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Diagnosis Of Diabetes Type 2

Type 2 Diabetes Diagnosis & Tests

Type 2 Diabetes Diagnosis & Tests

XIAFLEX® is a prescription medicine used to treat adults with Dupuytren's contracture when a "cord" can be felt. It is not known if XIAFLEX® is safe and effective in children under the age of 18. Do not receive XIAFLEX® if you have had an allergic reaction to collagenase clostridium histolyticum or any of the ingredients in XIAFLEX®, or to any other collagenase product. See the end of the Medication Guide for a complete list of ingredients in XIAFLEX®. XIAFLEX® can cause serious side effects, including: Tendon rupture or ligament damage. Receiving an injection of XIAFLEX® may cause damage to a tendon or ligament in your hand and cause it to break or weaken. This could require surgery to fix the damaged tendon or ligament. Call your healthcare provider right away if you have trouble bending your injected finger (towards the wrist) after the swelling goes down or you have problems using your treated hand after your follow-up visit Nerve injury or other serious injury of the hand. Call your healthcare provider right away if you get numbness, tingling, increased pain, or tears in the skin (laceration) in your treated finger or hand after your injection or after your follow-up visit Hypersensitivity reactions, including anaphylaxis. Severe allergic reactions can happen in people who receive XIAFLEX® because it contains foreign proteins. Call your healthcare provider right away if you have any of these symptoms of an allergic reaction after an injection of XIAFLEX®: hives swollen face breathing trouble chest pain low blood pressure dizziness or fainting Increased chance of bleeding. Bleeding or bruising at the injection site can happen in people who receive XIAFLEX®. Talk to your healthcare provider if you have a problem with your blood clotting. XIAFLEX® may not b Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Print Diagnosis To diagnose type 2 diabetes, you'll be given a: Glycated hemoglobin (A1C) test. This blood test indicates your average blood sugar level for the past two to three months. It measures the percentage of blood sugar attached to hemoglobin, the oxygen-carrying protein in red blood cells. The higher your blood sugar levels, the more hemoglobin you'll have with sugar attached. An A1C level of 6.5 percent or higher on two separate tests indicates you have diabetes. A result between 5.7 and 6.4 percent is considered prediabetes, which indicates a high risk of developing diabetes. Normal levels are below 5.7 percent. If the A1C test isn't available, or if you have certain conditions — such as if you're pregnant or have an uncommon form of hemoglobin (known as a hemoglobin variant) — that can make the A1C test inaccurate, your doctor may use the following tests to diagnose diabetes: Random blood sugar test. A blood sample will be taken at a random time. Blood sugar values are expressed in milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) or millimoles per liter (mmol/L). Regardless of when you last ate, a random blood sugar level of 200 mg/dL (11.1 mmol/L) or higher suggests diabetes, especially when coupled with any of the signs and symptoms of diabetes, such as frequent urination and extreme thirst. Fasting blood sugar test. A blood sample will be taken after an overnight fast. A fasting blood sugar level less than 100 mg/dL (5.6 mmol/L) is normal. A fasting blood sugar level from 100 to 125 mg/dL (5.6 to 6.9 mmol/L) is considered prediabetes. If it's 126 mg/dL (7 mmol/L) or higher on two separate tests, you have diabetes. Oral glucose tolerance test. For this test, you fast overnight, and the fasting blood sugar level is measured. Then you drink a sugary liquid, and blood s Continue reading >>

Newly Diagnosed

Newly Diagnosed

Being newly diagnosed with diabetes can be confusing and overwhelming with all the new things you have to learn and understand. This page provides a synopsis of the most important information and answers to commonly asked questions. What is Diabetes? Find out about diabetes: the terminology, symptoms, diagnosis and goals of treatment. Learn how the body keeps the blood sugar in balance. Types of Diabetes There are many type of diabetes. Learn more about your type of diabetes or look at the classification table to see a comprehensive list. Insulin given by injection is the central treatment for type 1 diabetes. There are fast acting and long acting insulin formulations. It is important to understand when to use these different formulations and the concepts behind choosing the right insulin dose. There is one other injected medication for type 1 diabetes, Symlin, that may be given in addition to insulin. The treatment for type 2 diabetes may be a simple as lifestyle changes (diet, exercise and weight management) with one or two pills to many different pills and/or insulin or other injected medications. Your medical team will help you decide the best choices for you. Find out if the treatment is working Blood sugar monitoring lets you know if the treatment plan is working and you are achieving the goals of therapy. And keeping a logbook helps everyone review and assess the results. Eating a healthy and balanced diet is another important part of living with diabetes. The first think you need to understand is which foods have sugar and starch (carbohydrates). When the blood sugar is uncontrolled When your blood sugar is too high or too low, you need to understand the symptoms and what to do. Some situations require urgent medical attention. When your blood sugar is not contr Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Without Complications

Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Without Complications

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Top 10 Tips For People Newly Diagnosed With Type 2 Diabetes

Top 10 Tips For People Newly Diagnosed With Type 2 Diabetes

twitter summary: Ten tips for newly diagnosed T2 #diabetes: act NOW for long-term benefits, use healthy eating, exercise, meds + structured blood glucose testing short summary: This article offers ten tips for people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes: 1) Know that developing type 2 diabetes does not represent a personal failing; 2) Start to take care of your diabetes as soon as you’re diagnosed (and even better, before, if you know you have prediabetes); 3) Recognize that type 2 diabetes is a progressive disease; 4) Keep in mind that food has a major impact on blood glucose; work to optimize your mealtime choices; 5) Exercise is a powerful and underutilized tool which can increase insulin sensitivity and improve health – use it as much as possible; 6) Use blood glucose testing to identify patterns; 7) Don’t forget that needing to take insulin doesn’t mean you failed; 8) Keep learning and find support; 9) Seek out the services of a Diabetes Educator; and 10) Review our Patient's Guide to Individualizing Therapy at www.diaTribe.org/patientguide. Know that developing type 2 diabetes does not represent a personal failing. It develops through a combination of factors that are still being uncovered and better understood. Lifestyle (food, exercise, stress, sleep) certainly plays a major role, but genetics play a significant role as well. Type 2 diabetes is often described in the media as a result of being overweight, but the relationship is not that simple. Many overweight individuals never get type 2, and some people with type 2 were never overweight. At its core, type 2 involves two physiological issues: resistance to the insulin made by the person’s beta cells and too little insulin production relative to the amount one needs. These problems can lead to high bl Continue reading >>

Getting Diagnosed

Getting Diagnosed

Type 2 diabetes is often diagnosed following blood or urine tests for something else. However, if you have any symptoms of diabetes you should see your GP straight away. To find out if you have type 2 diabetes, you usually have to go through the following steps: Speak to your GP about your symptoms. Your GP will check your urine and arrange a blood test to check your blood sugar levels. It usually takes about 1 to 2 days for the results to come back. If you have diabetes, your GP will ask you to come in again to explain the test results and what will happen next. If you’re diagnosed with diabetes What your GP will discuss with you during your appointment depends on the diagnosis and the treatment they recommend. Generally, they’ll talk to you about: what diabetes is what high blood sugar means for your health what medication you’ll have to take your diet and exercise your lifestyle, for example alcohol and smoking Your GP will do their best to discuss the diagnosis with you but this first appointment might only be 10 to 15 minutes. If you have questions about your diagnosis It’s usually difficult to take in everything the GP tells you during the appointment. Talk to family and friends about what the GP told you and write down all the questions you have. Then make another GP appointment and take your list of questions with you. There’s also a lot of information on diabetes available. What happens after the diagnosis Usually the following things happen after your diagnosis: Your GP will prescribe medication. It might take time for you to get used to the medication and to find the right amounts for you. You might need to make changes to your diet and be more active. You’ll have to go for regular type 2 diabetes check ups. You’ll have to look out for certain s Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Type 2 diabetes is a chronic metabolic condition characterised by insulin resistance (that is, the body's inability to effectively use insulin) and insufficient pancreatic insulin production, resulting in high blood glucose levels (hyperglycaemia) Type 2 diabetes is commonly associated with obesity, physical inactivity, raised blood pressure, disturbed blood lipid levels and a tendency to develop thrombosis, and therefore is recognised to have an increased cardiovascular risk is associated with long-term microvascular and macrovascular complications, together with reduced quality of life and life expectancy In 2013, over 3.2 million adults were diagnosed with diabetes, with prevalence rates of 6% and 6.7% in England and Wales respectively estimated that about 90% of adults currently diagnosed with diabetes have type 2 diabetes Type 2 diabetes is more common in people of African, African-Caribbean and South Asian family origin can occur in all age groups and is increasingly being diagnosed in children Characteristics (in general): onset often after 40 years of age no HLA associations 58% concordance in identical twins (2) no islet cell antibodies there is insulin resistance glucagon secretion is increased often the patient is obese the patient is not prone to ketoacidosis there is no association with autoimmune disease more common in people of African, African-Caribbean and South Asian family origin Treatment: nutritional therapy oral hypoglycaemic agents occasionally insulin therapy Reference: Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Practice Essentials Type 2 diabetes mellitus consists of an array of dysfunctions characterized by hyperglycemia and resulting from the combination of resistance to insulin action, inadequate insulin secretion, and excessive or inappropriate glucagon secretion. See the image below. See Clinical Findings in Diabetes Mellitus, a Critical Images slideshow, to help identify various cutaneous, ophthalmologic, vascular, and neurologic manifestations of DM. Signs and symptoms Many patients with type 2 diabetes are asymptomatic. Clinical manifestations include the following: See Presentation for more detail. Diagnosis Diagnostic criteria by the American Diabetes Association (ADA) include the following [1] : Whether a hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) level of 6.5% or higher should be a primary diagnostic criterion or an optional criterion remains a point of controversy. Indications for diabetes screening in asymptomatic adults includes the following [2, 3] : Overweight and 1 or more other risk factors for diabetes (eg, first-degree relative with diabetes, BP >140/90 mm Hg, and HDL < 35 mg/dL and/or triglyceride level >250 mg/dL) See Workup for more detail. Management Goals of treatment are as follows: Microvascular (ie, eye and kidney disease) risk reduction through control of glycemia and blood pressure Macrovascular (ie, coronary, cerebrovascular, peripheral vascular) risk reduction through control of lipids and hypertension, smoking cessation Recommendations for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus from the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) and the American Diabetes Association (ADA) place the patient's condition, desires, abilities, and tolerances at the center of the decision-making process. [4, 5, 6] The EASD/ADA position statement contains 7 key points: Ind Continue reading >>

Newly Diagnosed With Diabetes

Newly Diagnosed With Diabetes

Save for later Diabetes is a lifelong condition that means your body can't produce enough insulin, or the insulin that is produced doesn't work properly. If untreated, it can cause serious health problems. Find out more Call our helpline on 0345 123 2399 Explaining diabetes © Diabetes UK 2017 A charity registered in England and Wales (no. 215199) and in Scotland (no. SC039136) A company limited by guarantee. Registered in England (no. 339181) Registered office: Wells Lawrence House, 126 Back Church Lane, London, E1 1FH. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Type 2

Diabetes Type 2

Finding out that you have diabetes which is a long-term illness, can prompt all sorts of emotions. Though some people took the diagnosis in their stride, many felt shocked and angry; others said they just couldn't believe that they had diabetes. People can feel overwhelmed when they realise that diabetes lasts forever, requires long-term medication, and needs to be actively 'controlled' by a combination of diet, exercise and medication. Some of those we interviewed who had had diabetes for some time recalled how they were 'in denial' about the disease in the early days. It helped some people accept their diagnosis if they knew others who had diabetes or where there was a history of diabetes in the family. Several said they had no problem accepting the diagnosis because they knew what was involved having seen other people managing to live a normal life with diabetes. For others however, the knowledge of a family history of diabetes had not prepared them and they felt taken aback by the news that they too had developed the disease. The fact that diabetes can be a “silent” disease - one that does not immediately display physical symptoms - can make it hard to accept at first. Some felt they were too young and too fit or active to be diabetic and felt complete disbelief. Others had received the diagnosis when they were getting treatment for other health conditions or at a time in their lives when they seemed to have other more immediate problems to cope with. For some, diabetes didn't seem that big a deal until they were confronted with physical proof that the condition was affecting them, for instance the loss of eyesight or physical strength were the kind of signs people said had triggered a change of attitude. Some said they were unsurprised by the diagnosis because Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms And Diagnosis

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms And Diagnosis

Because type 2 diabetes develops slowly, and symptoms generally come on gradually, they may go unnoticed for a long time, or they may be attributed to something else. For example, increased thirst may be chalked up to a hot summer, or fatigue may be interpreted as a sign of aging or stress. This is unfortunate, because even short-term high blood sugar (hyperglycemia) diminishes your quality of life. And if high blood sugar persists for a long time, it can eventually cause complications such as diabetic retinopathy or kidney disease (diabetic nephropathy) that cannot be completely reversed with improved blood sugar control. Type 2 diabetes can cause a wide range of signs and symptoms, including: Fatigue Dry mouth Thirst Excessive urination Hunger Weight loss Blurry vision Cloudy thinking Irritability Wounds that won't heal Infections associated with undiagnosed type 2 diabetes include gum infections, urinary tract infections (particularly in women), slowly healing wounds with subsequent infections, and infections of the feet. Symptoms in Men Type 2 diabetes symptoms are generally the same for men and women. However, urological problems such as erectile dysfunction (ED) — the inability to achieve or maintain an erection — have been associated with all forms of diabetes, including type 2. According to the National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse, 20 to 75 percent of men with any type of diabetes have ED. Researchers believe diabetes causes sexual function problems in men due to damage to the body's autonomic nervous system, which controls circulation. If you have the symptoms of ED, it may be a sign you have diabetes. Another urological problem associated with diabetes in men is retrograde ejaculation, or the release of semen into the bladder during ejaculation. Sym Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

The Facts Diabetes is a condition in which the body cannot properly store and use fuel for energy. The body's main fuel is a form of sugar called glucose, which comes from food (after it has been broken down). Glucose enters the blood and is used by cells for energy. To use glucose, the body needs a hormone called insulin that's made by the pancreas. Insulin is important because it allows glucose to leave the blood and enter the body's cells. Diabetes develops when the body can't make any or enough insulin, and/or when it can't properly use the insulin it makes. For some people with diabetes, the body becomes resistant to insulin. In these cases, insulin is still produced, but the body does not respond to the effects of insulin as it should. This is called insulin resistance. Whether from not enough insulin or the inability to use insulin properly, the result is high levels of glucose in the blood, or hyperglycemia. There are two main types of diabetes: type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. About 90% of people with diabetes have type 2 diabetes, which used to be called adult onset diabetes. However, more and more children are being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes due to the rise in obesity. Some people do not have diabetes but also do not handle glucose as well as normal. This is called impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). Up to 40% of people with IGT will eventually develop type 2 diabetes. Causes In type 2 diabetes, either the pancreas does not make enough insulin and/or the body does not use it properly. No one knows the exact cause of type 2 diabetes, but it's more likely to occur in people who: are over 40 years of age are overweight have a family history of diabetes developed gestational diabetes during a pregnancy have given birth to a baby that is more than 4 kg (9 l Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Tests And Diagnosis

Type 2 Diabetes Tests And Diagnosis

Type 2 diabetes is far more common than type 1 diabetes and there are a number of tests that can be used to diagnose it. Still, this illness remains vastly under diagnosed. Medical researchers are testing a range of new methods of earlier detection and prevention. Currently, a significant proportion of new cases show signs that they have already had the illness for a few years by the time they had it diagnosed. (If you have type 2 diabetes and live in Florida, you could qualify for our diabetes clinical trial in DeLand, FL.) When Are Most Cases of Type 2 Diabetes Diagnosed? Most cases of type 2 diabetes are diagnosed when an individual goes in for their annual physical or check up. This is primarily due to the lack of noticeable symptoms for this illness. If a patient does appear to show some signs of type 2 diabetes, then the doctor will order one of the following tests to confirm the presence of diabetes. Diagnostic Tests for Diabetes There are a number of tests that doctors currently are using to diagnose diabetes in patients. Most of these tests are looking to measure the blood glucose levels in the patient with regards to when they last ate. The type of diagnostic test used on a patient fully depends on the particular situation and the doctor’s own preference. Confirmation of the presence of diabetes will usually be made with a second test done on a different day. • Glycated Hemoglobin (A1C) Test: In 2009, the American Diabetes Association, the European Association for the Study of Diabetes and the International Diabetes Federation officially recommended the use of the A1C test in diagnosing type 2 diabetes. This blood test will show doctors what the patient’s average blood glucose level was for the last two to three months. This test has certain advantages o Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus E11- >

Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus E11- >

A disease in which the body does not control the amount of glucose (a type of sugar) in the blood and the kidneys make a large amount of urine. This disease occurs when the body does not make enough insulin or does not use it the way it should. A heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance. A metabolic disorder characterized by abnormally high blood sugar levels due to diminished production of insulin or insulin resistance/desensitization. A subclass of diabetes mellitus that is not insulin-responsive or dependent (niddm). It is characterized initially by insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia; and eventually by glucose intolerance; hyperglycemia; and overt diabetes. Type ii diabetes mellitus is no longer considered a disease exclusively found in adults. Patients seldom develop ketosis but often exhibit obesity. A type of diabetes mellitus that is characterized by insulin resistance or desensitization and increased blood glucose levels. This is a chronic disease that can develop gradually over the life of a patient and can be linked to both environmental factors and heredity. Diabetes is a disease in which your blood glucose, or sugar, levels are too high. Glucose comes from the foods you eat. Insulin is a hormone that helps the glucose get into your cells to give them energy. With type 1 diabetes, your body does not make insulin. With type 2 diabetes, the more common type, your body does not make or use insulin well. Without enough insulin, the glucose stays in your blood.over time, having too much glucose in your blood can cause serious problems. It can damage your eyes, kidneys, and nerves. Diabetes can also cause heart disease, stroke and even the need to remove a limb. Pregnant women can also get diabetes, called gestati Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

By the dLife Editors Type 2 diabetes—previously referred to as adult-onset or non-insulin dependent diabetes—accounts for 90 to 95 percent of all diabetes cases in the United States. It’s characterized by the body’s inability to use insulin effectively. Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas that helps the body turn glucose into energy. Unlike people with type 1 diabetes, who do not produce insulin at all, people with type 2 diabetes do make insulin. They may not, however, produce enough to handle the concentration of glucose in their blood. Or, they may have insulin resistance, which means the body produces enough but it can’t use the insulin anymore to break down all the glucose. Type 2 Diabetes Causes The exact causes of type 2 diabetes aren’t completely understood, but it’s widely accepted that a combination of inherited genetic risk factors and environmental triggers is involved. Risk factors include: obesity, physical inactivity, poor diet, smoking, chronic stress, low birth weight, high blood pressure, a history of gestational diabetes, and high fasting blood glucose levels. Individuals with a parent or sibling with type 2 diabetes have a higher chance of developing the disease than those with no family history. African Americans, Hispanics/Latinos, Native Americans, some Asians, and Pacific Islanders are at greater risk for type 2 diabetes. Risk increases with age, but it is important to note that rates of type 2 diabetes in children and adolescents have been on the rise recently. Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms Not everyone with type 2 diabetes has symptoms, particularly in the early stages of the disease. In fact, 8.1 million of the 29.1 million people with diabetes in America are unaware that they even have the disease. 8.9 percent of Americans Continue reading >>

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