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Diabetic Toe Pain

Motion Based Recognition In Neurostimulator For Diabetic Foot Pain

Motion Based Recognition In Neurostimulator For Diabetic Foot Pain

Abstract: We present a novel technique for the better recovery of the diabetic foot pain by using kinematic analysis. The aim of the project is to develop a technique that not only reduces the diabetic foot pain but also involves the gait analysis. In this technique the "Helen Hayes marker set" is designed and fixed in the lower extremity of the leg (sacrum, hip, knee, ankle, heel and toe) and the walking pattern of both diabetic patients and normal subjects are recorded using SLR camera. Using TVC the videos are converted into avi format. Using Virtual dub the videos are converted into frames. The hip, knee and ankle data's are processed using MATLAB coding and angle changes are detected. The change in gait pattern and gait parameters are detected using stride analysis and stimulation is provided at exact location of pain in the foot using Neurostimulator. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Neuropathy

Diabetic Neuropathy

Print Overview Diabetic neuropathy is a type of nerve damage that can occur if you have diabetes. High blood sugar (glucose) can injure nerve fibers throughout your body, but diabetic neuropathy most often damages nerves in your legs and feet. Depending on the affected nerves, symptoms of diabetic neuropathy can range from pain and numbness in your extremities to problems with your digestive system, urinary tract, blood vessels and heart. For some people, these symptoms are mild; for others, diabetic neuropathy can be painful, disabling and even fatal. Diabetic neuropathy is a common serious complication of diabetes. Yet you can often prevent diabetic neuropathy or slow its progress with tight blood sugar control and a healthy lifestyle. Symptoms There are four main types of diabetic neuropathy. You may have just one type or symptoms of several types. Most develop gradually, and you may not notice problems until considerable damage has occurred. The signs and symptoms of diabetic neuropathy vary, depending on the type of neuropathy and which nerves are affected. Peripheral neuropathy Peripheral neuropathy is the most common form of diabetic neuropathy. Your feet and legs are often affected first, followed by your hands and arms. Signs and symptoms of peripheral neuropathy are often worse at night, and may include: Numbness or reduced ability to feel pain or temperature changes A tingling or burning sensation Sharp pains or cramps Increased sensitivity to touch — for some people, even the weight of a bed sheet can be agonizing Muscle weakness Loss of reflexes, especially in the ankle Loss of balance and coordination Serious foot problems, such as ulcers, infections, deformities, and bone and joint pain Autonomic neuropathy The autonomic nervous system controls your hea Continue reading >>

Diabetic Foot Ulcer

Diabetic Foot Ulcer

What is a diabetic foot ulcer? Diabetic foot ulcers are sores on the feet that occur in 15% of diabetic patients some time during their lifetime. The risk of lower-extremity amputation is increased 8-fold in these patients once an ulcer develops. They occur in type 1 and in type 2 diabetes mellitus. What causes a diabetic foot ulcer? A diabetic foot ulcer is caused by neuropathic (nerve) and vascular (blood vessel) complications of diabetes. Nerve damage due to diabetes causes altered or complete loss of feeling in the foot and/or leg. This is known as peripheral neuropathy. Pressure from shoes, cuts, bruises, or any injury to the foot may go unnoticed. The loss of protective sensation stops the patient from being warned that the skin is being injured and may result in skin loss, blisters and ulcers. Vascular disease is also a major problem in diabetes and especially affects very small blood vessels feeding the skin (microangiopathy). In this situation a doctor may find normal pulses in the feet because the arteries are unaffected. However other diabetic patients may also have narrowed arteries so that no pulse can be found in the feet (ischaemia). The lack of healthy blood flow may lead to ulceration. Wound healing is also impaired. Vascular disease is aggravated by smoking. What are the signs and symptoms of diabetic foot ulcer? It is not unusual for patients to have had diabetic foot ulcers for some time before presenting to a health professional, because they are frequently painless. Depending on severity, a diabetic foot ulcer may be rated between 0 and 3. 0: at risk foot with no ulceration 1: superficial ulceration with no infection 2: deep ulceration exposing tendons and joints 3: extensive ulceration or abscesses Tissue around the ulcer may become black due to t Continue reading >>

32 Home Remedies For Diabetes

32 Home Remedies For Diabetes

Even though it looks much the same as any other foot, the diabetic foot requires special attention. Why? Nerve damage is common with diabetes, especially in the lower extremities. Blood vessels are damaged as a result of the disease and circulation is decreased. When this happens, feet and legs tend to be cold and sores heal slowly, in some cases taking years to heal. This can easily lead to infection. Nerve damage can also decrease your ability to feel sensations in your feet, such as pain, heat, and cold. That means you may not notice a foot injury until you have a major infection. A common complaint from many people is, "My feet are killing me!" For a person with diabetes, that statement could be all too true. Loss of nerve function, especially on the soles of the feet, can reduce feeling and mask a sore or injury on the foot that, if left unattended, can turn into an ulcer or gangrene. Neuropathy, damage to the nerves, is a common problem for people with diabetes. It occurs most often in the feet and legs, and its signs include recurring burning, pain, or numbness. In addition to being painful, neuropathy can be harmful because if it causes a loss of feeling in the foot, even a minor foot injury may go undiscovered. In extreme cases, this can lead to serious infection, gangrene, or even amputation of the limb. Because of this, people with diabetes must be meticulous in caring for their feet. Moderate exercise, such as walking, cycling, or swimming, are best for people with diabetes. Because people with diabetes have to take some extra precautions while exercising, you will need to work with your health-care provider to design an exercise program that is right for you. For example, since exercise lowers blood glucose, you will need to learn how to maintain the correc Continue reading >>

Diabetic Foot Care - Symptoms

Diabetic Foot Care - Symptoms

A A A Diabetic Foot Care (cont.) Write down the patient's symptoms and be prepared to talk about them on the phone with a doctor. Following is a list of common reasons to call a doctor if a person with diabetes has a diabetic foot or leg problem. For most of these problems, a doctor visit within about 72 hours is appropriate. Any significant trauma to the feet or legs, no matter how minor, needs medical attention. Even minor injuries can result in serious infections. Persistent mild-to-moderate pain in the feet or legs is a signal that something is wrong. Constant pain is never normal. Any new blister, wound, or ulcer less than 1 inch across can become a more serious problem. The patient will need to develop a plan with a doctor on how to treat these wounds. Any new areas of warmth, redness, or swelling on the feet or legs are frequently early signs of infection or inflammation. Addressing them early may prevent more serious problems. Pain, redness, or swelling around a toenail could mean the patient has an ingrown toenail - a leading cause of diabetic foot infections and amputations. Prompt and early treatment is essential. New or constant numbness in the feet or legs can be a sign of diabetic nerve damage (neuropathy) or of impaired circulation in the legs. Both conditions put the patient at risk for serious problems such as infections and amputations. Difficulty walking can result from diabetic arthritis (Charcot's joints), often a sign of abnormal strain or pressure on the foot or of poorly fitting shoes, as well as the inability to perceive pain. Early intervention is key to preventing more serious problems including falls as well as lower extremity skin breakdown and infections. Constant itching in the feet can be a sign of fungal infection or dry skin, both of wh Continue reading >>

Diabetic Foot

Diabetic Foot

What you need to know Diabetic foot can be prevented with good glycaemic control, regular foot assessment, appropriate footwear, patient education, and early referral for pre-ulcerative lesions Examine the feet of people with diabetes for any lesions and screen for peripheral neuropathy and peripheral arterial disease, which can lead to injuries or ulceration Refer patients with foot ulceration and signs of infection, sepsis, or ischaemia immediately to a specialised diabetic foot centre for surgical care, revascularisation, and rehabilitation Foot disease affects nearly 6% of people with diabetes1 and includes infection, ulceration, or destruction of tissues of the foot.2 It can impair patients’ quality of life and affect social participation and livelihood.3 Between 0.03% and 1.5% of patients with diabetic foot require an amputation.4 Most amputations start with ulcers and can be prevented with good foot care and screening to assess the risk for foot complications.5 We provide an update on the prevention and initial management of diabetic foot in primary care. Sources and selection criteria This clinical update is based on recommendations in the standard treatment guideline, The diabetic foot: prevention and management in India 2016, published by the Indian Ministry of Health and Family Welfare.33 A multidisciplinary guideline development group consisting of surgeons, primary care practitioners, and a patient representative developed these guidelines, with inputs from experts in diabetes, diabetic foot rehabilitation, and vascular surgery. The group included representation from rural and urban India, and public and private sectors. The guideline development group selected recommendations from the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence clinical guideline 1 Continue reading >>

Diabetic Neuropathy Symptoms

Diabetic Neuropathy Symptoms

The symptoms of diabetic neuropathy depend on what type of neuropathy you have. Symptoms are dependent on which nerves have been damaged. In general, diabetic neuropathy symptoms develop gradually; they may seem like minor and infrequent pains or problems at first, but as the nerves become more damaged, symptoms may grow. Don’t overlook mild symptoms. They can indicate the beginning of neuropathy. Talk to your doctor about anything you notice—such as any pain, numbness, weakness, or tingling—even if it seems insignificant. Your pain may mean the control of your diabetes could be improved, which will can help slow down the progression of your neuropathy. Pain and numbness are also important warning signs to take very good care of your feet, so you can avoid wounds and infections that can be difficult to heal and even raise risk for amputation. 1 Peripheral Neuropathy Symptoms Peripheral neuropathy affects nerves leading to your extremities—the feet, legs, hands, and arms. The nerves leading to your feet are the longest in your body, so they are the most often affected nerves (simply because there’s more of them to be damaged). Peripheral neuropathy is the most common form of diabetic neuropathy. Peripheral neuropathy symptoms include: Pain Burning, stabbing or electric-shock sensations Numbness (loss of feeling) Tingling Muscle weakness Poor coordination Muscle cramping and/or twitching Insensitivity to pain and/or temperature Extreme sensitivity to even the lightest touch Symptoms get worse at night. 2, 3 Autonomic Neuropathy Symptoms The autonomic nervous system is in charge of the "involuntary" functions of your body. It keeps your heart pumping and makes sure you digest your food right—without you needing to think about it. Autonomic neuropathy symptoms i Continue reading >>

Pain In Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Pain In Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Managing the Cause Local wound care for a person with a diabetic foot ulcer should occur only after assessment of the patient as a whole (see Figure 1). The patient's general health should include a review of symptoms, especially the major diabetic complications from the head down: stroke, retinopathy, heart, kidneys, hypertension, peripheral vascular disease, and neuropathy. Knowledge of co-existing conditions and medicines taken also may be important in determining the patient's ability to heal. Diabetic control has an impact on wound healing1 and can be accurately assessed with a blood test for Hgb AIC (ideal control under .084 or 8.4%) that approximates the average blood sugar over the past 90 days or the lifespan of the red blood cell containing the hemoglobin. "Pain is the gift no one wants."2 This sentiment was offered by Dr. Paul Brand, an eminent physician and former head of the National Hansen's Disease Center. To be certain, the etiology of the diabetic foot wound and the majority of foot pathology centers on the absence of pain or loss of protective sensation (LOPS). People with diabetes and neuropathy, through a combination of high plantar pressure and repetitive stress (daily activity), may wear a hole in their foot just as one would wear a hole in a stocking.3,4 Teaching patients with diabetic neuropathy and their respective healthcare providers to respond to the absence of pain is paramount to both treatment and prevention. This does not, however, discount the importance of responding to pain when it is present. In fact, the presence of pain in the neuropathic (high-risk) diabetic foot is not normal and should raise significant concerns. Ulcers related to diabetes are often caused or impacted by several health-related issues, including vascular disease, Continue reading >>

Symptoms Of Foot Damage

Symptoms Of Foot Damage

Tweet The general rule for people with diabetes is to notify your doctor if you notice any change in feeling or appearance in your feet. This page provides information on the range of symptoms that can indicate a wide variety of diabetic foot problems. Foot problems can quickly become serious so it’s important to check your feet daily for signs of damage or change in addition to attending foot examinations. Signs of foot damage Wounds – cuts, burns, grazes or blisters Pain in the feet Prickly tingly feelings Burning sensation Warm or hot feet Dry and cracked skin Firm spots on the feet Warts and fungus Changes in colour Changes in shape of the foot Changes in toenails Changes in smell Wounds – cuts, burns, grazes or blisters It’s important to take action on any wounds, such as cuts, burns, grazes or blisters. Make sure your feet are kept clean, cover the area of damage with a plaster that allows the area to breathe and ensure the area is not rubbed or made worse. It’s important to let your doctor know at the earliest opportunity so he or she can advise on the best care advice for you. Contact your doctor, out of hours service or NHS direct if you notice pus or any sign of infection in your feet. Pain Pain may occur as a result of damage, such as a wound, blister or broken bone but can also occur for other reasons including neuropathic pain (nerve pain). In some cases, such as with nerve pain, the feeling of pain may be present despite no other outward changes. A number of people with diabetes report intense pain when the skin on their feet or legs come into contact with material such as bed linen. A burning sensation, which can present difficulty when getting to sleep is also relatively common. These symptoms in people with diabetes tend to be dysesthesia, a t Continue reading >>

6 Best Foot-care Strategies For Diabetics

6 Best Foot-care Strategies For Diabetics

Diabetes Diabetic foot pain can keep you from doing the things you love. Learn how to prevent problems and get diabetic foot pain relief. Diabetes brings many complications, including problems with the feet. Preventive foot care will help people with diabetes avoid diabetic toe nails, diabetic blisters and it also lowers the risk of amputation. Current recommendations by the American Diabetes Association state that foot care for people with diabetes includes visiting a foot specialist every year. This professional evaluation is a preventive visit. The annual visit to a podiatrist (foot doctor) includes checking how well your blood flows through your feet since poor blood circulation in the legs and feet often results from diabetes. Your doctor will also test your ability to feel with your feet (things like pain, or hot versus cold), and common foot deformities. Diabetes can put you at risk for foot sores and amputations. Shoes are important. Wearing the right shoes will decrease the risk of ulcers and amputation. Foot sores precede many amputations, so preventing these ulcers is key! The best strategies for diabetic foot pain relief 1. Practice good hygiene. Wash your feet every day with lukewarm water and soap. Clean around and under the toenails with a brush or manicure stick. Dry carefully, especially between the toes. Use cream or lotion daily to prevent dry skin, but do not apply lotion between the toes. 2. Foot maintenance. Toenails should be trimmed straight across, with the corners sanded smooth. Thin down thick nails by filing the tops with an emery board. Never use a razor blade or knife to cut corns, calluses or toenails. Keep feet warm and dry by changing shoes and socks frequently. 3. Never walk barefoot, indoors or out. Walking barefoot puts feet at risk f Continue reading >>

Diabetic-related Athlete’s Foot

Diabetic-related Athlete’s Foot

Dry Skin or Athlete’s Foot? Diabetic Patients, Beware! Athlete’s foot is a common, fungal skin infection we see in our diabetic patients. A majority of cases begin between the toes and spread to the bottom of the feet. Anyone can get athlete’s foot, but it is more severe for a diabetic. Naturally, patients with diabetes have a weaker circulatory system along with an impaired immune system. This causes a higher risk for infection. Athlete’s foot is a concern for diabetics because their skin lacks hydration, making dry skin prominent. Athlete’s foot is caused from fungus growing on the top layer of your skin. It is contagious and you can get it from touching the affected area of a person who has it, and more commonly, from contaminated surfaces such as damp floors in public showers or locker rooms. Many diabetics confuse athlete’s foot as being dry skin on their feet. Because athlete’s foot has similar characteristics to dry skin such as peeling, cracking redness, blisters, breakdown of the skin, itching and burning, it is understandable as to why these two conditions can be confused. If untreated, athlete’s foot can lead to a severe bacterial infection of the foot and leg. Risk Factors Men are more susceptible than women Having athlete’s foot before An impaired immune system Living in a warm, damp climate More common in adults than children Depending on the severity of the fungus, athlete’s foot can lead to blisters, cracked skin and open wounds. With a diabetic foot, a wound as minor as a blister can cause a lot of damage. Diabetes decreases blood flow, which causes healing time for injuries to be slower. Diabetes also enables infections to spread quickly, which is a concern as it is one of the most common complications of the diabetic foot. If an in Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Your Feet Care Of The Diabetic Foot

Diabetes And Your Feet Care Of The Diabetic Foot

Diabetes has many effects on feet, and it is extremely important that any diabetic seek podiatric care. Diabetes is a syndrome (a set of symptoms which occur together) characterized mainly by an increase in sugar levels or a failure of the body to produce insulin to control its sugar levels. "It's essential that I take care of my feet." It is imperative that diabetics take special care of their feet. Bear in mind that, if you are diabetic, you need a doctor's care to protect your feet — and that this page is not intended as a substitute for a medical diagnosis or suggested course of treatment. Please see your doctor! Diabetes is a serious condition which can have many effects on the feet, including: (1) Nerve damage, resulting in numbness, extensive burning, pain, coldness, "pins and needles" or tingling while at rest. These nerves may actually affect the "position" sense, so that the joints or bones actually collapse with time. (2) Blocked blood vessels or decreased blood flow with fewer nutrients reaching the feet. Without proper nourishment, sores on the foot may not heal in the normal time period, or may be vulnerable to secondary problems such as infection. (3) Weakened bones, causing a shift in the foot, which may become deformed, changing the way the foot distributes pressure. (4) Collapsed joints, especially in the area of the arch. As a result, the arch can no longer absorb pressure. The surrounding skin may also begin to break down. (5) Blisters and Calluses. Diabetics are much more vulnerable to blister or callus formation, which generally stars as a warm or red spot caused by unrelieved skin pressure and the failure of the diabetic to feel the area. (6) Ulcers or sores more easily occur as a result of the breakdown of several layers of skin. These ulcers m Continue reading >>

Diabetic Nerve Pain: 10 Foot Care Tips To Protect Yourself

Diabetic Nerve Pain: 10 Foot Care Tips To Protect Yourself

Diabetes can mean double trouble for your feet. First, diabetes can reduce blood flow to your feet, depriving your feet of oxygen and nutrients. This makes it more difficult for blisters, sores, and cuts to heal. And second, the diabetic nerve damage called peripheral neuropathy can cause numbness in your feet. When you can't feel cuts and blisters, you're more likely to get sores and infections. If you don't notice or treat the sores, they can become deeply infected, and lead to amputation. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy can also cause sharp pain in your feet. You may become excruciatingly sensitive to the lightest touch, like the sheets on your bed. Fortunately, a little TLC goes a long way in preventing foot problems from diabetes. Look over both feet carefully every day, and be sure you check between all of your toes. Blisters and infections can start between your toes, and with diabetic neuropathy, you may not feel them until they've become irritated or infected. If a physical challenge keeps you from checking your own feet, ask a family member to help. Wash both of your feet briefly each day with warm -- not hot -- water. You may not be able to feel heat with your feet, so test the water with your hands first. Avoid soaking too long in water, since waterlogged sores have a harder time healing. Dry your feet right away, and remember to dry gently between all of your toes. It's an investment worth making. Even the slightest rubbing or misfit shoe can cause a blister that turns into a sore that becomes infected and never heals. Buy better-fitting shoes, or try different socks, even at the most minor signs of redness or irritation, since you may not be able to feel when it's getting worse. Before buying or putting on the shoes check your shoes for rough seams, sharp e Continue reading >>

Diabetic Neuropathy (nerve Damage) - An Update

Diabetic Neuropathy (nerve Damage) - An Update

Nerve damage or diabetic neuropathy resulting from chronically high blood glucose can be one of the most frustrating and debilitating complications of diabetes because of the pain, discomfort and disability it can cause, and because available treatments are not uniformly successful. Some patients find some relief from this nerve damage or neuropathy by keeping blood sugars as closely controlled as possible, getting regular exercise and keeping their weight under control. Using non-narcotic pain relievers consistently throughout the day—rather than waiting until nighttime when symptoms can become more severe—also seems to help if pain is the major symptom. Surprisingly, clinicians have also found that certain antidepressants may be helpful and can take the edge off the pain of neuropathy. Although pain or numbness in the legs or feet may be the most common complaint from people diagnosed with neuropathy, it is not the only symptom of this complication. Neuropathy can cause a host of different types of symptoms, depending on whether nerves in the legs, gastrointestinal tract, or elsewhere in the body are affected. If you have any of these symptoms, neuropathy may be the culprit: inability to adequately empty the bladder of its contents, resulting in frequent infections; nausea, vomiting, abdominal fullness or bloating, diarrhea, or constipation; low blood pressure upon standing that causes fainting or dizziness; inability to lift the foot or new deformities of the foot, or foot ulcers; trouble achieving or maintaining an erection. Although physicians have found some medications and other treatments that help ease these symptoms in some people, prevention continues to be the key. "Hemoglobin A1C readings should ideally be at 7.0% or lower. Those that are consistently n Continue reading >>

7 Foot Problems That Can Be Serious

7 Foot Problems That Can Be Serious

If you want to know the state of your health, try looking down. “There’s no question it’s extremely important that people pay attention to their feet,” says Terry Philbin, D.O., spokesperson for the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons (AAOS) and a foot and ankle specialist at the Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Center in Westerville, Ohio. The condition of your feet can give you clues to a host of medical issues, such as diabetes, arthritis, and even heart disease. Read on to find out what to look for and what it may mean. 1. Pain “There’s no pain that should be ignored,” says Jane Andersen, D.P.M., a podiatrist in Chapel Hill, North Carolina and a member of the American Podiatric Medical Association. Any type of pain—new or prolonged—warrants a visit to your primary care doctor or podiatrist. Pain in the feet can signal a host of conditions, from fractures to plantar fasciitis (inflammation in the tissue that connects your heel bone to toes), to arthritis. Noting the time of day when the pain occurs can give you a hint as to the cause. Pain in the morning, when you first get up, can point to arthritis or plantar fasciitis. With both conditions, pain will recede as the foot loosens up throughout the day. A common cause of heel pain, plantar fasciitis often affects runners, and people who are overweight. Wearing high heels, or shoes that don’t have enough arch support also raises the risk. Dr. Andersen often sees people in her practice whose plantar fasciitis is caused by exercising in worn out shoes. “Athletic shoes don’t last very long,” she says. If you can estimate the mileage you put on shoes, then a good rule of thumb is replacing shoes every 350-500 miles, or anything over a year old, she says. Pain that gets worse throughout the day may in Continue reading >>

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