diabetestalk.net

Diabetic Tattoo Designs

Diabetes Tattoo Ideas And Designs Pictures

Diabetes Tattoo Ideas And Designs Pictures

Sponsored Link By: tattooed Category: Arm Tattoos , Back Tattoos , Hand Tattoos Diabetes Tattoo Ideas good replacements for a med bracelet! Apparently, tattoos are turning out to be one of the greatest tools for diabetes awareness. Despite the challenges faced by diabetes patients, most of them are now using tattoos as a symbol of love as well as a show of commitment to support one another in time of needs. To add on, these tattoos can also serve as an alert symbol in times of danger, and thats the reason why anyone with diabetes should considered getting one of these tattoos. Here are some Ideas For Diabetes Tattoos : A bow with a medical symbol at the middle Instead of going for a diabetes ribbon tattoo, you can incorporate some styles into the design by turning it into a bow-tie shape before you placing the diabetes medical symbol at the centre, where the knot is. Dont forget to write the word diabetes at the lower end of the tattoo so that it can be understood by those that are not conversant with the symbol. This tattoo is a perfect replacement for the diabetes bracelet or pendant. It only involves getting a chain tattoo around your wrist and scribbling the word diabetes underneath it and youre done. Similarly, you can decide to go for a tattoo of a wrist watch and have the medical symbol tattooed on the screen. This tattoo can be designed by drawing a butterfly before placing the ribbon symbol at the centre of the butterfly. You can decide to have the design tattooed on either your shoulder or the back if not the wrist. To make it more understandable, just tattoo the word diabetes underneath it for alert purposes. Continue reading >>

Tattoos And Diabetes

Tattoos And Diabetes

Tweet Tattoos are a popular form of body art that involves using needles to inject ink under the skin. Having diabetes doesn't mean you can't have a tattoo, but before deciding to have one done you must be well and ensure that your diabetes is well controlled. High blood sugar levels, for example, can complicate the healing process and increase the risk of infection. Blood pressure should also be kept within the recommended target range. Bear in mind that your blood sugar level may rise whilst your tattoo is being applied. As this process can be quite long, painful and somewhat stressful, particularly if you've chosen a large and complex design - another reason why they must be stable before the procedure starts. However, they should return to normal the next day. Other things to consider before getting a tattoo include: Placement Permanent body art can be applied to nearly every part of the body. For people with diabetes, there are certain areas that should be avoided including those with poor circulation, such as: Buttocks Shins Ankles Feet Common insulin injection sites such as arms, abdomen and thighs. Tattoos in these places usually take longer to heal, which can lead to complications (e.g. infection). Design Tattoo designs are usually based on things that are meaningful or significant to the individual. For a person with diabetes, this could be something that includes clear medical symbols and/or text that indicates their condition. These so-called 'diabetes tattoos' have become quite common in recent years, with many diabetics using them to replace medical jewellery as a permanent form of diabetes identification. Design inspiration Members of the Diabetes.co.uk Facebook page shared their tattoos with us. Have a look, they're certainly a source of inspiration. Thi Continue reading >>

Medic Alert Tattoo | Diabetic Connect

Medic Alert Tattoo | Diabetic Connect

- Style/image: I think the bracelets are hokey and tattoos are cool. I don't have any tattoos now, partly because I've always half worried that I'd never find gainful employment if I did. But isn't a serious medical condition like diabetes a GREAT excuse to have a tattoo? - Safety. As it is, I never wear my medic alert bracelet. It's a pain to put on and I've never found one I liked (see above). - Will never be able to lie about not having diabetes. - Social stigma attached to being tattooed. - What if my medic alert tattoo turns out to be just just as hokey as a medic alert bracelet, only more permanent? I would really appreciate input from others on this. Thanks! UPDATE: Apparently ALL the cool diabetics are doing it! I found this site with a ton of pictures of medic alert tattoos for type 1's: As long as your diabetes is well managed. Theres no problem. Suggest you talk to your doctor beforehand I have had the tatoo on my left wrist for years. On the underside of my wrist I got "Diabetic" tatooed in a nice looking cursive writing. The positive comments over the years have been worth it, from the public, friends, & emergency personnell. C What are the chances of infection. I thought being diabetic you would really have to worry about it. How do you know where you go is a safe place to get it done? This was discussion in 2008. What about 2011? this is such a rad idea!!! i have several tattoos already and i always joked about getting a diabetic tattoo of my insulin pump on my side haha but, this is a great idea! i think im gonna get one ;) do it!!!! Thinking about getting one myself. I work in "high voltage" conditions and the bracelet/necklace is a safety hazard. As far as "hokey", that depends on who does the tatoo. I had two done at age 25 and they sucked. I had a c Continue reading >>

20 Med Alert Tattoos For Inspiration

20 Med Alert Tattoos For Inspiration

While tattoos are becoming a way of expressing yourself or making your fashion sense being known, they have also started taking on another dimension, that is of being the means to tell people about your medical conditions, which in turn will mean that proper care and treatment is given to you on time. This way med alert tattoos can really make the difference between death and life to people by revealing their medical condition in a way that is noticeable by others and effective. Sometimes, people also use tattoos to cover up marks and scars that they have as a result of some medical procedure. Women go in for tattoos as a means of creating a areola when they lose their breast due to cancer. Sometimes tattoos also cover the entire breast area. Now that tattoos also serve a really vital purpose, there is all the more reason to combine art with vital lifesaving information so that you make a statement that will help you in when in need. Diabetic Band Tattoo: Most people get weary about wearing a band to show that they are diabetic and the solution is simply a tattoo. It is permanent and looks cool while telling the world about your health condition. You can also get it in the form of diabetic alert tattoo in the middle of an image in a really clear and readable form. Do Not Resuscitate Tattoos: Some people have gone for this option and a tattoo is a good way of making your wishes known in case it is needed. Of course, the risk here is somebody may ask people they do not like, to get one of these just out of malice Penicillin Med Alert Tattoo: There are some people who cannot withstand treatment from penicillin which can react in dire consequences. One of the ways to tell medical professionals about it in a simple and easy manner is by having a tattoo. This covers emergency Continue reading >>

Creating Diabetes Tattoos That Sense Changes In Blood Sugar

Creating Diabetes Tattoos That Sense Changes In Blood Sugar

It’s not often that the words “cool” and “diabetes” get used in the same sentence, but researchers at MIT and Harvard have joined the two concepts with an idea for creating tattoos that change color based on the blood sugar level of the person wearing them. The project has the oddly dystopian name of the Dermal Abyss (or, as they call it d-abyss) and is a collaboration between the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Media Lab and Harvard Medical School, according to Katia Vega, a post doctoral associate at MIT and a member of the team. “The Dermal Abyss is a proof-of-concept that illustrates the potential of culturally and medically integrated biosensors,” Vega says. “They are biosensor tattoos that visibly react to changes in the metabolism. The purpose of the work is to light the imagination of biotechnologists and stimulate public support for such efforts.” The tattoos they designed will not be showing up in a pharmacy or tattoo shop any time soon. “The purpose of the work is to highlight a novel possibility for biosensors rather than bring a medical device to market,” Vega says. “As such, there are currently no plans to develop the Dermal Abyss as a product or to pursue clinical trials.” Like a hot concept car, there is real technology in the tattoos that were produced for the project. Various iterations of the tattoos sense changes not only in glucose but in pH, which can indicate dehydration and changes in sodium ion, which can give indications of hypertension. For glucose, the colors change from a light blue at a reading of five, and go through five shade changes until it’s dark brown at a reading of 110. The team at d-abyss inserted biosensors in place of traditionally used tattoo ink into skin from a pig at a depth of 10 millimeter Continue reading >>

Inspiring Diabetes Tattoos

Inspiring Diabetes Tattoos

Over 29 million people in the United States alone have diabetes. That’s 9.3 percent of the population. And each year, 1.4 million more people are diagnosed. In adults, over 90 percent of those diagnoses are for type 2 diabetes, though many of the tattoos below are on those with type 1 diabetes or on those who love them. Many people who have diabetes, or know someone who does, choose to get inked. For some, it’s for their own safety: Getting the word “diabetic” tattooed on their arm can help make sure those around them are aware in case of an emergency. For others, it’s about raising awareness. And for loved ones, it’s about solidarity. Whatever the reasons, these tattoos, which were submitted by some of our readers, all send powerful messages. Check them out below! If you'd like to share the story behind your diabetes tattoo, email us with the subject line "My diabetes tattoo" and be sure to include: a photo of your tattoo, a short description of why you got it or why you love it, and your name. “I decided to get my diabetes tattoo mainly because I never wore my medical bracelet and I wanted to make sure that I had some sort of permanent marking in case of emergency. Since having the tattoo, I have found that it, in addition to keeping me safe, also allows me to commemorate my struggles as a diabetic and showcase my artsy flair.” -Amelia “This tattoo is on my leg. My son drew this in pencil 10 days before he passed away. He was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at age 4 and died at age 14 on March 25, 2010.” -Jen Nicholson “I’ve had type 1 diabetes since January 3, 2007. The butterfly represents me, the blue circle represents type 1 juvenile diabetes, and the grey ribbon represents diabetes awareness.” -Vanessa “About a year ago, I got ‘DIABET Continue reading >>

‘tattoo’ May Help Diabetics Track Their Blood Sugar

‘tattoo’ May Help Diabetics Track Their Blood Sugar

People with type I diabetes must prick their fingers several times a day to test their blood sugar level. Though the pain is minor, the chore interferes with daily life. “They never really escape it,” says Paul Barone, a postdoctoral researcher in MIT’s Department of Chemical Engineering. Barone and professor Michael Strano are working on a new type of blood glucose monitor that could not only eliminate the need for finger pricks but also offer more accurate readings. “Diabetes is an enormous problem, global in scope, and despite decades of engineering advances, our ability to accurately measure glucose in the human body still remains quite primitive,” says Strano, the Charles and Hilda Roddey Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering. “It is a life-and-death issue for a growing number of people.” Strano and Barone’s sensing system consists of a “tattoo” of nanoparticles designed to detect glucose, injected below the skin. A device similar to a wristwatch would be worn over the tattoo, displaying the patient’s glucose levels. Continuous glucose detection A 2008 study in the New England Journal of Medicine showed that continuous monitoring helped adult type I diabetes patients who were at least 25 years old better control their blood glucose levels. However, existing wearable devices are not as accurate as the finger-prick test and have to be recalibrated once or twice a day — a process that still involves pricking the finger. “The most problematic consequences of diabetes result from relatively short excursions of a person’s blood sugar outside of the normal physiological range, following meals, for example,” says Strano. “If we can detect and prevent these excursions, we can go a long way toward reducing the devastating impact of this Continue reading >>

Diabetic Kids Learn How To Inject Themselves With Fun, Intuitive Insulin Kit

Diabetic Kids Learn How To Inject Themselves With Fun, Intuitive Insulin Kit

For those living with type one diabetes, injecting yourself is a daily occurrence. The chronic disease, which is caused when a person cannot produce their own insulin, can be a life-altering condition, with patients having to inject themselves several times a day, check their blood glucose levels regularly and make big changes to their diets, exercise regime and general lifestyle. The condition is common in children. According to charity JDRF (Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation), around 29,000 children in the UK live with type one diabetes, and the number of five-year-olds with the disease goes up by 5% every year. Having to manually inject insulin into your body is part of the treatment for the disease, and whats more, the JDRF estimates that a person with type one diabetes will have around 65,000 injections in their lifetime. Renata Souza, a 24-year-old product design graduate from Parsons School of Design in New York, has come up with a prototype for a new, fun and intuitive insulin pen for children, which aims to reduce the stigma, embarrassment and pain that can result from having to inject several times a day. Discussed at this years Design Indaba in Cape Town, South Africa, Thomy is a colourful insulin-injecting kit inspired by Souzas six-year-old nephew Thoms, who was recently diagnosed with type one diabetes. The designer worked with doctors, patients and other designers on the prototype, and conducted research into type one diabetes. It consists of a chunky, colourful insulin pen, with a big handle that aims to be better-suited to childrens hands and easier for them to hold, a shorter needle to make it easier to reach and thermochromatic plastic at the top that changes colour to indicate when someone is finished administering insulin and can release the ne Continue reading >>

6 Tattooing Tips For People With Type 1

6 Tattooing Tips For People With Type 1

A tattoo aficionado with Type 1 shares his experience on getting some ink done. I wanted to get a tattoo, but people discouraged me from doing it because of my Type 1 diabetes. The naysayers told me that we didn’t heal well enough, that we got infections too easily, that there was just too much risk. But then I began noticing people with diabetes-related tattoos. Some people were getting them on their wrists in place of MedicAlert bracelets. Others were getting more elaborate tattoos on other parts of their bodies. I learned about Darren Brass, a Miami tattoo artist with Type 1 diabetes. I read in Diabetes Mine about a columnist’s tattoo. Apparently we could get inked. sponsor Of course, as with everything in life, people with diabetes have some additional things to think about when it comes to tattoos. There are risks involved, as a tattoo is an open wound. Some people with diabetes heal slower than others, making the open wound more prone for infection. Many of us also deal with poor circulation, making tattoos on areas furthest from the heart a little more risky. After doing my research, I decided to get a diabetes-related tattoo of my own. At first I thought it would be a great idea to get a MedicAlert tattoo. But as I thought about it more, I decided a more elaborate diabetes-related tattoo would be a way to own my diabetes. No hiding, no ignoring, no running away, it would be a constant reminder to me. This is what I did to make sure my first tattoo went smoothly: -Made sure my A1C score was less than 7.0. -Made sure my 14-day blood sugar average was below 140 mg/dL. -Got my doctor’s approval before going under the pen. -Made sure I picked the right artist, one who had a good reputation and a clean parlor. -Brought a snack and checked my blood sugar at least Continue reading >>

The Safe Way To Get Ink When You Have Diabetes

The Safe Way To Get Ink When You Have Diabetes

There was a time when tattoos were something only sailors, bikers, and other hard-livin’ rebels inked into their skin. Now 1 in 5 people have at least one—tattoos aren’t taboo anymore. But can someone with diabetes get one? Of course! And if you’re thinking about getting a medical alert tattoo, you’re taking a great step to ensure proper care in case of emergency. What are the Risks? Suzanne Ghiloni, B.S.N, R.N., C.D.E., a nurse educator at Joslin Diabetes Center, says tattoo precautions for patients with diabetes aren’t all that different from anyone else getting a tattoo. “Make sure the parlor you choose is licensed, state inspected, and clean,” she says. When choosing a tattoo parlor, ask about how they manage their equipment. The shop you choose should: Have a licensed/accredited tattoo artist (preferably someone with artistic talent) Use a brand new needle just for you Autoclave their tattoo machines between customers Use disposable ink pots “The only time I’d be hesitant is if the person has uncontrolled diabetes,” says Ghiloni. Her advice to anyone with diabetes, “get your HBA1C in a good range before you go to the tattoo parlor.” The reason: if your levels are out of control, you put yourself at risk for slower healing, nasty infections and, in severe cases, amputation. “A person with diabetes need to be hyper-vigilant about preventing infection,” says Ghiloni. “Follow all the aftercare precautions.” Stephan Lanphear, an award winning tattoo artist who helped legalize tattoo parlors in Massachusetts, is also a Joslin patient living with type 1 diabetes. During the legalization process, Lanphear helped the board of health write guidelines and regulations for the tattoo industry. “Health releases in tattoo studios have a questio Continue reading >>

7 Amazing Diabetes Tattoos!

7 Amazing Diabetes Tattoos!

#7. Submitted by Kaitlin Tucker Savio “Just got it done. I’ve been diabetic for over 15 years and on a pump for 13.” Source #6. Submitted by Matthew Eglin #5. Submitted by Kerri Keiser Caraballo Source The Diabetes Site is a place where people can come together to help those whose lives have been affected by diabetes. In addition to sharing inspiring stories, shopping for the cause, and signing petitions, visitors can take just a moment each day to click on the red button to provide much-needed support for diabetes research. Visit The Diabetes Site and click today - it's free! #4. Submitted by Brittany D’Amico #3. Submitted by Megan Alfson Source #2. Submitted by Patti Scoles-Higdon “In memory of My Mom & Family members with Type 2 Diabetes.” Source #1. Submitted by Shannon Kidd Santos “My husband and I let our 7 year old (dx 4-11-12) tell us what tattoo he wanted us to have. He wanted the blue circle with his “signature” in the middle. Everytime he sees it… He smiles. I am so happy to know he realizes how much we support and love him.” Source Continue reading >>

Color-changing Tattoos Aim To Monitor Blood Sugar, Other Health Stats

Color-changing Tattoos Aim To Monitor Blood Sugar, Other Health Stats

For many people with diabetes, keeping tabs on blood sugar every day is expensive, time-consuming and invasive, but researchers at MIT and Harvard are exploring a creative new approach that could one day help make things easier: biosensing tattoos. The scientists have developed special tattoo ink that contains chemicals that can sense blood sugar levels, pH, and sodium. When blood sugar goes up, for example, the glucose sensing ink changes from blue to brown. When a person's salt levels increase, the sodium sensing ink becomes a more vibrant green under UV light. When alkaline levels shifts, a pH sensor changes from purple to pink. The DermalAbyss ink – still in what scientists call the "proof-of-concept" stage – alters its hues in response to changes in the fluids inside a person's body, MIT Media Lab researcher Xin Liu told CBS News. It literally becomes an interactive display. "People with diabetes email us and say, 'I want to try it out,'" Liu said. For someone with diabetes who has to prick their finger multiple times a day to test their blood sugar level, or who wears pricey blood glucose monitoring equipment that can be cumbersome during activities like swimming, glancing down at a tattoo to check if blood sugar has dropped or spiked could be a lower-maintenance approach to health monitoring. But the technology is still in the very early research stage, Liu points out, and has only been tested on pig skin samples, not living, breathing animals – let alone humans. Liu said there are a lot of unknowns in testing it on living skin, including questions about allergies, accuracy and durability. "It will take a long time for anything practical to go to market, but it [the technology] evokes imaginations and opens up possibilities," said Liu. For some, the idea of Continue reading >>

New Tattoos Constantly Monitor Glucose Levels In Diabetics | Inhabitat - Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green Building

New Tattoos Constantly Monitor Glucose Levels In Diabetics | Inhabitat - Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green Building

For some people, staying healthy could require getting some ink. Researchers at MIT recently created a new type of tattoo designed for folks living with diabetes. Once injected, the nanoparticle ink can consistently measure glucose levels in the bloodstream, alerting patients if their blood sugar levels fall outside the normal range. Weve seen similar tattoo technology from a different lab covered before on Ecouterre , and now were excited to see that MIT is getting in on the action tattoos such as these offer a huge advance in glucose-level monitoring. Typically, diabetics need to prick their fingers several times a day in order to monitor blood sugar levels. Not only is this method a nuisance, its not entirely effective: By not consistently tracking glucose, diabetics can miss the moment when blood sugar levels start to change, like after eating. While some constant monitors exist, theyre not approved for long-term use. To create the blood sugar-reading ink , scientists used nanotubes wrapped in a glucose-sensitive polymer. After the ink is injected beneath the surface of the skin, the nano-ink seeks out glucose and fluoresces when it detects it. A separate device kind of like a wristwatch provides near-infrared to read the fluorescing (kind of like a secret decoder ring), and allows users to track rising and falling glucose levels. While all this is pretty fascinating, it gets better: Wearers arent stuck with the same tattoo for life. The nano-ink starts to disappear after about six months, when patients will need to be re-injected with the ink. Continue reading >>

Tattoos

Tattoos

November is Diabetes Awareness Month and so November of 2006 seemed the appropriate time to have a diabetes awareness tattoo created. My son, Liam was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes at the ripe old age of two. Every day I strive to keep him as healthy as possible. Every day I work to ensure that his life is as normal as possible. Diabetes does not make that easy. That is one of the reasons that I created the online community called Diabetes Advocacy (www.diabetesadvocacy.com ). Each year Diabetes Advocacy has done its bit to increase awareness of diabetes and diabetes related issues in this country. We have sent out calendars filled with people living with diabetes and have created booklets filled with their stories. In November of 2006, we took diabetes awareness to a level. Across North America—from Newfoundland to California, people came together through Diabetes Advocacy with one common goal. They have decided to have a tattoo done to raise awareness of Type 1 Diabetes. I did as well. No one in my immediate family had a clue that I was even considering this. My oldest son was shocked. My youngest told me I took after him and was tough! Despite the initial shock, the reaction has been the same—Wow! I would like to thank Bernard at Peek-a-Boo Tattoos in Stephenville for creating a true work of art and a picture of love. The tattoo you see below was created by him from a very rough concept I brought to him. He created two hearts for my two children—equal in my love. He added a touch of color that reflected their birthstones. He kept hues soft and loving. The ribbons are grey and in Liam’s case, end in the Diabetes Awareness ribbon. His heart also shows the drop of blood that he must part with every time he eats and plays so that we can ensure his blood glucose Continue reading >>

Mit’s Color-changing Tattoos Are Perfect For Diabetics

Mit’s Color-changing Tattoos Are Perfect For Diabetics

Cool tat, man: Researchers at MIT and Harvard Medical School have developed color-changing tattoo ink that responds to variations in bodily fluid. Dermal Abyss is a proof-of-concept that turns the body’s surface into an interactive display. “It blends advances in biotechnology with traditional methods in tattoo artistry,” the scientists said, emphasizing that “this is a research project,” and there are no current plans to develop Dermal Abyss or pursue clinical trials. That’s too bad. Because this new science sounds really great—particularly for folks who suffer from diabetes and other medical conditions. Diabetics currently spend their days pricking a finger to monitor the glucose in their blood. But what if that recurring painful procedure could be replaced with a one-time painful procedure—a tattoo? Embedded biosensors transition from blue to brown as the concentration of blood sugar increases, allowing the user to keep an eye on color changes indicating the need for insulin. Similarly, the pH sensor—measuring the alkalinity of interstitial fluid—changes from purple to pink and the sodium sensor fluoresces under a UV light, becoming a more intense green as salt intake grows. “The Dermal Abyss creates a direct access to the compartments in the body and reflects inner metabolic processes in a shape of a tattoo,” according to the MIT website. “I could be used for applications in continuously monitoring such as medical diagnostics, quantified self, and data encoding in the body.” MIT is no stranger to tat tech: Last year, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology introduced temporary tattoos that serve as high-tech wearables. DuoSkin uses off-the-shelf materials and electronic components to design a swipeable UI element directly on your skin. Continue reading >>

More in diabetes