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Diabetics With No Insurance

Getting Financial Help For Diabetes

Getting Financial Help For Diabetes

By the dLife Editors No matter whom you ask—patients, caregivers, medical professionals, insurers, even employers—diabetes is expensive. In 2013, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) released the results of their five-year cost analysis, which showed that people with diabetes spend an average of $13,700 per year on healthcare-related expenses. The Health Care Cost Institute examined the spending of people under the age of sixty-five who were covered by employer-sponsored insurance from 2009 to 2013. They found that expenses were even higher, at approximately $15,000 per person. And when you look at the impact on the workforce, lost productivity and wages send these costs into the billions. It’s estimated that people with diabetes have healthcare costs totaling almost three times that of people without diagnosed diabetes. It’s no wonder that many need financial help. If you are one of them, there are a number of financial resources to tap into. Here are some quick ideas to get you started. Look for an insurance plan that covers as many diabetes-related expenses as possible. Check out the governmental and nongovernmental programs—both federal and local—to see where you qualify. Visit this government site to see what benefits you qualify for: Contact your primary care provider as well as the makers of any medications you use to find out if assistance programs are available. Dial 2-1-1, a free and confidential services that helps people find the local resources they need. Contact a medical social worker—typically found in a hospital—to discuss your options. Want to know more? Let’s look closer at your options. GENERAL Health Insurance Because health insurance is meant to cover unexpected future illnesses, diabetes that has already been diagnosed present Continue reading >>

Paying For Diabetes

Paying For Diabetes

What’s your biggest diabetes fear? Complications are scary, but for many, the biggest fear is that diabetes will reduce them to poverty. Others fear that they don’t have enough money for good care or needed supplies. In America, most people can’t pay for diabetes care without some kind of health insurance. Finding decent insurance can come to rule people’s lives. “I have had diabetes for 55 years,” wrote an anonymous commenter on a recent blog entry by Meagan Esler. “I have spent the majority of my life worrying about insurance coverage. It has impacted every job choice I have ever made. I never had the luxury of picking a job I might enjoy. I had to take whatever job had the best insurance.” Even with insurance, many people wrote that they were unable to afford supplies. Esler wrote, “I attempted to get an insulin pump but found that even with the insurance I had, it was still thousands of dollars out of reach.” Aside from health insurance, people with diabetes are much more likely to have economic problems. Studies show that people with diabetes are two and a half times more likely to be unemployed and to live in poverty than people without diabetes. With diabetes, lack of money can seriously restrict people’s lives. Writing of one of her uninsured times, Esler recalled. “I re-used my syringes until they dulled and became painful… I hardly ever ate, rarely saw the doctor, and barely made ends meet.” One of her commenters wrote that his children had to do without, and they still don’t go out socially, even for “Saturday night out,” because they can’t afford it. Cost issues can also interfere with doctors’ decisions. Dr. Anne Peters, director of the Clinical Diabetes Program at University of Southern California, says she modifies pa Continue reading >>

Financial Help For Diabetes Care

Financial Help For Diabetes Care

How costly is diabetes management and treatment? Diabetes management and treatment is expensive. According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), the average cost of health care for a person with diabetes is $13,741 a year—more than twice the cost of health care for a person without diabetes.1 Many people who have diabetes need help paying for their care. For those who qualify, a variety of government and nongovernment programs can help cover health care expenses. This publication is meant to help people with diabetes and their family members find and access such resources. 1American Diabetes Association. Economic costs of diabetes in the U.S. in 2012. Diabetes Care. 2013;36(4):1033–1046. What is health insurance? Health insurance helps pay for medical care, including the cost of diabetes care. Health insurance options include the following: private health insurance, which includes group and individual health insurance government health insurance, such as Medicare, Medicaid, the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP), TRICARE, and veterans’ health care programs Starting in 2014, the Affordable Care Act (ACA) prevents insurers from denying coverage or charging higher premiums to people with preexisting conditions, such as diabetes. The ACA also requires most people to have health insurance or pay a fee. Some people may be exempt from this fee. Read more about the ACA at HealthCare.gov or call 1–800–318–2596, TTY 1–855–889–4325. Key Terms Some terms listed here have many meanings; only those meanings that relate to the financial and medical aspects of diabetes and its management and treatment are included. affiliation period: a period of time that must pass before health insurance coverage provided by a health maintenance organization (HMO) be Continue reading >>

Type 1diabetes + No Insurance? How Little Can You Pay To Live?

Type 1diabetes + No Insurance? How Little Can You Pay To Live?

You are an adult with T1 diabetes living in the United States. You have no health insurance – or worse, health insurance with such a high deductible that everything you need is out of your own pocket. This is today’s reality for so many people. Want to know how much having diabetes and paying out of pocket will cost? How little you can pay? Read on… Ground Rules This is the bare minimum standard of care, which means I’m not trying to NOT use test strips or avoid tests or health care visits. When I say “bare minimum”, it means that there are no insulin pumps, no continuous glucose monitors, no conveniences, no latest on the market medications, and forget the latest insulin analogues. The insulin you’ll be using is the same formulation that I started with in 1983 – Regular and NPH (except you get recombinant DNA and I got a mix of beef and pork). You should take this as a “If I am to follow what the ADA says I need to do at the very least, this is how much it would cost me for my diabetes.” This does NOT take into consideration if you have to see additional health care professionals or have additional tests if it’s been determined that you have complications. I am using the American Diabetes Association’s Standards of Care 2014 as the guiding document. Most of the items listed can be purchased at Wal-Mart. Why Wal-Mart? Because ReliOn items, sold at Wal-Mart, are the cheapest on the market. I can’t vouch for their accuracy, efficacy, or their overall comfort and convenience. With the exception of the ReliOn glucose tabs that I purchased in an emergency once, I’ve never used these items. But here goes… Insulin The least expensive insulin that you can purchase in the United States is at Wal-Mart. Remember that these particular insulins are not Continue reading >>

The Cost Of Having A Child With Diabetes

The Cost Of Having A Child With Diabetes

We all know the ultimate cost that living with Diabetes places on the PWD and their families. The mental burden of living with diabetes and caring for someone that lives with Diabetes can become overwhelming as it is. While previously we discussed about the increasing prices of insulin and its rise to an all-time highs, it is only a small piece of the puzzle, a small glimpse of the bigger picture of what it truly costs for someone with diabetes to stay ALIVE each and every month. We are not talking about just managing, or being healthy, but staying ALIVE. Let that word sink in for a moment with you. Yes, there are medications one takes to feel better, ibuprofen for a headache, or Tylenol for aches and pains, however, insulin and other diabetes related supplies are the few things that stand between someone with diabetes and death. Am I being over dramatic? Not really when you think about it, insulin is not a cure; it is not a medication you can miss for a day and still be okay the next day. While you may not necessarily DIE from one missed day of a dose of insulin, I can tell you that you will not feel good at all and may actually end up in the hospital. As you may be aware, I have two children who have type 1 diabetes, so I know a little bit about the costs of living with it, even though I do not live with the disease myself. I wanted to put together something that showed those with and especially those without diabetes how much it truly costs for people with this chronic illness to LIVE. The Burden of Diabetes The one thing that has always bugged me about this disease other than the most common reasons is the financial cost it takes to keep someone with Diabetes alive! Thankfully, we have insurance that covers for the majority of the cost, but I know there are people o Continue reading >>

Type 1 & Type 2: Need Medicine And Have No Insurance For Your Diabetes?

Type 1 & Type 2: Need Medicine And Have No Insurance For Your Diabetes?

Nearly one in six people in the United States has no health insurance. If you have diabetes, that’s a very tough position to be in. There are, however, resources that can cut the costs that you have been paying out of pocket for medicines and supplies. For one, there’s the Together Rx Access Card. Totally free to get and free to use, it was created by leading pharmaceutical companies. Cardholders simply bring their Together Rx Access Card to their pharmacist along with their prescription, and the savings are provided right at the pharmacy counter. Included in the program are certain blood glucose meters and test strips, as well as approximately 300 brand name medicines. Nearly 90 percent of uninsured people and their families are eligible for a card. Maximum income levels range from $45,000 for a single person to $90,000 for a family of four, but you must have no public or private prescription coverage and must not qualify for Medicare. Most cardholders save 25 to 40 percent on brand-name prescription products, and savings are also available on many generics. The exact amount saved depends on the particular drug purchased, the amount purchased, and the pharmacy where purchased. The Together Rx Access Program is part of the Partnership for Prescription Assistance (PPA), a collection of more than 475 public and private assistance programs, including 180 offered by pharmaceutical companies. People who are eligible for the Together Rx Access Card may also be able to take advantage of other patient assistance programs, as well as free healthcare clinics, in the PPA. For more information about the Together Rx Access Card, contact Together Rx Access at 1-800-250-2839, or visit TogetherRxAccess.com. Information is also available on Facebook at and on Twitter at *** Source: Continue reading >>

Health Insurance And Diabetes: What Your Insurer Wont Tell You

Health Insurance And Diabetes: What Your Insurer Wont Tell You

What Your Health Insurance Company Won't Tell You Written by Mike Hoskins on October 19, 2017 Dealing with insurance coverage is of course one of the biggest headaches of living with a chronic illness like diabetes. These days, it's even more nerve-wracking with all the political back-and-forth about healthcare policy , leaving folks with "pre-existing conditions" unsure how our coverage will be affected. With the nationwide open enrollment period about to begin for many employer-based insurance policies, and the unfortunately shorter 'Obamacare' enrollment period only lasting until Dec. 15, this is a key time for many of us to make insurance decisions. And it's no picnic trying to review options, we know. To offer some assistance, we compiled the following list of tips on how to get satisfaction from your insurance company -- things they often don't tell you but are important to know when dealing with them. This list was originally published a few years ago following the second annual MasterLab advocacy training event featuring some key D-advocates with insider knowledge of "payers" (a telling name for health insurance companies). Here's the 2017 update on what may help if you're a PWD navigating coverage issues: Tips for Swaying Your Health Insurance Company Search online. Sounds like a no-brainer, but you can often find insurance companies' medical policies online for a specific drug, device, or therapy just by Googling it. Look for language outlining the criteria they use to determine whether or not youre eligible and covered. As a non-doctor, of course you won't have access to the physicians only portal on your payer's website, so using Google, just type in your payer's name (Aetna, BCBS Virginia, etc.), the name of the treatment category (subcutaneous insulin inf Continue reading >>

Treating Type 1 Diabetes Without Insurance The #overthecountert1dchallenge

Treating Type 1 Diabetes Without Insurance The #overthecountert1dchallenge

Treating Type 1 diabetes without Insurance The #OverTheCounterT1DChallenge Losing your insurance should never be a death sentence. A few things to get out of the way really quick: I acknowledge that I am very privileged. I have had access to healthcare and financial means that provide me with above average care for my T1D and Im very grateful for that. I made concessions to the typical over the counter experience (like wearing a CGM) in order to provide better data collection for the challenge. 2018 is an interesting time to be a person with Type 1 diabetes. On one hand, we are making significant progress in both research and advocacy, with social media connecting T1Ds across the world like never before. On the other, the cost of prescription insulin has tripled from 2002 2013 , for no other reason than the pharmaceutical companies can hike the prices, and in the United States, this issue seemingly couldnt resonate less with lawmakers. The consequences of this injustice are utterly tragic. Stories are widespread of T1Ds perishing while attempting to ration insulin or trading supplies on the black market. Certainly there are programs aimed to provide insulin for those who cant afford it, but even they have been unable to stop multiple deaths due to the high cost of prescription insulin in the United States. These deaths break my heart because they could happen to any T1D. We all walk a fine line. At the beginning of 2017, I left the comfort zone of my advertising agency job to start my own company. For years Id wanted to enter an entrepreneurial venture, but always hesitated because the healthcare options in front of me left me with more questions than answers. I stockpiled as much insulin and as many pump supplies as I could, and devoted myself to ensuring that my new Continue reading >>

How I Survived 4 Years Without Health Insurance With Type 1 Diabetes

How I Survived 4 Years Without Health Insurance With Type 1 Diabetes

From June 2008 (when I graduated college) to March 2012 (when I left the personal training business), I was completely uninsured. Working as a personal trainer often means that you’re an employee but you don’t get any benefits. You get a W2 for your taxes, but you don’t get paid vacation time, sick days, or health insurance. It wasn’t until my last six months as a personal trainer that they started offering health insurance at the biggest fitness chain in Vermont, but you only qualified if you worked X amount of hours per week, and they didn’t count hours spent doing new member consults (which they needed me to do), which is half of what all my 35 hours each week were spent doing. Building a full week’s worth of personal training isn’t easy, and many trainers have second or third jobs or they quit after 6 months because they aren’t making enough money–it’s tough, and every client you do have, you worked hard to acquire and maintain. I had been making a decent living for myself, but when it came to insurance, I was screwed. I couldn’t get state insurance because of my job at the gym and my income being well over 20K, and getting my own private insurance plan would cost over $600 a month with a $5000 deductible that wouldn’t even cover diabetes supplies for the first year because I’d been uninsured for more than 3 months. This really isn’t a guide or a how-to or tips for surviving without insurance, because honestly, it feels like it was total luck that I was able to get by without health insurance while living with type 1 diabetes. I need 2-3 bottles of inulin per month + approximately 200 strips per month + syringes and lancets. When you add that up at full cost, it’s well over $600 per month to keep myself safely and healthfully alive. The Continue reading >>

This Is What Happens When People With Diabetes Lose Medicaid

This Is What Happens When People With Diabetes Lose Medicaid

In 2003, Jose Sanchez was a recent graduate just starting out in the world, hustling to get his graphic design business off the ground. Then, one day, his life changed. “I went to take a nap and then I didn’t wake up for two days,” he said. “When I woke up, I looked like the Matrix. I had all these tubes coming out of me.” Sanchez discovered he had Type 1 diabetes only after he had fallen into diabetic ketoacidosis, a life-threatening condition. His story is a reminder of what many diabetics went through in the years before the Affordable Care Act, and what many could face again if it’s rolled back. Because he had very little income at the time, Sanchez was able to qualify for New York State’s Medicaid program. Between changing his diet and lifestyle and getting insulin and other health care through Medicaid, he managed to stay relatively healthy after the incident. Eventually, he found stable employment and had a son. But then another disaster hit. In 2007, he learned that his job—working nights at Abercrombie & Fitch, prepping the store for the morning crowds—paid just a little too much for him to continue to qualify for Medicaid. “That’s when I found out the true cost of being a diabetic,” he said. Without insurance, insulinrefillsalone cost him $225 every three weeks. Diapers, food and milk for his son came first, so he rationed the medication and ended up in the emergency room over and over again, racking up tens of thousands of dollars in medical bills he had no way to pay on his salary. “I would end up being in the hospital for a weeklong visit as they brought my levels back down,” he said. “This just became routine. Once or twice I had to have the ambulance come and get me at my house.” For a lot of people like Sanchez, the expans Continue reading >>

Diabetes Programs And Supplies

Diabetes Programs And Supplies

For diabetic patients who need financial assistance with supplies and related health care items and services, the following programs may be of help. Please note that applications must be submitted to the programs and not to PPA® . Categories Insulin Access Programs Blink Health is working with Eli Lilly and Company to offer a 40 percent discount on Lilly insulins. The Blink Health Insulin Patient Access Program delivers the 40 percent discount directly to patients and will be honored at over 67,000 local pharmacies nationwide. Anyone can participate in the Blink Health Insulin Patient Access Program via the Blink Health mobile app (available for iOS & Android) or website, www.blinkhealth.com, which has no membership fees or monthly premiums. Patients enter the form, dosage and quantity of the Lilly insulin that matches their prescription. The discount will be automatically applied. Payments are made online and the prescriptions can be picked up at virtually any U.S. pharmacy, including: Walgreens, CVS/pharmacy, Target, RiteAid, Safeway and Kroger. People using federal government programs are not eligible. Purchases are fully refundable. Assistance: Insulin Free Glucose Meters Abbott Diabetes Care provides free blood glucose monitoring system kits to those with diabetes. Abbott Diabetes Care, Inc. 1360 South Loop Road Alameda, CA 94502 USA Tel: 888-522-5226 Fax: 202-337-8314 Email: [email protected] Assistance: Free Glucose Meters Test Strips Roche Diagnostics, the maker of ACCU-CHEK® Products provides a limited supply of ACCU-CHEK Aviva test strips to a network of community clinics and health centers throughout the U.S. to distribute to their low-income and uninsured patients with diabetes. Roache Diagnostics Corporation 9115 Hague Road Indianapolis, IN 46250 Phone: 800 Continue reading >>

What To Do When You Can’t Afford Your Diabetes Medication Or Supplies

What To Do When You Can’t Afford Your Diabetes Medication Or Supplies

In today’s demanding economy, it can be difficult to manage the cost of ongoing diabetes care. Whether you are insured, under-insured or uninsured, monthly medical expenses can add up. Discover what to do when you can’t afford your diabetes medication or supplies. Many people with diabetes must take oral medications, injectables or insulin to avoid serious blood sugar fluctuations. They must also test their blood sugars daily with a glucometer and strips. Having diabetes can involve a range of expenses including doctor visits, co-payments, prescriptions and even the cost of healthy food choices. Cutting back on or going without diabetes medications or supplies and doctor visits is not the answer. People with diabetes must closely monitor and control the disease to avoid future complications that could become even more costly. Ask Your Health Care Team Never stop taking medications or reduce the doses without talking to your doctor first. Ask your health care team about ways to cut medication costs. Request equivalent generic versions of medication when possible. Always shop around for the best prices. If you take more than one medication for diabetes, find out if it is possible to take a combination pill. If you have a mail order insurance drug program, take advantage of the 3 month medication supply at a reduced cost. Check Your Community Check with local community centers, local and state governments and neighborhood clinics to learn more about diabetes medication assistance and help covering the cost of diabetes supplies. Many states have programs to help people with diabetes who do not qualify for Medicaid benefits. Get involved in free screening events sponsored by hospitals and out-patient centers. Try Drug Companies Contact the drug companies or supply compan Continue reading >>

Diabetes Health Coverage: State Laws And Programs

Diabetes Health Coverage: State Laws And Programs

Diabetes Health Coverage State Laws and Programs Diabetes Health Coverage: State Laws and Programs This is a policymaker and consumer guide to state insurance mandated coverage, Medicaid coverage and state-sponsored diabetes programs. It was published 2011and updated material was added January 2016 All state law diabetes mandates and minimum coverage requirements for state-regulated health insurance policies. The tables include the enacted state laws passedsince the firstmandates inCalifornia (1981) and New York (1993). Use links below to go directly to state-based information: State Medicaid diabetes coverage terms and conditions. All Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) diabetes coverage. Contact information and an overview of federal funding provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to state-sponsored diabetes prevention and control programs (DPCPs). DPCPs represent the front line in battling diabetes in most states. An overview of other state activities and initiatives, such as creation of diabetes coordinator positions in the executive branch to fight diabetes. Federal Health Reform.The federal Affordable Care Act (ACA) signed March 2010, has led to changed and expanded coverage termed "EssentialHealth Benefits." Newly Released: NCSL Survey:Diabetes Drug coverage: A new survey of2016 Insurance Plans in 50 states, examining 1) patient access to the scores of diabetes drug treatments and2) results in the 46 states with laws mandating or offering diabetes coverage. NCSL original research, published summer 2016. [Read the report] December 2015: " Diabetes: Addressing the Costs; A 50-State Budget Survey for FY 2014 ." NCSL released its latest diabetes report, taking a closer look at programs and budget appropriations that play a role in con Continue reading >>

How Do I Find Low Cost Help For Diabetes Care With No Money And No Insurance?

How Do I Find Low Cost Help For Diabetes Care With No Money And No Insurance?

Every month, I spend time combing the Q&A area of the site and I notice many questions looking for help to pay for medication, supplies, or guidance for assistance programs. With the current state of unemployment and underemployment these questions are important and need we need to have a collective list of resources. To make this complete, if you have information to share, please add your comments and list resources This will be a collective reference with ongoing updates! Access to Prescription Drugs: Partnership for Prescription Assistance is an organization that helps qualifying patients without prescription drug coverage get the medicines they need for free or nearly free! According to their website, “Our mission is to increase awareness for patient assistance programs and boost enrollment of those who are eligible. We offer single point of access to more than 475 public and private programs, including 200 offered by pharmaceutical companies”" Their link is www.pparx.org/en Select Care Benefits Network is an organization that helps with patient assistance programs and offers a personal care advocate to help you wade through the process of applying for assistance programs. One of our community member Rosa posted her experience and advice! Under RXassist, I was able to look up metformin and found the price for under $10.00 and the retailer who worked with this program. You do need to apply for the program. I did find it hard to locate the application, but they also offer a phone number to call. Find a doctor, prescription assistance, or need help with insurance: Under healthcare.gov, there is a tab Find Insurance Options. Using my own state and my diabetes as a guide to what is available to me, I had 3 choices, one of which listed affordable healthcare, some of w Continue reading >>

Health Insurance Coverage Among People With And Without Diabetes In The U.s. Adult Population

Health Insurance Coverage Among People With And Without Diabetes In The U.s. Adult Population

OBJECTIVE To compare health insurance coverage and type of coverage for adults with and without diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The data used were from 2,704 adults who self-reported diabetes and 25,008 adults without reported diabetes in the 2009 National Health Interview Survey. Participants reported on their current type of health insurance coverage, demographic information, diabetes-related factors, and comorbidities. If uninsured, participants reported reasons for not having health insurance. RESULTS Among all adults with diabetes, 90% had some form of health insurance coverage, including 85% of people 18–64 years of age and ∼100% of people ≥65 years of age; 81% of people without diabetes had some type of coverage (vs. diabetes, P < 0.0001), including 78% of people 18–64 years of age and 99% of people ≥65 years of age. More adults 18–64 years of age with diabetes had Medicare coverage (14% vs. no diabetes, 3%; P < 0.0001); fewer people with diabetes had private insurance (58% vs. no diabetes, 66%; P < 0.0001). People 18–64 years of age with diabetes more often had two health insurance sources compared with people without diabetes (13 vs. 5%, P < 0.0001). The most common private plan was a preferred provider organization (PPO) followed by a health maintenance organization/independent practice organization (HMO/IPA) plan regardless of diabetes status. For participants 18–64 years of age, high health insurance cost was the most common reason for not having coverage. CONCLUSIONS Two million adults <65 years of age with diabetes had no health insurance coverage, which has considerable public health and economic impact. Health care reform should work toward ensuring that people with diabetes have coverage for routine care. The number of adults in th Continue reading >>

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