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Diabetic Substitute For Potatoes

Potatoes And Diabetes

Potatoes And Diabetes

Potatoes are another staple we've all grown to love over the years. BUT if you have diabetes, potatoes are a no no if you want to lower blood sugar and A1C. Why? Quite simply, they are a high carbohydrate food, and they are also high glycemic index as well, meaning they cause rapid rises in blood sugar. If you go searching out on the web, you will still see lots of diabetic recipes containing potatoes. There are thousands of recipes and meals out there promoted to be diabetic friendly, but they're not. Here you'll only find low carb recipes that are going to help you gain better control. So let's briefly explore some potato nutrition facts and then share some potato alternatives and a recipe you can try. Potato Nutrition Facts Potatoes range from 21 g carbs through to around 35 g carbs per one medium potato. There is such a wide range in carb count because it depends on the type of potato. Even at 21 g that's quite high for a single potato – chances are you'd probably want to eat more. It's also the same for glycemic index (GI) – it ranges from 60 right up to 95. Anything below 55 is considered a low GI, and the higher it gets over 55, the more rapidly it is going to send your blood sugar soaring. Even 60 is a high GI, and 95, well that's crazy high. So unfortunately, eating potatoes is not going to help you lower blood sugar or A1C and keep things under control. Sorry to be the bearer of the bad news if you didn't know this already. But there are some tasty alternatives. Sure, there's nothing quite like potato. But we can adapt and use other things – here comes cauliflower again! Cauliflower Cauliflower is a very adaptive, versatile vegetable – we talked about that recently in our rice alternatives post and hopefully you gave the cauliflower rice a try. Because Continue reading >>

Pasta, Potato & Rice Substitutes

Pasta, Potato & Rice Substitutes

Pasta and potatoes, I love them - but sadly, they don't love me. As a matter-of-fact, white starches (such as rice, pasta, potatoes and white bread products) should no longer be on my menu, except rarely or in very small quantities. A serving of any of these white, starchy no-no's should be limited to 1/3 cup once or twice a week, at the most. Have you ever measured out a level 1/3 cup of pasta? It's not much more than a spoonful. Plop that in the middle of your plate, top with spaghetti sauce and that's not much of a meal! I thought the days of my favorite spaghetti dinner were over for good. But instead of giving up, I got creative! There are lower carb, higher fiber pastas on the market, such as Dreamfields brand, which is formulated in such a way that only 5 net carbs are absorbed by the body. It tastes like regular pasta to me, so it is my favorite "go to" brand when cooking for my family. Even with reduced carb pastas, portion control is important. One serving is about ½ to ¾ of a cup of cooked pasta, not a heaping plate full, but a small side-dish size. Also, it is best to test and see how your blood glucose reacts to the different reduced carb pastas before you include it regularly in your food plan. (To see how your body reacts to any food, check your blood sugar about 2 to 2½ hours after eating, if it is still elevated and over 150, then the offending food should be limited in your diet.) When it comes to potatoes and rice, for me they need to be avoided almost entirely. Here are some of my favorite food substitutes that can stand in nicely for this disastrous trio that are much more nutritious while adding fiber and flavor to your meal. 1. Spaghetti Squash is extremely easy to prepare, but you do need to plan ahead for cooking time. Simply cut the squash i Continue reading >>

6 Healthy Alternatives To Mashed Potatoes!

6 Healthy Alternatives To Mashed Potatoes!

Anti-Inflammatory | Budget Recipes | Candida diet | Celiac-friendly | Dairy-free | Diabetic-friendly | Gluten-free | GMO-free | Holiday | Hypo-allergenic | Monsanto-free recipes | Nightshade-free | Paleo Auto-immune | Paleo Diet | Quick & Easy | SCD & GAPS diets | Tree Nut free | Vegan | Vegetables | Vegetarian I cant live without fluffy holiday potatoes!But now we have 4big problems: 1) White potatoes are a high-carb, low-nutrient invitation to elevatedblood sugar and weight gain. 2) Nightshadeintolerance is more common. 3) GMOpotatoesarehere! 4) The Paleo diet excludes white potatoes.So I decided to test 6 different veggiesto finda tastier, healthier alternativeto mashed potatoes. And theyre ALLfabulicious! Top row: Cauliflower, Japanese Sweet Potato, Celery root Bottomrow: Parsnip, Garnet Yam, Broccoli Unknown inEurope until the late 1500s, the potato comes fromSouth America, brought to Europe by Spanish conquistadors. Potatoes are easier to grow than wheat, and by thelate 1700s became the #1 staple crop in northern Europe. Peasants could pretty much liveon potatoes grown in their own gardens. Poor Irish folk survived on potatoes, sufferingmalnutrition, food reactions, and an epidemic of dropsy, which isjointswellingand water retention. In the 1840sa strange fungus ravaged the entire potato crop four years in a row. The resulting Irish potato famine wiped out one fourthof the population and forcedmillions to immigrate to the USA. Nowadaysweenjoya widevarietyof potatoes, from Yukon gold to Fingerlings, each witha distinctive flavor. But we still have problems: All nightshade vegetables increase your risk of arthritis and auto-immune disease. Ifyou suffer fromgluten or dairy intolerance, mood swings, indigestion, joint swelling, edema, arthritis, leaky gut, or intesti Continue reading >>

Great Food Swaps For Diabetes—mashed Potatoes

Great Food Swaps For Diabetes—mashed Potatoes

To have comforting, creamy, mashed potatoes without chalking up 35 grams of carbs in a one-cup serving, try this half-and-half strategy. Use half the amount of potatoes you want for your dish. A medium potato contains about 33 grams of carbs and 3 grams of fiber per cup. Then use an equal amount of either turnips (about 8 grams of carbs and 3 grams of fiber per cup), rutabaga (about 15 grams of carbs and 3 grams of fiber per cup), cauliflower (about 3 grams of carbs and 2 grams of fiber per cup) or some combination of the three. Boil or microwave the potatoes and vegetables, and mash these up together. Add softened butter. Then, warm some cream or half-and-half in the microwave, and beat in until smooth. Salt and pepper to taste. For extra flavor, add minced garlic (raw or gently cooked) to the butter mixture, or mix in some grated Parmesan, romano, or asiago cheese. Continue reading >>

11 Superfoods For Your Diabetes Diet

11 Superfoods For Your Diabetes Diet

Getty Images What to Eat to Beat Type 2 Diabetes What makes a food “super”? When it comes to type 2 diabetes, it’s not just about foods that pack lots of nutrients. For a diabetes-friendly diet, you also need foods that will help keep your blood sugar levels in check. “Look for items that contain healthy fats and are high in vitamins, minerals, and fiber,” says Sue McLaughlin, RD, a certified diabetes educator at Burgess Health Center in Onawa, Iowa. It’s also crucial to eat a wide variety of foods to make sure you’re getting a healthy mix of phytochemicals and essential fatty acids. Add these 11 superfoods to your grocery cart to keep your diet diabetes-friendly. Continue reading >>

12 Tasty Substitutions When Cutting Carbs

12 Tasty Substitutions When Cutting Carbs

12 Tasty Substitutions When Cutting Carbs Cutting carbs doesnt have to be a buzzkillwe reviewed some equally awesome options The best way to cut carbs from your diet is to make creative substitutions, says Arthur Agatston, M.D., author of The South Beach Diet. That way you can still eat the foods you love, without busting your diet. Dr. Agatston told us how to make cauliflower taste like mashed potatoes. Other nutrition experts gave us tricks for cutting white flour, pasta, and potatoes and replacing them with lower-carb alternatives that taste nearly identical. We then had some loyal carbo-cravers taste-test these dishes. Turns out some of them are so good, youll wonder why you werent eating them in the first place. Summer squash (the football-shaped yellow kind) tastes similar to potatoes when cookedbut has just a fraction of the carbs. Grate the squash, mix in an egg as binder, make patties, and fry them in olive oil, says Mary Dan Eades, M.D., coauthor of The Low-Carb Comfort Food Cookbook. Carbs Eliminated: About 15 grams (g) per hash-brown patty The Taste: Not as firm and crispy as regular hash browns, but the potato flavor is there. One of Dr. Agatstons favorites: Steam some fresh or frozen cauliflower in the microwave. Then spray the cauliflower with butter substitute, add a little nonfat half-and-half substitute, and puree in a food processor or blender. Salt and pepper to taste and youve got something that quite honestly can compete with the real thing any day,says Dr. Agatston. To make it even better, try adding roasted garlic, cheese, or sour cream to the mixture. The Taste: After a couple of bites, you forget its not potatoes. Slice four to five medium-size zukes lengthwise into three-quarter-inch-thick strips, instructs Lise Battaglia, a New Jersey chef w Continue reading >>

Top 10 Worst Diet Choices If You Have Diabetes

Top 10 Worst Diet Choices If You Have Diabetes

If you have diabetes, in many ways your diet is your medicine. As diabetes educators, we help patients understand what food and beverage choices are best to avoid. When foods are high in carbohydrates, fat and sodium, they increase your risk for high blood pressure, high cholesterol, weight gain, heart disease and uncontrolled sugar . Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy Sweetened drinks. These include regular pop/soda, fruit punches and iced teas. These are loaded with sugar and calories, and they usually have little or no nutritional value. Instead, try infusing plain water with different berries and fruits so you can enjoy the natural sweetness. “Designer” or specialty coffee drinks – including frappuccinos or cappuccinos. That “once a day special treat” can add up to lots of extra sugar, calories and saturated fat. Instead, go for straight java, either black, with artificial sweetener or a small splash of skim milk. Whole milk. It has too much fat, which can lead to weight gain. Switch to 2 percent, 1 percent – or even better: skim milk. Keep in mind that one cup of skim milk has 12 grams of carbohydrates. If you don’t like milk or are lactose intolerant, you can drink almond milk, rice milk or soy milk instead—but remember to get the low sugar varieties. Hot dogs. These grilled little favorites are still high in saturated fat and sodium—yes, that even includes turkey dogs! Try to avoid them or eat them only occasionally. Packaged lunch meats. These are also high in saturated fat and sodium. Check your deli for low sodium meats—or better yet use sliced meat that you’ve roasted at home to make your sandwic Continue reading >>

Diabetic Low Carb Rice Alternatives

Diabetic Low Carb Rice Alternatives

We have become so used to eating things on top of something, wouldn't you agree? Things like pasta, rice, noodles and breads have become our staple foods – mainly because they are a cheaper source of food to produce on a large scale. And they tend to store for longer periods than fresh produce. So when it comes to rice, what can we do? An Inside Look At Rice Nutrition As you can see, rice is quite high in carbs for just a small amount (1/2 cup). Many people often consume way more than 1/2 cup at one sitting. And if you remember, carbs are the main nutrient that affects blood sugar and A1C levels – so you definitely want to limit your intake if not cut out rice altogether, which is often recommended. So if you were to cut rice out, what rice alternatives can you use? Let's explore a few ideas now. Diabetic Low Carb Rice Alternatives There are a few rice alternatives you can try. Cauliflower rice Konjac rice Cabbage chunk rice Other alternatives Cauliflower Rice Using cauliflower as rice may sound like a really strange idea but it really works. I remember the first time I served it up to my partner and he was pleasantly surprised it how good it was. If I can get stuff past him I know we're onto a winner! When you grind cauliflower up and cook it, it has a similar texture to rice and the flavor absorbs other saucy things that you might eat with it. Take this Chicken Massaman Curry as an example. It's served with cauliflower rice instead of standard rice. Served with cauliflower rice this meal is 13 g net carbs. Served with 1/2 cup brown rice it would be around 30 g carbs. Cauliflower rice is not exactly like rice, so it is something that you need to get used to – but when it comes to what we eat, that's like anything we want to change. Konjac Rice Image As we suggest Continue reading >>

Are Sweet Potatoes Better Than White Potatoes?

Are Sweet Potatoes Better Than White Potatoes?

Q: How do sweet potatoes affect diabetes? Are they a good substitute for white potatoes? A: The same amount of white potatoes and sweet potatoes contain about the same amount of carbohydrates (1/2 cup = 15 grams of carbs). Sweet potatoes, however, have more fiber and are slightly lower on the glycemic index than white potatoes. For this reason, blood glucose will rise a little more gradually with sweet potatoes than with white potatoes. As far as nutrients go, sweet potatoes are a rich source of vitamin A and beta-carotene. As with all foods containing carbohydrates, keep in mind the importance of portion size and distribution throughout the day. Virginia Zamudio Lange, a member of Diabetic Living's editorial advisory board, is a founding partner of Alamo Diabetes Team, LLP in San Antonio. Continue reading >>

13 Best And Worst Foods For People With Diabetes

13 Best And Worst Foods For People With Diabetes

If you have diabetes, watching what you eat is one of the most important things you can do to stay healthy. "The basic goal of nutrition for people with diabetes is to avoid blood sugar spikes," said Dr. Gerald Bernstein, director of the diabetes management program at Friedman Diabetes Institute, Beth Israel Medical Center in New York. Candy and soda can be dangerous for diabetics because the body absorbs these simple sugars almost instantly. But all types of carbs need to be watched, and foods high in fat—particularly unhealthy fats—are problematic as well because people with diabetes are at very high risk of heart disease, said Sandy Andrews, RD, director of education for the William Sansum Diabetes Center in Santa Barbara, Calif. Worst: White rice The more white rice you eat, the greater your risk of type 2 diabetes, according to a 2012 review. In a study of more than 350,000 people, those who ate the most white rice were at greatest risk for type 2 diabetes, and the risk increased 11 percent for each additional daily serving of rice. "Basically anything highly processed, fried, and made with white flour should be avoided," Andrews said. White rice and pasta can cause blood sugar spikes similar to that of sugar. Have this instead: Brown rice or wild rice. These whole grains don't cause the same blood sugar spikes thanks to fiber, which helps slow the rush of glucose into the bloodstream, Andrews said. What's more, a Harvard School of Public Health study found that two or more weekly servings of brown rice was linked to a lower diabetes risk. Worst: Blended coffees Blended coffees that are laced with syrup, sugar, whipped cream, and other toppings can have as many calories and fat grams as a milkshake, making them a poor choice for those with diabetes. A 16-ounce Continue reading >>

What Can Replace Rice And Potatoes In A Diabetic Diet?

What Can Replace Rice And Potatoes In A Diabetic Diet?

Rice and potatoes are both carbohydrate foods. Diabetics can eat them if they limit the serving size. If you are looking for substitutions there are many choices. Whole grains like quinoa, oats, couscous, and orzo. Beans and soy products. Look for intact grains which contain fiber and lead to lower blood sugars. You can eat rice and potatoes if you have diabetes. However, you will need to eat smaller portions. One medium potato (3 potatoes / pound) is a serving. Find 3 potatoes at the store and put in the scale until it equals one pound. Rice can be a challenge because a little goes a long way for your carbohydrate count. You'll need to eat a portion smaller than a computer mouse. If you can't do that, you might consider a different carbohydrate. Remember that all foods can fit into a diet for people with diabetes. The focus is on how much carbohydrate and saturated fat is in foods. One carbohydrate (carb) serving is equal to 15 grams of carbohydrate. One half cup of potatoes or one third cup of rice is equal to 15 grams or one carb choice. Consult your registered dietitian and/or certified diabetes educator to find out how many carb choices you have at each meal. Then you can decide how many carb servings of potatoes or rice you would like to consume. If you do not want to use up your carb choices from potatoes or rice and are looking for low carb choices you can try mashed cauliflower with low fat tub margarine or spray butter. One half cup serving of cooked cauliflower is only 5 grams of carbohydrate. You don't have to give up rice and potatoes just because you have diabetes. But you may have to watch your portion size more closely (keep it to about a 1/2 cup). If you choose to have rice, make sure it is brown rice. Brown rice has more protein and fiber and takes lon Continue reading >>

Our Best Potato Recipes

Our Best Potato Recipes

Enjoyed alone or accompanied by meat, veggies, or cheese, potatoes make a perfect side dish, satisfying soup, savory casserole, and even a sweet dessert. Enjoyed alone or accompanied by meat, veggies, or cheese, potatoes make a perfect side dish, satisfying soup, savory casserole, and even a sweet dessert. Enjoyed alone or accompanied by meat, veggies, or cheese, potatoes make a perfect side dish, satisfying soup, savory casserole, and even a sweet dessert. Enjoyed alone or accompanied by meat, veggies, or cheese, potatoes make a perfect side dish, satisfying soup, savory casserole, and even a sweet dessert. Continue reading >>

10 Diabetic Foods To Avoid For Good Blood Sugar Control

10 Diabetic Foods To Avoid For Good Blood Sugar Control

These ten diabetic foods to avoid are your enemies if you are trying to control blood sugar. That is because of insulin resistance in a type 2 diabetic and the insulin impairment in a type 1 diabetic. The foods listed here cause huge spikes in insulin, so your pancreas has to respond quickly. But diabetics have impaired insulin response. We need to stay away from those foods that are easily digested and release glucose in a flood. Of course, table sugar causes a blood sugar spike. Sugar in all its forms tops the list of diabetic foods to avoid. All type 1 and type 2 diabetic have been told this. The problem lies in the other things, foods that act like sugar when they hit our stomach and start being digested. Here are the ten worst of them. White pasta is made from refined flour, one of a diabetic's worst enemies. That makes it one of the top diabetic foods to avoid. White flour has every bit of fiber and vitamins stripped away, leaving only simple carbohydrate, which is one step away from simple sugar. It is in nearly all processed foods in some form, and in your digestive system it becomes pure glucose very fast. White rice has been polished, a refining process that removes the outer parts where fiber and vitamins are found. All that is left is the endosperm, which is also a simple carbohydrate. Like white flour it turns to glucose very fast. Blood sugar spikes, insulin is pumped out to meet it, and very soon you have a sugar low and feel hungry again. If you are fighting obesity and diabetes, white rice and white pasta are bound to make your battle harder. Does that mean no pasta or rice in your diet? No, it means you look for alternatives. Two great ones are brown rice and whole wheat pasta. Both are available at your grocery store next to the white versions. They a Continue reading >>

Potato Substitute

Potato Substitute

Friend T2 since Feb 2007 diet and exercise. I am doing fairly well with my diet and exercise regime to lower my levels, however the next stage will be more difficult . My daytime levels are more or less sorted with shreaded wheat for breakfast then a mixed salad for lunch and apples for snacks. I am virtually at my perfect weight now and have a good evening meal, usually of meat or fish and veg or salad , but the dilemma is Potatoes i never have mash or Jacket i usually have boiled in jackets or mainly oven chips, however i would like my early morning levels slightly lower so wonder what i could have sometimes instead of the chips ! Also at night i do like the odd snack and reach for low fat crisps as i like savory things, any other ideas, as my fill of veg and fruit is good for the day. Hi Steve, congrats on doing so well with your diet. A few suggestions for potato replacements are: soy chips, mock potato salad, mock mac & cheese. I love the mock potato salad in the summer. Instead of potatoes, I use cauliflower. It is a very good taste and you don't miss the potatoes. Also the same with the mac and cheese. Replace the pasta with cauliflower. Soy chips I just love and I look at the benefits of the protein...lol D.D. Family T1 dxd March 2006 MDI Levemir & Humalog pens I also replace pasta with spaghetti squash! You just use a fork to scoop it out once cooked & it comes out like spaghetti! I put in lots of butter & broccalli. 2006 A1c March 15.3 / July 6.6 / October 6.0 Friend Type 1 since 2005, on the pump since February 2007 I too like to use cauliflower as a substitute, I mash them up for mock mashed potatoes and I roast it too in the oven like potatoes. I like to snack on soy nuts and soy chips, and I also sometimes use different seasonings on nuts for a savory cru Continue reading >>

5 Healthy Alternatives To Your Favorite Potato Dishes

5 Healthy Alternatives To Your Favorite Potato Dishes

5 Healthy Alternatives to Your Favorite Potato Dishes Get a print subscription to Reader's Digest and instantly enjoy free digital access on any device. Instead of roasted potatoes try: Roasted turnips Preheat oven to 400F. Trim 2 pounds of turnips, and toss with a tablespoon of olive oil, and salt to taste. Roast for about 30 minutes, or until brown and tender. For added flavor, sprinkle with rosemary. Instead of French fries try: Baked yam fries Preheat oven to 425F. Scrub yams and cut into 1/4 x 1/4 x 4-inch strips. Toss with a tablespoon of olive oil, and a teaspoon each of ground cumin and ground coriander, and 1/4 teaspoon pepper. Spray a baking sheet with vegetable spray, and arrange yams on the sheet in a single layer. Bake for 25 minutes, turning once midway through. Instead of mashed potatoes try: Mashed cauliflower Steam a whole cauliflower (or just some florets) until soft. In a large bowl, combine the steamed vegetable with 1/2 cup of milk and 2 tablespoons of softened butter. Use a potato masher to mash the cauliflower until smooth and creamy. Sprinkle with salt and pepper to taste. Preheat oven to 400F. Rinse and dry kale leaves; tear into roughly 3 x 3-inch strips. Mist leaves lightly with cooking spray, and sprinkle with salt. Bake for 10 minutes or until brown and crispy. Instead of a baked potato try: Baked celery root Preheat over to 400F. Peel 4 pounds of celery root (about 3 pieces) and cut into 1-inch chunks. Toss with 1/3 cup vegetable oil and 2 teaspoons salt. Place in a roasting pan and bake 30 minutes. Stir, reduce temperature to 375F, and bake 60 minutes more. Continue reading >>

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