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Diabetic Sweets And Chocolate

Eating With Diabetes: Desserts And Sweets

Eating With Diabetes: Desserts And Sweets

I’d be willing to bet that most everyone has been told—and therefore believes—that people with diabetes cannot have any sugar and are resigned to living without dessert for the rest of their lives. Well, as a Certified Diabetes Educator, I'm here to tell you that this is a myth. People with diabetes can eat sugar, desserts, and almost any food that contains caloric sweeteners (molasses, honey, maple syrup, and more). Why? Because people with diabetes can eat foods that contain carbohydrates, whether those carbohydrates come from starchy foods like potatoes or sugary foods such as candy. It’s best to save sweets and desserts for special occasions so you don’t miss out on the more nutritious foods your body needs. However, when you do decide to include a sweet treat, make sure you keep portions small and use your carbohydrate counting plan. No sugar ever again? No way! The idea that people with diabetes should avoid sugar is decades old. Logically, it makes sense. Diabetes is a condition that causes high blood sugar. Sugary foods cause blood sugar levels to increase. Therefore people with diabetes should avoid sugary foods in order to prevent hyperglycemia (high blood sugar) and keep their diabetes under control. However, simply avoiding sugary foods does not go very far in terms of controlling blood sugar. Here's why. After you eat, your blood sugar level (aka postprandial blood glucose level) is largely determined by the total amount of carbohydrate you ate, not the source of the carbohydrates eaten. There are two types of carbohydrates that elevate your blood sugar levels: sugar and starch. Both will elevate your blood glucose to roughly the same level (assuming you ate the same amount of each). For example, if you were to eat a ½ cup of regular ice cream (1 Continue reading >>

News From Hershey’s: Diabetics Can Eat Sugar!

News From Hershey’s: Diabetics Can Eat Sugar!

To be fair, there’s a lot of useful information on this website from Hershey’s (as in the candy company) about diabetes and sugar. It points out that diabetics can eat sugar in small quantities — provided that they manage it appropriately with insulin or exercise — and explains some of the different kinds of sugar substitutes and how they’re digested. Hell, it even provides a hotline number for the ADA and some baking tips — though somehow I doubt too many people are going to permanently start using baby food as a sweetener in their Toll House cookies. But there’s still a “fox-guarding-the-henhouse” aspect to a candy company advising diabetics — let alone giving advice to doctors and nurses on how to, as the website states, “educate people on how to manage their diabetes and live healthy lives while enjoying one of life’s most evocative and symbolic pleasures: chocolate.” Speaking as someone who’s tried the apple-sauce-in-baked-goods trick (the dirty secret: it’s just not that good), I feel like I should add my own advice on how to manage this particular evocative and symbolic pleasure: eat it in small quantities. Also, don’t eat Hershey’s — it’s way too sweet, and doesn’t hold a candle to the real stuff. Instead, acquire a taste for dark chocolate, the more expensive the better — money has an amazing way of encouraging self-restraint. (Sure, I’ll eat something that eventually could make me go blind — but if it’s $7 a bar? Forget about it!) For a long time I was eating Scharffen-Berger 70% cacao; these days my favorite is Green & Black, also 70%. I have a small piece after lunch or dinner and, I’ll admit it, I don’t feel guilty at all. The chocolate’s dark enough (and the quantity I eat small enough) that it doesn’ Continue reading >>

My Love Of Chocolate And My Diabetes

My Love Of Chocolate And My Diabetes

One of my favorite things to eat is chocolate. As a diabetic, I set out to find if eating chocolate was a treat I needed to give up. Not only did I look into it, but I was very surprised at what I found. In fact, I ended up creating my own line of sugar-free chocolate. There are over 350 million people suffering from diabetes. One of the most frequently asked questions regarding diabetes and diet is whether diabetics must give up chocolate and other candy treats for good. The good news, however, is that those suffering from diabetes can enjoy an occasional chocolate treat if they exercise restraint and moderation. And with many new products on the market that are sugar-free, it makes it that much easier to have a treat every now and then. One of the reasons that an occasional chocolate bar is okay for diabetics is the fact that the sugar in chocolate is absorbed more slowly than that found in many other foods, such as white bread and even mashed potatoes. This means that the body has a bit more time to deal with the rise in blood sugar caused by chocolate. It is important to keep in mind, however, that too much chocolate can lead to excess weight gain that could complicate one’s diabetes. Many diabetics wonder about the special chocolates made with diabetics in mind. Like any other type of food, these diabetic chocolates can be either good or bad, depending on how they are consumed. When eaten as part of an overall healthy diet, diabetic chocolate can be an awesome treat, but when consumed in excess, it can be just as fattening and dangerous as any other sweet treat. While diabetic chocolate is designed to not raise blood glucose levels, it still has plenty of calories – you want to keep that in mind when consuming. It is important not to think of this special choco Continue reading >>

6 Brownie Recipes For People With Diabetes

6 Brownie Recipes For People With Diabetes

Bake better brownies Consuming too much sugar is considered by some to be the ultimate marker for developing type 2 diabetes. However, according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), being overweight is the more significant risk factor. But you can still bake a cake and eat it too if you have diabetes. Certain ingredients have the power to transform traditional sweets into suitable substitutes. Not only will your sweets still taste great, they may even be good for you. And portion control is the second part of the equation. A little bit of something delicious can go a long way. 1. Sugar-free brownies These sugar-free brownies are gluten-free, dairy-free, and sweetened with Swerve, a natural sweetener. The Center for Science in the Public Interest reports that small amounts of erythritol (found in the sweetener) is probably safe. The recipe also calls for protein-rich oat flour. You can make this ingredient inexpensively at home by pulsing dry rolled oats in your food processor, blender, or clean coffee bean grinder. For an extra protein and fiber kick, try adding your favorite nuts. Get the recipe from Sweet As Honey. 2. Single-serving brownie Unsweetened applesauce takes center stage in this gluten-free, grain-free, low-fat, vegan recipe. The single serving size is perfect for portion control. It’s sweetened with just a small amount of maple syrup. Plus, you can make this recipe in the microwave if you need a quick treat. Get the recipe from Southern In Law. 3. Black bean brownies Beans are one of the ADA’s top 10 diabetes superfoods, and they take center stage in this delicious recipe. The best part is that you’d never guess this dessert contains a heaping helping of black beans. The result is a fudgy treat with almost 4 grams of protein and only 12.3 net Continue reading >>

What Sweet Foods Can A Diabetic Eat?

What Sweet Foods Can A Diabetic Eat?

Diabetics are not really limited to a special kind of diet. They just have to remember that portion control and moderation is key! There are many different kind of sweet foods that can be eaten. From fruits to honey, to quick desserts. One of the sweet food that people with diabetes can eat is chocolates! Specifically, dark chocolates. Dark chocolates trumps the other chocolates other there because 1. It has fewer calories Compared to other chocolates, such as milk and white chocolates, dark chocolates contains the least calories out of the three. It’s the preferred chocolate to have if you’re watching your weight at the same time. 2. It has less sugar Did you know that sugar is the first ingredients in both milk and white chocolate? The ingredient that’s listed first for dark chocolate is cocoa mass/solids. Also, one has to remember that milk and white chocolate has more sweetener and cream added to them, making them sweeter. 3. It contains the most antioxidants If you didn’t know cocoa is one of the richest source of antioxidants. Since dark chocolate contains the most cocoa out of the other chocolates, it has the highest amount of antioxidants. In fact, dark chocolates contains 8 times more antioxidants than strawberries! The reason why milk chocolates has lesser antioxidants is because the milk in milk chocolate binds to the antioxidant, making it less readily available. For white chocolate, it has no antioxidants at all as it does not contain any cocoa solids. Health benefits to eating dark chocolates Due to the antioxidants in dark chocolates, there so some health benefits to eating them: Things to look for Of course, it does not mean that all kinds of dark chocolates are good. Here’s the things to note when choosing dark chocolate: The most beneficial d Continue reading >>

Chocolate Crackles

Chocolate Crackles

December is a tough month for bakers. By the 23rd, I’ve been baking for 23 days. Cookies, cakes, pies, cookies, breads, candies, cookies… Did I mention cookies? I usually spend the last hours before many get-togethers scrambling to find a suitable dessert that’s sweet enough for my dad (a diabetic) to enjoy without feeling cheated but still healthy enough to not knock his blood sugar out of whack. I found the recipe for Chocolate Crackles in The Big Book of Diabetic Desserts. Chocolatey, sweet, chocolatey – the cookies were almost brownie-like in their consistency and should come with a warning label: Chocolate! Do not drink without a glass of ice cold milk! Did I mention they were chocolatey? And with a pretty fractured coating of powdered sugar, they present nicely in a festive Christmas tin. A diabetic-friendly rich chocolate cookie. Ingredients 1 1/4 cup all purpose flour 1 tsp baking powder 1/4 teaspoon salt 2/3 cup unsweetened cocoa 1/2 cup dark brown sugar 1/2 cup Ideal (or Splenda, but I think Ideal is much better than Splenda for baking) 1/2 cup butter, cubed and at room temperature 2 eggs 1 1/2 tsp vanilla 1/4 cup powdered sugar Instructions Preheat oven to 350. Whisk dry ingredients together in a bowl and set aside. Cream brown sugar and butter on med-high until light and fluffy. Add in Splenda, one egg at a time until well combined, and add the vanilla. Switch mixer to off, add dry ingredients, and turn to low until mixed, scraping down the sides of the bowl. Place powdered sugar in a bowl. Drop one tablespoon of dough into the bowl, turning to coat, and roll the ball around in your loosely cupped hand - this forms the dough into a ball without pressing the powdered sugar into the dough and allows the excess powdered sugar to fall back into the bowl. Continue reading >>

Top 5 Diabetic Chocolate Picks

Top 5 Diabetic Chocolate Picks

Are you a chocolate lover? And more importantly are you a diabetic on the lookout for your best chocolate options? I tend to make my own chocolate (and we have quite a few recipes for that), but I know most people aren't as motivated as me and prefer to buy something prepackaged. So to save you time and energy I went on a search for some ‘healthy' diabetic chocolate brands, ones I thought stood out of the crowd. When I did my search I was looking for ones low in carbs and preferably sugar free and made with stevia (my preferred natural sweetener). So I came up with a few good contenders for you to choose from and have gathered all the info below so you can make your own comparisons. 1. Dante's Confection This brand is a very popular top seller on Amazon, and I like it because it only contains 3 ingredients! Any ‘product' that has 5 or less ingredients, with ingredients we can recognize, gets the T2DT seal of approval It's also low in carbs and is excellent value for money. Another reason this one is the chocolate of choice is because it is the lowest in total carbs as well. Ingredients: Organic Fair-Trade Cocoa, Stevia, Natural Vanilla. Nutrition – Serving size: 45 g (1 bar) Calories: 260 Fat: 24 g Carbs: 12 g Fiber: 7 g Sugars: 0 g Net carbs: 5 g Protein: 7 g Cost: $16.99 for 4 x 45 g (1.5 oz) bars and many people say that eating just half a bar is all you need to feel satisfied. Check Out Dante's Confection on Amazon Here 2. Lily's Sweets Lily's Sweets has a variety of chocolate blends to choose from, dark chocolate, dark chocolate almond, milk chocolate, milk chocolate almond and more. These are sweetened with stevia and erythritol and have lots of good reviews on Amazon. They do contain a few more ingredients but some of their flavors might be worth exploring. Continue reading >>

Healthy Desserts For Your Diabetes Diet

Healthy Desserts For Your Diabetes Diet

You might think a diabetes diagnosis means you’ll have to skip dessert forever. “Not so,” says Lara Rondinelli-Hamilton, a certified diabetes educator at DuPage Medical Center in Chicago. “With a little planning, you can satisfy your sweet tooth while keeping your blood sugar under control.” But just how do you do that? There are several ways. Swap Other Carbs for Dessert “Everyone focuses on the sugar, but what’s really important is the total carbohydrates,” says Rondinelli-Hamilton, author of the American Diabetes Association cookbook Healthy Calendar Diabetic Cooking. “If you’d like to have a small piece of pie for dessert, skip the starchy vegetable during dinner,” she says. But she’s quick to point out that this isn’t something you should do on a regular basis. “Desserts and sweets don’t have the nutritional value that other foods do, so it’s best to save them for special occasions,” she says. Think Small Along with limiting how often you have dessert, you’ll also need to limit how much you eat -- and that can be a challenge. “Sugar sets off fireworks in your brain, making you crave more,” says Jessica Bennett, RD, a dietitian at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville. Fighting the urge to overdo it takes a lot of effort. But there are ways to make it a little easier. “Set yourself up for success by buying desserts that are packaged as a single serving, like a sugar-free fudge pop or a small square of dark chocolate,” Rondinelli-Hamilton says. And be realistic. “If you can’t have cake in the house without eating the whole thing, don’t buy a cake,” she says. When you go out, check the menu for miniature desserts. Many restaurants now offer treats served in small dishes or shot glasses. “If that’s not Continue reading >>

Chocolate As Diabetes Medicine

Chocolate As Diabetes Medicine

I used to say chocolate tasted great, but if you thought it was a health food, you were kidding yourself. But research shows that chocolate helps manage diabetes, prevents heart disease, and improves mood. Is this too good to be true? Next week, I’ll get back to toxic chemicals. This week, I felt like something tastier. According to nutritionist Amy Campbell, chocolate is made from cacao (cocoa) beans. The insides of the roasted beans, or the “nibs,” are crushed into a paste. So right there is a good start. We’ve written before about the diabetes benefits of beans, so chocolate has a good pedigree for health. Most of chocolate’s healing power seems to come from “flavonoids,” biological chemicals that Campbell says “are thought to help lower cholesterol and lower the risk of blood clots.” Other studies show chocolate can relax blood vessels; lower blood pressure, LDL (“bad”) cholesterol, and blood glucose; and improve insulin function. Unfortunately, pure chocolate is bitter. You have to add sugar to make it taste good. And pure chocolate is powdery and dry. You have to add an emulsifier, like fat, to give it an enjoyable texture. So authorities have long called chocolate harmful and told people, especially people with diabetes, to avoid it. Is there a way to get the benefits, minimize the harmful sugars and fats, and still have something you want to eat? The healing flavonoids and flavonols are in the dark part of the chocolate. About.com guide Elizabeth LaBau defines “dark chocolate” as “chocolate without milk solids added…The cocoa content of commercial dark chocolate bars can range from 30%… to 70%… or even above 80% for extremely dark bars. Common terms used to distinguish the cocoa content of dark chocolate bars [from bitterest to Continue reading >>

Diabetes-friendly Chocolate Desserts

Diabetes-friendly Chocolate Desserts

Love chocolate? With these chocolate diabetic recipes, you can have your cake and eat it, too. And your brownies and cookies and ice cream! Love chocolate? With these chocolate diabetic recipes, you can have your cake and eat it, too. And your brownies and cookies and ice cream! Love chocolate? With these chocolate diabetic recipes, you can have your cake and eat it, too. And your brownies and cookies and ice cream! Love chocolate? With these chocolate diabetic recipes, you can have your cake and eat it, too. And your brownies and cookies and ice cream! Continue reading >>

Died And Went To Heaven Chocolate Cake,diabetic Version

Died And Went To Heaven Chocolate Cake,diabetic Version

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Blend flour, SPLENDA® Granulated Sweetener, SPLENDA® Brown Sugar Blend, baking powder, baking soda, cocoa powder and salt in large mixing bowl. Pour batter into cake pan or bundt pan. Bake for 35 minutes, until an inserted toothpick in center of cake comes out clean. Let cool in pan for 5 minutes. Note. Exchanges per Serving: 2 Starches, 2 Fats. Advertisement Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Chocolate?

Can Diabetics Eat Chocolate?

If you have diabetes, you can eat anything -- although possibly not in the quantities you'd like. That includes chocolate. Some types of chocolate, such as dark chocolate, might even have health benefits, in moderation. Portion control is the key to enjoying foods like chocolate if you have diabetes, the American Diabetes Association reports. Dark chocolate is rich in polyphenols, plant substances that act as antioxidants and that might also help prevent heart disease and lower blood glucose levels. Types of Chocolate All chocolate is not created equal in terms of health benefits. When it comes to foods high in simple sugars, less is better if you have diabetes. Dark chocolate contains more cocoa and less sugar than milk chocolate, so you can eat a little more of it if you're controlling your calories or sugar intake. With dark chocolate, the higher the cocoa percentage, the better it is for you. Look for dark chocolate with at least 70 percent cocoa, registered dietitian Mitzi Dulan recommends. White chocolate contains no cocoa and is higher in calories and saturated fat than dark or milk chocolate. Potential Benefits According to a study that appeared in the January, 2015 issue of ARYA Atherosclerosis, high-cocoa polyphenol-rich chocolate lowers blood pressure and insulin resistance in patients with diabetes and high blood pressure. Insulin resistance restricts the uptake of glucose into cells, which causes blood glucose levels to rise. People who ate white chocolate did not experience a decrease in blood pressure or insulin resistance. In a British study published in the November 2010 issue of Diabetic Medicine, diabetics who consumed chocolate high in cocoa for 16 weeks experienced a decrease in total cholesterol and an increase in high-density lipoprotein, the so-c Continue reading >>

5 Sweet Treats For Your Diabetic Valentine

5 Sweet Treats For Your Diabetic Valentine

5 Sweet Treats for Your Diabetic Valentine Having a diabetic Valentine no longer means that you have to avoid giving the gift of sweets to your sweetheart. Sugar-free delicacies are now aplenty, and these days, they are definitely not the bitter- tasting diabetic substitutes that we had a long time ago. Whether you want to buy a traditional-style chocolaty gift or take the time to make something special, you can freely give the gift of confectionaries to your sugar-free Valentine. 1. Chocolates Charles Schulz, American cartoonist and creator of Peanuts, once said, “All you need is love. But a little chocolate now and then doesn’t hurt.” Chocolate and Valentine’s Day go hand-in-hand. If you have time to spare, making a special chocolate treat adds a very personal touch to your gift. Starting with this basic chocolate recipe, you can create just about anything your Valentine would want. Ingredients: ½ cup sugar-free cocoa powder + 1 tablespoon 4 Tablespoons of coconut oil Liquid Stevia 2-4 drops = 1 tsp sugar Equal 1 packet = 2 tsp sugar Splenda 1 tsp = 1 tsp sugar Melt the coconut oil, add chocolate and stir until well-blended. Add sweetener to taste. Pour into a specially shaped container or onto a sheet and freeze until solid. Use this recipe as your base and from here, you can go anywhere chocolate can. You can add toppings or fillings to give it some extra flair. One idea is to get some heart shaped trays and fill them halfway with the liquid chocolate. Add a bit of red by placing a fresh raspberry or strawberry in the middle and pour the rest of the chocolate on top. Place the trays in the freezer until cooled. If you have a coconut lover, add some sugar-free shredded coconut to the center instead. If your Valentine is nuts about nuts – then go nuts! If y Continue reading >>

4 Healthy Tips For Satisfying Your Sweet Tooth With Diabetes

4 Healthy Tips For Satisfying Your Sweet Tooth With Diabetes

Having diabetes doesn’t mean the end of sweet treats. But if you have frequent cravings for food high in sugar and fat, giving in every time can wreak havoc on your blood glucose. Instead, follow these smart steps to satisfy your sweet tooth without harming your health. 1. Eat a Small Serving Desserts pack more carbohydrates in each bite than most other foods. Going overboard can send your blood glucose soaring. If you plan ahead, however, you can substitute a small portion for other carbohydrate-containing foods, such as bread, tortillas, or cereal. If you tend to binge on sugar, don’t buy it for your home. Order dessert only when you eat out, and split it with a friend. Choose dark chocolate when you can—the higher the percentage of cocoa, the less sugar in the bar. Dark chocolate also provides healthy antioxidants that can control blood pressure and protect your heart. 2. Substitute Naturally Sweet Foods Next time you have a hankering for sugar, reach into the fruit basket instead of the cookie jar. Beyond its sweet flavor, fruit provides a cocktail of nutrients without much fat, sodium, or cholesterol. Fruit does have carbohydrates, such as the simple sugar fructose. So, you’ll still need to fit nature’s bounty into your meal plan. Start by choosing whole fruit more often than juice. The skin and flesh contain fiber, which fills you up, reduces your risk for heart disease, and helps control your blood glucose. Then, learn proper portion sizes. Each of the following contains 15 grams of carbohydrates: One small apple or orange, or a very small banana 1/2 grapefruit 3/4-cup blueberries, blackberries, or pineapple 1 cup raspberries or melon 1 1/4 cup whole strawberries A few simple steps can turn fruit into an even more satisfying dessert. For instance: Freez Continue reading >>

7 Healthier Chocolate Diabetic Desserts

7 Healthier Chocolate Diabetic Desserts

Gooey Double-Chocolate Brownies Reader's Digest This quick and easy dessert becomes even more special when you serve it with a small scoop of low-fat frozen yogurt, berries, and chocolate sauce. Makes 24 brownies. Prep Time: 25 minutes. Cook Time: 30 minutes. • 1/2 cup butter, at room temperature • 1 1⁄3 cups semisweet chocolate, chopped • 2 eggs • 1 cup superfine sugar • 1 tsp. vanilla extract • 1/2 cup all-purpose flour • 2 tbsp. unsweetened cocoa powder • 1 cup walnuts, roughly chopped (optional) 1. Grease 8-by-8-inch cake pan and line with parchment paper. Preheat oven to 350°F. Melt butter and 3/4 cup chocolate in bowl set over gently simmering water or in the microwave; remove from heat and let cool. 2. Whisk eggs in bowl with electric beaters. Gradually add sugar; beat continuously until mixture is thick and foamy and leaves ribbonlike trail when beaters are lifted. Add vanilla extract and chocolate mixture, and blend thoroughly. Sift flour and cocoa powder over mixture and scatter in walnuts, if using, and remaining chocolate. Fold mixture together with large spoon. 3. Pour batter into pan and bake about 30 minutes or until toothpick inserted in middle comes out clean. If top starts to look like it might burn before brownies are cooked through, place a piece of foil over pan. Cool brownies briefly in pan; cut into 24 squares. Cool brownies completely on wire rack. Store in airtight container for 3 to 4 days. Per brownie (with walnuts): 152 cal, 10 g fat (5 g sat), 16 g carbs, 2 g protein, 1 g fiber, 25 mg chol, 40 mg sodium, 8 mg calcium. Chocolate Mousse Tart Reader's Digest Celebrating a special occasion? Go ahead, indulge! This rich, creamy treat is much lower in fat than a traditional chocolate tart, so you can enjoy a bit of guilt-free de Continue reading >>

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