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Diabetic Supplies Storage

Storing Your Glucose Test Strips Correctly

Storing Your Glucose Test Strips Correctly

Storing glucose test strips incorrectly, especially in high humidity, can lead to falsely high readings. Congratulations on your decision to manage your diabetes using a home glucose monitoring system. The success of glucose monitoring at home depends on accurate readings. Though you may face several issues when checking your glucose levels at home, inaccurate glucose readings are often resulted from test strip errors. If you use test strips to monitor your glucose levels at home you must ensure you close the vial immediately after using them especially in in a humid environment. Failure to do so can potentially expose the test strips to humidity. Exposure to humidity can often result in erroneous glucose test results. How to Properly Store Test Strips? To ensure proper storage of your glucose test strips follow these 4 steps: Store the test strips in their original vial Close the vial tightly after taking out the test strips Write the discard date on the vial. Discard date is 9 months after you first open the vial. Check the expiration date on the vial before using test strips Test strips contain electrical terminals that can quantify the amount of Gluconic acid present in the blood sample. The current amount of glucose produced depends on the level of Gluconic acid. The intensity of the current is then measured by the blood glucose monitor and a numbered reading is generated. Therefore it’s crucial to tightly close the vial immediately after use. Leaving test strips in an open vial or in an unoriginal vial could expose the test strips to an environment that could change the chemical properties of test strips. Such an exposure can result in false glucose readings. Always read the safety instruction provided in the test strip box. Keep your strips in their original vi Continue reading >>

4 Tips For Organizing Your Diabetes Supplies

4 Tips For Organizing Your Diabetes Supplies

Home Education and Information 4 Tips for Organizing your Diabetes Supplies 4 Tips for Organizing your Diabetes Supplies Posted by Naomi Ruperto On March 26, 2014 In Education and Information Has this ever happened to you? You think you have a couple of reservoirs left in your drawer, its a long holiday weekend, and before you know it, its time to change out your infusion set and reservoir. You look in your drawer and find that you dont have any left. Have you ever been here before? I know I have. With spring here and all of the spring cleaning you might be doing, consider adding your diabetes supplies to the list of household items that need some organization. Start by making an inventory list of your diabetes supplies. This would consist of items you use all the time, such as test strips, infusion sets, reservoirs, and insulin. Be sure to include essential items that are absolutely necessary, but sometimes go unaccounted for, such as batteries for your pump, test strips, lancets, tape, glucose tablets, and syringes for manual injections (just in case). Take your list, laminate it, and place this next to your supplies. This way you can check off your essentials and not forget crucial items. Now that you have your list, dedicate a place in your home to keep only your diabetes supplies. This area will be your one-stop shop for all your needs. Ive used different spaces in my house and now have everything in three drawers in my bedroom, with medication like insulin stored in the fridge. I know that some people also use their kitchen and dedicate a section of their pantry, cabinents, or kitchen drawers for their supplies. You might even want to invest in dividers for your drawers or put labels on clear plastic bins. Which ever area you choose, keep your infusion sets, rese Continue reading >>

Supplies & Devices You Need For Managing Diabetes

Supplies & Devices You Need For Managing Diabetes

Each works differently based on how long they take to start working, when they reach maximum strength, and how long they last. There are a few strengths of insulin, but the most common is U-100 (100 units per milliliter of fluid). You'll need to inject insulin from one to four times a day, depending on what your doctor suggests. You can do this with a syringe, which draws a dose of insulin from a bottle. Or you can use an insulin pen , which is either pre-filled or has an insertable cartridge. There is also a type of insulin that you inhale. Instead of shots, your doctor may suggest an insulin pump . It continuously gives you short- or rapid-acting insulin. You'll still need to test your blood sugar levels, but you may find a pump helps you control them better. Insulin pumps are small, and you can easily attach one to your waistband, sock, or underwear. It's connected to a thin tube known as a catheter, which you put under your skin with a needle. The catheter regularly delivers insulin from the pump in small doses that are pre-programmed and vary throughout the day and night. You'll also press a button on the pump to give yourself insulin in another larger dose when you eat to break down the carbohydrates in your meal. This imitates the way your body naturally uses insulin. Blood Sugar Meters, Blood Lancets, and Diabetic Test Strips A blood sugar meter, also known as a blood glucose meter or a glucometer, is a portable electronic device that measures your blood sugar at any moment to make sure it's not too high or too low. First you'll use a blood lancet, an instrument that quickly pricks your skin, to draw a small sample of blood . Place a drop onto the edge of a disposable diabetic test strip. Insert the strip into the monitor, and wait for it to display your blood Continue reading >>

A New Diabetic Supply Carrying Case

A New Diabetic Supply Carrying Case

The day after I was released from the hospital after my diagnosis of being a Type 1 Diabetic , I looked over my syringes, vials, test strips, lancets, logbook and other such supplies and decided I needed some sort of carrying case. However, in being either vain or private, I wanted it to be discrete. Thankfully, this was before the age of smartphones, and toting around a day planner wasnt all that uncommon. I wound up using my diagnosis as an excuse to buy a Palm Vx to eliminate the logbook and my paper sliding scale and then I picked up a day planner from Franklin Covey. I wound up emptying it of everything except the zip-lock pouch inside, and thats where I stored my supplies. It had a nice little pocket inside for PDAs, which fit my Palm Vx nicely, and when it was obsolete, thats where my glucometer and lancing device went. I had this day planner so long that it even got nicknames, it was known as The Diabetes. Ive always been afraid of losing The Diabetes. It had its own place everywhere that Ive lived, and the minute it is moved from that place, chaos and anarchy began to take over my life. 999 times out of 1000, The Diabetes just wound up getting pushed out of the way, relocated over to my computer desk, left in my laptop bag or scooped up by my loving wife and tucked away because she takes such good care of me. I remember scolding her a little bit and telling her that I loved how much she helped out but that one day Id take it for granted and wed both forget The Diabetes and wed wind up somewhere and needing it, or worse, forgetting it somewhere. We tackled that challenge and it just became part of our routine, she grabbed it and packed it in her purse and then I asked her before we left to make sure she had it. Every time that I thought I lost The Diabetes, it Continue reading >>

Disaster Preparedness And Diabetes

Disaster Preparedness And Diabetes

Disaster the word elicits both emotion and fear. Disasters are not new theyve occurred since the beginning of time. However, they seem to be increasing in frequency and severity. When the subject of emergency preparedness arises in the Western U.S., the focus almost always is on earthquakes, drought, or wildfires. The discussion is not about if a disaster will strike, but when. In the Southeast, the concern is hurricanes; in the Plains states, tornadoes; in the Northeast, blizzards and ice storms; and in the Midwest (and elsewhere), floods. Natural or manmade theres always the possibility disaster can strike. Are you ready for the next disaster? Having diabetes requires much more planning and gathering of emergency supplies. On top of all the other basic human needs, you have additional issues vital to your survival the need for proper medication storage and to manage stress, injury, and illness and their effects on blood sugars. With preparation, you can both survive and maintain control over your diabetes. The most important part of preparedness is the pre what you do before a disaster hits. Once disaster strikes, communication and transportation systems will be disrupted. Water systems, gas, and electricity may be damaged or experience outages. Infrastructure medical, police, fire, hospitals, pharmacies may be damaged or overwhelmed. Picking up a new vial of insulin or syringes from a pharmacy or hospital may be impossible. What do you do then? Here are some basics for collecting and storing the supplies youll need to become self-sufficient in an emergency situation. The goal is to motivate yourself toward your own personal preparedness, so you can pick yourself up and get back to life as usual as quickly as possible should a disaster befall you. Before making a lis Continue reading >>

Prepping With Type 1 Diabetes

Prepping With Type 1 Diabetes

The most important element in survival is clean water -- but what do you do when it's contaminated?This online class teaches everything you need to know Start learning today. Type 1 diabetes also called Juvenile Diabetes shook our prepping plans to their foundations. While I was stockpiling food, learning to make cheese, and writing the occasional post for the Survival Mom, my 9 year-old daughters body was attacking itself and she was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes. Just a short time later I found myself trying to find answers for prepping with Type 1 Diabetes. A T1D diagnosis is a life sentence of finger pokes and insulin administration. And because its genetic, we now know our other children are at risk. Whats a survival mom to do? I didnt even wait for the shock to wear off before I took to the internet seeking advice from the preparedness communityand was extremely disappointed with the meager information available. (Ive included the links to those I found even a little bit helpful to save you time.) Even expert Mormon preppers who have so much information and resources had little to offer. NOTE:This post is specific to Type 1 Diabetes, NOT Type 2. Please keep the differences in mind when you post comments and suggestions. Finding ways to prepare for a serious disease like this is scary. Suggestions that simple adjustments, like changing the food we have stored, as if we wouldnt have already done that if it would resolve the issue, are more hurtful than helpful. *Disclaimer: I am not a doctor, attorney, engineer, moralist, spiritual adviser, survivalist, or millionaire. Use the attached links and their information at your own risk. Ive simply put together whats on the net and what Ive personally experienced. The rest is up to you. For claritys sake, please understa Continue reading >>

7 Ways To Manage And Organize Your Diabetes Supplies

7 Ways To Manage And Organize Your Diabetes Supplies

7 Life Hacks to Manage and Organize Your Diabetes Supplies Medically reviewed by Peggy Pletcher, MS, RD, LD, CDE on January 10, 2017 Written by Susan Weiner, MS, RDN, CDE, CDN If your medicine cabinet is busting at its seams with diabetes supplies, it may be time for you to find a better organization method. Here are some practical tips on keeping your supplies at the ready without being overwhelmed by them. Use checklists as a tool to keep track of your diabetes supplies and medications. You can create master checklists for items you use every day, those you use during travel, and others that you use at work or when youre on the go. Keep a written checklist on a notepad in your kitchen, or use the notes section on your smartphone so you know which supplies are running low. Set a reminder on your smartphone as a cue for you to update your checklists. This will help you closely monitor your supply inventory, while also avoiding duplicate purchases. Saving time and money, what could be better? Treat your diabetes supplies like a librarian treats books: Sort your supplies into categories and group like with like. This will allow you to find what you need quickly and reduce some of the daily stress associated with diabetes management. For example, your meter, test strips, and lancets should be stored together. Keep fast-acting sources of carbohydrates, such as glucose tablets or hard candy, in another place so you can easily locate them in case of a low blood sugar episode. If you have deep shelves or limited counter or cabinet space, think vertically. Drawer organizers that stack on top of each other on a shelf are the perfect way to maximize your storage. The drawers pull out, so theres no need to unstack containers to get to the ones on the bottom. Alcohol wipes, lancet Continue reading >>

Best Methods To Organize Your Diabetes Supplies

Best Methods To Organize Your Diabetes Supplies

Best Methods to Organize Your Diabetes Supplies Do you know where all of your diabetes supplies are? Do you known how much of each you have and when they need to be re-ordered? Organization methods tend to involve grouping and centralizing locations of similar things. The same goes for diabetes supply organization with the addition of a few important details. Here are some ideas on how to organize and store your special diabetes stuff. Unopened insulin needs to be stored in the refrigerator. Beware of storing at the back where ice crystals sometimes form. For many people, the butter compartment is a good place to give your insulin a dedicated home away from food and one that is visible so you always know how much you have left. When it comes to oral medications, you probably want them near where you take them every morning or night. Just pick a spot that is well-suited for keeping the temperature consistent as well as out of the reach of young children. As for your lot of strips, syringes, batteries, pump and continuous glucose monitor supplies, insulin pen needles, ketone strips, lancets, glucose tablets, emergency glucagon, and any other diabetes related supply or accessoryyou might consider putting it all in one central location. Try getting a nice storage box with a lid (or more than one if needed) and fit everything inside in a way that allows you to view how much of everything you have available. This way, as you dip into your supply box, you are well aware of what supplies are dwindling. Then store this box in an accessible place out of the way of any direct cold or heat or too much humidity. Another idea is to dedicate a drawer or cabinet or a closet shelf to all your diabetes supplies. Whatever works well for you personally, is ideal. Make Note of When Prescri Continue reading >>

Take Care Of Your Test Strips For Accurate Results

Take Care Of Your Test Strips For Accurate Results

Test strips are one of the most important supplies in your medicine cabinet. Regular testing can help you keep track of your blood sugar levels, and that allows you to make lifestyle and medication adjustments accordingly. Proper handling and storage of test strips can help ensure an accurate result every time. Six tips for handling test strips When it's time to take a blood sugar reading, handle test strips properly for an accurate result. Here are six things to keep in mind when dealing with your test strips. Wash your hands. Wash and dry your hands thoroughly before you open the test strip vial. Check the expiration date. Make sure the vial is not past its expiration date, and that the strips are clean and dry. Check the test strip code. If your strips must be coded, make sure the code on the meter matches the code on the vial. Handle carefully. Shake a test strip out into your hand. Try not to touch the end of the strip. Protect test strips from air. Immediately close the vial to protect the integrity of the remaining strips. Make sure you have the proper amount of blood for a good reading. You only get one shot at this per strip, so make sure you have ample blood before applying the drop. Also, be sure to apply the blood correctly. Some test strips wick the blood drop at the side of the strip, while others do so at the very end of the strip. Test strips that are sold in wheels or drums don't have to be handled individually. This can be an advantage for those with arthritis or other conditions that might affect dexterity. Follow the instructions very carefully to ensure that you have inserted the drum or wheel properly. How to properly store test strips Your test strips should remain in the vial or wrapping until you are ready to use one of them. Test strips are pac Continue reading >>

Barriers To Appropriate Diabetes Management Among Homeless People In Toronto

Barriers To Appropriate Diabetes Management Among Homeless People In Toronto

Barriers to appropriate diabetes management among homeless people in Toronto We are experimenting with display styles that make it easier to read articles in PMC. The ePub format uses eBook readers, which have several "ease of reading" features already built in. The ePub format is best viewed in the iBooks reader. You may notice problems with the display of certain parts of an article in other eReaders. Generating an ePub file may take a long time, please be patient. CMAJ: Canadian Medical Association Journal Barriers to appropriate diabetes management among homeless people in Toronto Homeless people are more likely to have chronic medical conditions and to encounter barriers to health care than the general population. In this study we identify barriers to appropriate disease management among homeless adults with diabetes mellitus in Toronto. People with diabetes were surveyed at homeless shelters in Toronto. Information was obtained on demographic characteristics, diabetes history, access to health care, substance abuse and mental illness. Participants descriptions of the difficulties they experienced in managing their diabetes were analysed qualitatively. Hemoglobin A1c levels were used to assess adequacy of glycemic control. Fifty people completed the survey (response rate 83%). Of the respondents 82% were male and 64% were white. Type 2 diabetes had been diagnosed in 86%, with 62% of all participants taking oral agents alone and 28% taking insulin alone. Overall, 72% of the participants reported experiencing difficulties managing their diabetes: the most common were related to diet (type of food at shelters and inability to make dietary choices, reported by 64%) and scheduling and logistics (inability to get insulin and diabetic supplies when needed and inability t Continue reading >>

How To Survive Diabetes In An Emergency

How To Survive Diabetes In An Emergency

C) Copyright 2012-20167by HappyPreppers.com. All rights reserved. The site happily targets concerned citizens who are self-reliant survivalists, preppers and homesteaders with original content on survival following societal collapse. You may link to our site, but you may NOT reproduce any part of our content, or store our content in any retrieval system to represent it as your own. Further, you may not transmit content in any other form or by any means, including (but not limited to) electronic, photocopy, mechanical, or recording without written consent. HappyPreppers.com makes no warranties. HappyPreppers.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com, amazonsupply.com, or myhabit.com. Amazon is a great place to buy emergency supplies. In other words, we recommend prepping gear sold on Amazon. It's a great place to shop. Get prepared! Read more emergency preparedness information on our home page. This article for preppers who have diabetes has been archived by waybackmachine.org and this helps protect our copyright. This article captured as many as 8 times between June 5, 2016 and November 13, 2017. Do NOT copy. Linking is okay, but please do not steal our copy That's plagiarism and illegal. It's NEVER okay to steal. sitemap privacy policy #9: Look to nature for solutions to diabetes. Always keep an eye on natural solutions. Below are some helpful herbs and foods for preppers who are diabetic: Cinnamon. Cinnamon is a natural for helping you control blood sugars. Cayenne. #6: Regulates blood sugars (provides diabetic support). Preppers with diabetes will appreciate how cayenne lowers and regulates blood sugar leve Continue reading >>

5 Tips For Caring For Your Diabetes Supplies

5 Tips For Caring For Your Diabetes Supplies

Be kind to your glucose meter. Since your meter plays a vital role in your diabetes management, be sure to take good care of it. That means you should never expose it to extreme temperatures, whether that may be freezing cold, or intense heat. If you keep a glucose meter in your car, make sure you remove it if very hot or cold weatehr is forecasted. Keep test strips safe. As anyone with diabetes will tell you, test strips are a very costly but very helpful tool for managing diabetes. You should protect your investment accordingly—never leave your strips exposed to extreme temperatures, and always close the cap on a canister of test strips. Keeping the lid closed at all times will protect the integrity of the strips, and also keep out moisture and debris. Keep your insulin cool—but not frozen. Exposing your insulin to extreme heat will most certainly ruin it, so be sure to keep insulin pens and vials refrigerated. It is perfectly fine to carry these supplies with you during the day unrefrigerated, just as long as you’re careful to keep them out of direct sunlight, and in a cool environment. On the other hand, never store insulin next to a frozen ice pack—freezing insulin will also destroy its efficacy. Protect your pump. Your pump provides some insulation of your insulin from the heat . If you are concerned about heat, you can use a protective pouch with a small, cold (but not freezing) gel pack placed inside the pouch as a way to protect your insulin from the effects of heat, advises Catherine Carver, M.S., A.N.P., C.D.E, and Vice President, Planning & Product Development at Joslin Diabetes Center. If you’ll be spending a long time out in the sun, cover the pump with a towel to protect it from prolonged direct sunlight, and limit the exposure to direct light. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Supply Case

Diabetic Supply Case

Color:Black SumacLife Diabetes Case. Large storage with elastic to hold testing supplies. 1x black case. God bless. Flents Diabetic Carry-All Travel Case. You will love this Diabetic Carry-All that holds insulin vials, syringes and alcohol swabs together in a compact case. Diabetic supplies not included. Designed ... This insulin bag is made from oxford fabric which is durable and waterproof. For diabetes, it is of small and portable design, you can carry it anywhere. What are you waiting for?. Get it and ease you... Daily travel case for diabetic supplies. Carry handle and optional shoulder/waist strap. We also accept most major credit cards. USA Fast Shipping Solidly TOP Quality Pouch For Patient Brand New SumacLife Diabetes Case Large storage with elastic to hold testing supplies Reliable mesh to hold insulin and supplies Hook And Loop Fastener to hold ice pack 3 x 6in Zippers shut to keep su... It's roomy, can fit all of testing supplies. have an odd-shaped, rather squat lancing device, and the elastic in the base holds it nicely. the sturdy construction. Thick Insulated cooler bag-For Insul... Myabetic Diabetes Organizer - Purple. Designed for Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes. Durable for daily testing and travel. Checking your blood sugar can be frustrating. Why make diabetes even more difficult by packing your diabetes supplies in an ugly, standard-issue meter case? It's time for a stylish upgrade. Get rid of... DIABOX LIGHTED ACRYLIC DIABETIC SUPPLIES ORGANIZER. Adjustable LED Light for Low Light Surroundings. Batteries Included. may not be reproduced or used in any manner whatsoever. Untitled 3. This stylish and lightweight item is perfect for storing or transporting your Insulin Pen, Blood Sugar monitor, and other required objects. Introducing oue black rigid EVA c Continue reading >>

Top 10 Diabetes Carrying Cases

Top 10 Diabetes Carrying Cases

When you’re diagnosed with diabetes, you don’t realize how much STUFF you have to always carry with you wherever you go. The items only multiple as time goes on and more treatment methods are added, etc. So where are you supposed to keep everything from your meter, to extra test strips, emergency medications and more? For women, you can opt to keep everything in your purse, but most often this can become disorganized and only creates additional frustration when you have to find everything in a pinch. In this guide we’re going to take a look at some of the best diabetes carrying cases on the market for those with all types of diabetes and of any age. If you haven’t found a case yet, then this guide can help start you on your journey of purchasing the right one. Or if it’s time to update your case, you may find one that suits your needs. I know with my kids with Type 1 diabetes, in the beginning I would have to purchase a new case every few months because of the wear and tear from carrying them virtually 24/7 no matter where we go. That was before I knew which were some of the best ones that not only provide you with somewhere to nicely keep all supplies organized but are durable enough to withstand frequent use. Here are some of my all-time favorites. 1. Medicool Dia-Pak The Medicool Dia-Pak allows you to conveniently keep all your supplies in one organized place. What’s nice about this diabetes carrying case is it comes with a freezable ice pack that allows you to keep your insulin or other supplies cool when traveling. Keeping everything together in one bag without bulkiness can be tricky, especially when it comes to making sure you have all the supplies you may need. The Medicool Dia-Pak folds up nicely to fit into a purse, travel bag, suitcase, or even ca Continue reading >>

Preparing To Leave

Preparing To Leave

You’ve already used the CDN Looking at Schools resources, chosen the place for you, and been accepted—congratulations! We at the College Diabetes Network have some tips from our staff and students to help make your transition to college as smooth as possible. To help you get prepared, packed, and ready to go, we have put together a timeline so that you know exactly what you should be doing, and when you should be doing it. We’ve provided you with an abbreviated version below, and the full, printable version here. THREE MONTHS BEFORE MOVE-IN DAY Create a plan for your supplies. Use the guidelines below to help! Where will you be getting your supplies from? Where will diabetes supplies be sent? Who will be ordering them? Who is responsible for making sure any payments are made? How long will your supplies last? How will you know when to re-order them? Where will you go to restock your low supplies? How will you get there? Don’t forget about back-up supplies. If you don’t have one already, be sure to get a backup meter from your endocrinologist before you leave for school—it’s a good idea to have another meter in case your first one breaks, gets lost, etc. Also make sure to have syringes (even if you’re on a pump), long-acting insulin, and anything else that may be helpful if your main method of care fails you. Determine where you’ll be keeping non-refrigerated supplies. Dorm rooms are usually not very big. It’s probably a good idea to get a plastic storage bin that will keep your diabetes supplies safely together without taking up much room. Create a communication plan With your family. When you go off to school, you don’t want your parents constantly asking about your diabetes. In order to avoid any conflict between you and them, create a communicat Continue reading >>

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