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Type 2 Diabetes And Vegan Diets

Type 2 Diabetes And Vegan Diets

The only prospective study measuring rates of diabetes in vegans, the Adventist Health Study 2, found them to have a 60% less chance of developing the disease than non-vegetarians after two years of follow-up. Previously, a cross-sectional report from the Adventist Health Study-2 showed vegans to have a 68% lower rate of diabetes than non-vegetarians. A number of clinical trials have now shown that a vegan, or mostly vegan, diet can lower body weight, reduce blood sugar, and improve other parameters for type 2 diabetes. 2017 Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies A 2017 meta-analysis reviewed 14 studies published in 13 papers ( 17 ). Two were cohort studies and the other 12 were cross-sectional. Vegetarians had a lower incidence of diabetes in eight of the studies while there was no difference in the other five. Based on the pooled analysis of the studies, vegetarians had a 27% lower risk for diabetes compared to omnivores (OR 0.73, 95% CI: 0.61, 0.87). When the researchers looked at effects in different groups, they found that vegetarian men were less likely to have diabetes than omnivore men, but there was no difference in risk between vegetarian and omnivore women. The researchers also looked at different types of vegetarian diets and found that risk for diabetes was lowest among vegans and lacto-vegetarians. Pesco-vegetarians did not have a lower risk for diabetes compared to omnivores, although semi-vegetarians did. The main limitation of this meta-analysis is that most of the studies were cross-sectional. In addition, the studies were from diverse populations throughout the world where definitions and composition of vegetarian diets may differ. This might explain why among these studies, the findings were stronger in studies from North America, Europe, and the We Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And The Vegetarian Diet

Type 2 Diabetes And The Vegetarian Diet

From the Clinical Nutrition & Risk Factor Modification Center (DJAJ, CWCK, AM, ALJ, and LSAA) and the Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism (DJAJ), St Michael's Hospital, Toronto; the Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto (DJAJ, CWCK, AM, and LSAA); the Department of Medicine, Children's Hospital, Boston (DSL); the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, Washington, DC (NDB); and the VA Medical Center, Graduate Center for Nutritional Sciences, University of Kentucky, Lexington (JWA). Address reprint requests to DJA Jenkins, Clinical Nutrition & Risk Factor Modification Center, St Michael's Hospital, 61 Queen Street East, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5C 2T2. E-mail: [email protected] . Search for other works by this author on: From the Clinical Nutrition & Risk Factor Modification Center (DJAJ, CWCK, AM, ALJ, and LSAA) and the Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism (DJAJ), St Michael's Hospital, Toronto; the Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto (DJAJ, CWCK, AM, and LSAA); the Department of Medicine, Children's Hospital, Boston (DSL); the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, Washington, DC (NDB); and the VA Medical Center, Graduate Center for Nutritional Sciences, University of Kentucky, Lexington (JWA). Search for other works by this author on: From the Clinical Nutrition & Risk Factor Modification Center (DJAJ, CWCK, AM, ALJ, and LSAA) and the Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism (DJAJ), St Michael's Hospital, Toronto; the Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto (DJAJ, CWCK, AM, and LSAA); the Department of Medicine, Children's Hospital, Boston (DS Continue reading >>

Vegetarian Dieting May Lead To Greater Weight Loss

Vegetarian Dieting May Lead To Greater Weight Loss

Vegetarian dieting may lead to greater weight loss Vegetarian dieting may lead to greater weight loss "Dieters who follow a vegetarian eating plan lose nearly twice as much weight," the Daily Mail reports following the results of a new study. Researchers randomly assigned two groups of people with type 2 diabetes to either a vegetarian diet or a standard weight loss diet. They found those on the vegetarian diet lost more weight and more body fat. Both diets involved reducing daily calorie consumption by 500 calories a day. The standard weight loss diet in this study is a diet recommended for people with diabetes. The vegetarian diet consisted of leafy vegetables, nuts, fruit, and grains. After six months, researchers found those in the vegetarian group had lost about twice as much weight as those in the other group – 6.2kg, compared with 3.2kg. But this isn't surprising – more people stuck to this diet compared with those on the standard weight loss diet. The media failed to make it clear that the study was carried out on overweight people with type 2 diabetes, and therefore the findings may not apply to other people trying to lose weight. If you have  type 2 diabetes and you're overweight, you should aim to  lose weight  as this will help control your symptoms. Some people may benefit from switching to a vegetarian diet, but it's not a magic bullet. The important thing if you're trying to lose weight is to reduce your daily calorie intake and get more exercise. Learn more in the  weight loss guide . The study was carried out by researchers from the Institute for Clinical and Experimental medicine, Charles University, and the Institute of Endocrinology, all in the Czech Republic, and the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine in the US. It was funded Continue reading >>

How To Manage Your Diabetes As A Vegetarian

How To Manage Your Diabetes As A Vegetarian

In this article, we will take a look at the benefits of following a vegetarian diet if you have diabetes. Though we cannot recommend a drastic change in one’s diet, we will enumerate the benefits of following a vegetarian diet. Prior to making any major changes in your diet if you have diabetes, it is imperative that you check with your primary care provider, and registered dietician or Certified Diabetes Educator for their input and expertise. Types of vegetarians Vegan A vegan is the strictest type of vegetarian. The vegan diet is referred to as a “total,” or “pure” vegetarian diet. People who are vegans do not eat any meat or animal products, including eggs and dairy products. This also includes fish and seafood. They are on a plant-based diet. To get the protein needed daily on a vegan diet, a person with diabetes could eat soy based products such as tofu or soy milk, all sorts of vegetables, and a variety of beans and whole grains. This is important because proteins are the “building blocks,” and have important functions related to cell structure and function, and even to make the hormone insulin. Because a vegan diet is low in vitamin B12, a multivitamin or supplement is usually recommended for a vegan diet. Ask your doctor before going on a vegan diet plan, and inquire about your vitamin B-12 needs while on a vegan diet. Lacto-vegetarian The lacto-vegetarian doesn’t eat meat or eggs. However, they don’t mind including milk products in their diet. Lacto-ovo vegetarian This group does not eat any meat, but they do enjoy animal products such as eggs and all varieties of milk products, such as eggs or cheese. Other Variations There are some variations on the theme, such as “pescetarian,” who will eat fish. There is also a version called, “raw Continue reading >>

How I Reversed My Diabetes And Stopped All Medications With A Plant-based Diet

How I Reversed My Diabetes And Stopped All Medications With A Plant-based Diet

I grew up at the tip of southern Texas with four brothers and three sisters. When I was eight years old, my father abandoned our family, and my mother was left to raise eight children on her own. In search of better employment, she moved us to the Chicago area in 1982. In high school, I thrived as an athlete and earned a football scholarship to the University of Michigan. In those days, I could eat whatever I wanted and did not have weight issues, because I was so physically active. At twenty-one years old I was 6’2″ and weighed 305 pounds. A Family Medical History Filled With Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Cancer As a young adult, I witnessed my beloved mother, the rock of our family, battle type 2 diabetes and the complications that come with it. She suffered from kidney failure, vision problems, and heart disease. After 33 years of fighting diabetes, she passed away in April of 2002. I miss her dearly. Just two months later, my oldest brother David passed away from pancreatic cancer. Out of eight siblings, my sister Jill is the only one who has not been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. But she, too, has felt its impact personally, since she donated one of her kidneys to our mother. My sisters Carol and Sandra, and my brothers Martin and Joe (my twin), have all struggled with the disease for years. Just two months ago, Joe also suffered a heart attack. Martin suffers terribly: he has had a pancreas and kidney transplant, is legally blind, had his right leg amputated, goes to dialysis three times a week, and takes 25 medications every day. My Own Struggle With Diabetes I have also struggled with diabetes. I was diagnosed with the disease the same year that it claimed my mom’s life. At that time, I began taking five different oral medications including Metformin and Continue reading >>

Breakfast Recipes For A Vegan Diabetic

Breakfast Recipes For A Vegan Diabetic

Source With the need to meet the requirements of two meal plans, it can be an extra challenge to find breakfast recipes for a vegan diabetic. The Most Important Meal of the Day Your mother was right. Breakfast is the most important meal of the day, and this is especially true for diabetics. A meal combining protein and low-glycemic carbs helps regulate blood sugar levels, preventing high spikes and sharp dips that can cause problems such as difficulty concentrating and fatigue. Good carb choices include whole-wheat toast or steel-cut oats, or low-glycemic fruits like berries or melon. Combine your carb with a low-fat protein like vegan yogurt, tofu, or a vegan-friendly meat substitute for a healthy and balanced breakfast. Is a Vegan Diet Safe for Diabetics? Quite simply, yes. The same basic diet guidelines apply to all diabetics, whether vegan or non-vegan. Consume carbohydrates in moderation, and choose whole grains and low-glycemic fruits instead of heavily processed flours and sugars. Keep close track of your meals to be sure to get an adequate amount of protein, about a half gram of protein per pound of body weight each day. Few plant proteins contain all eight needed amino acids, so vegans will need to be careful to get protein from a variety of sources. Easy Breakfast Recipes for a Vegan Diabetic Some days, there's no time to put together a meal. If you need a quick meal for a morning on the run, a smoothie might be just the ticket. Basic Breakfast Smoothie - makes 1 serving 1 cup soy milk or low-fat soy milk 1/2 banana, frozen and sliced 3 tbsp. wheat germ 1/2 tsp. vanilla Combine all ingredients in a blender, and blend until smooth and creamy. If a meal-in-a-glass isn't your morning preference, try using tofu as a base for a vegan version of classic scrambled eg Continue reading >>

Vegetarian Diets Almost Twice As Effective In Reducing Body Weight, Study Finds

Vegetarian Diets Almost Twice As Effective In Reducing Body Weight, Study Finds

Follow all of ScienceDaily's latest research news and top science headlines ! Vegetarian diets almost twice as effective in reducing body weight, study finds Dieters who go vegetarian not only lose weight more effectively than those on conventional low-calorie diets but also improve their metabolism by reducing muscle fat, a new study has found. The vegetarian diet was found to be almost twice as effective in reducing body weight than the conventional diet. The vegetarian diet was found to be almost twice as effective in reducing body weight than the conventional diet. Dieters who go vegetarian not only lose weight more effectively than those on conventional low-calorie diets but also improve their metabolism by reducing muscle fat, a new study published in the Journal of the American College of Nutrition has found. Losing muscle fat improves glucose and lipid metabolism so this finding is particularly important for people with metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes, says lead author, Dr. Hana Kahleov, Director of Clinical Research at the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine in Washington DC. Seventy-four subjects with type 2 diabetes were randomly assigned to follow either a vegetarian diet or a conventional anti-diabetic diet. The vegetarian diet consisted of vegetables, grains, legumes, fruits and nuts, with animal products limited to a maximum of one portion of low-fat yoghurt per day; the conventional diabetic diet followed the official recommendations of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD). Both diets were restricted by 500 kilocalories per day compared to an isocaloric intake for each individual. The vegetarian diet was found to be almost twice as effective in reducing body weight, resulting in an average loss of 6.2kg compared to Continue reading >>

Adopting A Vegetarian Meal Plan

Adopting A Vegetarian Meal Plan

An Option to Consider The road to health is paved with vegetables, fruits, beans, rice and grains. – Polly Strand In the United States, vegetarianism has often been considered something of a fad or an aspect of an “alternative” lifestyle. In recent years, however, this way of eating has become more mainstream. Today, up to 10% of Americans call themselves vegetarians, although they don’t all define the word the same way. “Vegans” avoid all foods derived from animals and eat only plant-based foods. “Lacto-vegetarians” avoid meat, poultry, fish, and eggs but include dairy products in their diets along with plant foods. “Lacto-ovo vegetarians” eat eggs in addition to dairy products and plant foods. And “flexitarians” (sometimes called “semi-vegetarians”) follow a primarily plant-based diet but occasionally eat small amounts of meat, poultry, or fish. The reasons people adopt a vegetarian eating style are varied and may include concern for animals and/or the environment, personal health, and culture or religion. Following a vegetarian meal plan does appear to have health benefits. According to the American Dietetic Association, vegetarians are less likely than meat eaters to be overweight or obese or to have Type 2 diabetes. They also tend to have lower blood cholesterol levels and lower blood pressure, and they have lower rates of death from heart disease and prostate or colon cancer. The features of a vegetarian meal plan that may reduce the risk of chronic disease include lower intakes of saturated fat and cholesterol and higher intakes of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, nuts, soy products, fiber, and phytochemicals (chemical compounds found in plants that may be beneficial to human health). In many ways, the characteristics of a well-planne Continue reading >>

Healthful Vegetarian Diet Reduces Type 2 Diabetes Risk Substantially

Healthful Vegetarian Diet Reduces Type 2 Diabetes Risk Substantially

Healthful vegetarian diet reduces type 2 diabetes risk substantially A new study, published this week in PLOS Medicine, shows that a diet low in animal-based foods and high in plant-based foods substantially lowers the risk of type 2 diabetes. They also find that the quality of the plant-based diet plays a significant role. Eating fewer animal products reduces diabetes risk. It is common knowledge that eating fruits and vegetables is essential to maintain a healthy body. It is also becoming clear, as research mounts, that a diet featuring fewer animal products is also a healthier option. For instance, a study published in 2013 that followed almost 70,000 people concluded that a vegetarian diet lowered the risk of cancer . Similarly, a study published in Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases in the same year followed more than 15,000 individuals and found that a vegetarian diet lessened the risk of diabetes . As a final example, a meta-analysis of more than 250 studies, published in JAMA Internal Medicine in 2014, demonstrated that a vegetarian diet significantly reduces blood pressure . The latest study in this vein once again looked at the effect of a vegetarian diet on diabetes. However, this study also looked at the quality of the vegetarian diet. They took into account whether the vegetarian diet was high in nutritious plant-based foods, such as whole grains, fresh fruits, and vegetables, and contrasted it with less healthy vegetarian diets that included items like refined grains, potatoes, and sweetened beverages. The team, headed up by Ambika Satija, also collated information about the amount of animal-based foods that the participants consumed. In all, the study used data from more than 20,000 male and female health professionals across the United St Continue reading >>

Vegetarian/diabetic Recipes | Sparkrecipes

Vegetarian/diabetic Recipes | Sparkrecipes

Spritz with olive oil and bake the breaded eggplant instead of frying for a lower calorie meal. May also use fat-free cheeses, but we love the recipe as written.Submitted by GETTO140 Carbs: 20.5g | Fat: 13.5g | Fiber: 3.5g | Protein: 16.2g | Calories: 263.6 Carbs: 21.1g | Fat: 0.5g | Fiber: 7.6g | Protein: 8.6g | Calories: 120.7 chipotle veggie 'burger'Submitted by A.WYLIE1 Carbs: 21g | Fat: 0.6g | Fiber: 6g | Protein: 5.9g | Calories: 110.9 Cookbook creator says: another version try using cooked quinoa instead of riceSubmitted by GOLFINGIRL Carbs: 31.8g | Fat: 9.2g | Fiber: 4.8g | Protein: 12.3g | Calories: 255.3 This Marinated Tempeh can be added to any combination of stir-fried vegetables - It adds a sauce as well - very good over brown rice.Submitted by SHAREDFIELD Carbs: 19.5g | Fat: 8g | Fiber: 6.3g | Protein: 12.1g | Calories: 201 Low-fat, crispy, garlic-seasoned oven fries.Submitted by LAYCEY Carbs: 33g | Fat: 0.4g | Fiber: 4.1g | Protein: 4.2g | Calories: 144 A tasty non-meat way to get some extra protein in your diet.Submitted by LILLAKE Carbs: 16g | Fat: 7.8g | Fiber: 3.5g | Protein: 11.5g | Calories: 180.3 A great recipe that is easy to make.Submitted by SPROUT Carbs: 8.5g | Fat: 8.5g | Fiber: 1.8g | Protein: 13.4g | Calories: 161.2 An easy and delicious meal.Submitted by DEBJOY Carbs: 23.9g | Fat: 15.3g | Fiber: 12g | Protein: 7.3g | Calories: 228.1 A traditional Family Recipe, not pretty, but very tasty and fillingSubmitted by COREBEENA Carbs: 41.7g | Fat: 9.8g | Fiber: 7.9g | Protein: 25.6g | Calories: 345.5 Quinoa is a tasty little seed (actually NOT a grain) that is high in fiber!Submitted by TLOGIRL Carbs: 34.3g | Fat: 4.2g | Fiber: 7g | Protein: 9.3g | Calories: 208.4 Carbs: 29.6g | Fat: 5g | Fiber: 3.1g | Protein: 5.9g | Calories: 185.3 Carbs: 22.3g Continue reading >>

Diabetic Diet Plan

Diabetic Diet Plan

Diabetes Diet Guidelines About 11 million Americans have diabetes, a disease that takes a heavy toll. Medical costs attributed to diabetes exceed $15 billion a year. Diabetes, which is associated with cardiovascular disease and kidney complications, claims over 130,000 lives a year. Consumption of a low-fat, plant-based diet, coupled with regular exercise and weight loss, has been shown to reduce the risk of Type II diabetes (non-insulin dependant diabetes) and facilitate the successful management of Type II diabetes. A vegetarian diet, rich in legumes and slow-digesting whole grains, improves blood glucose control and provides long-term benefits for those individuals with Type II diabetes. Diabetes has been found to be 1.5 to 2 times higher in nonvegetarians compared with vegetarians. A high percentage of Type II diabetics are overweight. The risk of diabetes increases especially in those with a high abdominal to hip body fat ratio. Bulky, fiber-rich meals have a lower caloric density, increase feelings of fullness and enable one to more easily lose weight. Weight reduction is associated with a reduction in blood pressure and blood lipid levels, and a decrease in insulin requirements. Since alcohol produces insulin resistance and elevated blood glucose levels its use cannot be recommended. Anderson opened up new approaches to diabetic management with the development of high-fiber diets for the diabetic. He demonstrated that diabetic control is greatly improved by high-fiber diets composed of whole-grain cereals, vegetables and legumes in which 60 percent of the calories are in the form of carbohydrates and not more than 25% of the calories come from fat, with at least 50 grams of fiber. Many Type II diabetics experienced much better glucose control with greatly reduced Continue reading >>

The Ultimate Anti-diabetes Diet

The Ultimate Anti-diabetes Diet

One of America's most common killer diseases, type 2 diabetes, jeopardizes the health, quality of life, and longevity of nearly 24 million Americans, according to the American Diabetes Association, and that number continues to rise. New cases have doubled over the past 30 years, and because the disease occurs gradually and often with no obvious symptoms, many people don't even know they have it. People who are overweight are at higher risk because fat interferes with the body's ability to use insulin, the crux of the disease. But a solution to the problem is within reach: a groundbreaking eating plan not only helps prevent this chronic disease, but actually reverses it while also promoting weight loss. Focusing on plant-based meals,the revolutionary plan was developed by Vegetarian Times former Ask the Doc columnist, Neal Barnard, MD, and is backed by the results of his long-term study. Your doctor may not tell you about this diet: dietitians generally counsel overweight diabetics to cut calories, reduce serving sizes, and avoid starchy carbohydrates that raise blood sugar levels. But Barnard's team at the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine and scientists at George Washington University and the University of Toronto thought this might be the wrong approach, considering that carbohydrate-rich rice, legumes, and root vegetables are staples throughout Asia and Africa, where most people are thin and diabetes rates are low. Barnard and his team studied a group of diabetics, comparing the effects of a diet based on standard recommendations versus a vegan-style diet with no limits on calories, carbs, or portions, and just three rules: eliminate meat, dairy, and eggs; minimize fat and oil; and favor low-glycemic foods (such as beans, vegetables, brown rice, and oatme Continue reading >>

Indian-style Vegetarian Skillet

Indian-style Vegetarian Skillet

Choices: Starch 1.5, Vegetable 1, Lean Meat 1, Fat 1.5 In a large skillet, heat the oil over medium heat. Add the onion and sauté for 4 minutes. Add the garlic and ginger, and sauté for 1 minute. Add the curry powder and cumin, and sauté for 30 seconds. Add the edamame and cook until the beans are tender, about 10 minutes. Add the tomatoes, chickpeas, salt, and pepper, and cook for 2 minutes. If desired, serve over 1/2 cup cooked bulgur (carbohydrate 17 g) or 1/3 cup cooked whole wheat couscous (carbohydrate 16 g). Continue reading >>

California Avocado Veggie Tacos-diabetic Diet

California Avocado Veggie Tacos-diabetic Diet

1 ripe, Fresh California Avocado As needed Non-stick cooking spray 1 1/4 cups onion, julienne strips 1 1/2 cups sweet green pepper, julienne strips 1 1/2 cups sweet red pepper, julienne strips 1 cup cilantro 1 1/2 cups Fresh Tomato Salsa (recipe below) 12 (8-inch) flour tortillas As needed Fresh Tomato Salsa (Yield: 1 1/2 cups) 1 cup fresh tomatoes, diced 1/3 cup onions, diced 1/2 clove garlic, minced 1/3 tsp. jalapeño peppers, minced 2 tsp. cilantro, minced 1 pinch cumin 1 1/2 tsp. fresh lime juice Instructions Prepare fresh tomato salsa in advance (see below). Spray skillet with non-stick cooking spray. Lightly sauté the onion and green and red peppers. Mince cilantro and cut avocado into 12 slices. Warm tortillas in oven or in a cast iron skillet and fill with sautéed peppers and onions, cilantro, avocado slices, and salsa. Fold tortilla over and serve. Salsa Preparation Mix together all ingredients and refrigerate Serving Suggestions This makes a quick snack for children after school or easy lunch. The fresh salsa can be made ahead and keeps for 2 days under refrigeration. *Large avocados are recommended for this recipe. A large avocado averages about 8 ounces. If using smaller or larger size avocados adjust the quantity accordingly. Per Serving: 158 calories, 5g fat, 0.8g saturated fat, 1.3g polyunsaturated fat, 2.7g monounsaturated fat, 0mg cholesterol, 175mg sodium, 25g total carbohydrate, 2g dietary fiber, 3g sugars, 4g protein. Exchanges Per Serving: 1 bread, 1 vegetable, 1 fat *Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 Calorie diet. Your Daily Values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs. Recipe Tags bell peppers cilantro dairy free diabetes salsa tacos tomatoes tortillas vegetables vegetarian Continue reading >>

The American Diabetes Association Vegetarian Cookbook

The American Diabetes Association Vegetarian Cookbook

The American Diabetes Association Vegetarian Cookbook Discover simple, delicious, meatless meals perfect for everyone, from the everyday vegetarian to the avid meat-eater looking for a hearty alternative. Discover simple, delicious meatless meals perfect for everyone, from the everyday vegetarian to the avid meat eater looking for a hearty alternative. Motivated by his recent diagnosis of prediabetes, chef Steven Petusevsky has created a cookbook for those who are new to vegetarianism and who want to lose weight and get their diabetes under control, all while pairing healthful eating with exceptional taste. Whether you’re a full-time vegetarian or just trying to incorporate a few meatless meals into your week, the easy-to-follow American Diabetes Association Vegetarian Cookbook is your personal guide to a healthier lifestyle, from selecting flavorful seasonal vegetables and building a pantry to preparing the most delicious and satisfying vegetarian dishes inspired by global cuisine. These versatile recipes will please every palate—proving you don’t have to sacrifice great flavor in the name of health. Softcover, 8 x 9, 158 pages, color photos Continue reading >>

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