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Diabetic Yogurts

Eating Yogurt May Cut Diabetes Risk, New Research Shows

Eating Yogurt May Cut Diabetes Risk, New Research Shows

Worried about the risk of developing diabetes? You might want to eat more yogurt. That's the takeaway from new research out of the University of Cambridge, which found that a significantly lower percentage of study subjects who ate yogurt at least four times a week developed diabetes than those who did not. Using data from a long-term study of the diets and health of 30,000 people in Norfolk, England, the researchers compared the diets of 753 participants who developed Type 2 diabetes over an 11-year period with 3,500 randomly selected people from the same population who remained healthy. The study, which was published yesterday in Diabetologia, the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes, analyzed study participants' consumption of all dairy products as well as specific foods. Like all such studies, the research documents only an association and does not prove cause and effect, cautioned lead researcher Dr. Nita Forouhi, an epidemiology group leader at the Medical Research Council at the University of Cambridge. Nevertheless, yogurt contains calcium, magnesium, vitamin D, and fatty acids, all of which have known health benefits, according to Forouhi. The fermentation process that turns milk into yogurt also produces probiotic bacteria and "specific types of vitamin K," that are known to be beneficial. While Forouhi and her team stopped short of identifying a mechanism for the protective effects of yogurt, it's likely that probiotic bacteria play a key role. Recent research has pointed towards the role of gut bacteria in mediating inflammation and thus increasing or decreasing the risk of numerous diseases including colorectal cancer and inflammatory bowel disease and Crohn's disease, as well as diabetes. In the last few years, studies have also su Continue reading >>

Yogurt Every Day May Help Keep Diabetes Away

Yogurt Every Day May Help Keep Diabetes Away

HealthDay Reporter TUESDAY, Nov. 25, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Eating a serving a day of yogurt may lower your risk of developing type 2 diabetes, new research suggests. "The data we have gathered show that yogurt consumption can have significant benefit in reducing the risk of diabetes," said senior study author Dr. Frank Hu, a professor of nutrition and epidemiology at Harvard School of Public Health, in Boston. "It's not a huge effect, about an 18 percent reduction [in risk]." "Yogurt is not magic for curing or preventing diabetes," Hu said. "That's the bottom line and the message we want to convey to our consumers, that we have to pay attention to our diet pattern. There is no replacement for an overall healthy diet and maintaining [a healthy] body weight." The study is published online Nov. 24 in the journal BMC Medicine. It was funded by the U.S. National Institutes of Health. In type 2 diabetes, the body does not produce enough insulin or the body's cells develop a resistance to insulin, and blood sugar levels then get too high. For the study, Hu and his team pooled the result of three large studies that tracked the medical histories and lifestyle habits of health professionals: the Health Professionals' Follow-up Study of more than 51,000 male health professionals; the Nurses' Health Study, which included more than 121,000 women nurses; and the Nurses' Health Study II, which followed nearly 117,000 women nurses. During the study follow-up, there were about 15,000 cases of type 2 diabetes. When they looked at total dairy intake, they saw no effect on the risk of diabetes. However, when they zeroed in on yogurt, they found one serving a day was linked with about a 17 percent reduced risk. The researchers next pooled their result with other published studies that lo Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Yogurt

Diabetes And Yogurt

Plain nonfat Greek yogurt is an excellent source of protein for a person on a diabetic diet. It is low in sugar and carbs, and it is considered a complete protein because it contains all 9 of the essential amino acids your body needs. Vegetarians know that a complete protein is one that contains all 9 amino acids. Nuts and beans do not contain all of the necessary amino acids. Eating a few fresh almonds or one Brazil nut at the same time as you eat the nonfat yogurt aids in its absorption into the body. A little healthy oil is good for the body, although it does add calories. Only one fresh Brazil nut a day, as they are high in selenium. You will exceed the recommended consumption amount of selenium if you eat more than one a day when your other food intake for the day is taken into consideration. If you consume a yogurt that has added fruit, then you might as well eat candy, as the calories and sugar content aren’t that far apart and you’ll have a tougher time controlling your blood sugar. A popular brand of plain nonfat Greek yogurt contains 90 calories, 0 fat, 7 grams carbs, 4 grams sugar and 15 grams of protein. This is a good mix that works with diabetes and yogurt. The lower the grams of sugar, the easier it’ll be to control your blood sugars. Reading the Labels A typical fruit yogurt has 230 calories, 46 grams carbs and 26 grams of sugar. If you shop around, you can find yogurts that contain fruit with less sugar and less fat, but make sure you read that label carefully. When looking at the labels on yogurt, always make sure that they contain the live active cultures to get the true benefit from the yogurt, and stay away from “whey concentrates” or any yogurt that has added “thickeners.” Greek Yogurt Options One of the most marvelous new introductio Continue reading >>

The Best Yogurt For People With Diabetes

The Best Yogurt For People With Diabetes

Yogurt can be one of the best foods for people with diabetes to eat. Or one of the worst. It is the probiotic food that we eat the most. These foods have friendly bacteria that help us to drive out the bad ones. This can be good for our health, the U.S. Government’s National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine says. But to get this benefit from yogurt or other probiotic foods, we have to avoid any of them that say on the label that they were heat treated after culturing. That kills the active cultures. Even worse is when we eat the usual yogurt preparations that are loaded with added sugars. This includes not only frozen yogurts but also what most of us think of as regular yogurt. For example, a little 6-ounce container of “Yoplait Original Blackberry Harvest” sounds great. But its 13 ingredients include so much sugar that it packs 33 grams of carbohydrate, according to the Nutrition Facts label on the company’s website. When we want to eat a healthy yogurt, we have to start by limiting our selection to plain ones. Then, if we like, we can add a little fresh fruit and perhaps some non-caloric sweetener. I often add a few organic blueberries and a small sprinkling of stevia. Somebody asked me a few months ago if I could find any organic, Greek style, full fat, plain yogurt. I can’t. But we can come close. I recommend full fat yogurt, particularly for those of us who follow a low-carb diet, because non-fat or 2 percent yogurts always have added bulking agents that increase the carbs. They don’t taste as good either. I also recommend organic yogurt, but perhaps out of an excess of caution. I do eat organic fruit and vegetables whenever I have a choice, because I want to avoid consuming all the insecticides and herbicides conventional farmers spray Continue reading >>

What's The Best Yogurt For People With Diabetes?

What's The Best Yogurt For People With Diabetes?

Yogurt, typically made from cow's milk (however, nowadays there are many alternatives), is a source of carbohydrate which is also full of good bacteria, calcium, and protein. If you have diabetes, yogurt can be a smart food choice; however, the trick is to know which kind of yogurt to choose and which to skip out on. What to Look for in a Yogurt In the best kinds of yogurt, you get a good balance of protein and carbohydrate, along with calcium and healthy probiotics. You also don't get a lot of added sugar, additives, food coloring, or saturated fat. Choosing a low-fat or non-fat yogurt version can help you to reduce your total calorie intake as well as keep your saturated fat (the type of fat that increase bad LDL cholesterol) low. In addition, since yogurt is a source of carbohydrate, you'll want to choose a yogurt that is low in added sugars such as fruited yogurts or those yogurts with added granola, or other toppings that are rich in sugar. Therefore, it's best to choose plain, low-fat yogurt. If you need to add sweetness, top your yogurt with some berries or peaches. Frozen varieties can make your yogurt seem "syrup-y", too, for more fiber and less added sugar. Greek Yogurt vs. Regular Yogurt Greek yogurt is regular yogurt that's been strained, removing some of the whey and leaving behind a thicker, more protein-rich yogurt. Greek yogurt is readily available in regular grocery stores; find it in the refrigerated dairy section. Regular yogurt provides 5 grams of protein per 6-ounce serving, while Greek yogurt provides up to 20 grams, depending on the brand. Because it has more protein, Greek yogurt has about 1/3 the carbohydrate of regular yogurt. And, because lactose is a source of carbohydrate in dairy products, this means that many people find Greek yogurt easie Continue reading >>

Is Yogurt Good Or Bad For Diabetics?

Is Yogurt Good Or Bad For Diabetics?

“Can Diabetics Have Yogurt?” This is a very popular question and in this article, we have tried to highlight the pros and cons of including yogurt in your diet plan if you happen to suffer from diabetes. While yogurt is considered a healthy option, the diabetics have to be really cautious of their diet. So, we have also included some guidelines which when followed will enable you to include yogurt in your diet effectively. So, come and join in for the article “Is Yogurt Good or Bad for Diabetics?” Facts About Various Yogurt Types You get different types of yogurt in the market depending on the ingredients which go into the making of the same. The varieties found may include pain or flavored Greek yogurt, vanilla yogurt, amongst others. The following are some nutritional facts about each type: 6 ounces of plain Greek yogurt contains somewhere around 6 to 8 grams of carbohydrates and around 4 to 8 grams of sugar. 6 ounces of flavored Greek yogurt contains somewhere around 16 to 22 grams of carbohydrates and around 12 to 18 grams of sugar. 6 ounces of plain yogurt contains somewhere around 11 to 15 grams of carbohydrates and around 10 to 12 grams of sugar. 6 ounces of plain vanilla yogurt contain somewhere around 22 to 23 grams of carbohydrates and around 21 to 28 grams of sugar. It is essential to know the above because when you are a person who suffers from diabetes, you have to be careful of the total amount of carbohydrates and other nutrients that you are consuming on a daily basis. Benefits of Including Yogurt in a Diabetic Diet The following are the advantages of including yogurt in your diabetic diet if you are someone who suffers from a condition like diabetes: Yogurt is a rich source of calcium and protein as mentioned above. With this, the daily requirem Continue reading >>

Light Berry Frozen Yogurt [no Sugar Added, Diabetic Friendly]

Light Berry Frozen Yogurt [no Sugar Added, Diabetic Friendly]

Valentine’s Day is coming in 3 days!!! What better way to show you care to your family and loved ones than by offering them a sweet, but healthier treat like frozen yogurt rather than ice cream! Frozen berries in the winter are the best way to still get in some awesome antioxidants and enjoy a taste of the summer! Mixing it with some delicious yogurt and a few other simple ingredients and you have a fantastically smooth and creamy dessert without all the fat and calories. Does your family love ice cream? My hubby and kids do and I hate buying it! I’m sensitive to dairy so I have to limit how much I have but occasionally I can tolerate some and this is my choice. I received some coupons to try Brown Cow Cream top yogurt and fell in love with the texture. It is full fat and typically I steer away on a regular basis and use nonfat Greek, but in this case and for this recipe I knew Brown Cow would be the best choice. But you can really substitute another plain yogurt of your choice. I can’t say that using nonfat plain yogurt will really provide you a nice creamy frozen yogurt, but you can certainly experiment. For myself I would probably use nonfat but for the family who will compare this to regular ice cream, nope! This is a winning recipe and if my kids loved it, I know it’s good! I’ve made it twice and it melts fairly quickly hence the pictures above. We added my homemade magic shell above and some homemade dairy free whipped cream. FYI: If you do not have an ice cream machine, just freeze it. This frozen yogurt will never be hard like ice cream, more soft like soft serve, but incredibly yummy just the same! Other frozen treats you might like: Continue reading >>

At The Grocery Store

At The Grocery Store

Greek yogurt has taken a huge chunk of the Québec yogurt market and now comes in a wide variety of brands and flavours. Creamy and high in protein Greek yogurt differs from "regular" yogurt by its creamy texture. The difference is due to the manufacturing process, which removes a portion of the liquid from the yogurt, leaving a solid, high-protein residue. For the same portion size, Greek yogurt has twice the protein of regular yogurt. This process also gives the yogurt a creamy taste even though it is made from skim milk. A premium price Because liquid is removed, the production of Greek yogurt requires three to four times the amount of milk as traditional yogurt, which justifies its higher price. High nutrient value The technique Greek-yogurt manufacturers use to remove water from the milk before producing the yogurt has an effect on its nutritional value. For example, the traditional drip technique results in the loss of some of the calcium and lactose contained in the milk, whereas a different technique preserves these two nutrients. The table below compares various plain Greek yogurt brands on the market. The table uses the "fat free" variety when available, or the lowest-fat version if a company does not produce a “fat free” product. Nutritional Value of Plain, Fat-free Greek Yogurt Compared to Regular Yogurt Per 175 g (175 ml or 3/4 cup) Protein (g) Carbohydrates (g) Calcium (% DV*) Vitamin D (% DV*) Plain, regular yogurt2 8 12 30% 0 to 35% Astro Original, plain, fat free 18 7 49% 0% President’s Choice 18 12 50% 0% Damafro1 14 6 40% 0% Iögo Greko1 (Ultima Foods) 17 7 45% 30% Liberty 20 6 15% 0% Oikos (Danone) 18 7 20% 0% Skotidakis 18 12 50% 0% * percentage Daily Value; that is, the percentage of the amount you need daily 1 fat-free not available: the ana Continue reading >>

Is Frozen Yogurt Healthy For Diabetics Or Not? Find Right Now!

Is Frozen Yogurt Healthy For Diabetics Or Not? Find Right Now!

Diabetes is a metabolic disorder, in which the patients afflicted with it are either unable to produce sufficient amounts of insulin, or the body cells do not assimilate insulin appropriately as they should. While diet is not the exclusive reason for this chronic ailment, it does contribute a lot to developing diabetes. Thus, the need for consuming a balanced and well-planned diabetic diet is obvious for diabetes management. The list of foods to be avoided in this therapeutic diet include fatty, sugary and carbohydrate rich items. Patients with diabetes have to restrict themselves from consuming sugary foods, fatty foods and many other food items. But, is frozen yogurt included in the same list? Can a diabetic patient consume frozen yogurt? The answer to both questions depends upon which type of frozen yogurt you are referring to, and whether you are using additional ingredients or not. Otherwise, yogurt rich in beneficial bacteria and proteins is good for health in a number of ways. For diabetic patients with recurrent bouts of yeast infections, consuming plain yogurt is an effectual remedy to combat such infections in the natural way. Before we have a discussion about frozen yogurt for diabetics, let's take a brief look at the importance of diabetic diet and sugar content in yogurt. According to the disease pathology, diabetes is further categorized into type 1 diabetes (insulin not secreted sufficiently), type 2 diabetes (body cells not responding to insulin) and gestational diabetes (developed during pregnancy). But, a condition apparent to all diabetic patients is elevated glucose concentration in the blood. Adding more sugar and carbohydrate in the diet puts a risk for further increase in the blood sugar levels. The correct diabetic diet is thus, planned in a way Continue reading >>

A Yogurt A Day May Keep Diabetes At Bay

A Yogurt A Day May Keep Diabetes At Bay

Eating a low-fat plain yogurt, instead of salty snacks or sugary drinks, may help reduce your risk of diabetes by almost 50%. In addition to eating more fruits and vegetables, consuming low-fat plain yogurt, in lieu of salty snacks or sugary drinks, may help prevent the onset of Type 2 diabetes, according to the result of a study by researchers at The University of Cambridge, England. Consumers should be wary of the content of their yogurt products, however. Many yogurt products today contain added sugars for flavoring. Others contain sugary granola or even crushed cookies and candies. This particular study looked at reduced-fat plain yogurt (<3.9% fat) and cheese, which were available in England. “Although we did not specifically examine it in this study, a reasonable assumption would be that the more traditional style yogurts without added sugar are a good choice,” noted the lead investigator Nita Forouhi, MD. Dr Nita Forouhi is the Group Leader of the nutritional epidemiology program at the Medical Research Council, Epidemiology Unit in Cambridge. Study Design The study details a careful analysis of data gleaned from the EPIC-Norfolk study that looked at the 7-day food diaries of well over 25,000 people based in England. The EPIC, or the European Prospective Investigation of Cancer (EPIC), is a large multi-center study looking at the connection between diet and cancer. The study was published in the journal Diabetologia, the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes. The investigators randomly selected 4,000 patients and 892 patients who developed diabetes during the 11-year study timeframe. This gave researchers the opportunity to examine the types of dairy diets that led to less diabetic cases. The investigators found that those who consumed Continue reading >>

Best Foods For Type 2 Diabetes

Best Foods For Type 2 Diabetes

Prevent dangerous blood sugar spikes with the help of these foods. Yogurt Low-fat yogurt naturally contains both high-quality carbohydrates and protein, making it an excellent food for slowing or preventing an unhealthy rise in blood sugar. Studies also show that a diet high in calcium from yogurt and other calcium-rich foods is associated with a reduced risk of type 2 diabetes. Be sure to stick to low-fat or nonfat brands; fat-free Greek yogurt is my top pick because it has twice as much protein as regular nonfat yogurt. Previous Next More Photos Almonds Fish Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Yogurt: The Do’s And Don’ts

Diabetes And Yogurt: The Do’s And Don’ts

Yogurt can be a great nutrient-dense breakfast option or an easy snack. It is low in carbohydrates, meaning it won’t cause blood sugar spikes in people with diabetes. There may even be additional benefits for people with diabetes. What Research Shows Fermented foods, such as yogurt, contain good bacteria called probiotics. Probiotics have been shown to improve gut health. Research on gut health is ongoing, but gut bacteria and overall health could play a factor in a number of health conditions, including obesity and diabetes. What Do I Need to Know About Probiotics? Recent research shows that yogurt consumption might be associated with lower levels of glucose and insulin resistance, and lower systolic blood pressure. Another study found a potential link between regular yogurt consumption and a reduced risk for type 2 diabetes. These studies are encouraging, but more research is needed to determine what link, if any, exists between yogurt and type 2 diabetes. What Makes Yogurt Great Most dairy products are low on the glycemic index. This makes them ideal for people with diabetes. To get the most out of your yogurt, check the labels before you purchase. If you want the gut benefits from the probiotics, choose a yogurt that contains live and active cultures. Also pay attention to the nutrition facts. Many yogurts have added sugars. Look for yogurts with high protein content and low carbohydrates, such as unflavored Greek yogurt. Sugar content among brands, and even among flavors within the same brand, can vary drastically, so check labels closely. Carbohydrates By Yogurt Type Yogurt Type (6 ounces) Carbohydrates Sugar plain Greek yogurt 6-8 grams 4-8 grams flavored Greek yogurt 16-22 grams 12-18 grams plain yogurt 11-15 grams 10-12 grams vanilla yogurt 22-33 grams 21-28 Continue reading >>

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YOGURT PROTECTS DIABETICS? When blood sugar levels rise too high in a diabetic, sugar sticks to cells to be converted to a poison called sorbitol that destroys the cell to cause blindness, deafness, heart attacks, strokes, and kidney damage. Diabetics should restrict foods that cause a high rise in blood sugar, particularly those made from flour and with added sugar. Researchers in Lund, Sweden wanted to find out how various milk products would affect the rise in blood sugar caused by eating bread. They found that regular milk and fresh cucumbers did not prevent the high rise in blood sugar that follows eating bread, but that yogurt or pickled cucumber prevented the high rise in blood sugar. They feel that acids in yogurt and pickled foods help to prevent the high rise in blood sugar that follows eating foods made from flour and sugar. If further studies confirm this one, diabetics may be able to eat bread safely if they take it with fermented milk or pickled products. Until then, diabetics should severely restrict the foods that cause a high rise in blood sugar, such as bakery products, pastas, foods with lots of sugar such a fruit juices. See report #D222. Inconsistency between glycemic and insulinemic responses to regular and fermented milk products. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 2001, Vol 74, Iss 1, pp 96-100. EM Ostman, HGML Elmstahl, IME Bjorck. Address: Ostman EM, Univ Lund, Ctr Chem & Chem Engn, Dept Appl Nutr & Food Chem, POB 124, SE-22100 Lund, SWEDEN Checked 5/19/13 Continue reading >>

Two Thumbs Up For Yogurt

Two Thumbs Up For Yogurt

Yogurt is one of those foods that you just can’t say enough about. Yes, I’ve written about it in the past (several different times), but it seems like there’s always something to share about its health benefits — hence, the focus of my posting this week is, once again, yogurt. In case you’re interested, yogurt is a fermented food made from milk and/or cream. Bacteria are added to heated, pasteurized milk, which is then incubated at a specific temperature to encourage the growth of the bacteria. The bacteria break down the lactose (milk sugar) to lactic acid, which thickens the milk and gives it a tangy flavor. Once that’s done, the yogurt is cooled and at this point, sweeteners, fruit, or other ingredients may be added. It’s a pretty simple process and many people make their own yogurt at home. Two benefits Yogurt actually has many health benefits, but I wanted to focus on two in particular this week. Diabetes prevention. The CDC recently released their diabetes statistics report, and the results aren’t looking too good: Roughly 29 million people in the U.S. now have diabetes, and another 86 million have prediabetes. While diabetes prevention involves a number of lifestyle changes, including weight loss, you might be interested to know that yogurt may play a role. Researchers at the University of Cambridge in England looked at data from more than 25,000 people, comparing the diets of 753 of those people who developed Type 2 diabetes with 3,502 people who did not get diabetes. Their findings? The folks who ate yogurt at least four-and-a-half times a week were significantly less likely to get diabetes than those who didn’t eat yogurt that often. What’s in yogurt that might be protective? There are a number of possible ingredients, including calcium, ma Continue reading >>

Eating Yogurt May Reduce Risk Of Diabetes

Eating Yogurt May Reduce Risk Of Diabetes

Eating yogurt four or five times a week may lower the risk for developing Type 2 diabetes, a new study has found. Researchers in the United Kingdom looked at the diets of 4,000 people and followed them for 11 years. They found that people with the highest yogurt consumption had a 24 percent lower risk of developing diabetes, compared with people who didn't eat yogurt. This risk reduction was seen in study participants who consumed an average of four and a half 4-ounce servings of low-fat yogurt per week, according to the study published today (Feb. 5) in the journal Diabetologia. The study found an association, not a cause-and-effect relationship between eating yogurt and lowered risk of diabetes. And at least part of the positive effect of eating yogurt seems to stem from the fact that people who eat yogurt also eat fewer unhealthy desserts and snacks, the researchers said. They found that replacing a serving of chips with a serving of yogurt reduced the risk of diabetes by 47 percent. [9 Snack Foods: Healthy or Not?] Still, there is reason to think yogurt may lower the risk, the researchers said. Yogurt is a fermented dairy product, and contains a specific type of vitamin K, as well as probiotics, both of which have been suggested to protect against diabetes, the researchers said. The researchers didn't find a link between total dairy consumption and the risk for diabetes, suggesting that only some dairy products may be beneficial in reducing the risk for this condition. Diabetes is a disease in which blood glucose levels are above normal, because the body cannot get the glucose into the cells to be used for energy. Risk factors for developing diabetes include obesity and physical inactivity. About 26 million people in the United States (8.3 percent of the population) Continue reading >>

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