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Diabetic Toe Pain

Home Remedies For Diabetic Foot Pain

Home Remedies For Diabetic Foot Pain

My husband's feet are getting painful, swollen, and numb due to his diabetes. Even if he gets medicine for diabetes this pain never stops. Please tell me if someone knows of or has experience with some home remedies for this pain and numbness. Your suggestions would be highly appreciated. By smile Answers No please, stop! Do not use ice on diabetic numb or swollen feet! If his blood sugars are uncontrolled and running too high, that in itself can cause severe neurological pain & numbness in the extremities! There's no home remedy for that EXCEPT tight blood sugar control! 1) Get him to the doc! Have his Ha1C checked! Have swelling & pain & numbness thoroughly evaluated! Don't treat this lightly, this could be life threatening! Does he have hardening of the arteries? CHF? Any other heart conditions? Kidney disease? Has he had his brachial BP checked in his ankles lately? There could be many reasons for the swollen feet too! Edema can be due to many causes. I have been Type 1 diabetic for 30 years, and used to get neuropathy pains in both feet and legs, hands & arms too. I was put on prescription Neurontin (generic version tho, Gabapentin) for about 10 years & increased up to 300mg twice a day. That worked great, but since I have cut out all white carbs, eat lots of fatfree salads, fresh veggies & fruits (at least 5 servings a day), lean meats--follow the American Heart Association diet basically - extra light olive oil, all antioxidant & anti-inflammatory foods, no junk foods, no fast foods, no sat fats or trans fats, no processed foods, no nitrates. For over 2 years now, I have stopped the Neurontin altogether within the past year, and lowered my HA1C to 7, but being on an insulin pump, I want to get it lower, 6.5%. I feel the best now than I have in 30 yrs! The neuropa Continue reading >>

Foot Problems

Foot Problems

Tweet Diabetes often means that there is a greater risk of a foot condition becoming serious so it’s important to let your doctor know if you have symptoms of any of the foot conditions in this guide. It’s important not to dismiss a foot problem as mild as each of the problems listed has the potential to be serious when diabetes is present. When contacting your doctor about any of these conditions, ensure the health team, including receptionist know that you have diabetes. Causes of diabetic foot problems There are a range of different foot complications which may each have different causes but there are some causes that are common to a number of foot problems. Poorly fitting shoes can lead to rubbing of skin causing blisters and corns and shoes that don’t leave enough room for all the toes may increase the chance of bunions or hammer toes occurring. Walking barefoot raises the risk of suffering a foot wound or, particularly in hot weather, burns. Having neuropathy can significantly increase the risk of a foot condition occurring as you may not sense when your feet are becoming aggravated or damaged. Having poor blood circulation can also lead to a number of foot problems. Preventing foot problems There are a number of ways you can reduce the chances of developing a foot problem, which include: Wearing shoes that fit well Avoiding walking bare foot Keeping feet clean Keeping feet moisturised Importantly – checking your feet for signs of damage on a daily basis Athlete's foot (tinea pedis) A fungal infection of the foot characterised by a rash between the toes which may be itchy and cause dry, flaky skin. Athlete’s foot can lead to fungal infection of the toenails and may cause skin on your feet to crack which can lead to infection and therefore can be a seriou Continue reading >>

Motion Based Recognition In Neurostimulator For Diabetic Foot Pain

Motion Based Recognition In Neurostimulator For Diabetic Foot Pain

Abstract: We present a novel technique for the better recovery of the diabetic foot pain by using kinematic analysis. The aim of the project is to develop a technique that not only reduces the diabetic foot pain but also involves the gait analysis. In this technique the "Helen Hayes marker set" is designed and fixed in the lower extremity of the leg (sacrum, hip, knee, ankle, heel and toe) and the walking pattern of both diabetic patients and normal subjects are recorded using SLR camera. Using TVC the videos are converted into avi format. Using Virtual dub the videos are converted into frames. The hip, knee and ankle data's are processed using MATLAB coding and angle changes are detected. The change in gait pattern and gait parameters are detected using stride analysis and stimulation is provided at exact location of pain in the foot using Neurostimulator. Continue reading >>

What Can Cause Diabetes Foot Pain: Treatment, Symptoms, Prevention

What Can Cause Diabetes Foot Pain: Treatment, Symptoms, Prevention

"Diabetes can slow you down, it can make your life different. But it must not stop you!" Scott Verplank, an American golfer who comes up with these great words in his Type 1 diabetes conditions surely inspires many of the fellow people suffering from diabetes. However, it is also true when we look upon the entire condition of a patient with diabetes it is perhaps not the one which could keep him normal with his routine and life style. There are some really serious symptoms which keeps him restricted from many things in his life. Apart from all the major symptoms there can be one of the major troublesome signs seen with the diabetic foot where the blood flow to the foot gets restricted and in turn the foot gets deprived from oxygen and various other nutrients. This in turn causes severe foot pain that would trouble the sufferer greatly. There are many other reasons leading to the diabetes foot pain or diabetic foot pain which will be discussed in the article below. So this current article will revolve around the facts of Diabetes Foot Pain or Diabetic Foot Pain where we will be discussing on the facts about the foot pain in diabetes, various factors causing the diabetes foot pain or diabetic foot pain and also talk about the diabetic foot care so as to prevent and reduce the foot pain in diabetes. So let us go through the following array of the content and have an idea about the diabetes foot pain. Facts About Diabetes Foot Pain Or Foot Pain In Diabetic Patients: Though there are many factors causing diabetes foot pain, the Peripheral artery disease (PAD) and the Peripheral neuropathy are the two main conditions which might cause the increased risk of various foot problems in diabetic patients. There are increased chances of having the risk of ulcers and damage to feet i Continue reading >>

Common Diabetes Foot Problems And How To Prevent Them

Common Diabetes Foot Problems And How To Prevent Them

Foot problems in diabetes can be caused by damage to both large and small blood vessels, which is much more common in diabetes. Foot problems, including nerve damage or peripheral neuropathy, usually begin with vascular disease. Damage to small blood vessels, in particular, appears to be the major cause of nerve damage that results in loss of feeling, or worse pain and burning sensations that bother the feel and legs. Once nerve damage progresses, it triggers loss of motor control and the abnormal gait that results in ulcers and amputations. Preventing foot problems in diabetes begins by preventing the loss of circulation that will result in serious nerve damage. This is relatively easy today if the risks for circulatory problems are recognized early. Keeping the blood pressure below 130/80 is essential for reducing damage to blood vessel walls. Preventing placque formation is also critical. This is done with medications the lower triglycerides and raise HDL, such as gemfibrozil and niacin, and those that lower LDL and make it lighter, such as the statins. Blood vessels walls can also be protected with certain blood pressure meds called ACE inhibitors. Blood flow may be improved with high dose vitamin E, although 1200 mg to 1500 mg a day are usually required for this effect. absence of foot pulses a pale color of the foot when it is raised feet that feel cold pain at rest pain at night relieved by hanging the feet over the side of the bed thin appearing skin loss hair from the toes and feet shiny skin a blue color of the toes reddish color of the feet ulcers that don't heal a foot infection that is hard to heal Although amputations are 15 times as common with diabetes, about half can be prevented with simple steps that protect the feet: Unfortunately, about 60 to 70 per Continue reading >>

Diabetic Foot Care - Ulcers, Pain, Sores, Wounds

Diabetic Foot Care - Ulcers, Pain, Sores, Wounds

Protect Your Feet Now and Avoid Diabetic Foot Problems If you are diabetic, you are more vulnerable to foot problems as the disease can damage your nerves and reduce blood flow to your feet. Proper care and early detection is crucial, as even the smallest cut, ingrown nail, or structural change may result in a serious problem. With proper foot care, most serious problems can be prevented. Start protecting your feet now at Roche Podiatry Group: Gentle foot screenings with expert podiatrists for early detection Educational consultation about prevention and diabetic foot care Professional treatment for diabetic foot problems Podiatrists play a crucial role in the prevention and management of complications of the foot in those with diabetes. A podiatrist should perform a complete foot screening, at least annually. If you have diabetes, call us now at (908) 753-0500 to learn how you can start protecting your feet now. Continue reading >>

Treat Type 2 Diabetes 'like Cancer': How This Major Complication Can Lead To Early Death

Treat Type 2 Diabetes 'like Cancer': How This Major Complication Can Lead To Early Death

"Diabetes can be more significant than many forms of cancer," said Dr David G. Armstrong, professor of surgery and director of the Southern Arizona Limb Salvage Alliance at the University of Arizona College of Medicine – Tucson. "This is a concept that's misaligned right now in medicine. “As we move toward diseases of decay, as I call them — things like cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes — our goal as physicians, surgeons, scientists and policymakers is to delay that decay." Dr Armstrong focussed on foot ulcers - a prevalent complication for millions of people with diabetes. Estimates indicate that as many as one-third of people with the disease will develop at least one foot ulcer over the course of their lifetime. These wounds can lead to further complications such as strokes, heart attacks, infections, loss of limbs and premature death. The expert said morbidity and mortality directly associated with foot ulcers often go unrecognised by doctors and patients alike. Currently, the clinical focus is on repairing an ulcer's surrounding tissue and healing the wound. Instead, physicians and patients need to focus on ulcer remission — that is, extending the time between the formation of ulcers, Dr Armstrong argued. Armstrong said extending patients' ulcer-free days using treatment and prevention is essential. "This paper is the first of its kind to call attention to remission," he explained. "The word 'remission' has been mentioned in the literature over the last few years. “But this is the loudest call yet, and more than any other work before, (it) lays out data in a way that sort of flips the script from healing to what we do in between healed wounds." Fri, August 19, 2016 Diabetes is a common life-long health condition. There are 3.5 million people diag Continue reading >>

Why Am I Experiencing Nerve Pain In My Feet?

Why Am I Experiencing Nerve Pain In My Feet?

If you’re experiencing pain in one or both of your feet, and think it’s every day wear and tear, it may be smart to talk with your doctor as soon as you experience noticeable discomfort. “The way a person walks has an effect on nerves, but it can also be related to more serious conditions,” Raymond Stolarski MD says. Nerve Problems and Foot Discomfort If you’re experiencing nerve associated foot pain, there are two likely conditions that could be the main factor: Diabetes Nerve compression Make an appointment: Find a podiatrist *All professionals quoted in this article were affiliated with TriHealth at the time of initial publication. If you're diagnosed with diabetes, diabetic neuropathy might be the cause of your foot pain. On the other hand, for those who do not have diabetes, nerve compression could be the root of your pain. To help your doctor determine if the pain is neuropathy-related or compression-related, nerve blocks, which are nerve-numbing substance injections, will be administered. “If a patient is experiencing pain in their lower extremity, we will try a nerve block,” explains Dr. Stolarski. “If they experience relief from the nerve block, then they are a good candidate for surgery.” If the nerve blocks are of no help, the condition is diabetic neuropathy, and surgery will not relieve the pain. Treatment Beyond Nerve Blocks To further treat the nerve compression, neurolysis is performed. In order to relieve the compression, your doctor will go into the injured area and decompress the nerves, by cutting surrounding tissue, but not the affected nerves. “Once you decompress the nerves, necessary blood flow and oxygen return to the area, and the nerves will heal on their own,” says Dr. Stolarski. Once feeling returns to the affected area Continue reading >>

Diabetic Nerve Pain: 10 Foot Care Tips To Protect Yourself

Diabetic Nerve Pain: 10 Foot Care Tips To Protect Yourself

Diabetes can mean double trouble for your feet. First, diabetes can reduce blood flow to your feet, depriving your feet of oxygen and nutrients. This makes it more difficult for blisters, sores, and cuts to heal. And second, the diabetic nerve damage called peripheral neuropathy can cause numbness in your feet. When you can't feel cuts and blisters, you're more likely to get sores and infections. If you don't notice or treat the sores, they can become deeply infected, and lead to amputation. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy can also cause sharp pain in your feet. You may become excruciatingly sensitive to the lightest touch, like the sheets on your bed. Fortunately, a little TLC goes a long way in preventing foot problems from diabetes. Look over both feet carefully every day, and be sure you check between all of your toes. Blisters and infections can start between your toes, and with diabetic neuropathy, you may not feel them until they've become irritated or infected. If a physical challenge keeps you from checking your own feet, ask a family member to help. Wash both of your feet briefly each day with warm -- not hot -- water. You may not be able to feel heat with your feet, so test the water with your hands first. Avoid soaking too long in water, since waterlogged sores have a harder time healing. Dry your feet right away, and remember to dry gently between all of your toes. It's an investment worth making. Even the slightest rubbing or misfit shoe can cause a blister that turns into a sore that becomes infected and never heals. Buy better-fitting shoes, or try different socks, even at the most minor signs of redness or irritation, since you may not be able to feel when it's getting worse. Before buying or putting on the shoes check your shoes for rough seams, sharp e Continue reading >>

How Can Diabetes Affect My Feet?

How Can Diabetes Affect My Feet?

Chronically high blood sugar (glucose) levels can be associated with serious complications in people who have diabetes. The feet are especially at risk. Two conditions called diabetic neuropathy and peripheral vascular disease can damage the feet (and other areas of the body) in people who have diabetes. What is diabetic neuropathy? Chronically high sugar levels associated with uncontrolled diabetes can cause nerve damage that interferes with the ability to sense pain and temperature. This so-called "sensory diabetic neuropathy" increases the risk a person with diabetes will not notice problems with his or her feet. Nearly 10% of people with diabetes develop foot ulcers due to peripheral vascular disease and nerve damage. People with diabetes may not notice sores or cuts on the feet, which in turn can lead to an infection. Nerve damage can also affect the function of foot muscles, leading to improper alignment and injury. What is peripheral vascular disease? Diabetes is associated with poor circulation (blood flow). Inadequate blood flow increases the healing time for cuts and sores. Peripheral vascular disease refers to compromised blood flow in the arms and legs. Poor blood flow increases the risk that infections will not heal. This, in turn, increases the risk of ulcers and gangrene, which is tissue death that occurs in a localized area when there is an inadequate blood supply. What are common foot problems of people with diabetes? The following images show common foot problems that anyone can get; however, those with diabetes are at increased risk for serious complications associated with these conditions, including infection and even amputation. Athlete's foot Fungal infection of the feet is called athlete's foot. Cracked skin, itching, and redness are associated w Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Foot & Skin Related Complications

Diabetes: Foot & Skin Related Complications

How can diabetes affect feet and skin? For people with diabetes, having too much glucose (sugar) in their blood for a long time can cause some serious complications, including foot and skin problems, as well as heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, eye damage, and other problems. How can diabetes affect my feet? Diabetes can cause two problems that can affect your feet: Diabetic neuropathy — Uncontrolled diabetes can damage your nerves. If you have damaged nerves in your legs and feet, you might not feel heat, cold or pain. This lack of feeling is called diabetic neuropathy. If you do not feel a cut or sore on your foot because of neuropathy, the cut could get worse and become infected. Peripheral vascular disease — Diabetes also affects the flow of blood. Without good blood flow, it takes longer for a sore or cut to heal. Poor blood flow in the arms and legs is called peripheral vascular disease. (The word "peripheral" means "located away from a central point," and the word "vascular" refers to the blood vessels. Peripheral vascular disease is a circulation disorder that affects blood vessels away from the heart.) If you have an infection that will not heal because of poor blood flow, you are at risk for developing gangrene, which is the death of tissue due to a lack of blood. To keep gangrene from spreading, the doctor may have to remove a toe, foot, or part of a leg. This procedure is called amputation. Diabetes is the most common, non-traumatic cause of leg amputations. Each year, more than 56,000 people with diabetes have amputations. However, research suggests that more than half of these amputations can be prevented through proper foot care. What are some common foot problems of people with diabetes? Anyone can get the foot problems listed below. For people Continue reading >>

Diabetic (charcot) Foot

Diabetic (charcot) Foot

Diabetes is a condition of elevated blood sugar that affects about 6 percent of the population in the United States, or about 16 million people. Diabetic foot problems are a major health concern and are a common cause of hospitalization. Most foot problems that people with diabetes face arise from two serious complications of the disease: nerve damage and poor circulation. One of the more critical foot problems these complications can cause is Charcot arthropathy, which can deform the shape of the foot and lead to disability. There are treatment options for the wide range of diabetic foot problems. The most effective treatment, however, is prevention. For people with diabetes, careful, daily inspection of the feet is essential to overall health and the prevention of damaging foot problems. Description Nerve damage (neuropathy) is a complication of diabetes that leads to a loss of sensation in the feet. Some people with diabetes can no longer feel when something has irritated or even punctured the skin. A wound as small as a blister can progress to a serious infection in a matter of days. Diabetes also damages blood vessels, decreasing the blood flow to the feet. Poor circulation weakens bone, and can cause disintegration of the bones and joints in the foot and ankle. As a result, people with diabetes are at a high risk for breaking bones in the feet. When a diabetic fractures a bone in the foot, he or she may not realize it because of nerve damage. Continuing to walk on the injured foot results in more severe fractures and joint dislocations. Sharp edges of broken bone within the foot can point downward toward the ground, increasing the risk of chronic foot sores from the abnormal pressure. (Left) This patient with Charcot of the ankle has developed a deformity that pla Continue reading >>

Diabetic Wound Care

Diabetic Wound Care

What is a Diabetic Foot Ulcer? A diabetic foot ulcer is an open sore or wound that occurs in approximately 15 percent of patients with diabetes and is commonly located on the bottom of the foot. Of those who develop a foot ulcer, 6 percent will be hospitalized due to infection or other ulcer-related complication. Diabetes is the leading cause of non-traumatic lower extremity amputations in the United States, and approximately 14-24 percent of patients with diabetes who develop a foot ulcer will require an amputation. Foot ulceration precedes 85 percent of diabetes-related amputations. Research has shown, however, that development of a foot ulcer is preventable. Causes Anyone who has diabetes can develop a foot ulcer. Native Americans, African Americans, Hispanics, and older men are more likely to develop ulcers. People who use insulin are at higher risk of developing a foot ulcer, as are patients with diabetes-related kidney, eye, and heart disease. Being overweight and using alcohol and tobacco also play a role in the development of foot ulcers. Ulcers form due to a combination of factors, such as lack of feeling in the foot, poor circulation, foot deformities, irritation (such as friction or pressure), and trauma, as well as duration of diabetes. Patients who have diabetes for many years can develop neuropathy, a reduced or complete lack of ability to feel pain in the feet due to nerve damage caused by elevated blood glucose levels over time. The nerve damage often can occur without pain, and one may not even be aware of the problem. Your podiatrist can test feet for neuropathy with a simple, painless tool called a monofilament. Vascular disease can complicate a foot ulcer, reducing the body's ability to heal and increasing the risk for an infection. Elevations in blo Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Foot Problems

Diabetes And Foot Problems

Foot problems are common in people with diabetes. You might be afraid you’ll lose a toe, foot, or leg to diabetes, or know someone who has, but you can lower your chances of having diabetes-related foot problems by taking care of your feet every day. Managing your blood glucose levels, also called blood sugar, can also help keep your feet healthy. How can diabetes affect my feet? Over time, diabetes may cause nerve damage, also called diabetic neuropathy, that can cause tingling and pain, and can make you lose feeling in your feet. When you lose feeling in your feet, you may not feel a pebble inside your sock or a blister on your foot, which can lead to cuts and sores. Cuts and sores can become infected. Diabetes also can lower the amount of blood flow in your feet. Not having enough blood flowing to your legs and feet can make it hard for a sore or an infection to heal. Sometimes, a bad infection never heals. The infection might lead to gangrene. Gangrene and foot ulcers that do not get better with treatment can lead to an amputation of your toe, foot, or part of your leg. A surgeon may perform an amputation to prevent a bad infection from spreading to the rest of your body, and to save your life. Good foot care is very important to prevent serious infections and gangrene. Although rare, nerve damage from diabetes can lead to changes in the shape of your feet, such as Charcot’s foot. Charcot’s foot may start with redness, warmth, and swelling. Later, bones in your feet and toes can shift or break, which can cause your feet to have an odd shape, such as a “rocker bottom.” What can I do to keep my feet healthy? Work with your health care team to make a diabetes self-care plan, which is an action plan for how you will manage your diabetes. Your plan should inclu Continue reading >>

Diabetic Neuropathy Symptoms

Diabetic Neuropathy Symptoms

The symptoms of diabetic neuropathy depend on what type of neuropathy you have. Symptoms are dependent on which nerves have been damaged. In general, diabetic neuropathy symptoms develop gradually; they may seem like minor and infrequent pains or problems at first, but as the nerves become more damaged, symptoms may grow. Don’t overlook mild symptoms. They can indicate the beginning of neuropathy. Talk to your doctor about anything you notice—such as any pain, numbness, weakness, or tingling—even if it seems insignificant. Your pain may mean the control of your diabetes could be improved, which will can help slow down the progression of your neuropathy. Pain and numbness are also important warning signs to take very good care of your feet, so you can avoid wounds and infections that can be difficult to heal and even raise risk for amputation. 1 Peripheral Neuropathy Symptoms Peripheral neuropathy affects nerves leading to your extremities—the feet, legs, hands, and arms. The nerves leading to your feet are the longest in your body, so they are the most often affected nerves (simply because there’s more of them to be damaged). Peripheral neuropathy is the most common form of diabetic neuropathy. Peripheral neuropathy symptoms include: Pain Burning, stabbing or electric-shock sensations Numbness (loss of feeling) Tingling Muscle weakness Poor coordination Muscle cramping and/or twitching Insensitivity to pain and/or temperature Extreme sensitivity to even the lightest touch Symptoms get worse at night. 2, 3 Autonomic Neuropathy Symptoms The autonomic nervous system is in charge of the "involuntary" functions of your body. It keeps your heart pumping and makes sure you digest your food right—without you needing to think about it. Autonomic neuropathy symptoms i Continue reading >>

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