Kingston upon Hull, United Kingdom Affiliation: Department of Cardiology, Scunthorpe General Hospital, Scunthorpe, United Kingdom Affiliation: Department of Diabetes and Endocrinology, Scunthorpe General Hospital, Scunthorpe, United Kingdom Affiliation: Department of Diabetes and Endocrinology, Calderdale and Huddersfield NHS Foundation Trust, Huddersfield, United Kingdom Affiliation: Department of Diabetes and Endocrinology, Scunthorpe General Hospital, Scunthorpe, United Kingdom Affiliation: Department of Cardiology, Scunthorpe General Hospital, Scunthorpe, United Kingdom Affiliation: Department of Academic Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, Hull York Medical School, University of Hull, Kingston upon Hull, United Kingdom Affiliation: Department of Cardiology, Castle Hill Hospital, Kingston upon Hull, United Kingdom To investigate the prognostic effect of newly diagnosed diabetes mellitus (NDM) and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) post myocardial infarction (MI). Retrospective cohort study of 768 patients without preexisting diabetes mellitus post-MI at one centre in Yorkshire between November 2005 and October 2008. Patients were categorised as normal glucose tolerance (NGT n = 337), IGT (n = 279) and NDM (n = 152) on pre- discharge oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Primary end-point was the first occurrence of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) including cardiovascular death, non-fatal MI, severe heart failure (HF) or non-haemorrha Continue reading >>

Koreamed Synapse

Koreamed Synapse

Min HK. Non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) in Korea. Diabet Med 1996;13:S13S15. Nathan DM, Davidson MB, DeFronzo RA, Heine RJ, Henry RR, Pratley R, et al. American Diabetes Association. Impaired fasting glucose and impaired glucose tolerance: implications for care. Diabetes Care 2007;30:753759. Yoon KH, Lee JH, Kim JW, Cho JH, Choi YH, Ko SH, et al. Epidemic obesity and type 2 diabetes in Asia. Lancet 2006;368:16811688. Knowler WC, Barrett-Conner E, Fowler SE, Hamman RF, Lachin JM, Walker EA, et al. Diabetes Prevention Program Research Group. Reduction in the incidence of type 2 diabetes with lifestyle intervention or metformin. N Engl J Med 2002;346:393403. Vendrame F, Gottlieb PA. Prediabetes: prediction and prevention trials. Endocrinol Metab Clin North Am 2004;33:7592. ix. Larsson H, Lindgrde F, Berglund G, Ahrn B. Prediction of diabetes using ADA or WHO criteria in post-menopausal women: a 10-year follow-up study. Diabetologia 2004;43:12241228. Santaguida PL, Balion C, Hunt D, Morrison K, Gerstein H, Raina P, et al. Diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of impaired glucose tolerance and impaired fasting glucose. Evid Rep Technol Assess (Summ) 2005;128:111. Shaw JE, Zimmet PZ, de Courten M, Dowse GK, Chitson P, Gareeboo H, et al. Impaired fasting glucose or impaired glucose tolerance. What best predicts future diabetes in Mauritius? Diabetes Care 1999;22:399402. De Vegt F, Dekker JM, Jager A, Hienkens E, Kostense PJ, Stehouwer CD, et al. Relation of impaired fasting and postload glucose with incident type 2 diabetes in a Dutch population: The Hoorn Study. JAMA 2001;285:21092113. Song KH, Nam-Goomg IS, Han SM, Kim MS, Lee EJ, Lee YS, et al. Change in prevalence and 6-year incidence of diabetes and impaired fasting glucose in Korean subjects living in a rur Continue reading >>

Evaluating The Prevalence And Progression Of Diabetes | The Journal Of The American Osteopathic Association

Evaluating The Prevalence And Progression Of Diabetes | The Journal Of The American Osteopathic Association

Evaluating the prevalence and progression of diabetes Evaluating the prevalence and progression of diabetes The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, March 2010, Vol. 110, eS3-eS5. doi: The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, March 2010, Vol. 110, eS3-eS5. doi: Nandish S, Wyatt J, Thukral N, Chilton RJ. Evaluating the prevalence and progression of diabetes. J Am Osteopath Assoc 2010;110(3_suppl_3):eS3eS5. doi: . Evaluating the prevalence and progression of diabetes You will receive an email whenever this article is corrected, updated, or cited in the literature. You can manage this and all other alerts in My Account The current American Diabetes Association (ADA) guidelines define prediabetes as having a fasting plasma glucose (FPG) of at least 100 mg/dL (5.6 mmol/L) but less than 126 mg/dL (7.0 mmol/L), or abnormal two-hour response to a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) of at least 140 mg/dL (7.8 mmol/L) and less than 200 mg/dL (11.1 mmol/L) (often termed IGTimpaired glucose tolerance). 1 The World Health Organization defers slightly by defining impaired fasting glucose (IFG) as a fasting glucose of at least 110 mg/dl (6.1 mm OL) with IGT similar to ADA Guidelines. 2 Looking at the prevalence of IFG levels according to race, Mexican American adolescents topped the list at 15.3% vs 11.3% of all non-Hispanic white and 7.4% of all non-Hispanic black adolescents. 3 This presents an enormous long-term risk for the potential development of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in most patients. The etiology of T2DM is complex and multifactorial; it covers the gamutfrom early development of oxidative stress leading to endothelial dysfunction, genetics, insulin resistance and cardiovascular risk factors. The bodily processes of glucose regulation star Continue reading >>

Santaguida, P.l., Et Al. (2008) Diagnosis, Prognosis, And Treatment Of Impaired Glucose Tolerance And Impaired Fasting Glucose. Summary Of Evidence Report/technology Assessment, No. 128. Agency For Healthcare Research And Quality. - References - Scientific Research Publishing

Santaguida, P.l., Et Al. (2008) Diagnosis, Prognosis, And Treatment Of Impaired Glucose Tolerance And Impaired Fasting Glucose. Summary Of Evidence Report/technology Assessment, No. 128. Agency For Healthcare Research And Quality. - References - Scientific Research Publishing

Santaguida, P.L., et al. (2008) Diagnosis, Prognosis, and Treatment of Impaired Glucose Tolerance and Impaired Fasting Glucose. Summary of Evidence Report/Technology Assessment, No. 128. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. JOURNAL NAME: Open Access Library Journal , Vol.2 No.1 , January 9, 2015 ABSTRACT: Introduction: According to an estimate of the World Health Organization, about 171 million people worldwide suffer from diabetes. But the incidence is increasing so rapidly that it is speculated that by 2030 this number will be almost doubled. Diabetes mellitus occurs all the way through the world, but it is becoming more common (especially type 2) in the developing countries. Due to rapid urbanization and changes of lifestyles, it is in the state of epidemiological shift. This study aimed to assess patients compliance to treatment and whether it reduces the complication of diabetes, and its impact on overall management of diabetes. Objectives: The study objectives were to assess the compliances of diabetics patients in terms of disease management & to assess the association of patients compliance with disease complexity. Methods: Mixed methods (qualitative & quantitative) were used to conduct this study in Manikgong and Dhaka city. A pre-tested questionnaire was used for both methods. Quantitative data were collected by a structured questionnaire from 1830 participants of both sexes, and for the qualitative data a semi-structured questionnaire was used to conduct in-depth interview from 25 respondents and informal discussion was also organized with 8 care providers, i.e. physicians. Results: Findings revealed that very significant relation exists with compliances and complication in managing diabetes. That compliances influence by various factors like gender, Continue reading >>

Guasalud. Clinical Practice Guideline For Type 2 Diabetes. Full Version. Prevention Of Diabetes In Patients With Intermediate Hyperglycaemia.

Guasalud. Clinical Practice Guideline For Type 2 Diabetes. Full Version. Prevention Of Diabetes In Patients With Intermediate Hyperglycaemia.

* ADA considers altered basal glycaemias between 100-125 mg/dl. The determinations are carried out in venous plasma. Altered basal glycaemia is the stage used to define basal glycaemia between normal glycaemia and diabetes. It is defined between the 110-125 mg/dl margins, according to WHO and IDF. According to the WHO and FID criteria, a 5% or higher prevalence is stated, which increases with age; according to the ADA criteria, its prevalence triples or quadruples ( 71 ). The classification as altered basal glycaemia can be hardly reproducible. If glycaemia repeats after six weeks, altered basal glycaemia is confirmed in 51% to 64% of the cases; 10% of the cases are classified as diabetic and the rest as normal ( 70 ). These patients have a five-fold risk to develop diabetes ( 70 ). Their cardiovascular risk (AMI, cerebrovascular accidents, non-fatal CVA) is higher (RR 1.19), and likewise is mortality higher (RR 1.28) ( 70 ). IGT is the stage defined by a plasma glycaemia in venous blood between 140 mg/dl and 200 mg/dl two hours after the 75g glucose tolerance test. It is more frequent in women. Its prevalence is around 10%; it increases with age and varies depending on race. IGT reproducibility after six weeks is low. It is confirmed in 33% to 48% of the cases; 36% to 48% are reclassified as normal and 6% to 13% as diabetic ( 2 ; 70 ). IGT is associated with a higher risk than altered basal glycaemia to develop diabetes. This risk is 6 times higher than in normoglycaemic patients [RR 6.02 (CI 95%: 4.66 a 7.38)], and up to 12 times more if both are associated [RR 12.21 (CI 95%: 4.32 a 20.10)] ( 70 ). IGT also implies a higher cardiovascular mortality risk (RR 1.48) and general risk (RR 1.66) ( 70 ). 6.3. Preventive interventions in patients with intermediate glycaemias Continue reading >>

Impaired Fasting Glucose

Impaired Fasting Glucose

Impaired fasting glucose, or Impaired Fasting Glycemia (IFG) is a type of prediabetes, in which a person's blood sugar levels during fasting are consistently above the normal range, but below the diagnostic cut-off for a formal diagnosis of diabetes mellitus.[1] Together with impaired glucose tolerance, it is a sign of insulin resistance. In this manner, it is also one of the conditions associated with Metabolic Syndrome. Those with impaired fasting glucose are at an increased risk of vascular complications of diabetes, though to a lesser extent. The risks are cumulative, with both higher blood glucose levels, and the total amount of time it spends elevated, increasing the overall complication rate. IFG can eventually progress to type 2 diabetes mellitus without intervention, which typically involves lifestyle modification. Those with impaired fasting glucose have a 1.5 fold increased risk of developing clinical diabetes within 10 years, when compared to the general population. Some studies suggest that without lifestyle changes, IFG will progress to clinically diagnosable diabetes in just under 3 years, on average.[2] Impaired fasting glucose is often, though not always, associated with impaired glucose tolerance, though it may occur in isolation, with such persons having a normal response to a glucose tolerance test. Signs and Symptoms[edit] Impaired fasting glucose is often without any signs or symptoms, other than higher than normal glucose levels being detected in an individual's fasting blood sample. There may be signs and symptoms associated with elevated blood glucose, though these are likely to be minor, with significant symptoms suggestive of complete progression to type 2 diabetes. Such symptoms include:[3] Increased thirst Increased urination, especially wak Continue reading >>

Prediabetes Or Categories Of Increased Risk For Diabetes

Prediabetes Or Categories Of Increased Risk For Diabetes

Prediabetes or Categories of Increased Risk for Diabetes is a topic covered in the Johns Hopkins Diabetes Guide. Official website of the Johns Hopkins Antibiotic (ABX), HIV, Diabetes, and Psychiatry Guides, powered by Unbound Medicine. Johns Hopkins Guide App for iOS, iPhone, iPad, and Android included. Explore these free sample topics: -- The first section of this topic is shown below -- Isolated impaired fasting glucose (IFG) and isolated impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) are intermediate states of abnormal glucose homeostasis between normal and overt diabetes. Prediabetes is an unofficial designation including either IFG, IGT or both. Documentation of IFG requires only a fasting plasma glucose. Documentation of IGT requires a 75-gm oral glucose tolerance test. A hemoglobin A1c of 5.7 - 6.4% identifies individuals in "categories of high risk for diabetes" to whom the term "prediabetes" may be applied (ADA Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes)[4]. Table 1 State Fasting Glucose (mg/dl) 2 hour Glucose (mg/dl) during a 75g OGTT A1c (%) Normal < 100 < 140 < 5.7 Isolated Impaired Fasting Glucose* 100-125 < 140 - Isolated Impaired Glucose Tolerance < 100 140-199 - Combined IFG and IGT 100-125 140-199 - Prediabetes or Categories of Increased Risk** 100-125 140-199 5.7 - 6.4 Diabetes** ≥ 126 ≥ 200 >6.5 * The WHO and IDF recommend that Impaired Fasting Glucose be 110-125 mg/dl **At least one criteria needs to be satisfied for diagnosis -- To view the remaining sections of this topic, please sign in or purchase a subscription -- Continue reading >>

Long-term Clinical Outcome In Patients With Acute Coronary Syndrome And Dysglycaemia

Long-term Clinical Outcome In Patients With Acute Coronary Syndrome And Dysglycaemia

Long-term clinical outcome in patients with acute coronary syndrome and dysglycaemia Diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) are major risk factors for atherosclerosis including coronary artery disease (CAD). The present studys aim was to investigate the importance of glucose tolerance for long-term clinical outcome in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). A total 1062 consecutive patients, 781 men and 281 women, aged 3280years, admitted to the coronary care unit at Danderyd University Hospital, Stockholm, for ACS from 2006 to 2008 were included. At discharge, the patients were categorized according to an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) as having normal glucose tolerance (NGT), n=295 (28%); impaired fasting glucose (IFG) and IGT, n=299 (28%); diabetes discovered by OGTT, n=156 (15%); or known diabetes at admission, n=312 (29%). Mortality and reinfarction rates were studied during a mean follow-up time of 4.0 (0.8) years. Clinical outcome data were obtained from the Swedish Coronary Angiography and Angioplasty Registry and the Swedish National Registry. There was significantly higher (p<0.001) mortality within, 30days, 1 and 3years in patients with known diabetes as compared to the other groups. During the follow-up, 86 patients (28%) with known diabetes had reinfarction as compared to 36 patients (12%) with NGT and 79 patients (17%) with dysglycaemia (IFG, IGT and diabetes) discovered by OGTT. A majority (72% in this study) of patients admitted for ACS have disturbed glucose metabolism, including diabetes, with high prevalence of previously undiagnosed dysglycaemia. Both patients with known diabetes and dysglycaemia discovered by OGTT show a high risk for poor clinical prognosis. Cardiovascular diseaseDiabetes mellitusImpaired glucose tolerancePrognosis Continue reading >>

Prediabetes

Prediabetes

Prediabetes is the precursor stage before diabetes mellitus in which not all of the symptoms required to diagnose diabetes are present, but blood sugar is abnormally high. This stage is often referred to as the "grey area."[1] It is not a disease; the American Diabetes Association says,[2] "Prediabetes should not be viewed as a clinical entity in its own right but rather as an increased risk for diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Prediabetes is associated with obesity (especially abdominal or visceral obesity), dyslipidemia with high triglycerides and/or low HDL cholesterol, and hypertension."[2] It is thus a metabolic diathesis or syndrome, and it usually involves no symptoms and only high blood sugar as the sole sign. Impaired fasting blood sugar and impaired glucose tolerance are two forms of prediabetes that are similar in clinical definition (glucose levels too high for their context) but are physiologically distinct.[3] Insulin resistance, the insulin resistance syndrome (metabolic syndrome or syndrome X), and prediabetes are closely related to one another and have overlapping aspects. Classification[edit] Impaired fasting glucose[edit] Main article: Impaired fasting glycaemia Impaired fasting glycaemia or impaired fasting glucose (IFG) refers to a condition in which the fasting blood glucose or the 3-month average blood glucose (A1C) is elevated above what is considered normal levels but is not high enough to be classified as diabetes mellitus. It is considered a pre-diabetic state, associated with insulin resistance and increased risk of cardiovascular pathology, although of lesser risk than impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). IFG sometimes progresses to type 2 diabetes mellitus. There is a 50% risk over 10 years of progressing to overt diabetes. Many newl Continue reading >>

Diagnosis, Prognosis, And Treatment Of Impaired Glucose Tolerance And Impaired Fasting Glucose: Summary - Ahrq Evidence Report Summaries - Ncbi Bookshelf

Diagnosis, Prognosis, And Treatment Of Impaired Glucose Tolerance And Impaired Fasting Glucose: Summary - Ahrq Evidence Report Summaries - Ncbi Bookshelf

NCBI Bookshelf. A service of the National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health. AHRQ Evidence Report Summaries. Rockville (MD): Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US); 1998-2005. This publication is provided for historical reference only and the information may be out of date. This publication is provided for historical reference only and the information may be out of date. 128Diagnosis, Prognosis, and Treatment of Impaired Glucose Tolerance and Impaired Fasting Glucose: Summary PL Santaguida, C Balion, D Hunt, K Morrison, H Gerstein, P Raina, L Booker, and H Yazdi. Diabetes mellitus (DM) and its associated disease outcomes are a growing concern worldwide. The current global prevalence of DM for all ages has been estimated at 2.8 percent and is predicted to reach 4.4 percent by 2030. 1 There is intense interest in identifying and treating risk factors that may prevent the onset of this disease and minimize morbidity. Impaired fasting glucose (IFG) and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) are the intermediate metabolic states between normal and diabetic glucose homeostasis. These conditions are thought to be the precursors of DM, but the progression to overt disease is not straight-forward. The risk for both macrovascular and microvascular complications increases across the distribution of blood glucose concentrations well below the overt DM, and the risk is more strongly associated with post-challenge hyperglycemia than fasting glucose levels. However, it is unclear whether this glucose effect is independent of classical risk factors, such as blood pressure and lipids, or occurs due to abnormalities of other metabolites, such as free fatty acids. The goal of this systematic review is to evaluate the state of the evidence in the areas of the diagnosis Continue reading >>

Impaired Fasting Glycemia

Impaired Fasting Glycemia

A person with impaired fasting glycemia isn't able to process glucose as efficiently as they should be able to Impaired fasting glycemia (IFG) may also be known as pre-diabetes or metabolic syndrome. Impaired fasting glycemia occurs when blood glucose levels in the body are elevated during periods of fasting , but not enough to prompt a diagnosis of diabetes. Effectively, a person with impaired fasting glycemia isnt able to process glucose as efficiently as they should be able to. What are the health implications of impaired fasting glycemia? People with impaired fasting glycemia face a greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes, despite having less of a risk than those with impaired glucose tolerance. The risk of developing cardiovascular disease is also lower than for people with impaired glucose tolerance . What does impaired fasting glycemia mean? Impaired fasting glycemia (IFG) means that the body cannot regulate glucose as efficiently as it should be able to. Glucose is usually carried around the body where it is absorbed and made into energy. Insulin regulates the concentration of glucose in the blood. IFG occurs when this process isnt functioning as effectively as it could, and effects millions of people in the UK. What are the symptoms of impaired fasting glycemia? Unfortunately, IFG may exhibit very little in the way of symptoms, meaning diagnosis often takes a long time. Many people diagnosed with IFG are overweight, have high blood pressure, increased cholesterol levels or a family history of IFG. So how do I know if my IFG becomes type 2 diabetes? IFG increases type 2 diabetes risk, so go straight to your doctor or healthcare professional if you feel unnaturally thirsty, pass more urine than usual, have recurrent infections, have blurred vision, or if your Continue reading >>

A Large Proportion Of Prediabetes And Diabetes Goes Undiagnosed When Only Fasting Plasma Glucose And/or Hba 1c Are Measured In Overweight Or Obese Patients - Em|consulte

A Large Proportion Of Prediabetes And Diabetes Goes Undiagnosed When Only Fasting Plasma Glucose And/or Hba 1c Are Measured In Overweight Or Obese Patients - Em|consulte

However, the best way to screen for prediabetes and diabetes is still under debate. On the one hand, measuring only fasting plasma glucose (FPG) is simple, and recommended by both the French National Agency of Accreditation and Evaluation in Health Care (ANAES) [ 10 Agence nationale daccrditation et dvaluation en sant. Principes de dpistage du diabte de type2. Report 2003. Click here to see the Library ] and the American Diabetes Association (ADA) [ 11 ADA. Clinical practice recommendations 2008. Diabetes Care 2008;31:S1110. Click here to see the Library ]. On the other hand, the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), including FPG measurement and 2-h post-load glucose (2hPG) determination, is recommended by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) [ 3 AlbertiK.G., ZimmetP., ShawJ. International diabetes federation: a consensus on type2 diabetes prevention Diabet Med2007 ; 24 : 451-463 [cross-ref] Click here to see the Library ] and the European Association for the Study of DiabetesEuropean Society of Cardiology (EASDESC) guidelines for patients with cardiovascular disease [ 12 RydenL., StandlE., BartnikM., Van den BergheG., BetteridgeJ., de BoerM.J., and al. Guidelines on diabetes, pre-diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases: executive summary Eur Heart J2007 ; 28 : 88-136 Click here to see the Library ]. OGTTs are more expensive and time-consuming than an isolated FPG measurement, but has certain advantages: the OGTT is the only way to detect IGT, seen in two-thirds to three-fourths of those with prediabetic states [ 3 AlbertiK.G., ZimmetP., ShawJ. International diabetes federation: a consensus on type2 diabetes prevention Diabet Med2007 ; 24 : 451-463 [cross-ref] Click here to see the Library , 12 RydenL., StandlE., BartnikM., Van den BergheG., BetteridgeJ., de BoerM. Continue reading >>

Effects Of Aqueous Extract Of Turnip Leaf (brassica Rapa) In Alloxan-induced Diabetic Rats

Effects Of Aqueous Extract Of Turnip Leaf (brassica Rapa) In Alloxan-induced Diabetic Rats

Hassanpour Fard, M., Naseh, G., Lotfi, N., Hosseini, S., Hosseini, M. (2015). Effects of aqueous extract of turnip leaf (Brassica rapa) in alloxan-induced diabetic rats. Avicenna Journal of Phytomedicine, 5(2), 148-156. doi: 10.22038/ajp.2015.3980 Mohammad Hassanpour Fard; Ghodratollah Naseh; Nassim Lotfi; Seyed Mahmoud Hosseini; Mehran Hosseini. "Effects of aqueous extract of turnip leaf (Brassica rapa) in alloxan-induced diabetic rats". Avicenna Journal of Phytomedicine, 5, 2, 2015, 148-156. doi: 10.22038/ajp.2015.3980 Hassanpour Fard, M., Naseh, G., Lotfi, N., Hosseini, S., Hosseini, M. (2015). 'Effects of aqueous extract of turnip leaf (Brassica rapa) in alloxan-induced diabetic rats', Avicenna Journal of Phytomedicine, 5(2), pp. 148-156. doi: 10.22038/ajp.2015.3980 Hassanpour Fard, M., Naseh, G., Lotfi, N., Hosseini, S., Hosseini, M. Effects of aqueous extract of turnip leaf (Brassica rapa) in alloxan-induced diabetic rats. Avicenna Journal of Phytomedicine, 2015; 5(2): 148-156. doi: 10.22038/ajp.2015.3980 Effects of aqueous extract of turnip leaf (Brassica rapa) in alloxan-induced diabetic rats 1Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Birjand University of Medical Sciences (BUMS), Birjand, Iran 2Department of General Surgery, BUMS, Birjand ,Iran 3Department of Anatomy, BUMS, Birjand, Iran 4Department of Biostatistics, BUMS, Birjand, Iran 5Department of Public Health, Research Centre of Experimental Medicine, BUMS, Birjand, Iran Objectives: Turnip leaf has been used in folk medicine of Iran for the treatment of diabetes. However,so far no scientific study has been done to support its use in traditional medicine. The present study was carried out to evaluate the possible hypoglycemic efficacy of aqueous extract of turnip leaf (AETL) in diabetic rats. Materials a Continue reading >>

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