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Diabetic Substitutions List

Kitchen Essentials For Diabetics

Kitchen Essentials For Diabetics

Use our handy list to keep your kitchen stocked with the basic ingredients you need for quick low-fat, low-sugar cooking. Check the pantry for these staples: • Baking powder • Baking soda • Bouillon granules: chicken, beef, and vegetable • Canned Broth: lower-sodium chicken, beef, and vegetable • Cornstarch • Flour: all-purpose, self-rising, whole wheat • Milk: nonfat dry milk powder, and fat-free evaporated milk • Oats: quick-cooking • Oils: olive, sesame, and vegetable • Sugar substitutes and sugar • Unflavored gelatin and sugar-free gelatin mixes Keep these fruits and vegetables on hand: • Canned beans • Canned tomato products: paste, sauce, whole, diced, and seasoned • Canned vegetables • Canned fruits packed in juice • Dried fruits You can always make a meal when you have these grains and pastas: • Bulgur • Couscous • Dry pastas • Rice and rice blends • Dry cereals without added sugar Add flavor with these condiments and seasonings: • Bottled minced garlic • Dried herbs and spices • Mayonnaise: low-fat • Mustards • Salad dressings and vinaigrettes: fat-free and reduced-fat • Seasoning sauces: hot sauce, ketchup, lower-sodium soy sauce, and Worcestershire sauce • Vinegars Fill the fridge with these items: • Cheeses: reduced-fat • Eggs and egg substitute • Milk: fat-free milk and low-fat buttermilk • Margarine, reduced-calorie margarine, and light butter • Rolls and pizza dough • Sour cream: low-fat • Yogurt: low-fat Stock up and store these foods in the freezer: • Cooked chicken: diced or strips • Ground round, pork chops, and other lean meats • Frozen fruits • Frozen vegetables • Juice concentrates Continue reading >>

Healthy Ingredient Substitutions You Never Thought To Try | Reader's Digest

Healthy Ingredient Substitutions You Never Thought To Try | Reader's Digest

14 Healthier Ingredient Substitutions You Never Thought to Try Nutritionists and food experts reveal their sneaky secrets to cut fat, sugar, and calories out of your favorite recipes using healthier ingredient substitutionswithout slashing any flavor. Substitute: Beans, oats, and veggies for red meat. Why: Use one ounce of ground beef per patty, and replace the rest with a mix of red beans, mushrooms, onions, oatmeal, and tomato pasteyoull get the same meaty texture with healthy, nutrient-dense substitutes. Take the bad stuff out, put the good stuff in, and use them in a way that makes the food more interesting and flavorful, says Joel Fuhrman, MD, author of The End of Dieting: How to Live for Life.These are healthy ingredients medical doctors always add to their meals . Substitute: Light-skinned sweet potatoes for fries.Why: Cut light-skinned sweet potatoes into rounds, season with sea salt and your choice of seasonings, and bake. Like orange sweet potatoes, these spuds are higher in fiber and have a lower glycemic index than white potatoes, so they wont spike your insulin, says Devin Alexander, New York Times bestselling author and The Biggest Loser chef. Substitute: Cinnamon for sugar. Why:The spice amplifies added sweetness (vanilla does, too), so desserts might only need half the called-for sugar, says Anjali Shah, health coach and The Picky Eater blogger who uses this trick in her low-fat breakfast muffins . Start with a teaspoon and add to taste from there. The end result, says Shah, will be less sweet, but with other spices and salt, you can trick your taste buds into thinking theres more sugar than there is. Having trouble giving up sweets? Try these recipes that make vegetables taste like candy . Substitute: Refried beans for cheese. How: Cut the fat in Mexic Continue reading >>

Best Sugar Substitutes For Diabetes

Best Sugar Substitutes For Diabetes

Oh the sweet goodness of sugar…. Yes, our taste buds love it but our blood sugar and the belly fat doesn't! Which is exactly why we're going to chat about the best sugar substitutes for diabetes today. But first, a short story. Quite a few years back now, I was shocked to see Jamie Oliver walk out on stage and tip a whole wheelbarrow full of sugar cubes on the stage as a representation of the amount of sugar a person now consumes per year – around 140 pounds annually! Yep, experts now agree that a lot of our health problems around the globe are due to excessive sugar intake. The World Health Organization now recommends people eat no more than 25 g or 6 teaspoons of ‘added' sugar per day. Even good ‘ol vegetables have natural sugars, so we're not talking about those. We're talking about hidden sugars in grocery store products. The Hidden Names of Sugar And, it is hidden everywhere under 59 different names of sugar in more than 70% of grocery store items! Take a look at this chart – it's really crazy stuff! Should you completely avoid sugar? Unfortunately the ‘white poison' as some call it, is highly addictive too. In fact, Dr Eric Stice, neuro-scientist, has done studies on the brain showing that the same ‘addiction’ receptors are activated when we consume sugar as they are if we consume cocaine. So you know, you could try to limit it but that's hard to do. I know when I eat sugar I just want more, and there's a reason why – those parts of the brain Dr Eric Stice discovered – they get stimulated, along with various hormones. It's not going to kill you to eat small amounts of sugar. But, the truth is, eating sugar is hard to moderate so turning to sugar substitutes can be a good solution, if you choose the right ones. Aspartame, Saccharin, Acesulfame-K Continue reading >>

11 Heart-healthy Food Substitutions

11 Heart-healthy Food Substitutions

The numbers speak for themselves: Cardiovascular events, such as heart attack and stroke, are the leading cause of death for people with diabetes. One of the first steps you can take to lower your risk is to be mindful of your dietary choices. Next time you’re in the grocery aisles, try focusing on making these heart-healthy food substitutions: Turkey, Veggie or Canadian Bacon: Despite being a breakfast favourite, regular bacon is high in both saturated fat and sodium, neither of which are good for heart health. Veggie bacon, turkey bacon, Canadian bacon, or lean cuts of ham or prosciutto are lower in saturated fat than regular bacon. Always look for low-sodium versions of these meats, and always try to bake or grill rather than fry. Low-Fat Mayonnaise or Mustard: Switching to a light or reduced fat mayo is one of the easiest ways to reduce your intake of saturated fat and overall calories. Better yet, skip mayo altogether and try mustard. It’s a heart-healthy choice that’s lower in saturated fat. Egg Whites: Whole eggs can be an important part of a healthy diet, but don’t forget they contain both saturated fat and cholesterol. Replacing whole eggs with egg whites (two whites per one whole egg) is a great alternative for meals and baking alike. Margarine, Cooking Spray or Olive/Canola Oil: Butter is very high in saturated fat, so avoid it when possible. Try replacing it with a soft tub margarine that has no saturated or trans fat. Always read the label, and avoid products that contain partially hydrogenated oils in the ingredient list. Other options include using cooking spray or a small amount of oil low in saturated fat, such as olive oil and canola oil. Whole-Grain Dinner Rolls: Diets rich in whole grains are important for overall well-being as well as your h Continue reading >>

8 Natural Substitutes For Sugar

8 Natural Substitutes For Sugar

Written by Kayla McDonell, RD on February 20, 2017 Added sugar is probably the single worst ingredient in the modern diet. It has been associated with many serious diseases, including obesity, heart disease, diabetes and cancer. What's more, most people consume way too much sugar and often have no idea. Fortunately, there are many ways to sweeten foods without adding sugar. This article explores 8 healthy alternatives you can use instead. For starters, there is simply nothing good about sugar. It contains no protein, essential fats, vitamins or minerals. There really is no need for it in the diet. In fact, there is a long list of reasons why you should avoid it. Sugar interferes with hormones in your body that regulate hunger and satiety. This can lead to increased calorie intake and weight gain ( 1 , 2 ). It also harms your metabolism, which can lead to increased insulin and fat storage. In fact, many studies have found a strong link between sugar and obesity ( 3 , 4 ). Simply put, people who consume the most sugar are far more likely to become overweight or obese than those who consume the least. High sugar intake is also associated with some of the world's most deadly diseases, including heart disease, diabetes and cancer ( 5 , 6 , 7 ). What's more, sugar is addictive. It causes dopamine to be released in the reward center of the brain, which is the same response activated by addictive drugs. This leads to cravings and can drive overeating ( 8 ). In short, sugar is incredibly unhealthy and should be avoided at all costs. Instead, consider the following 8 alternatives. Stevia is a natural sweetener that's extracted from the leaves of a South American shrub known scientifically as Stevia rebaudiana. It contains zero calories and has no known links to weight gain. In f Continue reading >>

5 Best Sugar Substitutes

5 Best Sugar Substitutes

[Below is my transcript of my video on the top five sugar substitutes, along with supplemental information on the topic.] Today, I’m here to share with you my top five natural sweeteners and sugar substitutes. This is a big deal. So many people overconsume high fructose corn syrup, processed sugar and just carbohydrates in general. I’m going to go over my top five natural sweeteners to use instead. Many of them — though not all of them — still have sugar, but they’re much easier for your body to digest and process, and they bring the most health benefits to your body. So whether you’re looking for sugar substitutes for baking or cooking, or just something to add in your morning tea or smoothie, these are the best five natural sweeteners you can use. Top 5 Sugar Substitutes 1. Raw Honey To start with, my No. 1 natural sweetener is pure, raw honey. We know the many health benefits of raw honey, so you really want to make sure it says raw on the label — because that’s the healthiest kind. Ideally, purchase it from a local source. One of the reasons it’s so beneficial is that honey is not just a sugar — it’s actually a food. In addition to sugar, honey also contains amino acids, specific types of electrolytes and antioxidants, and antimicrobial compounds that can really support the health of your body. So one of your best options when it comes to sugar substitutes is to use pure, raw honey. Now, you want to use it sparingly, as the proverbs say. (1) You don’t want to go overboard with using these sweeteners. One tablespoon, one to two times daily, is a good, healthy amount that most people can do well with. There are a few other benefits of honey as well. For instance, it helps reduce allergy symptoms. The reason it does is, if you buy local honey, i Continue reading >>

Diabetic Exchange Diet

Diabetic Exchange Diet

If you have diabetes, your doctor may put you on a diabetic exchange diet to help control both your weight and the amount of sugar and cholesterol in your blood. You will need to measure your food while on this diet, and you will probably need to eat 3 meals and 1 to 3 snacks daily. This diet divides the foods you can eat into 6 groups and measures each food by exact serving size to help you eat the right amount from each food group daily. Your dietitian will give you a meal plan that lists the number of servings you may eat from each food group shown below. The plan will give examples of a typical selection from each group. You can exchange any food in a group for any other from the same group, always limiting yourself to the specified serving sizes. For example, 1 slice of bread can be exchanged for 3/4 cup dry cereal. Or you can exchange 1/2 cup fruit juice for 1/2 of a 9-inch banana. Ask your dietitian for the correct serving size if a food you want is not listed below. At first, weigh or measure all of your foods and beverages so that you eat only the specified amounts. Do not use sugar and avoid foods on the "Do Not Eat" list. Breads and Starches for Diabetics 1/2 of a 3-inch bagel 1 slice bread (4-inch square) 1/2 cup cooked cereal 1/2 cup corn or 1 medium corn on the cob 6 saltine crackers or three 2-1/2-inch square graham crackers 1 small (2-inch square) dinner roll 1/2 cup cooked dried beans (such as kidney, pinto, lentils, chick peas, white, or navy) 1/2 of an English muffin 1/2 cup cooked green peas 1/2 of a hamburger or hot dog bun 1/2 cup cooked lima beans 1/2 cup cooked pasta 1/2 of a 6-inch piece of pita bread 1/2 cup mashed potatoes or a 3-inch baked potato 1/3 cup cooked rice 2 rice cakes One 6-inch round tortilla 1/2 cup cooked winter squash Fruits 1 Continue reading >>

5 Sugar Substitutes For Type 2 Diabetes

5 Sugar Substitutes For Type 2 Diabetes

1 / 6 A Small Amount of Real Sugar Is Best, but Sugar Substitutes Can Help If you think that people with diabetes should always avoid sugar, think again — they can enjoy the sweet stuff, in moderation. "The best bet is to use a very minimal amount of real sugar as part of a balanced diabetic diet," says Keri Glassman, MS, RD, CDN, of Nutritious Life, a nutrition practice based in New York City. That being said, sugar substitutes offer sweetness while controlling carbohydrate intake and blood glucose. There are many sugar substitutes to choose from, but they’re not all calorie-free and they vary in terms of their impact on blood sugar. "The major difference between the sugar substitutes is whether they are nutritive or non-nutritive sweeteners," says Melissa Mullins, MS, RD, a certified diabetes educator with Johnston Memorial Hospital in Abingdon, Va. "Non-nutritive sweeteners provide no calories and no changes in blood glucose levels, which is perfect for people with diabetes.” Here are six sweet options to consider. Continue reading >>

Healthy Recipes: A Guide To Ingredient Substitutions

Healthy Recipes: A Guide To Ingredient Substitutions

Healthy recipes: A guide to ingredient substitutions Use this guide to see how you can make simple ingredient substitutions that will give your recipes a healthy boost. Whipping up healthy recipes may be easier than you think. You can make simple ingredient substitutions to create healthy recipes that don't sacrifice taste and enjoyment. To create healthy recipes, first look at what's on hand in your own pantry. You may have healthier ingredients available and not realize it. If you don't have the ingredients on hand to create healthy recipes, just make a shopping list for the next time you hit the store. Use this substitution guide to help reduce the amount of fat, salt, sugar and calories as you prepare healthy recipes. Your guide to ingredient substitutions for healthy recipes If your recipe calls for this ingredient: Canadian bacon, turkey bacon, smoked turkey or lean prosciutto (Italian ham) Butter, margarine, shortening or oil in baked goods Applesauce or prune puree for half of the called-for butter, shortening or oil; butter spreads or shortenings specially formulated for baking that don't have trans fats Note: To avoid dense, soggy or flat baked goods, don't use oil in place of butter or shortening. Also don't use diet, whipped or tub-style margarine in place of regular margarine. Butter, margarine, shortening or oil to prevent sticking Fat-free half-and-half, evaporated skim milk Fat-free or low-fat cream cheese, Neufchatel, or low-fat cottage cheese pureed until smooth Two egg whites or 1/4 cup egg substitute for each whole egg Whole-wheat flour for half of the called-for all-purpose flour in baked goods Note: Whole-wheat pastry flour is less dense and works well in softer products like cakes and muffins. Fruit canned in its own juices or in water, or fresh Continue reading >>

Sugars, Sugar Substitutes And Sweeteners: Natural And Artificial

Sugars, Sugar Substitutes And Sweeteners: Natural And Artificial

If you’re living with diabetes, or even if you’re not, you might think sweet foods are a barrier to your healthy, balanced diet. As a general rule,everyone should be eating less sugar– but sometimes, only something sweet will do. If want to lose weight, or you’re trying to keep your blood glucose levels stable, you may want to know whether artificial sweeteners could help. If you browse around your local supermarket, you’ll see a huge range of sweeteners on offer, so it can be baffling to know which, if any, to go for. So in this section we'll take you through: Sweeteners are ingredients that are added to food to enhance sweetness. They can be grouped in different ways: One way is to loosely group sweeteners as: sugar or sugar substitutes.Another way to group sweeteners is whether the sweetener is: natural or artificial. One of the most useful ways of grouping sweeteners is to look at those that have nutritive value, ie nutritive sweeteners, and those without nutritive value, ie non-nutritive or ‘low-calorie’ sweeteners. Nutritive sweeteners There are different types of nutritive sweeteners, but they all contain carbohydrate and provide calories. They are usually referred to as ‘sugars’ or ‘added sugar’, but they can also appear in the ingredient list of food packaging as: glucose fructose sucrose maltose honey and syrup, etc. Polyols One group of nutritive sweeteners is polyols, which are sugar alcohols, and include: erythritol isomalt maltitol mannitol sorbitol xylitol. They can be natural or artificially produced. Polyols contain carbohydrates and calories, but they have fewer calories and less of an effect on blood glucose levels than sucrose (sugar). Polyols and diabetes It’s not exactly clear how the polyols should be ‘counted’ by peopl Continue reading >>

Ingredient Substitutions For Healthier Cooking | Diabetic Connect

Ingredient Substitutions For Healthier Cooking | Diabetic Connect

Simple ingredient substitutions can benefit your healthy lifestyle without sacrificing flavor. It may be scary and foreign at first to swap the butter on your morning toast for a spread of avocado instead, but your body will thank you and so will your waistline. Heres a list of simple ingredient substitutes for healthier cooking that you can implement into your daily routine. Greek yogurt and sour cream are similar in texture and both have a mild flavor that can be used interchangeably. Switching out fat-laden sour cream for protein-rich Greek yogurt is a smart swap that doesn't affect the end result. Try using Greek yogurt on enchiladas, soups, baked potatoes, veggie dips or in this green bean casserole . 2. Extra virgin olive oil for vegetable oil and butter The benefits of extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) are vast. According to the FDA, two tablespoons of olive oil per day may reduce the risk of heart disease. While oils are high in fat, olive oil contains unsaturated fats, or healthy fats. Despite its name, vegetable oil is not healthy: it contains high amounts of polyunsaturated fats and can cause inflammation and clogged arteries. Butter should used in moderation because it contains high amounts of cholesterol, which may lead to heart disease. Instead of baking with vegetable oil, use an equal amount of EVOO. When sauting vegetables, leave out the butter and use a tablespoon of EVOO and some fresh herbs or spices. You can also make your own flavored olive oils with herbs like rosemary and basil. 3. Avocado for butter, Miracle Whip, and mayo Avocados can help reduce your risk of certain diseases and help slim your waistline . Healthy fats like this can have anti-inflammatory benefits and help your skin and hair look healthier. Condiments like mayonnaise and Miracle W Continue reading >>

Here’s The 8 Best And Worst Sugar Substitutes For Your Health

Here’s The 8 Best And Worst Sugar Substitutes For Your Health

Now that people are becoming more aware about the dangers of too much refined sugar, people are opting for “healthier” substitutes for the sweetener. Whether it’s sugar-free soda, a lighter Starbucks drinks, or sugar-free gum, artificial sweeteners have been popping up everywhere, and many are choosing these options over their sugar-filled counterparts, believing them to be the more nutritious option. Unfortunately, many of these sugar substitutes are actually worse for you than the real thing. Whether you’re into baking at home or trying to buy the right products at the grocery store, it’s important to know which sugar substitutes to choose and which to avoid. If you’re at a loss as to what sweeteners are the healthiest option, use the below guide for the worst and best sugar substitutes. Worst Sugar Substitutes 1. Equal This popular sweetener is made from aspartame, which can cause headaches, and even worse, an increased risk for heart attack and stroke. Aspartame is found in thousands of foods, especially diet soda, and it accounts for 75 percent of the adverse food reactions reported to the FDA. 2. Splenda Splenda, also known as sucralose, has been found to have some harmful effects on the body, including reducing good gut bacteria, releasing toxic compounds during baking, and altering insulin responses and blood sugar levels. Research has also shown that consumption of sucralose is linked to type 2 diabetes, obesity, and heart disease. 3. Sweet N’ Low Sweet N’ Low contains saccharin, a white crystalline powder that is 200 times sweeter than sugar. Studies from the 1970s show that rats who consumed the sweetener showed a higher risk of obtaining bladder cancer, and while the effect has not yet been shown on humans, the Center for Science in the Publi Continue reading >>

12 Tasty Substitutions When Cutting Carbs

12 Tasty Substitutions When Cutting Carbs

12 Tasty Substitutions When Cutting Carbs Cutting carbs doesnt have to be a buzzkillwe reviewed some equally awesome options The best way to cut carbs from your diet is to make creative substitutions, says Arthur Agatston, M.D., author of The South Beach Diet. That way you can still eat the foods you love, without busting your diet. Dr. Agatston told us how to make cauliflower taste like mashed potatoes. Other nutrition experts gave us tricks for cutting white flour, pasta, and potatoes and replacing them with lower-carb alternatives that taste nearly identical. We then had some loyal carbo-cravers taste-test these dishes. Turns out some of them are so good, youll wonder why you werent eating them in the first place. Summer squash (the football-shaped yellow kind) tastes similar to potatoes when cookedbut has just a fraction of the carbs. Grate the squash, mix in an egg as binder, make patties, and fry them in olive oil, says Mary Dan Eades, M.D., coauthor of The Low-Carb Comfort Food Cookbook. Carbs Eliminated: About 15 grams (g) per hash-brown patty The Taste: Not as firm and crispy as regular hash browns, but the potato flavor is there. One of Dr. Agatstons favorites: Steam some fresh or frozen cauliflower in the microwave. Then spray the cauliflower with butter substitute, add a little nonfat half-and-half substitute, and puree in a food processor or blender. Salt and pepper to taste and youve got something that quite honestly can compete with the real thing any day,says Dr. Agatston. To make it even better, try adding roasted garlic, cheese, or sour cream to the mixture. The Taste: After a couple of bites, you forget its not potatoes. Slice four to five medium-size zukes lengthwise into three-quarter-inch-thick strips, instructs Lise Battaglia, a New Jersey chef w Continue reading >>

Healthy Alternatives To Make Your Meals Better For You | Greatist

Healthy Alternatives To Make Your Meals Better For You | Greatist

We're always looking for ways to make our favorite foods healthier without sacrificing flavor. So we compiled a list of our best substitutions and discovered some new ones along the way. Below are our 67 (!) top picks, guaranteed to make that next meal a delicious, better-for-you hit. It wasn't easy taste-testing all this food, but someone had to. Amiright? Swapping out flour for a can of black beans (drained and rinsed, of course) in brownies is a great way to cut out the gluten and fit in an extra dose of protein. Do it: When baking, swap out 1 cup flour for 1 cup black bean pure (about one 15-ounce can). This switch makes it possible for all of us to enjoy a rich baked good... even those of us who can't eat gluten. When you use gluten-free flour, you lose the stickiness, which helps bind the muffin, cake, or pizza together, so you'll need to throw in 1 teaspoon xanthan gum per cup of flour. While couscous is made from processed wheat flour, quinoa is a whole-grain superfood packed with protein and nutrients. Bonus points: They have almost the exact same texture. Thin strips or ribbons of zucchini are a great stand-in for carb-packed pastas. Plus, its one excuse to skip the boilingsimply saute for a few minutes until soft. Crushing flaxseeds and mixing it with some herbs makes an easy, lower-sodium substitution for traditional bread crumbs. Roasted and pulled apart with a fork, spaghetti squash is a great low-carb substitute for pasta. One squash will make between two and three servings. It's not a perfect swap, but forgoing the carbs for fresh lettuce is a fun (and easy) switch that can lighten up any wrap or taco dish. Plus it provides a nice little crunch that the wrap doesn't. Who said gluten-free folks can't have tacos? Dig in. Cooked with milk (cow, almond, hem Continue reading >>

Healthy Recipe Substitutions

Healthy Recipe Substitutions

Diabetic Living / Diabetic Recipes / Low-Fat Make your favorite recipes healthier with a few simple substitutions, and you'll save on calories, carbs, fat, and sodium. We'll show you how to enjoy classic recipes on a diabetic diet. By Elizabeth Burt, R.D., LD; Reviewed by Hope Warshaw, R.D., CDE, BC-ADM Use Fat-Free Plain Yogurt, Not Sour Cream Sour cream is cream treated with lactic acid to give it the trademark tangy flavor. Yogurt has a slightly different tang, but it's a good substitute in most savory sauces and dips. For sweet dips and sauces, you can use a flavored fat-free yogurt, such as vanilla or strawberry. Yogurt will also yield similar results when substituted for sour cream in baked goods. 1 cup sour cream: 370 calories, 38 g fat (22 g sat. fat), 4 g protein 1 cup fat-free plain yogurt: 130 calories, 0 g fat, 13 g protein When your recipe calls for: Fine dry bread crumbs Fine dry bread crumbs are commonly used as coatings for fried or baked fish or chicken or toppings for vegetable and starch casseroles. Substituting cereal will give you a darker, crunchier coating with fewer calories and less sodium. 1/2 cup fine dry breadcrumbs: 210 calories, 400 mg sodium (seasoned breadcrumbs have 1,055 mg sodium), 2 g fiber 1/2 cup crushed high-fiber cereal (such as bran flakes, bran buds, or shredded wheat): 100 calories, 175 mg sodium, 24 g fiber Make the switch in this Green Bean Casserole recipe Use Yogurt and Cottage Cheese, Not Sour Cream Use this instead: Equal parts low-fat yogurt and no-salt-added low-fat cottage cheese Dips and salad dressings made with sour cream are smooth, creamy, and have a tangy zip, but they also can be loaded with fat, calories, and sodium. Get the same smooth tanginess by replacing sour cream with a combination of fat-free yogurt an Continue reading >>

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