diabetestalk.net

Diabetic Teaching Nursing

Patient Education: Diabetes

Patient Education: Diabetes

March/April 2009, Volume :5 Number 2 , page 26 - 27 [Free] Join NursingCenter to get uninterrupted access to this Article Gattullo, Barbara Ann RN, ANP-BC, CDE, MS Diabetes is a disease that affects the way your body uses food. Most of the food you eat changes into glucose, or sugar, for your body to use as energy. The pancreas, an organ near the stomach, makes a hormone called insulin, which helps sugar get into the body's cells. The cells use sugar for energy. When you have diabetes, your body either doesn't make enough insulin or it can't use the insulin that it makes. This causes you to have high blood sugar. There are two types of diabetes-type 1 and type 2. In type 1 diabetes, the body doesn't make insulin. This type of diabetes often develops before age 30. Most people with diabetes have type 2, which usually develops in adults over age 40. With type 2 diabetes, the body still makes insulin but the cells can't use it. The cause of diabetes isn't known, but you may be more likely to have it if someone else in your family does. Your healthcare provider will look for certain well-known symptoms known as the "diabetes alert." These include the need to urinate often, extreme thirst or hunger, blurry vision, sores that won't heal, weakness and fatigue. He'll also order one or more tests, which may include: * Urinalysis. This looks for sugar in your urine. * Fasting plasma glucose test. This test measures the sugar level in your blood. You'll have to stop eating and drinking for at least 8 hours before this test. * Random (nonfasting) plasma glucose test. This test also measures the amount of sugar in your blood, but you don't have to stop eating or drinking before the test. * Oral glucose tolerance test. For this test, you'll fast for at least 8 hours, then drink a su Continue reading >>

Nursing Care Plan For Diabetes

Nursing Care Plan For Diabetes

Diabetes is really prevalent. Just recall all the patients you saw today and theres probably a handful of them who are diabetic. According to the National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health PromotionDivision of Diabetes Translation, up to 30.3 million people in the United States have diabetes. Because of how prevalent it is, nurses need to be highly knowledgeable and skilled when it comes to educating and caring for their patients. That includes preparing the right nursing care plan for diabetes. Diabetes ordiabetes mellitusis a metabolic disease where blood glucose levels are abnormally high. Symptoms of high blood glucose levels include: In general, there are three types of diabetes and each one varies in terms of treatment and management. Type 1 diabetes is also called insulin-dependent and juvenile-onset diabetes. This type of diabetes often begins early in childhood. Its an autoimmune disorder where the bodys immune system attacks its own pancreas, inhibiting its capacity to produce insulin. Type 2 diabetes accounts for the 95% of diabetes cases in the US. Onset is usually late in adulthood. It happens when the pancreas is unable to produce adequate insulin to meet the bodys needs or when the bodys cells become resistant to it. Type 2 diabetes can be managed with lifestyle and diet changes as well as intake of oral hypoglycemic agents (OHAs). Gestational diabetes is characterized by pregnancy-induced insulin resistance. It affects roughly 2% to 10% of pregnancies. Diabetic patients need complex nursing care. Here are some of the most important NCPs for diabetes: 1. Deficient knowledge regarding disease process, treatment, and individual care needs verbal statements of concerns or misconceptions improper or inadequate follow-through of instructions de Continue reading >>

Diabetes Self Management Patient Education Materials

Diabetes Self Management Patient Education Materials

Table of Contents Click on any of the links below to access helpful materials on managing all aspects of diabetes that can be printed and given to your patients . Introductory Information 1. Diabetes Mellitus Type 1 Symptoms, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment (e.g., insulin) 2. Diabetes Mellitus Type 2 Symptoms, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment (e.g., medications) 3. Women and Diabetes: Eating and weight, pregnancy, and heart disease 4. Men and Diabetes: Sexual Issues and employment concerns 5. Diabetes and Your Lifestyle: Exercise, traveling, employment, sexual issues, and special considerations for the elderly General Self-Care (e.g., Blood Glucose, Foot Care) Blood Glucose 6. Pass This Test: Testing blood glucose levels 7. Get off the Blood Glucose Rollercoaster: High/low blood sugar symptoms and treatment A. TOOL: Blood Sugar Monitoring Log (Oral Meds): Patient log to record levels B. TOOL: Blood Sugar Monitoring Log (Insulin Meds): Patient log to monitor levels Feet 8. Foot Care for People with Diabetes: Hygiene, inspection, and when to call your physician C. TOOL: Foot Care Log Patient log to record self-inspections and any problem areas D. TOOL: Injection Sites Patient log to help rotate injection sites Exercise E. TOOL: Planning Your Exercise: Guide to help patients design an exercise program F. TOOL: Physical Activity Log: Patient log to record physical activity 9. Exercise in Disguise Finding ways to exercise at home and outside of the gym 10. Exercising Like Your Life Depends on It: Health benefits to exercising 11. Hot Weather Exercise: Taking extra care when exercising in hot weather Nutrition/Health Diet/Weight Loss 12. Managing Type 2 Diabetes through Diet: Suggestions for balancing your diet 13. Losing Weight When You Have Diabetes: Weight loss be Continue reading >>

Partnering With Diabetes Educators To Improve Patient Outcomes

Partnering With Diabetes Educators To Improve Patient Outcomes

Go to: One in every three Americans currently has or is at risk to develop diabetes mellitus.1 Worldwide, the number of individuals with diabetes is growing at an unprecedented rate and is expected to surpass 550 million by 2030.2 Diabetes mellitus (diabetes) is actually a group of diseases characterized by high blood glucose levels that result from defects in the body’s ability to produce and/or use insulin. The hyperglycemia resulting from the excessive amounts of circulating glucose can be aggravated by exogenous factors, such as food consumption, physical activity, inflammation, medications, and stress. The chronic, progressive nature of diabetes necessitates ongoing medical care; it benefits from timely access to patient self-management education and support to prevent acute complications and to reduce the risk of long-term complications.3 Adequately responding to and managing circulating glucose requires an assortment of elements, including an ongoing assessment of pharmacology, nutritional interventions, and monitoring. Historically, diabetes was depicted as a condition managed by diet, exercise, and medication. Seemingly straightforward, diabetes management has always been challenging. Changes in each of these treatment elements over the past 2 decades have increased the overall complexity of the disease’s management. Nutritional intake remains the foundation of diabetes management. However, the diabetes diet has shifted away from a physician-prescribed, calorie-restricted exchange diet toward an individualized meal plan that takes into account a patient’s cultural background and nutritional likes and dislikes. Exercise, which is still widely recognized as an anchor to diabetes management, is now carefully linked to the patient’s routine so as to maximiz Continue reading >>

A Pocket Guide For The Patient With Newly Diagnosed Diabetes

A Pocket Guide For The Patient With Newly Diagnosed Diabetes

A pocket guide for the patient with newly diagnosed diabetes Q: I routinely have only a short period of time in which to teach my patients who've been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, and I sometimes find it difficult to drill down to the basics. Do you have any suggestions for creating a primer on essential facts and skills? A: In today's world of shortened hospital stays, patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes (if admitted at all) are allowed little time to learn important facts and skills to keep themselves healthy and safe at home. Keeping this in mind, a concise care plan, which can be completed in a short period of time, needs to be utilized. This care plan will give your patient the basic information and skills he needs to safely care for himself until he's able to attend a more inclusive diabetes education class. Patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes have a unique set of needs relating to education about their condition. Here's what you need to teach your patient before he's discharged from the hospital: an overview of the prescribed medication, including proper use, peak time, and length of action (Instruction on the proper disposal of sharps is needed if your patient has been prescribed insulin injections.) the purpose of a glucose meter, instruction in its use and care, how often your patient needs to check his blood glucose level, and an understanding of how to record blood glucose levels in a log book for use in care-making decisions his target blood glucose level (as determined by the healthcare provider) and at what level he should call the healthcare provider for glucose excursions an overview of hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia, their causes, and how to recognize, treat, and prevent these conditions basic dietary facts and a copy of his pre Continue reading >>

Educating The Diabetic Patient

Educating The Diabetic Patient

by Michele Wojciechowski | Jul 30, 2016 | Career Advice , Clinical , Nursing Articles | 0 comments When patients are diagnosed with diabetes, they often can feel scared, lost, and/or confused. So when part of your job as a nurse is to educate diabetic patients about the condition and the changes they need to make in their lives, its important to know how to handle it. When patients panic, they cant take in any information. That can be a problem when trying to educate them. Vashti Johnson, RN, at BrightStar Care in Cary, North Carolina says that when she needs to educate newly diagnosed diabetics, the first thing she stresses is that its not a death sentence. If managed properly, a diabetic patient can live a long and productive life, explains Johnson. They simply need to change some habits and to focus on a healthier lifestyle. Its important to remember that being diagnosed with any disease can be very overwhelming and almost always leaves the patient with many questions and concerns, says Brittany Dudley, RN, director of nursing at the Health Care Center at Friendship Village in Tempe, Arizona. Newly diagnosed patients are often fearful of the facts of their disease and will withdraw from engaging with education. I always assess my patients to the best of my ability on their ability to learn and what technique of teaching best fits their needs prior to initiating any education. Which brings us to our next stepfiguring out what to tell them and how. Patients with Type II diabetes are often asked to make life changes, and, for many, this can be difficult. Commonly, explains Dudley, they will be put on a diet, exercise, and medication regime. And some of them may not like it. The more you understand a patients lifestyle, the better you can educate them, says Dudley. I of Continue reading >>

What Is A Diabetes Nurse Educator?

What Is A Diabetes Nurse Educator?

A diabetes nurse educator is a nurse who specializes in the care and management of patients with diabetes. They can be registered nurses, advanced-practice nurses , or nurses working in an expanded role. They can manage patients with both Type I and Type II diabetes, as well as women with gestational diabetes . Diabetes education can be one on one with patients, or via a group class. They teach patients the causes, pathophysiology, and signs and symptoms of diabetes as well as hypo and hyperglycemia. Patients need to understand these concepts to remain compliant with treatment and follow up. For example, many lay people don't realize that diabetes can affect multiple organ systems. Patients need to learn how to assess their extremities, especially the feet, for wounds, lacerations, and ulcers as diabetes can affect healing. They need to get routine eye exams to check for retinopathy. Diabetes nurse educators must also reach patients about the importance of diet and nutrition. Patients must learn to count carbohydrates and read food labels. They also need to learn to log their blood sugars and food to find out how they respond to the foods they choose. Logging blood sugars and diet also helps diabetes nurses and physicians change medications or treatments to ensure their blood glucose remains within a desirable range. Patients must also learn about medications used for diabetes, whether it's oral or injectable medications. They must learn time frames in which the peak effect of the medication takes place, and what signs and symptoms of hypoglycemia are and how to avoid "bottoming out." Insulin-dependent diabetics especially need close monitoring-they must learn about the different types of insulins along with their onset of action. Diabetes nurse educators also help mon Continue reading >>

How Can Nurses Help Diabetes Patients?

How Can Nurses Help Diabetes Patients?

People diagnosed with diabetes must follow lifelong care plans to manage the disease. Nurses are at the forefront of educating and treating diabetic patients. While doctors may create a diabetic care plan, it usually falls to nurses to provide care and to educate patients about managing diabetes. Diabetes is a complex disease that requires nurses to stay up-to-date on the latest approaches to managing the condition. RNs can gain expert knowledge and skills vital to improving diabetic care by completing an RN to BSN program . These programs offer additional training in evidence-based nursing care. In the doctors office, nurses can assess patients before they see the doctor and then answer questions after the doctors visit. Nurses can also provide diabetic wound care. This care is important because diabetes slows the healing of wounds, especially on the feet. In the hospital, nurses can look for signs that an undiagnosed person might have diabetes. Nurses know that diabetic patients are at higher risk for problems such as infections, disturbed sensory perception and nutritional imbalances. Nurses can identify these problems early and provide the needed care. Nurses working with diabetic patients have five priorities, according to Nurselabs.com: Restore the balance of fluids, electrolytes and the acid-base balance. Correct/reverse abnormal metabolic functions. Educate patients about diabetes and how it affects the body, self-care and necessary treatments. Beyond treating diabetic patients in a doctors office or hospital, nurses can take on the specialized role of diabetes educator. These educators teach people with diabetes to understand and manage the following: How to change health habits, including making supportive food choices, exercising and quitting smoking, if app Continue reading >>

Diabetic Teaching Plan For Nurses Essay

Diabetic Teaching Plan For Nurses Essay

C.S. is a morbidly obese 32-year-old female admitted to the hospital on 8/26/05 with an admitting diagnosis of poly-drug overdose. According to the patient, the last thing she remembers is going to bed and then waking up in the hospital 2 days later without any recollection of what had happened. She has a history of suicide twice in the past, but denies suicidal ideations this time. C.S. also has a history of Diabetes type II that is normally controlled with oral medications. She states that she checks her blood glucose at home and it has been in the 200mg/dl range for the past month. Current blood glucose is 256mg/dl. C.S. is to be discharged tomorrow with a new prescription for insulin. Assessment data that indicates learning show more content Learning objective #1: (cognitive) patient will be able to verbalize the signs and symptoms of hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia and the actions to take with each situation. Learning objective #2: (Affective) patient will be able to verbalize the benefits of maintaining acceptable blood glucose levels and the importance of taking insulin exactly as prescribed. Learning objective #3: (Psychomotor) patient will demonstrate ability to self-administer Insulin with little, or no prompts. The estimated time for the teaching session is approximately 3 hours. In the first hour I will give a brief overview of what diabetes is and how it can be controlled with insulin. First I will include a very simple explanation of the pathophysiology of the disease and the signs and symptoms that are common. Next, I will explain that when controlling diabetes, her blood sugar can become too high or too low. High blood sugar, or hyperglycemia is caused by eating too much food, eating sugary foods, or by not taking insulin as prescribed. Signs of high blo Continue reading >>

The Nurse Education And Transition (neat) Model: Educating The Hospitalized Patient With Diabetes

The Nurse Education And Transition (neat) Model: Educating The Hospitalized Patient With Diabetes

The number of patients with a diabetes mellitus (DM)-related diagnosis is increasing, yet the number of hospital-based diabetes educators is being reduced. Interest in determining effective ways for staff nurses to deliver diabetes education (DE) is mounting. The purpose of this multi-phase feasibility study was to develop and evaluate the Nurse Education and Transition (NEAT) inpatient DM education model. Exploratory focus groups were conducted with staff nurses from inpatient units at academic tertiary and community hospitals to gain insight into barriers, content, delivery and support mechanisms related to providing DE to hospitalized patients. Findings informed the development of the NEAT model, which included a delivery protocol and toolkit with brief educational videos on key diabetes topics uploaded onto iPads, patient assessments and teach back tools, a discharge survival skills summary sheet, and guidelines for electronic medical record documentation and scheduling outpatient DE visits. Trained staff nurses used NEAT to deliver DE to hospitalized patients with DM and then participated in follow-up focus groups to assess their experiences, with particular attention to the usefulness of NEAT in meeting the needs of nurses related to the delivery of diabetes survival skill education. Information generated was analyzed to identify emerging key themes. Exploratory focus groups revealed that staff nurses view teaching patients with DM as part of their job, but report barriers. Nurses agreed that inpatient DE should be designed to assure safety after discharge and advised that it be patient-centered, targeted, assessment-based and user friendly. Nurses who participated in the delivery of NEAT found that the process and tools met the majority of the basic DE needs of Continue reading >>

Diabetes | Nurse Teachings

Diabetes | Nurse Teachings

SN explained that the Diabetes can affect the small blood vessels of the body that supply the skin with blood. Changes to the blood vessels because of diabetes can cause a skin condition called diabetic dermopathy. This appears as scaly patches that are light brown or red, often on the front of the legs. SN instructed patient on the diabetes. Make wise food choices. Choose fruits, vegetables, whole grains, fish, lean meats, and low - fat dairy products. Learn when to eat and how much to have.Be physically active for 30 to 60 minutes most days, such as taking a brisk walk as tolerated. Two times a week do activities to strengthen muscles and bone, such as lifting weights or sit - ups. Reach and stay at a healthy weight. Making wise food choices and being active can help you control your weight. Take your medicines as prescribed and keep taking them, even after youve reached your targets. Sn instructed patient on diabetes management. Aim for your A1c level to be between 6-7%. For every 1% you decrease your A1c levels you decrease your risk of Diabetic complications. Physical activity helps to decrease blood sugar levels and monitor your food intake such as carbohydrates and fats. Patient verbalized understanding. SN instructed patient on diabetes and kidney problem, that diabetes mellitus ( DM ) is one of the leading cause of kidney failure in the United States. Approximately one-half of people who need dialysis have kidney disease from diabetes.With that, tight control of blood sugar must be done by avoiding concentrated sweets and high-carbohydrate content foods.Diabetic patients with hypertension have a special lower blood pressure target of less than 130 / 80 mmHg to reduce cardiovascular risk and delay progression of kidney disease. SN instructed that if you have di Continue reading >>

Key Element Of Diabetic Nutrition: Education

Key Element Of Diabetic Nutrition: Education

Key element of diabetic nutrition: Education An important message for nurses to share with diabetic patients is their diet is not about deprivation. Thats one of many nuggets of nutritional truth Virginia Peragallo-Dittko, MA, APRN, BC-ADM, CDE, shares with clients at the Diabetic and Obesity Institute at Winthrop-University Hospital in Mineola, N.Y. Peragallo-Dittko, the centers executive director, said myths and misunderstandings often lead patients to make wrong nutritional choices. The foods that are important to a patient culturally can be included in a meal plan, she said. Its all about portions. Marlene Bedrich, MS, RN, BC-ADM, CDE, agrees. Many patients have a distorted idea about portion sizes and dont know what a balanced diet is, she said. Bedrich is program coordinator for the University of California, San Franciscos Diabetes Teaching Center. She said patients should know diabetes can be controlled and requires lifestyle changes. Bedrich often needs to correct patients faulty information, such as the belief that a diabetic cant eat carbohydrates. If a person loses some weight, the diabetes will improve, she said. She often counsels patients to take it one day at a time and learn what makes a balanced diet. Diabetes nurse educator Marianne Chojnicki, RN, CDE, at the Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston, teaches to eat a healthy diet, patients must put the right combinations of food on the plate. Each meal should have carbohydratesparticularly whole grainsproteins and fats. Vegetables should take up half the plate, with carbohydrates (potatoes, rice, pasta, for example) and protein each as one-fourth of the meal. Chojnicki starts teaching a patient about nutrition by taking a food history, discovering what the person is eating. Then she helps the patient take bab Continue reading >>

Teaching Plan For Diabetes Mellitus

Teaching Plan For Diabetes Mellitus

Please read about my new book This is a powerful antioxidant therapy which has natural ingredients to combat effects of oxidative stress to promote health and wellness. Please visit our other website by Louise Diehl, RN, MSN, ND, CCRN, ACNS-BC, NP-C Nurse Practitioner - Owner Doctor of Naturopathy Lehigh Valley Wellness Center Before you begin your teaching plan be sure to define the characteristics of the clinical site and patient population. The teaching plan should be customized to this population. This is a sample teaching plan that you can use and customize to your needs. You may want to design a pre-test and post-test to give your patients would are attending the teaching program. Based on statistics from the Centers for Disease Control website, 17.0 million people in the United States, approximately 6.2% of the population, have diabetes. Of this 17 million people, 11.1 million are diagnosed and 5.9 million are undiagnosed. In the different age groups, about 151,000 people less than 20 years of age have diabetes, approximately 0.19% of people in this age group. In the 20 and older age group 16.9 million and 8.6% of people have diabetes. The 65 and older age group has 7.0 million and 20.1% of all people with diabetes (www.cdc.gov/diabetes). The Identified Learning Need Patients with Diabetes have very comprehensive learning needs. The learning needs are focused on managing their glucose levels and preventing complications of diabetes. Learning needs for managing diabetes are complex and include: monitoring blood glucose levels, menu/food planning, exercise, medications, skin care, management of co-existing disease processes, knowledge of medications, knowledge of the disease process and how to manage hypo/hyperglycemic episodes. Many patients are diagnosed with dia Continue reading >>

Diabetic Diet

Diabetic Diet

If you have diabetes, your body cannot make or properly use insulin. This leads to high blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels. Healthy eating helps keep your blood sugar in your target range. It is a critical part of managing your diabetes, because controlling your blood sugar can prevent the complications of diabetes. A registered dietitian can help make an eating plan just for you. It should take into account your weight, medicines, lifestyle, and other health problems you have. Healthy diabetic eating includes Limiting foods that are high in sugar Eating smaller portions, spread out over the day Being careful about when and how many carbohydrates you eat Eating a variety of whole-grain foods, fruits and vegetables every day Eating less fat Limiting your use of alcohol Using less salt NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Continue reading >>

Diabetes Minor | Ucsf School Of Nursing

Diabetes Minor | Ucsf School Of Nursing

The Department of Family Health Care Nursing offers a minor in diabetes(video) to any student enrolled in a Master's program in the School of Nursing at UCSF. Students who complete all three courses will be awarded a certificate that they have completed the minor in diabetes. Students in the ACNP, AGNP, FNP, ACPNP, and PNP specialties are given preference for enrollment, as the course of study is focused on outpatient management of diabetes. This program provides students with expertise in diabetes across the lifespan with courses that focus on the medical management of pediatric and adult diabetes, as well as the behavioral aspects of self-management of this chronic condition. Students accepted into the minor may have the opportunity to be placed in clinical rotations specific to the delivery of diabetes care within primary care and specialty care clinics. These clinical rotations will be arranged through the students specialty coordinators. Clinical practices include the UCSF Madison Clinic for Pediatric Diabetes, The UCSF Diabetes Teaching Center, The Richard H. Fine Peoples Clinic at ZSFG (Zuckerberg San Francisco General), the ZSFG Endocrine Clinics, and other family practice and community clinics. Students interested in the diabetes minor need only send a one-page goal statement as to why they want to take the minor course of study. Additionally, student advisors will need to send an email to Maureen McGrath, Program Director, to verify that the student has discussed their decision with their advisor and that they are in good academic standing. Contact [emailprotected] with questions. Continue reading >>

More in diabetes