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Diabetics

Best And Worst Foods For Diabetes

Best And Worst Foods For Diabetes

Your food choices matter a lot when you've got diabetes. Some are better than others. Nothing is completely off limits. Even items that you might think of as “the worst" could be occasional treats -- in tiny amounts. But they won’t help you nutrition-wise, and it’s easiest to manage your diabetes if you mainly stick to the “best” options. Starches Your body needs carbs. But you want to choose wisely. Use this list as a guide. Best Choices Whole grains, such as brown rice, oatmeal, quinoa, millet, or amaranth Baked sweet potato Items made with whole grains and no (or very little) added sugar Worst Choices Processed grains, such as white rice or white flour Cereals with little whole grains and lots of sugar White bread French fries Fried white-flour tortillas Vegetables Load up! You’ll get fiber and very little fat or salt (unless you add them). Remember, potatoes and corn count as carbs. Best Choices Fresh veggies, eaten raw or lightly steamed, roasted, or grilled Plain frozen vegetables, lightly steamed Greens such as kale, spinach, and arugula. Iceberg lettuce is not as great, because it’s low in nutrients. Low sodium or unsalted canned vegetables Go for a variety of colors: dark greens, red or orange (think of carrots or red peppers), whites (onions) and even purple (eggplants). The 2015 U.S. guidelines recommend 2.5 cups of veggies per day. Worst Choices Canned vegetables with lots of added sodium Veggies cooked with lots of added butter, cheese, or sauce Pickles, if you need to limit sodium -- otherwise, pickles are okay. Sauerkraut, for the same reason as pickles -- so, limit them if you have high blood pressure Fruits They give you carbohydrates, vitamins, minerals, and fiber. Most are naturally low in fat and sodium. But they tend to have more carbs Continue reading >>

Diabetes Symptoms, (type 1 And Type 2)

Diabetes Symptoms, (type 1 And Type 2)

Diabetes type 1 and type 2 definition and facts Diabetes is a chronic condition associated with abnormally high levels of sugar (glucose) in the blood. Insulin produced by the pancreas lowers blood glucose. Absence or insufficient production of insulin, or an inability of the body to properly use insulin causes diabetes. The two types of diabetes are referred to as type 1 and type 2. Former names for these conditions were insulin-dependent and non-insulin-dependent diabetes, or juvenile onset and adult onset diabetes. Symptoms of type 1 and type 2 diabetes include increased urine output, excessive thirst, weight loss, hunger, fatigue, skin problems slow healing wounds, yeast infections, and tingling or numbness in the feet or toes. Some of the risk factors for getting diabetes include being overweight or obese, leading a sedentary lifestyle, a family history of diabetes, hypertension (high blood pressure), and low levels of the "good" cholesterol (HDL) and elevated levels of triglycerides in the blood. If you think you may have prediabetes or diabetes contact a health-care professional. Diabetes mellitus is a group of metabolic diseases characterized by high blood sugar (glucose) levels that result from defects in insulin secretion, or its action, or both. Diabetes mellitus, commonly referred to as diabetes (as it will be in this article) was first identified as a disease associated with "sweet urine," and excessive muscle loss in the ancient world. Elevated levels of blood glucose (hyperglycemia) lead to spillage of glucose into the urine, hence the term sweet urine. Normally, blood glucose levels are tightly controlled by insulin, a hormone produced by the pancreas. Insulin lowers the blood glucose level. When the blood glucose elevates (for example, after eating food Continue reading >>

The 15 Best Superfoods For Diabetics

The 15 Best Superfoods For Diabetics

beats1/Shutterstock Chocolate is rich in flavonoids, and research shows that these nutrients reduce insulin resistance, improve insulin sensitivity, drop insulin levels and fasting blood glucose, and blunt cravings. But not all chocolate is created equal. In a 2008 study from the University of Copenhagen, people who ate dark chocolate reported that they felt less like eating sweet, salty, or fatty foods compared to volunteers given milk chocolate, with its lower levels of beneficial flavonoids (and, often, more sugar and fat, too). Dark chocolate also cut the amount of pizza that volunteers consumed later in the same day, by 15 percent. The flavonoids in chocolate have also been shown to lower stroke risk, calm blood pressure, and reduce your risk for a heart attack by 2 percent over five years. (Want more delicious, healthy, seasonal foods? Click here.) Jiri Vaclavek/Shutterstock Broccoli is an anti-diabetes superhero. As with other cruciferous veggies, like kale and cauliflower, it contains a compound called sulforaphane, which triggers several anti-inflammatory processes that improve blood sugar control and protect blood vessels from the cardiovascular damage that’s often a consequence of diabetes. (Heart disease is the leading cause of death for people with diabetes, so this protection could be a lifesaver.) Sulforaphane also helps flip on the body’s natural detox mechanisms, coaxing enzymes to turn dangerous cancer-causing chemicals into more innocent forms that the body can easily release. Blueberries funnyangel/Shutterstock Blueberries really stand out: They contain both insoluble fiber (which “flushes” fat out of your system) and soluble fiber (which slows down the emptying of your stomach, and improves blood sugar control). In a study by the USDA, peopl Continue reading >>

8 Best Fruits For A Diabetes-friendly Diet

8 Best Fruits For A Diabetes-friendly Diet

1 / 9 What Fruit Is Good for High Blood Sugar? When you're looking for a diabetes-friendly treat that can help keep your blood sugar within a healthy range, look no farther than the produce drawer of your refrigerator or the fruit basket on your kitchen table. Believe it or not, the notion that fruit is not safe when you need to watch your A1C is a popular diabetes myth that has been debunked again and again. Indeed, according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), many types of fruit are loaded with good-for-you vitamins and minerals, as well as fiber — a powerful nutrient that can help regulate blood sugar levels and decrease your risk of developing type 2 diabetes, according to the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Fiber — which can also be found in some of the best vegetables for diabetes, as well as whole grains — can further benefit your health because it promotes feelings of fullness, curbing unhealthy cravings and overeating, research shows. Healthy weight maintenance can increase your insulin sensitivity and help in your diabetes management. So, how do you pick the best fruit for diabetes? While some forms of fruit, like juice, can be bad for diabetes, whole fruits like berries, citrus, apricots, and yes, even apples — can be good for your A1C and overall health, fighting inflammation, normalizing your blood pressure, and more. But as with any food in your diabetes diet, you have to be smart about counting carbohydrates and tracking what you eat. Portion size is key. Consume fruit in its whole, natural form, and avoid syrups or any processed fruits with added sugar, which have the tendency to spike your blood sugar. Stick to the produce aisle and the freezer section of your grocery store. If you're using the glycemic index (GI) or glycemic Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Symptoms, Causes And Treatments

Diabetes: Symptoms, Causes And Treatments

Diabetes, often referred to by doctors as diabetes mellitus, describes a group of metabolic diseases in which the person has high blood glucose (blood sugar), either because insulin production is inadequate, or because the body's cells do not respond properly to insulin, or both. Patients with high blood sugar will typically experience polyuria (frequent urination), they will become increasingly thirsty (polydipsia) and hungry (polyphagia). Here are some key points about diabetes. More detail and supporting information is in the main article. Diabetes is a long-term condition that causes high blood sugar levels. In 2013 it was estimated that over 382 million people throughout the world had diabetes (Williams textbook of endocrinology). Type 1 Diabetes - the body does not produce insulin. Approximately 10% of all diabetes cases are type 1. Type 2 Diabetes - the body does not produce enough insulin for proper function. Approximately 90% of all cases of diabetes worldwide are of this type. Gestational Diabetes - this type affects females during pregnancy. The most common diabetes symptoms include frequent urination, intense thirst and hunger, weight gain, unusual weight loss, fatigue, cuts and bruises that do not heal, male sexual dysfunction, numbness and tingling in hands and feet. If you have Type 1 and follow a healthy eating plan, do adequate exercise, and take insulin, you can lead a normal life. Type 2 patients need to eat healthily, be physically active, and test their blood glucose. They may also need to take oral medication, and/or insulin to control blood glucose levels. As the risk of cardiovascular disease is much higher for a diabetic, it is crucial that blood pressure and cholesterol levels are monitored regularly. As smoking might have a serious effect on c Continue reading >>

Nerve Damage (diabetic Neuropathies)

Nerve Damage (diabetic Neuropathies)

What are diabetic neuropathies? Diabetic neuropathies are a family of nerve disorders caused by diabetes. People with diabetes can, over time, develop nerve damage throughout the body. Some people with nerve damage have no symptoms. Others may have symptoms such as pain, tingling, or numbness—loss of feeling—in the hands, arms, feet, and legs. Nerve problems can occur in every organ system, including the digestive tract, heart, and sex organs. About 60 to 70 percent of people with diabetes have some form of neuropathy. People with diabetes can develop nerve problems at any time, but risk rises with age and longer duration of diabetes. The highest rates of neuropathy are among people who have had diabetes for at least 25 years. Diabetic neuropathies also appear to be more common in people who have problems controlling their blood glucose, also called blood sugar, as well as those with high levels of blood fat and blood pressure and those who are overweight. What causes diabetic neuropathies? The causes are probably different for different types of diabetic neuropathy. Researchers are studying how prolonged exposure to high blood glucose causes nerve damage. Nerve damage is likely due to a combination of factors: metabolic factors, such as high blood glucose, long duration of diabetes, abnormal blood fat levels, and possibly low levels of insulin neurovascular factors, leading to damage to the blood vessels that carry oxygen and nutrients to nerves autoimmune factors that cause inflammation in nerves mechanical injury to nerves, such as carpal tunnel syndrome inherited traits that increase susceptibility to nerve disease lifestyle factors, such as smoking or alcohol use What are the symptoms of diabetic neuropathies? Symptoms depend on the type of neuropathy and which Continue reading >>

Diabetes

Diabetes

Diabetes is a disease in which your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. Glucose comes from the foods you eat. Insulin is a hormone that helps the glucose get into your cells to give them energy. With type 1 diabetes, your body does not make insulin. With type 2 diabetes, the more common type, your body does not make or use insulin well. Without enough insulin, the glucose stays in your blood. You can also have prediabetes. This means that your blood sugar is higher than normal but not high enough to be called diabetes. Having prediabetes puts you at a higher risk of getting type 2 diabetes. Over time, having too much glucose in your blood can cause serious problems. It can damage your eyes, kidneys, and nerves. Diabetes can also cause heart disease, stroke and even the need to remove a limb. Pregnant women can also get diabetes, called gestational diabetes. Blood tests can show if you have diabetes. One type of test, the A1C, can also check on how you are managing your diabetes. Exercise, weight control and sticking to your meal plan can help control your diabetes. You should also monitor your blood glucose level and take medicine if prescribed. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Diabetes means your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. With type 2 diabetes, the more common type, your body does not make or use insulin well. Insulin is a hormone that helps glucose get into your cells to give them energy. Without insulin, too much glucose stays in your blood. Over time, high blood glucose can lead to serious problems with your heart, eyes, kidneys, nerves, and gums and teeth. You have a higher risk of type 2 diabetes if you are older, have obesity, have a family history of diabetes, or do not exercise. Havin Continue reading >>

Healthy Eating For Diabetics

Healthy Eating For Diabetics

In the Spotlight Contributed by Gloria Brien, RD, CDE and Jacqueline Roos, RD, CDE Eating healthy is the first step in controlling diabetes. The following are some helpful tips for healthy eating. Eat three meals a day Eat your meals at the same time each day and do not skip meals Eat about the same amount of food each day The plate method is a good way to control your portions One-half of your plate should be covered with low starch vegetables One quarter of your plate should be covered with starchy foods One quarter of your plate should be covered with protein. Include baked, broiled, or grilled lean meats, low fat cheeses, eggs, or vegetarian protein choices like beans and lentils, as part of your meal Add a small glass of low fat milk and a piece of fruit, and your meal is complete! Low starch vegetables are low in carbohydrate and high in fiber. Add vegetables to your meals for variety, and to help fill you up. Examples include: Brussel Sprouts Green beans Eat more fiber Fiber can help slow down the rise in blood sugar following a meal. To get more fiber in your diet, eat at least five servings of fruits and vegetables a day, choose whole grain bread/cereal and eat more beans or legumes. Control your eating of carbohydrates Carbohydrate is the main nutrient that affects blood sugar levels. When you eat a carbohydrate, it is turned into sugar by your body. Therefore, it is important to control the amount of carbohydrate that you eat each day. Carbohydrates consist of sugars, starches, and fiber. Common sources of carbohydrates include: Starchy vegetables (potatoes, corn, peas) Beans and lentils Bread, cereal, pasta, rice Milk, yogurt, pudding Fruit and fruit juice Desserts, candy, ice cream, doughnuts, sugar sweetened beverages You should eat about 60 grams of carbo Continue reading >>

Symptoms

Symptoms

Print Overview Diabetes mellitus refers to a group of diseases that affect how your body uses blood sugar (glucose). Glucose is vital to your health because it's an important source of energy for the cells that make up your muscles and tissues. It's also your brain's main source of fuel. If you have diabetes, no matter what type, it means you have too much glucose in your blood, although the causes may differ. Too much glucose can lead to serious health problems. Chronic diabetes conditions include type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. Potentially reversible diabetes conditions include prediabetes — when your blood sugar levels are higher than normal, but not high enough to be classified as diabetes — and gestational diabetes, which occurs during pregnancy but may resolve after the baby is delivered. Diabetes symptoms vary depending on how much your blood sugar is elevated. Some people, especially those with prediabetes or type 2 diabetes, may not experience symptoms initially. In type 1 diabetes, symptoms tend to come on quickly and be more severe. Some of the signs and symptoms of type 1 and type 2 diabetes are: Increased thirst Frequent urination Extreme hunger Unexplained weight loss Presence of ketones in the urine (ketones are a byproduct of the breakdown of muscle and fat that happens when there's not enough available insulin) Fatigue Irritability Blurred vision Slow-healing sores Frequent infections, such as gums or skin infections and vaginal infections Although type 1 diabetes can develop at any age, it typically appears during childhood or adolescence. Type 2 diabetes, the more common type, can develop at any age, though it's more common in people older than 40. When to see a doctor If you suspect you or your child may have diabetes. If you notice any poss Continue reading >>

The Best And Worst Foods To Eat In A Type 2 Diabetes Diet

The Best And Worst Foods To Eat In A Type 2 Diabetes Diet

Following a type 2 diabetes diet doesn’t mean you have to give up all the things you love — you can still enjoy a wide range of foods and, in some cases, even help reverse type 2 diabetes. Indeed, creating a diet for diabetes is a balancing act: It includes a variety of healthy carbohydrates, fats, and proteins. The trick is ultimately choosing the right combination of foods that will help keep your blood sugar level in your target range and avoid big swings that can cause diabetes symptoms — from the frequent urination and thirst of high blood sugar to the fatigue, dizziness, headaches, and mood changes of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). The Basics of the Type 2 Diabetes Diet: What Should You Eat? To follow a healthy diet for type 2 diabetes, you must first understand how different foods affect your blood sugar. Carbohydrates, which are found to the largest degree in grains, bread, pasta, milk, sweets, fruit, and starchy vegetables, are broken down into glucose in the blood faster than other types of food, which raises blood sugar, potentially leading to hyperglycemia. Protein and fats do not directly impact blood sugar, but both should be consumed in moderation to keep calories down and weight in a healthy range. To hit your blood sugar level target, eat a variety of foods but monitor portions for foods with a high carbohydrate content, says Alison Massey, RD, CDE, the director of diabetes education at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore. “[Foods high in carbohydrates] have the most impact on blood sugar level. This is why some people with diabetes count their carbohydrates at meals and snacks,” she says. How Many Carbs Can You Eat If You Have Diabetes? According to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), you can calculate Continue reading >>

The Fda Has Approved An Implantable Glucose Monitor For Diabetics That Lasts For Months

The Fda Has Approved An Implantable Glucose Monitor For Diabetics That Lasts For Months

The FDA Has Approved an Implantable Glucose Monitor for Diabetics That Lasts for Months Eversenses implantable sensor, seen above. Keeping track of your blood sugar is poised to become a lot easier for some diabetics living in the U.S. On Thursday, the Food and Drug Administration approved the Eversense Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM) system. The Eversense is not the first approved CGM system, though it is the first with a fully implantable sensor, according to the agency. Its also the longest-lasting by far, being able to be used for 90 days at a time, compared to previous systems that need to be replaced every seven to 14 days. The Eversense uses a small pill-shaped sensor thats implanted under the skin by a doctor in a five-minute procedure. The sensor is coated in a fluorescent chemical that responds to glucose, allowing the sensor to measure someones glucose levels in real time. A wireless, rechargable transmitter affixed to the skin on top of the implant through an adhesive both powers the implant and allows it to send signals to a mobile app. Every five minutes, it sends measurements to the app, which will alert users if their blood sugar is too low (hypoglycemia) or too high (hyperglycemia). The sensor also has vibration alarms that can go off in case someones mobile device is out of range. The FDA is committed to advancing novel products that leverage digital technology to improve patient care, said FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, in a statement announcing the approval. These technologies allow patients to gain better control over their health. This approval of a more seamless digital system that gives patients the ability to effectively manage a chronic disease like diabetes is a vivid illustration of the potential for these mobile platforms. The Eversen Continue reading >>

Diabetics Doing Things

Diabetics Doing Things

The DOC is an amazing space for many of us; real-life T1Ds connecting on social platforms to share their story, motivate, and educate, creating a chain reaction of inspiration and confidence for the newly introduced to do the same. While we often think about and highlight advocacy and education in the community, race, culture, and background arent always discussed as much as they should be. Todays guest,Ariel Lawrence, or as you may know her, Just A Little Suga ( @justalittle_suga on Instagram ), shares her passion for bringing to light the underrepresentation of people of color in the diabetic online community. Ariel shares her diagnosis story and we discuss how interesting the event can be. We break down the idea of diagnosis and how it can become three separate moments; the first diagnosis (diagnosis by a doctor), the second (the moment of acceptance), and third (diagnosis from an activism/advocate standpoint). The conversation continues as we chat about topics such as: parents overcoming their children living with diabetes, T1D children learning to be resilient from such a young age, and to always looks for the silver lining. Ariels creation of Just A Little Suga began after the passing of her grandmother (a type 2 diabetic) as she wanted to find a community of diabetics who could empathize with her grief and help her take better care of herself, but found that voices of people of color were few and far between. Just A Little Suga takes that issue head, motivating herself and others to be resilient in the face of diabetes and to enlighten the friends and family of diabetics so theyll be encouraged to better support them. Ariel Lawrence + Diabetics Doing Things = One incredible episode Continue reading >>

Diabetes Action Network

Diabetes Action Network

Blind diabetics and those losing vision can continue to be independent. The blind can and do accurately draw up insulin, monitor blood glucose levels, etc. 'Limitations' are usually self-imposed, and often all that is needed to overcome negative thinking is simply to know where to go for information. Some equipment (i.e. audio output devices) has been adapted for the blind. By using alternative techniques and products, the blind can control their diabetes as efficiently as do their sighted peers. The Diabetes Action Network, a division of the National Federation of the Blind, is a support and information network for all diabetics, especially those who are blind or losing vision. Many of our members have experienced ramifications of diabetes such as blindness, amputation, nerve damage, heart problems, kidney disease, etc. Others have experienced no chronic complications, but want to utilize our services, learn more about diabetes, and be part of a caring support group. In addition to reaching out to fellow diabetics who may be finding it difficult to cope with problems that accompany diabetes, we provide support and information to interested persons. Please join our list serv. We have discussions covering all aspects of living with diabetes. Bridging the Gap - Living with Blindness and Diabetes focuses on nonvisual methods of managing diabetes. This volume has been prepared to answer common questions from blind diabetics. It includes a collection of some of the best articles from the Voice of the Diabetic and a useful resource section. Contact the NFB Independence Market for a copy in print or audio. Additional literature focusing on diabetes as well as blindness related products, which enable the user to perform everyday tasks more independently, can be ordered from the Continue reading >>

15 Power Foods For Diabetics

15 Power Foods For Diabetics

Some of the best foods for diabetics include dark chocolate, avocados, fish, quinoa, spinach, tomatoes, red onions, broccoli, egg whites, beans, blueberries, oatmeal, and many more. What is Diabetes? The fact that you are reading this article likely means that you are familiar with diabetes, perhaps you even suffer from the condition yourself, but a bit of background information is always valuable. If you know someone who has diabetes or are have a lifestyle that puts you at high risk for diabetes, then this is also information that could be very beneficial for you. Diabetes, quite simply, is a classification of metabolic diseases that result in a person having high blood sugar. More than 380 million people around the world suffer from this disease, and numbers are increasing every year. The technical name of diabetes is Diabetes mellitus, but more importantly is knowing the difference between different types of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes: Type 1 diabetes means that a person is unable to produce insulin, a hormone that enables cells in our fat tissue and skeletal muscles to absorb glucose (sugar) from the blood. Having too much blood sugar causes a wide range of health concerns, including increased hunger and thirst (which leads to overeating and obesity), increased urination, and even more serious health issues, such as kidney failure, heart problems, damage to your vision, and even death. Type 1 diabetes is caused by the autoimmune destruction of the beta cells in the pancreas that create insulin; this type represents approximately 10% of diabetes cases in the world. Type 2 diabetes: Type 2 diabetes represents the other 90% of global diabetes cases and is often referred to as “adult-onset diabetes”. Type 2 diabetes is a result of lifestyle, not a metabolic autoimmu Continue reading >>

10 Foods Diabetics Should Eat Daily

10 Foods Diabetics Should Eat Daily

Be sure to put these in your meal rotation. Making healthy food choices to control blood sugar is key for those with type 2 diabetes, but what if there were foods that not only kept diabetes under control, but also improved your diabetes and overall health - kind of how calcium can improve bone health? Researchers have identified some key functional foods that appear to improve the disease condition and possibly reduce risk. Blueberries Eating the tiny blue fruit is a nutrient-dense way to get some of your daily carbs, and research also suggests that eating blueberries regularly - as well as other berries - improves insulin sensitivity. This means cells are more receptive to the body's own insulin. Researchers also credit the anti-inflammatory effect of phytochemicals in berries as possibly reducing some of the cardiovascular risks seen with type 2 diabetes. Oranges Oranges, grapefruits, clementines - research suggests that consumption of citrus fruit has a positive, long-term effects on blood sugar, as well as cholesterol levels, thanks to the anti-inflammatory compound hesperidin and a healthy dose of soluble fiber. Additional research from Harvard School of Public Health suggests that eating the whole fruit, rather than the juice, was associated with a lower risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. Chickpeas Chickpeas, as well as beans and lentils, are well-known foods with a low glycemic index, making them good choices for diabetes, but new research suggests that eating legumes may actually have a therapeutic effect. In a 2012 study published in Archives of Internal Medicine, individuals with type 2 diabetes consumed one cup of legumes daily as part of their carbohydrate intake for three months. When compared with other study participants, the daily legume eaters showed Continue reading >>

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