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Diabetic Tussin Nt

Robitussin Dm Cough Syrups

Robitussin Dm Cough Syrups

Search your store by entering zip code or city, state. Showing 34 of 34 results that match your query. Product - Robitussin Adult Severe Multi-Symptom Cough Cold + Flu CF Nighttime Max, 4.0 FL OZ Product - 2 Pack Robitussin Long-Acting Cough Gels Adult Lingering Cold 20 Liqui-Gels Each Product - Robitussin Extended-Release 12 Hour Cough Relief, Orange 3 oz Product - 3 Pack Robitussin Long-Acting Cough Gels Adult Lingering Cold 20 Liqui-Gels Each Product - 4 Pack Robitussin Long-Acting Cough Gels Adult Lingering Cold 20 Liqui-Gels Each Product - Robitussin Cough & Chest Congestion Non-Drowsy Grape Flavor Liquid, 4 oz (Pack of 3) Product - 5 Pack Robitussin Long-Acting Cough Gels Adult Lingering Cold 20 Liqui-Gels Each Product - Robitussin Severe Maximum Strength Cough, Cold, & Flu Nighttime Medicine 8 oz Product - Robitussin Extended-Release 12 Hour Cough Relief, Orange 3 oz (Pack of 2) Product - Robitussin Cough & Chest Congestion Non-Drowsy Grape Flavor Liquid, 4 oz (Pack of 6) Product - Robitussin Extended-Release 12 Hour Cough Relief, Grape 3 oz (Pack of 3) Product - 2 Pack Robitussin Extended-Release 12 Hour Cough Relief Grape Flavor 3 Oz Each Product - Robitussin Cf Max 8oz + Free Dm Nt 4oz Product - Robitussin Extended-Release 12 Hour Cough Relief, Grape 3 oz (Pack of 2) Product - Robitussin Maximum Strength Severe Multi-Symptom Cough Cold+Flu Medicine 4 oz (Pack of 4) Product - Robitussin Honey Cough & Chest Congestion DM Children's Cough & Congestion Relief Liquid 4 fl. oz. Box Product - Robitussin Honey Nighttime Cough DM Maximum Strength Adult Cough Remedy Liquid 8 fl.oz. Box Product - Robitussin Extended-Release 12 Hour Cough Relief, Grape 3 oz (Pack of 6) Product - Robitussin Maximum Strength Severe Multi-Symptom Cough Cold+Flu Nighttime Medicine 4 oz (Pack Continue reading >>

Otc Cough Cold Allergy

Otc Cough Cold Allergy

aspirin 325mg, chlorpheniramine 2mg, phenylephrine 7.8mg acetaminophen 325mg, chlorpheniramine 2mg, dextromethorphan 10mg, phenylephrine 5mg Allergic Rhinitis Exclusions to Self Care "Children <12 y/o (general rule for allergies) (Preg & lac = first generation OTC antihistamines = cross into milk or dry up = do not treat [may change w/loratadine going OTC]) In OTC setting, first correct answer is to refer patients with these exclusions. -can treat someone with fever; can treat allergy portion Textbook pg. 193 --> more likely to ask question on cold however - pay attention to cut & dry dextromethorphan 10 mg; guaifenesin 100 mg dextromethorphan 10 mg; guaifenesin 200 mg brompheniramine 1 mg; phenylephrine 2.5 mg brompheniramine 1 mg; dextromethorphan 5 mg; phenylephrine 2.5 mg Dimetapp Long-Acting Cough Plus Cold -- Children's chlorpheniramine 1 mg; dextromethorphan 7.5 mg 25 mg q 4 h for adults and children > 12 y/o Geriatrics - caution use due to anticholinergic effects "Young children may experience a paradoxical excitation effect. Patient should avoid activities requiring mental alertness or coordination until drug effects are realized, as drug may cause drowsiness. This drug may cause anticholinergic effects. Elderly patients may be more susceptible to these effects. Patient should avoid concomitant use of MAO inhibitors or CNS depressants. Patient should not drink alcohol while taking this drug. IR: 200 to 400 mg ORALLY every 4 hours; MAX 2400 mg/day. ER: 600 to 1200 mg ORALLY every 12 hours; MAX 2400 mg/day DO NOT USE children < 2 yo --> life-threatening effects. IR > 12 yo: 200 to 400 mg ORALLY every 4 hours; MAX 2400 mg/day. ER > 12 yo: 600 to 1200 mg ORALLY every 12 hours; MAX 2400 mg/day. 6-11: 100 to 200 mg ORALLY every 4 hours; MAX 1200 mg/day. 4-5: 100 mg Continue reading >>

Formulary Search

Formulary Search

Some medications listed may have additionalrequirements or limitations of coverage. These requirements and limits mayinclude prior authorization, quantity limits, age limits or step therapy. Medications not listed on the formulary are consideredto be non-formulary and are subject to prior authorization. Additionally, if a medication is available as ageneric formulation, this will be Anthem's preferred agent, unless otherwisenoted. If you have any questions about coverage of a certain product, pleasecontact us at 800-473-0694. In order to request prior authorization, the provideror member must contact the Anthem pharmacy department at 800-473-0694 (Mon-Fri8am-8pm, Sat 10am-2pm). Providers should be prepared to provide relevantclinical information that supports the medical necessity of the requestedmedication. Machine Readable Data for Prescription Drug Formulary: Healthy Indiana Plan Basic Medicaid Machine Readable File Drug Search: Severe Congestion Relief 10 mg-650 mg-400 mg/20 mL oral liquid To view other medications in a therapeutic class, click any class hyperlink in your search results. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Tussin Dm Oral : Uses, Side Effects, Interactions, Pictures, Warnings & Dosing - Webmd

Diabetic Tussin Dm Oral : Uses, Side Effects, Interactions, Pictures, Warnings & Dosing - Webmd

This combination medication is used to relieve coughs caused by the common cold , bronchitis , and other breathing illnesses. Guaifenesin belongs to a class of drugs known as expectorants. It works by thinning and loosening mucus in the airways, clearing congestion, and making breathing easier. Dextromethorphan belongs to a class of drugs known as cough suppressants . It acts on a part of the brain ( cough center) to reduce the urge to cough . If you are self-treating with this medication, it is important to read the package instructions carefully before you start using this product to be sure it is right for you. (See also Precautions section.) Cough -and-cold products have not been shown to be safe or effective in children younger than 6 years. Therefore, do not use this product to treat cold symptoms in children younger than 6 years unless specifically directed by the doctor. Some products (such as long-acting tablets/capsules) are not recommended for use in children younger than 12 years. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more details about using your product safely. These products do not cure or shorten the length of the common cold and may cause serious side effects. To decrease the risk for serious side effects, carefully follow all dosage directions. Do not use this product to make a child sleepy. Do not give other cough -and-cold medication that might contain the same or similar ingredients (see also Drug Interactions section). Ask the doctor or pharmacist about other ways to relieve cough and cold symptoms (such as drinking enough fluids, using a humidifier or saline nose drops/spray). Take this medication by mouth with or without food, as directed by your doctor. If you are self-treating, follow all directions on the product package. If you are uncertain abo Continue reading >>

Are Cough And Cold Products Safe For People With Diabetes?

Are Cough And Cold Products Safe For People With Diabetes?

It's that time of year again. Stuffy noses, scratchy throats, upset tummies, and splitting headaches can send even the most stoic among us to the local drugstore for a magic pill to take away the pain. The fluorescent aisles of brightly colored bottles promising fast relief can seem daunting. Are all over-the-counter cold and flu meds safe for people with diabetes? Many over-the-counter cough, cold, and flu remedies list diabetes as an underlying condition that may indicate you should leave the medication on the shelf. The warnings are clear: "Ask a doctor before use if you have: heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes." Unfortunately, your doctor is not along for the trip to the pharmacy. Most experts agree that most people with diabetes can feel free to select whatever over-the-counter (OTC) product works best for them, so long as the medication is taken as directed. At the same time, everyone is different so it's important to shop smartly to ensure a quick and safe recovery from this season's infections. Because illness causes your body to release stress hormones that naturally raise blood glucose, you'll want to be sure that over-the-counter medications won't increase blood glucose levels, too. Ask the Pharmacist Don't just wander around the drugstore dazed and confused. "When making these choices, this is a time to utilize a pharmacist…This is what they are trained for…Tell the pharmacist all your symptoms, what other medicines you are taking,” says Jerry Meece, RPh, FACA, CDE, director of clinical services at the Plaza Pharmacy and Wellness Center in Gainesville, Texas." Meter/Monitor Accuracy There's been concern that certain OTC medications can cause false blood glucose readings. "Ten years ago, as companies were changing the process by which they mon Continue reading >>

Wikipedia:wikiproject Pharmacology/list Of Drugs

Wikipedia:wikiproject Pharmacology/list Of Drugs

Wikipedia:WikiProject Pharmacology/List of drugs This page is currently inactive and is retained for historical reference. Either the page is no longer relevant or consensus on its purpose has become unclear. To revive discussion, seek broader input via a forum such as the village pump . The contents of this page have been copied to Talk:List_of_drugs . Please put comments there. I ( User:MattKingston ) am in the process of creating a list of drugs and their various names. The list will be alphabetical and will use the following format (subject to change if better suggestions are put forward). All items in the list will follow the general format: Name of drug (who calls it that) [country]. Redirects to name of drug. ===Name of drug=== *Will be capitalized if it is a trade name (brand name) or uncapitalized if it is a generic name. *Two trade names that are nearly identical (eg Adalat PA and Adalat XL) need not have separate entries unless there is a particular reason for doing so. *Names will be listed alphabetically and broken into an appropriate number of pages (with 200-500??? items per page) Peg-Intron is the correct spelling that you have listed as Pegetron for pegylated interferaon alfa2b made by schering plough and marketed in the US for HCV For generic names, this is the agency which has designated that name. [eg ( INN ), ( BAN ), or ( USAN )] for brand names, this is the company which produces that brand. If there is more than one agency, then use a comma separated list in the brackets [eg ( INN , BAN )] Continue reading >>

How To Choose Cough Syrup For Diabetics

How To Choose Cough Syrup For Diabetics

For people with diabetes , sickness as mild as cold can truly be troublesome. The ailment itself does not endanger their health or life, but the medicine used for treating it is often contraindicated with their condition. Symptoms like coughs can often be relieved only by taking syrup, which contains sugar, which is bad for their diabetes. Diabetic people thus need to know how to pick the rightcough syrup for diabetics. If you are diabetic who is dealing with coughs, you should know whether the sugar content of the syrup is dangerous for your health and whether you should pick a sugar-free drug to treat your condition. Is the Sugar in Cough Syrup Harmful for Your Health? Before you buy and use sugar-freecough syrup for diabetics, the first option that is often available for you when it comes to choosing the right medicine for your condition a syrup that contains sugar. The question is, is the sugar content of the syrup dangerous for your condition? When you read the label of the cough syrup, you will see that the drug is not recommended for people with diabetes. The most common message printed on the label is that you need to ask your doctor before taking the drug if you have heart problem, high blood pressure or diabetes. By looking at the label alone, you should already know that the drug should be taken with caution, especially if you are diabetic. So, the drug tells you that as a diabetic , you should consult your doctor before trying to take the drug. But doctor is not available all the time, right? So, most of the time, you need to rely on your own judgment to determine whether the sugar-containing drug is safe for you to use. If you want to avoid sugar completely, then you need to avoid using sugar-containing cough syrup and choose sugar-freecough syrup for diab Continue reading >>

Access Leading Drug And Healthcare References - Medicinescomplete

Access Leading Drug And Healthcare References - Medicinescomplete

* based on average data in the last 12 months MedicinesComplete provides the latest and most relevant medicines information from world renowned publications, curated by leading scientists, experts and researchers. Gain confidence in decision making using our unbiased and reliable information on the administration and use of drugs, including drug interactions, guidance on dosage and adverse drug reactions. An intuitive search experience and a modern user interface allows you to seamlessly navigate across comprehensive and relevant content for clinical, research and education needs. Our key resources are created in house by expert teams with content reviewed and updated regularly. We pride ourselves on our rigorous editorial processes and innovative approach to content delivery. The Royal Pharmaceutical Society (RPS) leads the profession of pharmacy to improve the publics health and wellbeing. The RPS is the professional membership body for pharmacists and pharmacy in Great Britain and an internationally renowned publisher of medicines information. We advance the profession of pharmacy for public and patient benefit, to improve the health of the public and to secure the future of our members. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Tussin: Indications, Side Effects, Warnings - Drugs.com

Diabetic Tussin: Indications, Side Effects, Warnings - Drugs.com

Generic Name: Dextromethorphan , Acetaminophen , and Diphenhydramine Liquid (DEX troe meth OR fan, a SEET a MIN oh fen, & DYE fen HYE dra meen) What do I need to tell my doctor BEFORE I take Diabetic Tussin? If you have an allergy to any part of Diabetic Tussin (dextromethorphan, acetaminophen, and diphenhydramine liquid). If you are allergic to any drugs like this one, any other drugs, foods, or other substances. Tell your doctor about the allergy and what signs you had, like rash; hives ; itching; shortness of breath; wheezing ; cough; swelling of face, lips, tongue, or throat; or any other signs. If you have taken certain drugs used for low mood ( depression ) like isocarboxazid , phenelzine , or tranylcypromine or drugs used for Parkinson's disease like selegiline or rasagiline in the last 14 days. Taking Diabetic Tussin (dextromethorphan, acetaminophen, and diphenhydramine liquid) within 14 days of those drugs can cause very bad high blood pressure. If you are taking any of these drugs: Linezolid or methylene blue . If you have a cough with a lot of mucous. If you have a long-term cough caused by smoking or being around smoke, or lung problems like asthma or emphysema . This is not a list of all drugs or health problems that interact with Diabetic Tussin (dextromethorphan, acetaminophen, and diphenhydramine liquid). Tell your doctor and pharmacist about all of your drugs (prescription or OTC, natural products, vitamins ) and health problems. You must check to make sure that it is safe for you to take Diabetic Tussin (dextromethorphan, acetaminophen, and diphenhydramine liquid) with all of your drugs and health problems. Do not start, stop, or change the dose of any drug without checking with your doctor. What are some things I need to know or do while I take Diabe Continue reading >>

Dailymed - Diabetic Tussin Dm- Dextromethorphan Hydrobromide And Guaifenesin Liquid

Dailymed - Diabetic Tussin Dm- Dextromethorphan Hydrobromide And Guaifenesin Liquid

dextromethorphan hydrobromide and guaifenesin liquid DEXTROMETHORPHAN HYDROBROMIDE (UNII: 9D2RTI9KYH) (DEXTROMETHORPHAN - UNII:7355X3ROTS) GUAIFENESIN (UNII: 495W7451VQ) (GUAIFENESIN - UNII:495W7451VQ) Labeler -Health Care Products (101196749) Registrant -Hi-Tech Pharmacal Co., Inc. (101196749) DIABETIC TUSSIN DM- dextromethorphan hydrobromide and guaifenesin liquid DIABETIC TUSSIN DM- dextromethorphan hydrobromide and guaifenesin liquid dextromethorphan HBr 20 MG / guaiFENesin 200 MG in 10 mL Oral Solution Dextromethorphan Hydrobromide 2 MG/ML / Guaifenesin 20 MG/ML Oral Solution dextromethorphan hydrobromide 10 MG / guaifenesin 100 MG per 5 ML Oral Solution dextromethorphan hydrobromide 15 MG / guaifenesin 150 MG per 7.5 ML Oral Solution dextromethorphan hydrobromide 20 MG / guaifenesin 200 MG per 10 ML Oral Solution Diabetic Tussin DM 10 MG / 100 MG in 5 mL Oral Solution Dextromethorphan Hydrobromide 2 MG/ML / Guaifenesin 20 MG/ML Oral Solution [Diabetic Tussin DM] Diabetic Tussin DM (dextromethorphan hydrobromide 10 MG / guaifenesin 100 MG) per 5 ML Oral Solution DIABETIC TUSSIN DM- dextromethorphan hydrobromide and guaifenesin liquid Copy the URL below and paste it into your RSS Reader application. To receive all DailyMed Updates for the last seven days Copy the URL below and paste it into your RSS Reader application. What will I get with the DailyMed RSS feed? DailyMed will deliver notification of updates and additions to Drug Label information currently shown on this site through its RSS feed. DailyMed will deliver this notification to your desktop, Web browser, or e-mail depending on the RSS Reader you select to use. To view updated drug label links, paste the RSS feed address (URL) shown below into a RSS reader, or use a browser which supports RSS feeds, such Continue reading >>

Diabetic Tussin Nighttime Cold & Flu (acetaminophen/diphenhydramine/dextromethorphan) Dosing, Indications, Interactions, Adverse Effects, And More

Diabetic Tussin Nighttime Cold & Flu (acetaminophen/diphenhydramine/dextromethorphan) Dosing, Indications, Interactions, Adverse Effects, And More

Indicated for relief of cold and flu symptoms 10 mL PO q4hr PRN; not to exceed 6 doses/24 hr Indicated for relief of cold and flu symptoms <6 years: Safety and efficacy not established 6-12 years: 5 mL PO q4hr PRN; not to exceed 6 doses/24 hr >12 years: As adults; 10 mL PO q4hr PRN; not to exceed 6 doses/24 hr Disorientation, Dizziness, Sedation, Confusion, Decreased cognitive function in elderly Pruritic maculopapular rash, Rash, Stevens-Johnson syndrome, Toxic epidermal necrolysis, Urticaria Agranulocytosis, Leukopenia, Neutropenia, Pancytopenia, Thrombocytopenia Hepatotoxicity, Liver failureGastrointestinal hemorrhage, Nephrotoxicity, Pneumonitis, Anaphylactoid reactions Anticholinergic effects, Xerostomia, Dry nasal mucosa, Pharyngeal dryness Hepatitis or hepatic/renal dysfunction, alcoholism Repeated administration in patients with anemia or cardiac, pulmonary, or renal disease Use within 14 days of MAO inhibitor therapy Lower respiratory disease, eg, asthma (controversial) Acetaminophen is found in many other dosage forms and products, check label carefully to avoid overdose Acetaminophen: Risk for rare, but serious skin reactions that can be fatal; these reactions include Stevens-Johnson Syndrome (SJS), toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN), and acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP); symptoms may include skin redness, blisters and rash Risk of hepatotoxicity is higher in alcoholics or with use of more than one acetaminophen-containing product Phenylketonuria (phenylalanine in orange flavoring) Acetaminophen: Excreted in breast milk; compatible with breastfeeding Diphenhydramine: Enters breast milk/contraindicated Dextromethorphan: Unknown if excreted in breast milk, use caution A:Generally acceptable. Controlled studies in pregnant women show no evidence Continue reading >>

What You Always Wanted To Know

What You Always Wanted To Know

WHAT YOU ALWAYS WANTED TO KNOW BUT DIDN'T KNOW WHERE TO ASK Inclusion of materials in this publication is forinformation only and does not imply endorsement by the Diabetes Action Network of the NFB. American Diabetic Supply, Inc., will ship your diabetes supplies to your door. They handle all insurance claims, and provide free delivery. Folks with Medicare and/or private insurance (no HMOs) may receive supplies with no further cost. For information contact: American Diabetic Supply, Inc., 400 S. Atlantic Ave., Suite 108, Ormond Beach, FL 32176; telephone: 1-800-453-9033. The National Federation of the Blind (NFB)maintains the "Materials Center," at the National Center for the Blind, ourheadquarters in Baltimore, Maryland. One of the many tasks performed there is the sale ofappliances and literature of interest to the blind. Some of these items are useful fordealing with diabetes. One we recommend highly is Jordan Medical's Count-a-Dose InsulinMeasuring Gauge, which allows reliable non-sighted drawing and mixing of insulins.Currently manufactured in the one-unit "low-dose" (50-unit BD syringe) versiononly, it is supplied with cassette instructions. While supplies last, the Materials Centeralso has a few of the two-unit version (100-unit BD syringe), good for those who need todraw a larger dose (no cassette instructions supplied with this version). Both versionsare priced at $40 each at the Materials Center (Jordan's list price is $59.95). For further information, to place an order, or to obtain a free catalog (in large print or Braille) of items offered by the NFB, contact: National Federation of the Blind, Materials Center, 1800 Johnson Street, Baltimore, MD 21230; telephone: (410) 659-9314. FROM THE EDITOR: If you have diabetes, you mayneed alternatives to some commo Continue reading >>

Formulary Search

Formulary Search

Tier 1 drugs have the lowest member cost share. These are typically generic drugs that offer the greatest value compared to others that treat the same conditions. Tier 2 drugs have a medium cost share. They may be preferred brand drugs, based on their effectiveness and value. Some are newer, more expensive generic drugs. Tier 3 drugs have a higher cost share. They will most likely include non-preferred brand and generic drugs. They may cost more than others used to treat the same condition. Tier 3 may also include drugs that were recently approved by the FDA. Tier 4 specialty drugs have the highest cost share and typically consist of specialty (brand and generic) drugs. They may cost more than others used to treat the same condition. Tier 4 may also include drugs that were recently approved by the FDA or specialty drugs used to treat complex, chronic conditions and may need special handling. Not Covered drugs include drugs specifically excluded from coverage by the terms of the plan. We will not provide any reimbursement for Not Covered drugs and you will have to pay out-of-pocket for these drugs. You may appeal our denial of coverage of a Not Covered drug. A non-formulary drug is not included on a plan's Drug List. You shoulddiscuss formulary alternatives with your physician. An exception process is available to request coverage for a non-formulary drug. Click here to see the criteria. Continue reading >>

Cold Medicines That Are Safe For Diabetes

Cold Medicines That Are Safe For Diabetes

Safe OTC Cold Medicines Various over-the-counter medications are designed to treat specific symptoms. Many pharmacists recommend these products for people with diabetes. Symptom: Cough Best option: Anti-tussive dextromethorphan (Delsym, Diabetic Tussin NT [includes acetaminophen, diphenhydramine]) Symptoms: Congestion, mucus in sinus passages Best options: Decongestant pseudoephedrine (Sudafed); phenylephrine; phenylpropalamine Symptoms: Phlegm, mucus in respiratory tract Best option: Expectorant guaifenesin (Mucinex, Robitussin) Symptoms: Pain and/or fever Best options: Analgesic acetaminophen (Tylenol); aspirin For fever and pain relief, look to analgesics, including aspirin and acetaminophen. Both are safe for most people and commonly available. The analgesic class of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS), which includes ibuprofen and naproxen, may increase blood pressure and is not a good choice for people with kidney problems. Note: Be sure to call your doctor if your temperature rises above 103 degrees Fahrenheit. Symptoms: Runny nose, itchy eyes Best option: Antihistamine Less-sedating options: certirizine (Zyrtec); loratadine (Claritin) More-sedating options: chlorpheniramine (Chlortrimeton); diphenhydramine (Benadryl) For a stuffy nose, oral decongestants (pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, phenylpropalamine) can increase both blood glucose and blood pressure and therefore are not usually recommended. "The occasional use of a decongestant should be the rule," says Robert Busch, M.D., an endocrinologist from Albany, New York. You'll have to sign the pharmacy register for over-the-counter remedies containing pseudoephedrine. Federal law limits pseudoephedrine purchases because the drug can be used to make illegal methamphetamine. All oral antihistamines are Continue reading >>

Codeine-guaifenesin Oral And Doxylamine-dm-acetaminophen Oral Drug Interactions - Rxlist

Codeine-guaifenesin Oral And Doxylamine-dm-acetaminophen Oral Drug Interactions - Rxlist

home > drug interactions checker >codeine-guaifenesin oral and doxylamine-dm-acetaminophen oral interactions Drug interactions with codeine-guaifenesin oral and doxylamine-dm-acetaminophen oral codeine-guaifenesin oral brand names and other generic formulations include: Allfen CD Oral, Allfen CDX Oral, Biotussin AC Oral, Bitex Oral, Bronkisan A/C Oral, Brontex Oral, Bron-Tuss Oral, CGU WC Oral, Cheracol Cough Oral, Cheratussin AC Oral, Codafen Oral, Codar GF Oral, Dex-Tuss Oral, Diabetic Tussin C Oral, DuraGanidin NR Oral, ExeClear-C Oral, Gani-Tuss NR Oral, Glydeine Oral, Gua C Oral, Guaiatussin AC Oral, Guai-Co Oral, Guaifen-C Oral, Guaifenesin AC Oral, Guaitussin AC Oral, Guaitussin with Codeine Oral, Guiatuss AC Oral, Guiatussin W/Codeine Oral, Halotussin AC Oral, Iofen-C NF Oral, Iophen C-NR Oral, Iophen Oral, Mar-Cof CG Oral, M-Clear WC Oral, Myci-GC Oral, Mytussin AC Oral, Orgadin-Tuss Oral, Pro-Clear Caps Oral, RelCof C Oral, Robafen AC Oral, Robichem Ac Oral, Robitussin A-C Oral , Romilar AC Oral, Trymine CG Oral, Tussiden C Oral, Tussidin Nr Oral, Tussin Ac Oral, TUSSI-ORGANIDIN NR Oral, TUSSI-ORGANIDIN-S NR Oral, Tusso-C Oral All generic drug interactions for codeine-guaifenesin oral (lists will include brand and generic names): Continue reading >>

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