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Diabetic Yogurts

Light Berry Frozen Yogurt [no Sugar Added, Diabetic Friendly]

Light Berry Frozen Yogurt [no Sugar Added, Diabetic Friendly]

Valentine’s Day is coming in 3 days!!! What better way to show you care to your family and loved ones than by offering them a sweet, but healthier treat like frozen yogurt rather than ice cream! Frozen berries in the winter are the best way to still get in some awesome antioxidants and enjoy a taste of the summer! Mixing it with some delicious yogurt and a few other simple ingredients and you have a fantastically smooth and creamy dessert without all the fat and calories. Does your family love ice cream? My hubby and kids do and I hate buying it! I’m sensitive to dairy so I have to limit how much I have but occasionally I can tolerate some and this is my choice. I received some coupons to try Brown Cow Cream top yogurt and fell in love with the texture. It is full fat and typically I steer away on a regular basis and use nonfat Greek, but in this case and for this recipe I knew Brown Cow would be the best choice. But you can really substitute another plain yogurt of your choice. I can’t say that using nonfat plain yogurt will really provide you a nice creamy frozen yogurt, but you can certainly experiment. For myself I would probably use nonfat but for the family who will compare this to regular ice cream, nope! This is a winning recipe and if my kids loved it, I know it’s good! I’ve made it twice and it melts fairly quickly hence the pictures above. We added my homemade magic shell above and some homemade dairy free whipped cream. FYI: If you do not have an ice cream machine, just freeze it. This frozen yogurt will never be hard like ice cream, more soft like soft serve, but incredibly yummy just the same! Other frozen treats you might like: Continue reading >>

A Yogurt A Day May Keep Diabetes At Bay

A Yogurt A Day May Keep Diabetes At Bay

Eating a low-fat plain yogurt, instead of salty snacks or sugary drinks, may help reduce your risk of diabetes by almost 50%. In addition to eating more fruits and vegetables, consuming low-fat plain yogurt, in lieu of salty snacks or sugary drinks, may help prevent the onset of Type 2 diabetes, according to the result of a study by researchers at The University of Cambridge, England. Consumers should be wary of the content of their yogurt products, however. Many yogurt products today contain added sugars for flavoring. Others contain sugary granola or even crushed cookies and candies. This particular study looked at reduced-fat plain yogurt (<3.9% fat) and cheese, which were available in England. “Although we did not specifically examine it in this study, a reasonable assumption would be that the more traditional style yogurts without added sugar are a good choice,” noted the lead investigator Nita Forouhi, MD. Dr Nita Forouhi is the Group Leader of the nutritional epidemiology program at the Medical Research Council, Epidemiology Unit in Cambridge. Study Design The study details a careful analysis of data gleaned from the EPIC-Norfolk study that looked at the 7-day food diaries of well over 25,000 people based in England. The EPIC, or the European Prospective Investigation of Cancer (EPIC), is a large multi-center study looking at the connection between diet and cancer. The study was published in the journal Diabetologia, the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes. The investigators randomly selected 4,000 patients and 892 patients who developed diabetes during the 11-year study timeframe. This gave researchers the opportunity to examine the types of dairy diets that led to less diabetic cases. The investigators found that those who consumed Continue reading >>

Diabetic Frozen Peach Yogurt

Diabetic Frozen Peach Yogurt

READY IN: 40mins YIELD: 8 1/2 cup servings UNITS: US 1 (14 ounce) can peaches in juice (I used my home canned peaches) Drain peaches reserving 1/2 cup of juice. Add yogurt, (I do this all in a four cup measuring cup) reserved juice, and Splenda; blend with hand blender until combined. Pour into freezer bowl, turn machine ON and let mix until frozen, about 25-30 minutes. If desired, pour frozen yogurt into plastic container and place in freezer until firm, about 2 hours. ht Advertisement Continue reading >>

What's In Your Pot?

What's In Your Pot?

According to consumer research, the UK population spends a staggering 1.7 billion a year on yogurt and fromage frais. With an ever-increasing range of yogurt varieties on offer, it can be difficult to work out why one variety may be more or less healthy than another. Here at Enjoy Food, we thought it was about time we took a closer look at this popular product and find out what exactly is in those pots… The good news Yogurt provides many health benefits. Made with milk, it contains protein and calcium needed for healthy bones and teeth. Some yogurts also have added vitamin D, which helps our body to absorb calcium. It’s also good to know that low-fat yogurts have just as much calcium as the full-fat versions. Some research even suggests that eating yogurt can help you to feel fuller, which may make it easier to manage your weight. As well as a useful portable snack, or instant pudding when you fancy a sweet fix, plain, natural, or greek yogurt can be used as a topping on fruit and desserts instead of cream, in smoothies, or in cooking. Spotlight on sugar As with most manufactured food products, you need to take a step back from the marketing hype and take a closer look at the food label, to check whether that innocent looking pot is as healthy as it seems. Many yogurts, particularly the ones aimed at children, are crammed full of the ‘free sugars’ we all need to cut back on. Looking at the label, the carbohydrate ‘of which sugars’ provides useful information. An amount in grams (g) will be given. Spotting 'free sugars' This figure includes sugars which come naturally from the milk used to make the yogurt, known as ‘lactose’, as well as any sugar added to the yogurt, ie ‘free sugars’, and sugar that comes naturally from any fruit or fruit puree that h Continue reading >>

Soy Yogurt Help To Control Diabetes

Soy Yogurt Help To Control Diabetes

U.S. researchers reported that soy yogurt, especially with fruit in it, may help control both type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure. Researchers report that, although people with diabetes are usually discouraged from eating sweet snacks, soy yogurt and some dairy yogurts rich in fruit seem to help regulate enzymes that affect blood sugar levels. "What one eats should be part of an overall approach to therapy," said Kalidas Shetty of the University of Massachusetts Amherst. Type 2 diabetes, which affects more than 15 million Americans and up to 150 million people globally, is characterized by an abnormal rise in blood sugar right after a meal. This effect, known as hyperglycemia, can damage blood vessels, the kidneys, heart, eyes and nerves. Shetty was interested in studying certain plant compounds that affect enzymes targeted by diabetes drugs, notably alpha-amylase and alpha-glucosidase. He also wanted to check on foods’ effects on angiotensin converting enzyme or ACE inhibitors, medicines used to fight high blood pressure. Shetty and his team went to a local supermarket and bought peach, strawberry, blueberry and plain yogurt made by four different producers, including a soy brand. Tests in their lab showed that soy blueberry yogurt strongly affected all three of the enzymes. Peach and strawberry yogurt also affected alpha-amylase and alpha-glucosidase. The researchers tested the yogurt varieties for antioxidants and plant compounds called phenols. Phenols and polyphenols give red wine and tea some of their heart-healthy benefits. Plain soy yogurt was the most potent, with blueberry dairy yogurt scoring second on phenol and antioxidant content, the researchers said. Soy yogurt was also the best at inhibiting ACE, which causes blood vessels to narrow and raises blo Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Yogurt: The Do’s And Don’ts

Diabetes And Yogurt: The Do’s And Don’ts

Yogurt can be a great nutrient-dense breakfast option or an easy snack. It is low in carbohydrates, meaning it won’t cause blood sugar spikes in people with diabetes. There may even be additional benefits for people with diabetes. What Research Shows Fermented foods, such as yogurt, contain good bacteria called probiotics. Probiotics have been shown to improve gut health. Research on gut health is ongoing, but gut bacteria and overall health could play a factor in a number of health conditions, including obesity and diabetes. What Do I Need to Know About Probiotics? Recent research shows that yogurt consumption might be associated with lower levels of glucose and insulin resistance, and lower systolic blood pressure. Another study found a potential link between regular yogurt consumption and a reduced risk for type 2 diabetes. These studies are encouraging, but more research is needed to determine what link, if any, exists between yogurt and type 2 diabetes. What Makes Yogurt Great Most dairy products are low on the glycemic index. This makes them ideal for people with diabetes. To get the most out of your yogurt, check the labels before you purchase. If you want the gut benefits from the probiotics, choose a yogurt that contains live and active cultures. Also pay attention to the nutrition facts. Many yogurts have added sugars. Look for yogurts with high protein content and low carbohydrates, such as unflavored Greek yogurt. Sugar content among brands, and even among flavors within the same brand, can vary drastically, so check labels closely. Carbohydrates By Yogurt Type Yogurt Type (6 ounces) Carbohydrates Sugar plain Greek yogurt 6-8 grams 4-8 grams flavored Greek yogurt 16-22 grams 12-18 grams plain yogurt 11-15 grams 10-12 grams vanilla yogurt 22-33 grams 21-28 Continue reading >>

Diabetes - Yogurt In Nutrition

Diabetes - Yogurt In Nutrition

Every food eaten induce a rise in glucose, or blood sugar, which the body uses for energy. This results in the release of insulin, which is a normal, healthy response to a meal. Insulin unlocks the bodys cells to let glucose in so it can be used for energy. Insulin helps regulate blood sugar. When its job is done, blood levels of insulin go back down. The optimal functioning of the body requires that glycaemia, which represents the concentration of sugar in our blood, be precisely regulated. Its level must remain within a narrow range to keep the body working optimally. If blood sugar chronically exceeds a threshold of normality -High blood glucose-, there will be a significant increase in the risk to develop severe long-term body damage and dysfunction (particularly targeting organs like the eyes, kidneys, nerves, heart and blood vessels). Taken together, these abnormalities are common symptoms characterizing diabetes. Criterias used to diagnose diabetes and pre-diabetes are fasting plasma blood glucose concentration (FP BG) and the value at 2-hours post-ingestion (2-Hr OGTT). Approximately 415 million people are affected by diabetes worldwide and it is estimated this will increase to 642 million people by 2040. Several Types of diabetes can be observed: Type 1 diabetes (T1D): A condition where the body does not produce enough insulin. It generally occurs during childhood or adolescence. Type 2 diabetes (T2D): A chronic condition where the bodys insulin in not working effectively. It occurs when the body doesnt produce enough insulin, or the bodys cells develop resistance to insulin.This is the most common type of diabetes. It commonly appears after the age of 45 years (but T2D in childhood has the potential to become a serious public health issue leading to adverse h Continue reading >>

Eating Yogurt May Cut Diabetes Risk, New Research Shows

Eating Yogurt May Cut Diabetes Risk, New Research Shows

Worried about the risk of developing diabetes? You might want to eat more yogurt. That's the takeaway from new research out of the University of Cambridge, which found that a significantly lower percentage of study subjects who ate yogurt at least four times a week developed diabetes than those who did not. Using data from a long-term study of the diets and health of 30,000 people in Norfolk, England, the researchers compared the diets of 753 participants who developed Type 2 diabetes over an 11-year period with 3,500 randomly selected people from the same population who remained healthy. The study, which was published yesterday in Diabetologia, the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes, analyzed study participants' consumption of all dairy products as well as specific foods. Like all such studies, the research documents only an association and does not prove cause and effect, cautioned lead researcher Dr. Nita Forouhi, an epidemiology group leader at the Medical Research Council at the University of Cambridge. Nevertheless, yogurt contains calcium, magnesium, vitamin D, and fatty acids, all of which have known health benefits, according to Forouhi. The fermentation process that turns milk into yogurt also produces probiotic bacteria and "specific types of vitamin K," that are known to be beneficial. While Forouhi and her team stopped short of identifying a mechanism for the protective effects of yogurt, it's likely that probiotic bacteria play a key role. Recent research has pointed towards the role of gut bacteria in mediating inflammation and thus increasing or decreasing the risk of numerous diseases including colorectal cancer and inflammatory bowel disease and Crohn's disease, as well as diabetes. In the last few years, studies have also su Continue reading >>

Best Foods For Type 2 Diabetes

Best Foods For Type 2 Diabetes

Prevent dangerous blood sugar spikes with the help of these foods. Yogurt Low-fat yogurt naturally contains both high-quality carbohydrates and protein, making it an excellent food for slowing or preventing an unhealthy rise in blood sugar. Studies also show that a diet high in calcium from yogurt and other calcium-rich foods is associated with a reduced risk of type 2 diabetes. Be sure to stick to low-fat or nonfat brands; fat-free Greek yogurt is my top pick because it has twice as much protein as regular nonfat yogurt. Previous Next More Photos Almonds Fish Continue reading >>

Choosing The Best Yogurt For You

Choosing The Best Yogurt For You

Have you taken a good hard look at the dairy case lately? If it’s a lot bigger than you remember, it’s likely because yogurt has commandeered much of the space. With so many flavors and varieties to choose from, it can be tricky to figure out what to buy. What is yogurt? Yogurt is probably one of the oldest foods around. The word yogurt is Turkish in origin, and it’s thought that it dates back to the Neolithic people of Central Asia around 6000 B.C. Yogurt was actually “discovered” accidentally: herdsman would carry milk in animal stomachs. The enzymes from the stomachs curdled the milk, turning it into what we know today as yogurt. Turkish immigrants brought yogurt to North American in the 1700s but it really caught on in the 1940s when the son of the Danone company founder started a small yogurt factory in the Bronx. We now know this company now as Dannon. Why eat yogurt? Yogurt has a lot going for it. It’s rich in a number of nutrients, including: • Calcium • Protein • Potassium • Magnesium • Vitamin D • Vitamin B-12 • Vitamin B-2 Protein and magnesium are two key nutrients for diabetes management. Protein provides a feeling of fullness and can even out blood sugar levels. Magnesium helps improve insulin sensitivity, which can also help improve blood sugar levels. Along with the above nutrients, yogurt contains probiotics, also known as “good” bacteria. While more research is needed, evidence points to these friendly bacteria as helping to boost the immune system, improving digestion, preventing urinary tract infections, and easing certain skin conditions, such as eczema. Yogurt’s darker side Sugar: While yogurt seems to be bursting with nutrition, some types of yogurt contain ingredients that aren’t so healthful. Many yogurts on the Continue reading >>

The Best Yogurt For People With Diabetes

The Best Yogurt For People With Diabetes

Yogurt can be one of the best foods for people with diabetes to eat. Or one of the worst. It is the probiotic food that we eat the most. These foods have friendly bacteria that help us to drive out the bad ones. This can be good for our health, the U.S. Government’s National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine says. But to get this benefit from yogurt or other probiotic foods, we have to avoid any of them that say on the label that they were heat treated after culturing. That kills the active cultures. Even worse is when we eat the usual yogurt preparations that are loaded with added sugars. This includes not only frozen yogurts but also what most of us think of as regular yogurt. For example, a little 6-ounce container of "Yoplait Original Blackberry Harvest" sounds great. But its 13 ingredients include so much sugar that it packs 33 grams of carbohydrate, according to the Nutrition Facts label on the company’s website. When we want to eat a healthy yogurt, we have to start by limiting our selection to plain ones. Then, if we like, we can add a little fresh fruit and perhaps some non-caloric sweetener. I often add a few organic blueberries and a small sprinkling of stevia. Somebody asked me a few months ago if I could find any organic, Greek style, full fat, plain yogurt. I can’t. But we can come close. I recommend full fat yogurt, particularly for those of us who follow a low-carb diet, because non-fat or 2 percent yogurts always have added bulking agents that increase the carbs. They don’t taste as good either. I also recommend organic yogurt, but perhaps out of an excess of caution. I do eat organic fruit and vegetables whenever I have a choice, because I want to avoid consuming all the insecticides and herbicides conventional farmers spray on Continue reading >>

Why Greek Yogurt Should Be Part Of Your Type 2 Diabetes Diet

Why Greek Yogurt Should Be Part Of Your Type 2 Diabetes Diet

Smooth, creamy, thick — Greek yogurt is one of the hottest foods around, and its popularity shows no signs of abating. With a pudding-like texture and a slightly tart flavor, Greek yogurt also has more protein and fewer carbs and fewer sugars than traditional yogurt. This means that Greek yogurt can be even better for people with type 2 diabetes, says Tami Ross, RD, CDE, a diabetes educator in Lexington, Kentucky. "My patients love the consistency of it," Ross explains. "Even the patients who are not big on yogurt or milk products overwhelmingly seem to like Greek yogurt." Greek yogurt's thick consistency comes from straining it to remove liquid whey. This process increases the amount of protein per serving and removes some of the carbohydrates, which people with diabetes must watch carefully. "For folks with diabetes, the lower carbs are a plus," Ross notes. "You can work in the yogurt for a snack without having to account for so many carbohydrates." The increased protein can also help you feel that you've had a more substantial snack, so you'll feel more satisfied and won't be hungry for something else quite so quickly. "In terms of promoting satiety and helping people feel full, it's great," Ross says. And starting your day with Greek yogurt may even help you manage your blood sugar throughout the day. Eating low-GI foods for breakfast helps prevent blood-sugar spikes later on, one recent study found. How to Find the Right Greek Yogurt Of course, not all Greek yogurts are created equal. With many brands and flavors on the market, it's important to read nutrition labels carefully to find one that will work with a diabetes-friendly diet. Carbohydrate content is the most important item to look for on the nutrition label of Greek yogurt, since it accounts for the sugar Continue reading >>

Recipes With Yogurts, Perfect For People With Diabetes

Recipes With Yogurts, Perfect For People With Diabetes

‘Yogur’, ‘ yogurt’, ‘yogourt’, ‘yoghurt’, ‘yoghourt’, ‘yogurth’ ó ‘yagurt’… It can be written in different ways. We refer to a very complete food given its high content of proteins, mineral calcium and vitamin B2. It has lactose, but digests better than milk thanks to its probiotic cultures and, because of this low glycemic carbohydrate,makes it a complete sustenance to control blood sugar levels. Different and simple recipes based on yogurt How to make homemade yogurt without sugar? Some yogurts sold in supermarkets, despite being labeled ‘Sugar free’, they do contain a small amount. Ingredients: 1/2 Liter of whole milk sterilized 1 Natural yogurt without sugar 4 medium size glasses 1 Yogurt maker If you own a yogurt maker (there is a lot of variety in the market at affordable prices), it is much more convenient to make. If you do not have it, you will have to let it stand for about 12 hours at a room temperature of 50 degrees. Preparation: The procedure is simple. The ingredients are introduced into a container. They mix well with a rod blender and the liquid is deposited in each of the glasses to its edge. Then, they are introduced in the yogurt maker and left there for 12 hours. When removing them, the liquid will be tempered. It is then, when they will be placed in the refrigerator and allowed to cool, at least 3 hours. To make it sweet, just add one or two small teaspoons of sweetener with zero sugars. Another option is to mix it with mermelada or with small pieces of fruit and nuts. Yogurt toast with honey and red berries To start the day well, you can choose to prepare a rich yogurt toast with honey and red berries. As we discussed in one of our posts(Frutos rojos y sus beneficios en diabetes. Insulclock),red fruits have numero Continue reading >>

Milk And Yogurt Recipes

Milk And Yogurt Recipes

While milk and yogurt are carbohydrate food (carb) – they have a low glycemic index. In addition, they are a great source of protein, calcium and vitamin D and have been linked with reducing risks of getting diabetes. Try some of these ideas to fit more milk and yogurt into your meal plan. Overnight Oats with Blueberries Makes 1 serving 1/3 cup rolled oats 1/3 cup 2% fat plain Greek yogurt 1/3 cup milk (nonfat) 1/3 cup blueberries Other items to add if desired: ½ tsp vanilla 1 tsp Chia seeds Sweetener to taste Directions: Combine in a 12 oz jar with a lid. Let sit in the refrigerator overnight. Grab and go! •Nutrition info for 1 serving (1 cup): Calories: 220, Carbs: 30 gm, Protein: 14 gm, Fat: 4 gm Berry Banana Smoothie Makes 4 Servings 16 oz plain nonfat yogurt 2 small bananas 1 cup sliced strawberries 1 cup raspberries, blueberries or blackberries Directions: Place all ingredients into a blender. Cover and blend until smooth. • Nutrition info for one serving (1 cup): Calories: 120, Carbs: 28 gm, Protein: 6 gm, Fat: 0 Hot Dark Chocolate Cocoa Makes 1 cup 1 Tbsp unsweetened Dutch process cocoa powder Artificial sweetener to taste (we used 1 Tbsp + 2 tsp Splenda) 2 Tbsp hot water 1 cup 1% milk Directions: Place the cocoa powder and sugar substitute in a microwavable mug. Add the hot water and stir until smooth. Pour in the milk and stir again. Microwave on high for 1 ½ minutes or until hot (but don’t boil.) • Nutrition info for one serving (1 cup): Calories:120, Carbs: 16 gm, Protein: 9 gm, Fat: 3 gm Sleepy time Spiced Milk Makes 1 cup 1 cup 1% milk 1 tsp vanilla ¼ tsp each: nutmeg and cinnamon Artificial sweetener (1-2 packets of your favorite sweetener to taste ) Directions: Still together the milk and vanilla in a microwavable mug. Microwave on high for Continue reading >>

The Best Yogurt For People With Diabetes

The Best Yogurt For People With Diabetes

Yogurt, typically made from cow's milk (however, nowadays there are many alternatives), is a source of carbohydrate which is also full of good bacteria, calcium, and protein. If you have diabetes, yogurt can be a smart food choice; however, the trick is to know which kind of yogurt to choose and which to skip out on. In the best kinds of yogurt, you get a good balance of protein and carbohydrate, along with calcium and healthy probiotics . You alsodon'tget a lot of added sugar, additives, food coloring, or saturated fat. Choosing a low-fat or non-fat yogurt version can help you to reduce your total calorie intake as well as keep your saturated fat (the type of fat that increase bad LDL cholesterol) low. In addition, since yogurt is a source of carbohydrate, you'll want to choose a yogurt that is low in added sugars such as fruited yogurts or those yogurts with added granola, or other toppings that are rich in sugar. Therefore, it's best to choose plain, low-fat yogurt.If you need to add sweetness, top your yogurt with some berries or peaches. Frozen varieties can make your yogurt seem "syrup-y", too, for more fiber and less added sugar. If you are looking to be "greener" and have some added healthy fats to your diet, you can choose a yogurt that is made from grass fed cows. Greek yogurt is regular yogurt that's been strained, removing some of the whey and leaving behind a thicker, more protein-rich yogurt.Greek yogurt is readily available in regular grocery stores; find it in the refrigerated dairy section. Regular yogurt provides 5 grams of protein per 6-ounce serving, while Greek yogurt provides up to 20 grams, depending on the brand. Because it has more protein, Greek yogurt has about 1/3 the carbohydrate of regular yogurt. And, because lactose is a source of carboh Continue reading >>

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