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Diabetic Symbol

Ok, I’m Confused…the Symbol For Diabetes Awareness Is…what?

Ok, I’m Confused…the Symbol For Diabetes Awareness Is…what?

If you were to do a series of online searches on Diabetes Awareness symbols, chances are that you’d encounter just what we have: confusion. There truly are several symbols out there that represent diabetes awareness. Some are more popular than others, however, and that’s what we’re hoping to do with this brief list: to show you three of the most commonly identified symbols so that you too can join in the fight against diabetes. 1. A grey ribbon with a drop of red The drop of red is meant to symbolize the blood used to test blood sugar. In general, this ribbon tends to be the most popular of the three within the United States, as it has been around the longest. ★ TYPE 1 HAS THEIR OWN RIBBON? ★ Type 1 diabetes actually does have its own awareness ribbon. One half of the ribbon is blue, and the other is grey, which also has a drop of red. *** What’s our favorite way to show to demonstrate our diabetes awareness? We really like to: Sock It to Diabetes! Sometimes we’ll wear one blue sock with one grey sock. Or one orange, and one blue. Well, you get the picture. You can help us Sock It To Diabetes. 2. A blue circle As an attempt to unify the fight against diabetes, the United Nations (UN) introduced the blue circle in 2006. Blue, according to diabetesbluecircle.org, “…reflects the color of the sky and the flag of the United Nations,” while the circle is meant to symbolize unity. ★ Help a Patient with Leg & Foot Ulcers ★ Sometimes insurance isn’t enough when the only medication that gives you hope costs more than insurance will provide. This requires thousands of dollars in co-pays or other out-of-pocket costs. Hundreds of patients, many whom are diabetic, who are being treated are choosing between their health and their family’s financial liveliho Continue reading >>

The Lack Of A Unified Diabetes Symbol Hurts Us All | Diabetic Connect

The Lack Of A Unified Diabetes Symbol Hurts Us All | Diabetic Connect

The Lack Of A Unified Diabetes Symbol Hurts Us All The Lack of a Unified Diabetes Symbol Hurts Us All The Importance of an Awareness Symbol to the Diabetes Cause Raising awareness around a disease or chronic condition can make a big difference in funding for research care, and improve quality of life for individuals living with that disease. Thank goodness then that more and more people are becoming aware of diabetes and its warning signs and effects. But with diabetes diagnoses on the rise, there ought to be even more awareness education. In a recent blog article , a woman named Laura Bee expressed a frustration I also share: the lack of a universal symbol or a way for everyone to unite in the diabetes cause together. She has designed a new symbol for diabetes that she is promoting and trying to get others in the diabetes community to adopt. There are several organizations that promote diabetes awareness, education and resources for people living with diabetes. One of the largest is the International Diabetes Federation (IDF). It is the only worldwide organization for diabetes and utilizes the blue circle as the symbol for diabetes. The IDF has done great things, but it is unfortunate, as Laura mentions in the article, that the blue circle has not yet been adopted as the universal sign for diabetes. It seems that with such a great cause all of the organizations and diabetes groups around the world would be able to join forces and unite together under one symbol to improve the lives of those living with diabetes and help prevent diabetes for those that may be at risk. So, I am with Laura on this one. Why cant we just find a symbol that can be easily recognized as the universal symbol for diabetes? Something that makes a statement and that people would see at the store Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Awareness Tattoos

Diabetes And Awareness Tattoos

The diabetes tattoos on this page are as permanent in our lives as living with diabetes is. In November of 2006, agroup of people with diabetes in their lives wanted to dosomething different to raise diabetes awareness. They decided to get diabetes tattoos. For some, it was achallenge. Others saw it as a fantasy come true. For everyone though, it was avery public display of love. Please enjoy the art and love the stories. If you are considering getting a diabetes tattoo, we have a few things that you may want to consider before you do. Once you make the decision to get a tattoo, we would love it if you share your design with us! This is where this page began, with my own tattoo. Here is my story . November is DiabetesAwareness Month and so November of 2006 seemed the appropriate timeto have a diabetes awareness tattoo created. No one in my immediatefamily had a clue that I was even considering this. My oldestson was shocked. My youngest told me I took after him and wastough! Despite the initial shock, the reaction to my diabetes awareness tattoo has been the sameWow! The tattoo artistcreated two hearts for my two childrenequal in my love. Headded a touch of color that reflected their birthstones. Hekept hues soft and loving while adding in aDiabetes Awareness ribbon. Thedrop of blood reflects the blood my son parts with every time he checkshis blood glucose levels . The fit isperfect for my shoulder. The concept is a reflection of my heart. In June of 2017, I had the image retouched as 11 years of showers had faded the original work. Here are many diabetes and diabetes awareness tattoos that have been sent to us over the years. They have come from individuals all over the world. These diabetes tattoos are on people with type 1 diabetes, those with type 2 diabetes as we Continue reading >>

World Diabetes Day And The History Of The Blue Circle

World Diabetes Day And The History Of The Blue Circle

We all know November is Diabetes awareness month, and November 14th is “World Diabetes Day.” But what is the meaning of the “blue circle” and why do we celebrate and advocate for diabetes so much this month? I asked Keegan Hall, the President of the Young Leaders in Diabetes Program, to talk a bit about the history. Many causes and conditions have a colored ribbon to symbolize the cause. In the diabetes community, we have done something very different—a blue circle. The blue circle is the universal symbol for diabetes. Until 2006, there was no global symbol for diabetes. The purpose of the symbol is to give diabetes a common identity. It aims to: Support all existing efforts to raise awareness about diabetes Inspire new activities, bring diabetes to the attention of the general public Brand diabetes Provide a means to show support for the fight against diabetes What is the history of the blue circle? The icon was originally developed for the campaign that resulted in the passage of United Nations Resolution 61/225 “World Diabetes Day.” The campaign for a United Nations Resolution on diabetes was a response to the diabetes pandemic that is set to overwhelm healthcare resources everywhere. The campaign mobilized diabetes stakeholders behind the common cause of securing a United Nations Resolution on diabetes. The United Nations passed Resolution 61/225 ‘World Diabetes Day’ on December 20, 2006. Why a circle? The circle occurs frequently in nature and has thus been widely employed since the dawn of humankind. The significance is overwhelmingly positive. Across cultures, the circle can symbolize life and health. Most significantly for the campaign, the circle symbolizes unity. Our combined strength is the key element that made this campaign so special. The Continue reading >>

Signs & Symptoms

Signs & Symptoms

There are many signs and symptoms that can indicate diabetes. Signs and symptoms can include the following: Unusual thirst Frequent urination Weight change (gain or loss) Extreme fatigue or lack of energy Blurred vision Frequent or recurring infections Cuts and bruises that are slow to heal Tingling or numbness in the hands or feet Trouble getting or maintaining an erection If you have any of these symptoms, it is important to contact your health-care provider right away. Even if you don’t have symptoms, if you are 40 or older, you should still get checked. It is important to recognize, however, that many people who have type 2 diabetes may display no symptoms. We respond to more than 20,000 requests per year by phone, email, and online chat. We are here to help give you the information and support you need so don't hesitate to contact us today. Contact Us Symptoms of diabetes in children Diabetes affects children of all ages. Most children who develop diabetes do not have a family history of diabetes. Symptoms of diabetes in your child could include: Drinking and going to the bathroom more frequently than usual Starting to wet the bed again Lack of energy If you think your child might have diabetes, see a doctor today. Diagnosis of diabetes Speak with your doctor and ask him or her to test you for diabetes using one of the following tests. The amount of glucose (sugar) in your blood is measured in mmol/L. Fasting blood glucose You must not eat or drink anything except water for at least eight hours before this test. A test result of 7.0 mmol/L or greater indicates diabetes. Random blood glucose This test may be done at any time, regardless of when you last ate. A test result of 11.0 mmol/L or greater, plus symptoms of diabetes, indicates diabetes. A1C This test may b Continue reading >>

6 Tattooing Tips For People With Type 1

6 Tattooing Tips For People With Type 1

A tattoo aficionado with Type 1 shares his experience on getting some ink done. I wanted to get a tattoo, but people discouraged me from doing it because of my Type 1 diabetes. The naysayers told me that we didn’t heal well enough, that we got infections too easily, that there was just too much risk. But then I began noticing people with diabetes-related tattoos. Some people were getting them on their wrists in place of MedicAlert bracelets. Others were getting more elaborate tattoos on other parts of their bodies. I learned about Darren Brass, a Miami tattoo artist with Type 1 diabetes. I read in Diabetes Mine about a columnist’s tattoo. Apparently we could get inked. sponsor Of course, as with everything in life, people with diabetes have some additional things to think about when it comes to tattoos. There are risks involved, as a tattoo is an open wound. Some people with diabetes heal slower than others, making the open wound more prone for infection. Many of us also deal with poor circulation, making tattoos on areas furthest from the heart a little more risky. After doing my research, I decided to get a diabetes-related tattoo of my own. At first I thought it would be a great idea to get a MedicAlert tattoo. But as I thought about it more, I decided a more elaborate diabetes-related tattoo would be a way to own my diabetes. No hiding, no ignoring, no running away, it would be a constant reminder to me. This is what I did to make sure my first tattoo went smoothly: -Made sure my A1C score was less than 7.0. -Made sure my 14-day blood sugar average was below 140 mg/dL. -Got my doctor’s approval before going under the pen. -Made sure I picked the right artist, one who had a good reputation and a clean parlor. -Brought a snack and checked my blood sugar at least Continue reading >>

International Diabetes Symbol

International Diabetes Symbol

Member Cystic Fibrosis related diabetes diagnosed Mar 09 Hi. I've been working on expanding the design, or rather further codifying the design, of the international symbol of diabetes, the blue circle. Before I post pngs of the augmented designs - and before I submit my proposal to IDF! - I have some questions: Do type 1s often become type IIs? Do Type IIs become Type Is? The symbol isn't widely recognized in America. Not even among the diabetic community, yet is is distinct, simple to reproduce, and there is no language-barrier, as text is not required to understand it. Why is it not in widespread use? Why do medical bracelet and tag companies insist on the cadaecus, which could mean SO MANY other conditions? Cystic Fibrosis related diabetes since March '09 Novolog @ 25 carb/unit & Lantus @ 7 units daily D.D. Family T2 since 1996 and struggling to be healthy. I do not know what you are talking about. Please post an image. Where has this image been used? The symbol on my id bracelet is a red with a design in center. I don't know if that is only in US or if that is an International symbol Do type 1s often become type IIs? Do Type IIs become Type Is? The answer to this question is NO to both. A T1 cannot become a T2. A T1 can develop some insulin resistance but that would still not make them a T2. Cozmore pump Started 3/22/07 using Novolog D.D. Family T2 dx 3/07, tx w/very lo carb D&E Met, bolus R Since Type 1 diabetes is caused by an auto-immune attack at any point in life, it is very possible for a type 2 diabetic to develop type 1 diabetes. I'm told that a member of this forum had that happen to them. A type 2 diabetic does NOT become a type 1 diabetic simply by taking insulin, however. The types are differentiating the basic cause of the lack of insulin, not the fact Continue reading >>

Logo Of The Disease | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Logo Of The Disease | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android . Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Hey everybody! I was thinking about a logo of the disease, which shows that I'm NOT like the others and make a tattoo. I want it to be a worldwide symbol. A few days ago I watched an amazing video clips. And I think the tattoo in that clip is a good one. So guys what do you think about it??? (not a native speaker. Sorry for the mistakes If you don't care about the idea. Watch this amazing video anyways please Hi For Info the International Symbol for Diabetes is a Blue Circe Rand, I know but it's not appropriate for the tattoo @ Ilya83 There is many tattoos that have been already used eg; It may not be appropriate, yet it is still a message. I prefer a tattoo to be a symbol of love and art etc; and not to say I am different. The video is very good yet I don't get the connection why a tattoo. Hi For Info the International Symbol for Diabetes is a Blue Circe Does this also apply to Type 2's? I've been diagnosed a year and have never heard of or seen the blue circle! Does this also apply to Type 2's? I've been diagnosed a year and have never heard of or seen the blue circle! I must be fair when I first heard that the blue circle was the Diabetes symbol, I just thought the circle was a cement. thing. Hey everybody! I was thinking about a logo of the disease, which shows that I'm NOT like the others and make a tattoo. I want it to be a worldwide symbol. A few days ago I watched an amazing video clips. And I think the tattoo in that clip is a good one. So guys what do you think Continue reading >>

The Blue Circle – A Powerful Symbol For World Diabetes Day

The Blue Circle – A Powerful Symbol For World Diabetes Day

During the last month, you have probably seen more than one pink ribbon. Every October, breast cancer awareness month, we see the pink ribbon displayed on everything from shirts to mugs to even stamps. Most people in the U.S., even many young children, are familiar with the pink ribbon and that it stands for breast cancer awareness. For the last 20 years, the pink ribbon has helped to increase awareness and funding for a very worthy cause. The sea of pink that takes over October is not only a reminder of how many people breast cancer has affected, but also how many people stand against it. It sends a powerful message that we as a community are standing up to a deadly NCD. The pink ribbon has taught us an important lesson – a simple message can have a large impact on community awareness. This lesson can be used to combat another NCD – diabetes. Diabetes also has a symbol to raise awareness, the blue circle. The blue circle has only been in existence since 2006, when the International Diabetes Federation (IDF), chose it because in many cultures a circle can symbolize life and health. And, more importantly, the circle symbolizes the unity that is necessary to combat such a deadly NCD. IDF chose the color blue for the color of the sky and the flag of the United Nations, an organization that stands for unity among many nations. World Diabetes Day (WDD) is on November 14th, almost a week away. Diabetes education and prevention is the WDD theme for the time period from 2009 – 2013. Awareness efforts include the WDD Blue Monument Challenge. On November 14th, 2010, over 900 monuments and buildings were lit blue to raise awareness for diabetes. This popular campaign will continue this year. If you would like to learn more about this initiative or to find out how to go about Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus

Diabetes Mellitus

"Diabetes" redirects here. For other uses, see Diabetes (disambiguation). Diabetes mellitus (DM), commonly referred to as diabetes, is a group of metabolic disorders in which there are high blood sugar levels over a prolonged period.[7] Symptoms of high blood sugar include frequent urination, increased thirst, and increased hunger.[2] If left untreated, diabetes can cause many complications.[2] Acute complications can include diabetic ketoacidosis, hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state, or death.[3] Serious long-term complications include cardiovascular disease, stroke, chronic kidney disease, foot ulcers, and damage to the eyes.[2] Diabetes is due to either the pancreas not producing enough insulin or the cells of the body not responding properly to the insulin produced.[8] There are three main types of diabetes mellitus:[2] Type 1 DM results from the pancreas's failure to produce enough insulin.[2] This form was previously referred to as "insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus" (IDDM) or "juvenile diabetes".[2] The cause is unknown.[2] Type 2 DM begins with insulin resistance, a condition in which cells fail to respond to insulin properly.[2] As the disease progresses a lack of insulin may also develop.[9] This form was previously referred to as "non insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus" (NIDDM) or "adult-onset diabetes".[2] The most common cause is excessive body weight and insufficient exercise.[2] Gestational diabetes is the third main form, and occurs when pregnant women without a previous history of diabetes develop high blood sugar levels.[2] Prevention and treatment involve maintaining a healthy diet, regular physical exercise, a normal body weight, and avoiding use of tobacco.[2] Control of blood pressure and maintaining proper foot care are important for people with t Continue reading >>

Diabetic Symbol Hexagon Bracelet

Diabetic Symbol Hexagon Bracelet

Show your support and spread awareness for diabetes with this sparkling hexagon bracelet! This white metal bracelet features a custom hexagon design complimented with 3.5 carats of pave set cubic zirconia accents! The bracelet includes a hook clasp for comfort and durability! Proudly Made in the USA! Inspired Silver features fashion jewelry, charms, cubic zirconia jewelry and more. Designer jewelry and Celebrity wedding rings as see in magazines as the finest collection of engagement rings and sisters jewelry . Also available: necklaces , rings , earrings , bracelets , pearls , charm jewelry , anklets, stud earrings , men's watches and many product reviews. 20032018 Inspired Silver. All rights reserved. Inspired Silver mark and logo are trademarks of Ecommerce Innovations LLC. Please note none of the products offered for sale by Inspired Silver are sponsored or endorsed by any celebrities or other famous persons. No celebrities or other famous persons are associated or affiliated with Inspired Silver in any way. Any similarities between the names or images appearing on this website and any celebrities or other famous persons is purely coincidental. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Symptoms, (type 1 And Type 2)

Diabetes Symptoms, (type 1 And Type 2)

Diabetes type 1 and type 2 definition and facts Diabetes is a chronic condition associated with abnormally high levels of sugar (glucose) in the blood. Insulin produced by the pancreas lowers blood glucose. Absence or insufficient production of insulin, or an inability of the body to properly use insulin causes diabetes. The two types of diabetes are referred to as type 1 and type 2. Former names for these conditions were insulin-dependent and non-insulin-dependent diabetes, or juvenile onset and adult onset diabetes. Symptoms of type 1 and type 2 diabetes include increased urine output, excessive thirst, weight loss, hunger, fatigue, skin problems slow healing wounds, yeast infections, and tingling or numbness in the feet or toes. Some of the risk factors for getting diabetes include being overweight or obese, leading a sedentary lifestyle, a family history of diabetes, hypertension (high blood pressure), and low levels of the "good" cholesterol (HDL) and elevated levels of triglycerides in the blood. If you think you may have prediabetes or diabetes contact a health-care professional. Diabetes mellitus is a group of metabolic diseases characterized by high blood sugar (glucose) levels that result from defects in insulin secretion, or its action, or both. Diabetes mellitus, commonly referred to as diabetes (as it will be in this article) was first identified as a disease associated with "sweet urine," and excessive muscle loss in the ancient world. Elevated levels of blood glucose (hyperglycemia) lead to spillage of glucose into the urine, hence the term sweet urine. Normally, blood glucose levels are tightly controlled by insulin, a hormone produced by the pancreas. Insulin lowers the blood glucose level. When the blood glucose elevates (for example, after eating food Continue reading >>

Inspiring Diabetes Tattoos

Inspiring Diabetes Tattoos

Over 29 million people in the United States alone have diabetes. That’s 9.3 percent of the population. And each year, 1.4 million more people are diagnosed. In adults, over 90 percent of those diagnoses are for type 2 diabetes, though many of the tattoos below are on those with type 1 diabetes or on those who love them. Many people who have diabetes, or know someone who does, choose to get inked. For some, it’s for their own safety: Getting the word “diabetic” tattooed on their arm can help make sure those around them are aware in case of an emergency. For others, it’s about raising awareness. And for loved ones, it’s about solidarity. Whatever the reasons, these tattoos, which were submitted by some of our readers, all send powerful messages. Check them out below! If you'd like to share the story behind your diabetes tattoo, email us with the subject line "My diabetes tattoo" and be sure to include: a photo of your tattoo, a short description of why you got it or why you love it, and your name. “I decided to get my diabetes tattoo mainly because I never wore my medical bracelet and I wanted to make sure that I had some sort of permanent marking in case of emergency. Since having the tattoo, I have found that it, in addition to keeping me safe, also allows me to commemorate my struggles as a diabetic and showcase my artsy flair.” -Amelia “This tattoo is on my leg. My son drew this in pencil 10 days before he passed away. He was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at age 4 and died at age 14 on March 25, 2010.” -Jen Nicholson “I’ve had type 1 diabetes since January 3, 2007. The butterfly represents me, the blue circle represents type 1 juvenile diabetes, and the grey ribbon represents diabetes awareness.” -Vanessa “About a year ago, I got ‘DIABET Continue reading >>

Diabetes Symbol Mostly Unused By U.s. Organizations

Diabetes Symbol Mostly Unused By U.s. Organizations

This is the universal symbol for diabetes. Yet, while the blue circle became the global symbol in 2007, it’s been fighting a battle to gain that recognition among diabetes organizations in the U.S. Why does that matter? Think pink ribbon. You thought breast cancer, didn’t you? That’s the power of one unifying symbol for a disease. Such a symbol can potentially generate greater prevention and care efforts, treatment advances, and more funding for research and a cure. The Blue Circle was created by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) in 2006 as part of a campaign urging the United Nations to pass a resolution to recognize diabetes as a serious global health threat. The IDF was successful. According to the International Diabetes Federation, UN Resolution 61/225 recognizes diabetes as debilitating and costly, and encourages all nations to develop prevention and treatment policies. It also designates November 14 — the birthday of Frederick Banting, one of insulin’s discoverers — as World Diabetes Day to be recognized by the UN. The blue circle became the official logo mark for World Diabetes Day, and the universal symbol for diabetes. Yet only the American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) adopted the Blue Circle as such. American Association of Diabetes Educators Sandra Burke, AADE’s President, said, “When you see the pink ribbon, the automatic recognizable symbol for breast cancer, you’re reminded breast cancer is serious. When people look at the Blue Circle we want them to be able to say, this is about diabetes, a disease that kills even more people than breast cancer. We need to solve this.” “By universally accepting a symbol for diabetes,” says Burke, “we have the beginning of developing a unified message that diabetes is serious Continue reading >>

World Diabetes Day Resources

World Diabetes Day Resources

World Diabetes Day (WDD) is the primary global awareness campaign of the diabetes community. A variety of resources are available to help mark the day, raise awareness of diabetes and show your support for the 415 million people currently living with diabetes. The theme of WDD 2017 is Women and Diabetes: our right to a healthy future. If you are interested in adapting or reproducing any of the resources, please contact [email protected] World Diabetes Day logo Continue reading >>

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