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Diabetic Workout Diet

Exercising With Diabetes: Is It Better To Eat Before Or After Your Workout?

Exercising With Diabetes: Is It Better To Eat Before Or After Your Workout?

Whether it’s best to eat before or after a workout has been debated for decades, and the decision becomes even more complicated if you have diabetes. “For someone with diabetes, they not only have to think about fuel for exercise, but they also have to think about glycemic control,” says Monet S. Bland, a clinical exercise physiologist and diabetes educator with Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston. Exercise impacts your blood sugar, so you need to make sure your levels aren’t too high when you start exercising, but also not so low that they’ll plummet during your workout. So while a study published in November 2010 in the Journal of Physiology found that not eating before exercise helped people burn fat, people with diabetes need to maintain blood sugar levels, and should plan to eat before, after, and sometimes even during exercise, Bland says. That’s the general recommendation, but it’s not a one-size-fits-all approach. You need to keep an eye on how your body responds, since “some people are more sensitive to the effects of exercise versus others,” Bland says. Not sure where to start? Bland recommends working with an endocrinologist or an exercise physiologist to establish blood glucose targets and an exercise plan that’s safe for you. No matter what, you’ll want to check your blood sugar before working out so you know how to fuel up. Your goal is a level greater than 100 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) — but always skip the workout if your blood sugar is at or higher than 250 mg/dL and ketosis is present, or greater than 300 mg/dL without ketosis. Be sure to talk to your doctor about your blood glucose targets before and after exercise. The Best Pre-Workout Snacks Your best bet is eating a balanced meal an hour to an hour and a half before your Continue reading >>

Bodybuilding With Diabetes.

Bodybuilding With Diabetes.

Weight training can be therapeutic and is recommended for the prevention and treatment of many diseases and illnesses. For example, it is recommended that people with diabetes exercise regularly. This is true for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. When individuals hear the term "bodybuilding," they automatically think of competitive bodybuilding. In all reality, this is just one very small sector of a large subset of the population who weight trains (e.g., body builds) for general aesthetics and health. Weight training itself can also be therapeutic and is recommended for the prevention and treatment of many diseases and illnesses. For example, it is recommended that people with diabetes exercise regularly. This is true for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. A Brief Background About Diabetes The rate of diabetes is soaring at an unthinkable level in North America. This increase is related to the obesity epidemic in this country; diabetes is one of the many diseases associated with obesity. There Are Two Main Types Of Diabetes: Type I Type II In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas (organ responsible for insulin production) completely stops producing insulin. Insulin is the hormone necessary to use glucose (sugar) found in foods for energy. Therefore, individuals with type 1 diabetes must take insulin shots. This usually develops in children between the ages of 8 to 12, but can develop at any age. I'm aware of one woman who developed type I diabetes in her mid 50's. Type 1 diabetes cannot be prevented; it is an autoimmune disease that ultimately results in the cells of the pancreas which produce insulin to stop functioning. On the contrary, type 2 diabetes is a disease in which the body is unable to produce and/or unable to properly use insulin. This accounts for about 90% of the t Continue reading >>

The Exercise Plan That Can Reverse Prediabetes | Prevention

The Exercise Plan That Can Reverse Prediabetes | Prevention

This expert-designed training plan will put you on the fast track to getting toned all over and shrinking your dress sizeno matter how healthy you are. And if you're one of the nearly 80 million Americans with prediabetes, it also has the power to actually reverse your diagnosis. Diabetes has spread across the nation with the persistence of a glacier and the devastation of a wildfire. About 10% of American adults have type 2 diabetes, and one in three has its precursor, prediabetes. Diet clearly plays a role. When glucose (sugar) floods the bloodstream from sodas, pies, ice cream, or even white bread, the pancreas has to pump out enough insulin to drive that glucose into cells. The more glucose, the more resistant your tissues eventually become to the effects of insulinso the pancreas has to secrete even more, until eventually it tires out. But managing your diet is only one way to control glucose. A major Finnish study found that subjects who exercised regularly reduced their risk of developing diabetes by up to 70%, compared with subjects who were less active. Aerobic exercise is a good start. But a growing stack of studies suggests that interval trainingwhich alternates a relaxed pace with bursts of high-intensity movementgenerates better glucose control than steady-state cardio. Why? The intense contractions that fatigue muscles also break down carbohydrate stores in muscle. The muscles then become much more responsive to insulin as they attempt to replenish these stores. Get theexercise solution for diabeticshere. THE GOAL: Blast belly fat, improve insulin resistance, and regulate blood sugarin 8 weeks. This workout and diet plan was designed to fight prediabetes, but it's great for anyone. THE RESULTS: The six prediabetic women who followed the plan saw their ris Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet, Eating, & Physical Activity

Diabetes Diet, Eating, & Physical Activity

Nutrition and physical activity are important parts of a healthy lifestyle when you have diabetes. Along with other benefits, following a healthy meal plan and being active can help you keep your blood glucose level, also called blood sugar, in your target range. To manage your blood glucose, you need to balance what you eat and drink with physical activity and diabetes medicine, if you take any. What you choose to eat, how much you eat, and when you eat are all important in keeping your blood glucose level in the range that your health care team recommends. Becoming more active and making changes in what you eat and drink can seem challenging at first. You may find it easier to start with small changes and get help from your family, friends, and health care team. Eating well and being physically active most days of the week can help you keep your blood glucose level, blood pressure, and cholesterol in your target ranges prevent or delay diabetes problems feel good and have more energy What foods can I eat if I have diabetes? You may worry that having diabetes means going without foods you enjoy. The good news is that you can still eat your favorite foods, but you might need to eat smaller portions or enjoy them less often. Your health care team will help create a diabetes meal plan for you that meets your needs and likes. The key to eating with diabetes is to eat a variety of healthy foods from all food groups, in the amounts your meal plan outlines. The food groups are vegetables nonstarchy: includes broccoli, carrots, greens, peppers, and tomatoes starchy: includes potatoes, corn, and green peas fruits—includes oranges, melon, berries, apples, bananas, and grapes grains—at least half of your grains for the day should be whole grains includes wheat, rice, oats, co Continue reading >>

7 Things You Need To Know About Exercising With Diabetes

7 Things You Need To Know About Exercising With Diabetes

If there’s one thing people with diabetes know, it’s that regular exercise requires more than just discipline and hard work. Mismanaging your blood sugar, diet and exercise intensity levels can have adverse and unpredictable effects on your body. This month, we spoke with Dr. Jonathon R. Fowles, an exercise physiologist at the Centre of Lifestyle Studies at Acadia University, to help answer some common questions about exercising with diabetes: 1) How often should I exercise? “Regardless of whether you have type 1 or type 2 diabetes, the CDA recommends 150 minutes a week of moderate to vigorous exercise,” Fowles says. “You should be combining both aerobic (running, swimming etc.) and anaerobic (resistance training, weight lifting) activity.” 2) What are the benefits? “People with type 2 diabetes can expect to lower their AIC levels after a couple months of meeting the guidelines, and drastically reduce the progression of their diabetes, as well as their cardiovascular risk,” Fowles says. For people with type 1 diabetes, Fowles says the benefits are a little different. “The combination of exercise with insulin can be quite dramatic. People with type 1 diabetes should communicate openly with their diabetes educator or physician, to learn the interaction between exercise, food and insulin," he says. “The evidence isn’t quite as strong for glucose regulation for people with type 1 diabetes, but it’s definitely beneficial for their cardiovascular risk reduction, overall health and quality of life.” 3) Why is anaerobic exercise important? While the treadmill or tennis court may be tempting if you’re looking to lose weight, Fowles says building muscle is essential for all people with diabetes, especially as they age. “Most of your blood glucose is Continue reading >>

The Diabetic Athlete

The Diabetic Athlete

In 1998, two-time Olympic gold medal swimmer Gary Hall Jr. was preparing for the Goodwill Games when his hands suddenly began to shake in the middle of practice. He shrugged it off; after all, he was training up to eight hours a day, burning calories out of the pool as well as through running, weightlifting and boxing. He downed some PowerBars and Gatorade to boost his blood sugar and went back to work. But then he began sucking liquids like a diesel truck, sometimes drinking four gallons of orange juice in one sitting. Soon he couldnt make out the letters on a Pepsi can held at arms length. He had all the telltale signs of diabetes: extreme thirst, blurry vision and fatigue. When he was diagnosed, he was told that his swimming career was over. The doctors said exercise was good in moderation, but not at the level I was at, says Hall. Yet he continued to dive into his sport, revamping his diet and closely monitoring his condition for warning signs. And when he climbed out of the pool in Sydney last year, four more Olympic medals hung around his neck, two of them gold. Hall may be an exceptional case, but he shows that men can pursue active lifestyles, and even exceed their expectations, while managing diabetes. About 16 million Americans have diabetes, and about 2,200 new cases are diagnosed each day. There are two primary kinds of diabetes: Type 2, in which the body lacks sufficient insulin or the ability to use it properly, accounts for more than 85 percent of cases and is generally diagnosed in obese adults over 40. Type 1, in which the pancreas becomes unable to manufacture insulin, usually strikes those under 30 and is the more common condition among active males. Insulin is a protein hormone that enables the body to use sugar and other carbohydrates; it also help Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes And Exercise

Type 1 Diabetes And Exercise

Exercise is an absolutely vital part of type 1 diabetes treatment. Staying fit and active throughout your life has many benefits, but the biggest one for people with diabetes is this: it helps you control diabetes and prevent long-term complications. Exercise makes it easier to control your blood glucose (blood sugar) level. Exercise benefits people with type 1 because it increases your insulin sensitivity. In other words, after exercise, your body doesn't need as much insulin to process carbohydrates. If your child has type 1 diabetes, making sure he or she gets enough exercise is not only a great way to help manage his or her diabetes but also instill healthy habits from an early age. To learn more about how to safely incorporate exercise into your child's routine, read our article about physical activity for children with type 1 diabetes. Exercise can also help people with type 1 diabetes avoid long-term complications, especially heart problems. As you can read about this in our article on type 1 diabetes complications, people with diabetes are susceptible to developing blocked arteries (arteriosclerosis), which can lead to a heart attack. Exercise helps keep your heart healthy and strong. Plus, exercise helps you maintain good cholesterol—and that helps you avoid arteriosclerosis. Additionally, there are all the traditional benefits of exercise: Lower blood pressure Better control of weight Leaner, stronger muscles Stronger bones More energy One person who certainly understands the benefits of exercise in managing type 1 diabetes is Jay Cutler, quarterback for the Chicago Bears. He was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in 2008, but the disease hasn't interfered with his football career. To learn more, read our article about Jay Cutler's experience with type 1 diabete Continue reading >>

Fuel Up: What To Eat When You Work Out

Fuel Up: What To Eat When You Work Out

When you have type 2 diabetes, you want to get the most bang for your exercise buck. You’ll need to fuel up the right way before, during, and after you work out. If you can manage your diabetes with diet and exercise alone, you don’t need a pre-workout snack any more than someone without the disease. But if you take insulin or a drug that pushes your pancreas to make it, you might have to think before you snack. What to eat depends on a few things: How high your blood sugar is before you work out How long you’ll be at it What time of day you plan to do it How your body reacts to exercise Check your blood sugar. If your reading is between 200 and 300 mg/dl and you’ve already eaten at least once that day, you probably don’t need to eat anything. But you do need to check for ketones if it’s over 250. Your body makes them when it burns fat for fuel instead of sugar. Don’t exercise if you have them. If your reading is over 300, ask your doctor if exercise is OK. Otherwise, grab a snack with 15-30 grams of carbs. The lower your blood sugar is before you start and the longer you plan to work out, the larger your snack should be, up to 30 grams of carbs. You’ll probably have to try a few options and amounts to see what works best. These snacks offer 15 grams of carbs with little prep time: 1 small piece of fresh fruit (4 ounces) 1 slice of bread (1 ounce) or 1 (6-inch) tortilla 1/2 cup of oatmeal 2/3 cup of plain fat-free yogurt or sweetened with sugar substitutes These have 30 grams of carbs: 1/2 peanut butter sandwich (1 slice whole wheat bread with 1 tablespoon peanut butter) and 1 cup milk 1 English muffin and 1 teaspoon low-fat margarine 3/4 cup whole grain, ready-to-eat cereal and 1/2 cup fat-free milk Continue reading >>

The Ultimate Muscle Building Diet Plan For Men With Diabetes | Calories, Macros, Nutrient Timing, And Supplements

The Ultimate Muscle Building Diet Plan For Men With Diabetes | Calories, Macros, Nutrient Timing, And Supplements

Everyone who goes to the gym with the goal of getting stronger and leaner is technically bodybuilding whether you like it or not. Competitive bodybuilding is fat loss taken that little bit further. The best diabetes bodybuilding diet plan is the one you can stick to the longest. Bodybuilding involves set periods of eating a calorie surplus and deficit. Bodybuilding is more challenging for people with diabetes. There are many important nutrition considerations. 99% of people looking to lose weight or gain muscle mass prioritse the wrong things when it comes to diet. If you don’t assess your diet you won’t reach your true potential. You need fewer supplements than you think. Both whey and creatine are valid options for people with diabetes. What you’re in for? 3,500 Words Reading Time ~ 20 minutes If you live with diabetes and love bodybuilding, this article is for you. I’m all for building muscle and shredding fat as fast as possible. However, to achieve this, your diet MUST be set up correctly. There is a fine line between… Eating too much Vs. Eating too little. Taking too much insulin Vs. Taking too little. Training too much Vs. Training too little. Overlook one detail and you run the risk of burning out, losing muscle, gaining body fat and looking the same (or worse) from year to year Sound familiar? Bodybuilding with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes, is more challenging than you think. That’s why so many people living with diabetes fail to look and perform their best in the gym. It’s taken me ten years of academic learning, 1000s of blood glucose tests, 1000s of hours in the gym and over 700 clients later to develop, The Ultimate Bodybuilding Cutting and Mass Building Diet Plan for people living with diabetes. BEFORE WE BEGIN: WHAT IS BODYBUILDING? When you h Continue reading >>

Post-workout Diet For People With Diabetes

Post-workout Diet For People With Diabetes

Post-workout Diet for People with Diabetes Since todays blog is about post-exercise snack strategies were assuming that you are already exercising. But for those who havent started yetand you know who you areremember that people who have diabetes need to exercise. Exercise can improve cardiovascular function, increase flexibility and strength and lower blood glucose levels. For people who take oral medications that cause the pancreas to increase its insulin production (such as glyburide, glucotrol, amaryl) or who take insulin, moderate or vigorous exercise can also lead to hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). Exercise has the potential to cause hypoglycemia up to 24 hours after you have stopped exercising. Therefore it is important to exercise safely. Follow the tips below to get the most out of your exercise sessions while maintaining good blood glucose control. Aim for a blood glucose level above 110mg/dl when you finish your exercise session. If your blood glucose is less than 110 mg/dl immediately after exercise: Have a 15-30 carbohydrate snack post exercise. If no meal or snack is scheduled for more than one hour, take 15 grams of carbohydrates and 7-8 grams of protein. If you take insulin, decrease the dose of insulin acting during the time you exercise for your next session. Consider decreasing the insulin dosage following exercise. Increase carbohydrates before and/or during exercise. If your blood glucose at bedtime is still less than 100 mg/dl, DOUBLE your bedtime snack, or, if possible, decrease your insulin dose acting during bedtime. Remember, hydration is important. Make sure you drink adequate fluid during and after you workout. For those controlled with diet and exercise or with medications such as metformin or actos, extra snacking before or after exercise Continue reading >>

How To Create A Pre- And Post-workout Eating Plan With Diabetes

How To Create A Pre- And Post-workout Eating Plan With Diabetes

5 Tips for Maintaining Good Blood Sugars During Exercise Jewels Doskicz is a registered nurse, freelance writer, patient advocate, health coach, and long-distance cyclist. Jewels is the moderator of Diabetic Connects weekly #DCDE Twitter chat, and she and her daughter both live healthfully with type 1 diabetes. You have diabetes, and you know you should be exercising, but you're concerned. You're concerned about dealing with low blood sugars, which can be scary. You're also concerned that you won't know how your body will react once you add new activity into your day. That's okay. But that's still no reason not to get the physical activity your body needs. Here are five tips that can help you as you start getting used to adding exercise into your daily life. 1. Sport beverages dont have to be part of the equation. You can down something healthier like fruit juice or a supplement like Skratch or Recharge if you need electrolytes but dont want the high fructose corn syrup and food dyes. 2. Bring two water bottles. Fill one with carb-filled liquid and the other with water. This way if youre running low or high, you have choices. 3. Think about fueling before you exercise. This may equate to a higher-carb dinner the night before, free carbs before exercise (not taking insulin for the carbs you eat), making adjustments to fast-acting insulin, and timing your exercise to avoid insulin peaks. Starting to exercise with full glycogen stores is ideal. 4. Replenish your carb banks. Stay on top of your carb supply as you exercise. Sip water powered with Nuun or try using products such as Clif Shot Bloks or GU Energy Gel , which are easy to carry along. Remember that the muscles and liver store carb supplies as glycogen. When you exercise and tap into these reserves, it helps the b Continue reading >>

10 Diet And Exercise Tricks To Control Diabetes

10 Diet And Exercise Tricks To Control Diabetes

Small goals make a big difference When it comes to type 2 diabetes, you need diet and exercise goals that encourage you to succeed—not ones that set you up to fail, says Ann Goebel-Fabbri, PhD, a psychologist and investigator at the Joslin Diabetes Center, in Boston. "I think goals have to be small and well spelled out for people. Everyone has the experience of going to a health practitioner and being told something vague: 'You know, you really ought to lose weight.' What does that mean? Goals need to be broken down into small nuts and bolts," she says. First step: See where you stand now Margaret Savoca, PhD, an assistant professor in the department of nutrition at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, suggests that you stop and look at your eating and exercise habits, and figure out what will be the easiest changes to make, rather than making huge changes that are tough to sustain. "Diabetes is a marathon, not a sprint," says Elizabeth Hardy, 47, a Dallas resident who was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in 2005. For Hardy it was easiest to make changes in her life one step at a time. Here are 10 ways to start. Bring your own lunch Avoid eating lunch at restaurants or fast-food joints. Restaurant meals "can go out of control easily," Savoca says. They tend to have large portions, lots of calories, and high amounts of fat. Research has found an association between eating out more and having a higher body weight. When you make your own lunch, you control the ingredients and your portion sizes. If making your own lunch every day is too much, you might want to try twice a week to start. Use a pedometer These handy devices—available for less than $20 at sporting goods stores—clip on to your waistband and record the number of steps you take. Use one to estimat Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes: The Fitness You Need

Type 2 Diabetes: The Fitness You Need

Type 2 diabetes is not inevitable. Preventing and even reversing the onset of diabetes is entirely possible, but it takes commitment. Taking charge of your health involves a two-pronged approach: diet and exercise. Both are crucial for long-term success and optimal health. Diet and exercise Diet and exercise are both key components of a successful strategy to beat or manage diabetes. Studies show that diet and exercise can sharply lower the likelihood of diabetes, even in people who are at high risk of developing it. Learn about the risk factors for type 2 diabetes » Other studies also show that lifestyle interventions can improve insulin sensitivity and blood lipid profiles and help lower high blood sugar levels. Diet and exercise help lower body weight — and excess body weight is closely linked to the onset of diabetes. A major clinical study called the Diabetes Prevention Program studied people at risk for diabetes. It showed that lifestyle changes involving 150 minutes of exercise per week decreased the risk of progressing to type 2 diabetes by 58 percent. Keep in mind that diet and exercise should go hand in hand. For instance, even if you regularly exercise, a diet with lots of sugar and fat and very little fiber or phytonutrients (beneficial plant compounds) could more than counteract those efforts. On the other hand, you can eat a healthful diet, but if you never get up and move, your cardiovascular health will almost certainly suffer. Cardiovascular health and diabetes are also intricately linked. Committing to a better diet and daily exercise promotes better blood sugar levels, blood lipid control, and mood. It also leads to higher energy levels, which makes it easier to exercise. Daily exercise helps keep blood vessels healthy, makes you feel better about Continue reading >>

How Do I Fuel For Exercise?

How Do I Fuel For Exercise?

I have type 2 diabetes, and I am a runner. Every day I run for 1 hour. What food can I eat, and what should I drink before I run? Miguel ngel Sosa Alfonso, Colombia, South America It is not usually necessary to eat extra for activities lasting an hour or less, but depending on the intensity of exercise you do, how long you work out, and the type of medications youre on, you may need to fuel up before, during, or after a workout. To best determine if you need to eat, consider the intensity of the run and check your blood glucose at the start and end of your workout. For example, if your blood glucose typically drops 50 mg/dl during a run and your target blood glucose is 120 mg/dl, you would want to eat a snack when your pre-run blood glucose readings are less than 170 mg/dl. If your pre-run blood glucose is 200 mg/dl, however, you probably dont need a snack. If you take insulin or certain oral medications such as glyburide, glimepiride, or glipizideyou may be at a higher risk for exercise-induced hypoglycemia (low blood glucose) . In that case, eat a snack with 10 to 20 grams of carbohydrate for every 30 minutes of moderate exercise (when you can hold a conversation while working out, but cant sing). Five to 10 grams of carbohydrate should be adequate for a low-intensity run (when you can comfortably sing a tune while you exercise). Still, you may need extra carbs during or after your workout to keep your blood glucose from dipping too low. Good choices for a pre-run snack include slowly absorbed carbohydrate sources, such as whole grain snack bars, apples, peaches, dates, figs, milk, and yogurt. If you use sports drinks, which raise blood glucose quickly, consider those with 6 to 8 grams of carbohydrate per 100 milliliters of fluid. Water is generally enough to keep yo Continue reading >>

15 Exercise Tips For People With Type 2 Diabetes

15 Exercise Tips For People With Type 2 Diabetes

Get a move on Exercise is safe—and highly recommended—for most people with type 2 diabetes, including those with complications. Along with diet and medication, exercise will help you lower blood sugar and lose weight. However, the prospect of diving into a workout routine may be intimidating. If you're like many newly diagnosed type 2 diabetics, you may not have exercised in years. If that's the case, don't worry: It's fine to start slow and work up. These tips will help you ease back into exercise and find a workout plan that works for you. Try quick workouts As long as you're totaling 30 minutes of exercise each day, several brief workouts are fine, says George Griffing, MD, professor of endocrinology at the Saint Louis University School of Medicine in St. Louis. "We need people with diabetes up and moving," Dr. Griffing says. "If you can do your exercise in one 30 minute stretch, fine. But if not, break it up into increments you can manage that add up to at least 30 minutes each day." Focus on overall activity Increase activity in general—such as walking or climbing stairs—rather than a particular type of exercise. However, don't rely on housework or other daily activity as your sole exercise. Too often, people overestimate the amount of exercise they get and underestimate the amount of calories they consume. (A step-counting pedometer can help.) Get a pedometer Stanford University researchers conducted a review of 26 studies looking at the use of pedometers as motivation for physical activity. Published in 2007, the review found that people who used a pedometer increased their activity by 27%. Having a goal of 10,000 steps a day (about five miles) was important, even if the goal wasn't reached. Pedometer users lost more weight, had a greater drop in blood pr Continue reading >>

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