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Diabetic Spaghetti And Meatballs

Diabetics & Pasta

Diabetics & Pasta

Most individuals with diabetes are fearful of the great Italian meal simply because of pasta's infamously high carbohydrate content. Nonetheless, with proper meal planning, pasta can be safely incorporated into a diabetic diet. The key is to limit the portion size and to select pastas made from high-fiber whole grains. Diabetes and Carbohydrates Individuals living with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes must monitor their carbohydrate intake in order to control their blood sugar. Excessive intake of carbohydrates can lead to hyperglycemia, or high blood sugar. When an individual's blood sugar runs high for an extended period of time, it can lead to other medical complications such as compromised eyesight and kidney disease. To avoid hyperglycemia and associated diseases, diabetics should moderate, but not eliminate, their intake of carbohydrate-containing foods, such as pasta. Carbohydrate Content of Pasta As a member of the grains food group, pasta contains a significant amount of starch, a complex form of carbohydrate. One diabetic serving of pasta is 1/3 cup of cooked pasta, or the equivalent of 15 grams of carbohydrate. One serving of pasta also contains fiber, another complex carbohydrate which helps to control blood sugar. Whole-wheat pasta contains the most fiber: roughly 3 to 5 grams of fiber per serving. Incorporating Pasta into a Healthy Diabetic Diet According to the American Diabetes Association, most diabetics may consume 45 to 60 grams of carbohydrate per meal. As a carbohydate-containing food, pasta is safe to consume when following a diabetic diet; however, because 1/3 cup equals 15 grams of carbohydrate, the amount of pasta in one meal should not exceed 1 cup, or 45 grams of carbohydrate. Additional sauces such as marinara and Alfredo contain minimal amounts of Continue reading >>

8 Diabetes-friendly Pasta Recipes

8 Diabetes-friendly Pasta Recipes

Pass the pasta If you have type 2 diabetes, you may have assumed that your pasta-eating days were over. Depending on your situation, that's not necessarily true. For some, bread and pasta can still be a part of a diabetes-friendly diet if you limit portions, follow the right recipes, and work them into the recommendations set by your dietitian. Talk to your doctor or dietitian about how your blood sugar may react after a pasta meal—the effect can be highly individual, so it's not a bad idea to test your blood sugar after eating to see how you react. Linguine With Pepper Sauce The star of this dish is the sauce: Red bell peppers, olive oil, fresh garlic, basil, and balsamic vinegar are sautéed and then put into the blender together to create a sauce that's packed with vitamin C and fiber. Yum! Ingredients: Olive oil, cooking spay, red bell pepper, garlic, fresh basil, balsamic vinegar, salt, black pepper, uncooked linguine Calories: 117 Try this recipe: Linguine with Red Pepper Sauce Cheesy Chicken Spaghetti Your whole family will love this one-pan meal. (And if you're eating alone, it works great as leftovers.) Spaghetti is baked with a mixture of onions, garlic, tomatoes, and seasoning, and is topped with reduced-fat cheddar cheese. Chicken breast adds lean protein. Swap in whole-wheat spaghetti for an even healthier meal. Ingredients: Uncooked spaghetti, cooking spray, onion, garlic, stewed tomatoes, low-sodium Worcestershire sauce, Italian seasoning, salt, reduced-fat cheddar cheese, frozen cooked chicken Calories: 395 Try this recipe: Cheesy Chicken Spaghetti Basil Scallops with Spinach Fettuccine A 3-ounce serving of scallops sets you back just 95 calories and less than a gram of fat—and pumps you up with an impressive 17 grams of protein. Scallops are also a Continue reading >>

Low Carb Spaghetti Squash And Meatballs With Fresh Mozzarella

Low Carb Spaghetti Squash And Meatballs With Fresh Mozzarella

* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs. The Nutritional Values provided are estimates only and may vary based on the preparation method. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Cut the spaghetti squash in half and remove seeds. Spray with cooking spray and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Place cut side down on a baking sheet and bake for 35-40 minutes until tender. Meanwhile, heat the olive oil over medium heat in large sauce pan. Add the onion and garlic and cook for 4-5 minutes. Add the crushed tomatoes, bay leaf, and oregano. Bring to a simmer and cover. Combine the beef, Parmesan cheese, parsley, egg, garlic, salt, and pepper in a bowl. Form into one inch meatballs and drop into the tomato sauce. Simmer the meatballs for 20 minutes until cooked through. To assemble spaghetti squash boats, first scrape the spaghetti squash away from the edges using a fork. Add the meatballs and some of the tomato sauce. Layer thin slices of mozzarella on top. Return to oven and cook for 3-5 minutes until cheese melts. Top with basil. Customizable weekly meal plans that include Weight Watchers friendly recipes for breakfast, lunch and dinner, nutritional information, shopping lists, and more... SmartPoints and PointsPlus calculated by Slender Kitchen; Not endorsed by Weight Watchers International, Inc. Continue reading >>

5 Secrets To Healthier Spaghetti And Meatballs

5 Secrets To Healthier Spaghetti And Meatballs

5 Secrets to Healthier Spaghetti and Meatballs Learn how to make spaghetti and meatballs healthier with our simple tricks for cutting calories and fat. EatingWell's nutrition advisor Sylvia Geiger, M.S., R.D. helped us give the old dinner standby spaghetti & meatballs a face-lift, with 48 percent fewer calories, 65 percent less saturated fat and two-thirds less sodium, while bumping up fiber, minerals and vitamins. Here's what she did to make spaghetti and meatballs healthier. Before Recipe Makeover: Spaghetti and Meatballs White spaghetti (2 cups) with 8 meatballs (6 ounces), sauce (3/4 cup) and Parmesan cheese (2 tablespoons), garlic bread, iceberg-lettuce salad. This high-carbohydrate meal hason averagea whopping number of calories (1,495) and fat grams (70) and more than a days worth of sodium, yet its shy in vitamins, minerals and other good things, such as antioxidants. Before Recipe Makeover: Spaghetti and Meatballs What Youre Eating: The average restaurant serving of spaghetti & meatballs heaped with grated cheese is enough food for two people. While red sauce and meatballs are a much better choice than creamy pasta carbonara or alfredo, too much of a good thing can still be fraught with nutritional pitfalls, most notably excess calories, sodium and saturated fat. Add a slab of garlic bread made with margarine and youve loaded up on trans fats as well. Iceberg lettuce adds great crunch to salad but few nutrients. Token tomatoes and a smattering of carrots barely help. Coated with 3 tablespoons Italian dressing and dotted with seasoned croutons, a salad like this tops out at about 1,300 mg sodium, 20 grams fat and 265 calories. Store-bought garlic bread, typically made with margarine and flavored salt, adds 320 calories, 20 grams fat and 500 mg of sodium to an a Continue reading >>

Old-fashioned Spaghetti & Meatballs Recipe - Eatingwell

Old-fashioned Spaghetti & Meatballs Recipe - Eatingwell

To prepare meatballs: Combine bulgur and water in a small bowl. Let stand until the bulgur is tender and the liquid is absorbed, about 30 minutes. Preheat oven to 350F. Coat a rack with cooking spray and place it over a baking sheet lined with foil. Combine ground beef, sausage, onion, egg whites, garlic, oregano, salt, pepper, breadcrumbs and the soaked bulgur in a large bowl; mix well. Form the mixture into 1-inch meatballs (about 24). Place the meatballs on the rack and bake for 25 minutes. Blot well with paper towel. To prepare sauce & spaghetti: Put a large pot of lightly salted water on to boil. Bring sauce to a simmer in a Dutch oven. Add the meatballs to the sauce and simmer, covered, for 20 minutes. Stir in basil (or parsley). Meanwhile, cook spaghetti (or linguine) until just tender, 8 to 10 minutes. Drain and transfer to a serving bowl. Top with the sauce and meatballs and serve with grated cheese. Tip: To make fresh breadcrumbs: Trim crusts from firm sandwich bread. Tear the bread into pieces and process in a food processor until coarse crumbs form. One slice makes about cup. Looks good but serving size isn't realisticIt says 8 oz. of meat and a pound of pasta for 6 people...the pasta serving is about right but the meat seems like too small of a portion Wonderful meal for a fall weekend!This recipe can be changed around a lot. I doubled the meat as 8 oz of meat did not sound right. I'll use garlic powder next time in place of the cloves and cut the parsley in half as our son does not like. I could sprinkle it on top of my serving.Pros: Very healthy ingredients and basically a one-dish stand alone entree.Cons: Did take me quite a while to prepare. Our son prefers garlic powder & no parsley. WHOA on the onion!Well, I cannot agree with the rave reviews and I c Continue reading >>

Classic Meatballs - Recipes For Healthy Living By The American Diabetes Association

Classic Meatballs - Recipes For Healthy Living By The American Diabetes Association

This recipe calls for 95% lean ground beef, but you can use ground turkey or chicken if youd like. These meatballs can be added to sauces, soups or other recipes. Prep Time: 15 minutesCook Time: 40 minutes 1/2 cup dried Italian bread or gluten-free bread cubes, drizzled with 1/4 cup skim milk, drained and squeezed of excess liquid 2 Tbsp fresh flat-leaf parsley or basil, finely chopped Combine all of the ingredients except for the tomato sauce in a large bowl. Mix well with hands. Shape mixture into uniform 1/2-inch meatballs and set on a clean baking sheet or cutting board. Bring tomato sauce to a light boil in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add the meatballs, stir and cover. Reduce heat to medium-low and simmer for 30 minutes, or until meatballs are cooked through and tender. Note: See recipe for Fresh Tomato Sauce to prepare. Choices: 1 Carbohydrate, 1 Lean Protein, 1/2 Fat From The Italian Diabetes Cookbook by Amy Riolo Photo: Classic Meatballs from The Italian Diabetes Cookbook. Rene Comet Photography. If you think Italian cuisine is off-limits for people with diabetes, think again! This collection of more than 150 easy-to-prepare recipes combines nutritious ingredients and traditional Italian cooking methods to bring out incredible flavor. The place to start: your kitchen! Try our smart swaps with flavorful ingredients. What have you done for your heart lately? Try these smart food choices. Heres one way to add healthful Italian recipes to a meal plan. It even fits in a traditional dessertperfect for a special occasion! Calculate the number of calories you should eat each day to maintain your present body weight: Please select an option before you continue. I don't do any physical activity other than what I need to do for my usual activities, such as going to Continue reading >>

Diabetic Pasta Recipe: Baked Ziti With Meatballs - Recipes For Diabetics

Diabetic Pasta Recipe: Baked Ziti With Meatballs - Recipes For Diabetics

1 15-ounce container low-fat ricotta cheese 1 28-ounce can pureed tomatoes with basil In a bowl, stir together the ground sirloin, garlic and onion powder, quick oats, egg substitute, water, salt, and pepper. Coat a non-stick skillet with cooking spray, and then saut meatballs in batches until browned and cooked through. Set aside. (You can make the meatballs in advance and freeze them.) Cook the pasta according to package directions for al dente. Put in 1 cup of cold water after removing from the heat, then drain and set aside. In a bowl, combine the ricotta, mozzarella and Parmesan cheeses. Add the garlic powder and red pepper flakes to the canned tomato puree. Place 1/4 cup tomato puree in the bottom of a casserole. Top with a layer of meatballs, dollops of cheese mixture, and tomato puree. Layer up the casserole, topping with a few dollops of cheese mixture. (You can freeze the casserole at this point, if you'd like.) Bake in oven for 45 minutes until the ricotta is browned and the casserole is hot. 487 calories (22% calories from fat), 36 g protein, 12 g total fat (5.2 g saturated fat), 55 g carbohydrates, 4 g dietary fiber, 51 mg cholesterol, 925 mg sodium Continue reading >>

Skillet Zoodles And Meatballs

Skillet Zoodles And Meatballs

In large bowl, mix beef, bread crumbs, onion, milk, Worcestershire sauce, salt, pepper and egg. Shape mixture into 12 (2-inch) meatballs. In 12-inch skillet, heat oil over medium heat. Add meatballs; cook 6 to 8 minutes, gently turning occasionally, just until browned on all sides. Add pasta sauce and water; heat to simmering. Simmer 8 to 10 minutes, stirring occasionally, until meatballs are thoroughly cooked and no longer pink in center (165F). Using slotted spoon, transfer meatballs to plate, and cover to keep warm. Stir zucchini noodles into sauce; cook 2 to 4 minutes, stirring gently, until noodles soften. Divide zoodle mixture among 4 bowls. Top with meatballs. Sprinkle with basil and Parmesan cheese. Be careful when adding the water and pasta sauce to the hot skillet with the meatballs. To avoid splattering, pour liquid into pan gently, holding jar and measuring cup close to skillet. Using prespiralized zucchini noodles that are measured in ounce-weights? For this recipe, we used 22 oz of zucchini noodles. Continue reading >>

Can A Diabetic Eat Spaghetti?

Can A Diabetic Eat Spaghetti?

After a diabetes diagnosis, your may fear you have to give up your favorite carbohydrate-rich meals like spaghetti and other pastas. Although it’s true that you need to keep careful watch over how many carbs, calories and fat you take in, you can accommodate an occasional serving of spaghetti. Make sure your eating is always within the context of a healthy, carb-balanced meal plan and that you are following the advice of your doctor or dietitian. You can also make small changes to your traditional spaghetti dish that make it just as palatable but reduce the impact on your blood sugar. Video of the Day Is Spaghetti OK? “The short answer to the pasta question is yes, you can eat pasta,” writes registered dietitian Cindy Moore on EatBetterAmerica.com. People with diabetes do not need to give up their favorite spaghetti meals. In fact, it’s important to have carbohydrates such as pasta at each meal. The “but” is you must ensure you are adhering the eating plan created by your doctor or dietitian. Spaghetti is “carbalicious,” and eating too much can spike your blood sugar. To keep it balanced, be sure to always eat the appropriate amount of carbohydrate servings when you have spaghetti. The nutrition facts on the spaghetti package will tell you how many carbohydrates are in a serving. A cup of cooked plain spaghetti without sauce has roughly 43 g of carbohydrates. If that’s more than your allowance of carbohydrates per meal, you can reduce your portion size, to 1/3 or 2/3 of a cup. Remember that the sauce will add more carbohydrates — close to 18 g for a typical 1/2 cup of tomato-based sauce. In addition, if you make meatballs with carbohydrate-containing items like breadcrumbs, that’s an additional carbohydrate source you need to account for. Choosing Continue reading >>

Low-carb Slow Cooker Spaghetti Squash And Meatballs Recipe

Low-carb Slow Cooker Spaghetti Squash And Meatballs Recipe

Get more recipes at AllDayIDreamAboutFood . Low-Carb Slow Cooker Spaghetti Squash and Meatballs Recipe Confession time. I really struggle with this low carb thing. Not for me, of course. I am fully on the low carb bandwagon and I dont find it a hardship to eat this way. But for my family, it isnt quite so simple. I have 3 hungry children and a very tall, VERY hungry husband. Simply put, I cant always keep up with the demand. They devour my creations quickly and I am always left wondering where that huge batch of muffins or bread or pancakes went. I double a lot of my casserole recipes, thinking we will have tons of leftovers, and it barely stretches beyond one meal. I would very much love to make everything they ate from scratch but that simply isnt practical. And I would love to have them fully on a grain-free diet, but we are not quite there. I sometimes have to rely on convenience foods, but I try to make smart choices about what those foods are. Frozen meatballs seems like such a shoo-in for low carb convenience, dont they? I mean, meatballs. Balls made out of meat. And my kids love them. But I have stood there so many times in the frozen food aisle, astounded at the carbs in ready-made meatballs. Sometimes up to 10 grams in a serving. Sounds to me like there is more bread than meat in those balls. Of course, they arent gluten-free and they usually have plenty of other fillers and junk in there too.So when Al Fresco asked if Id like to try their frozen chicken meatballs, I was a bit skeptical. But I was very pleasantly surprised to see that they are completely gluten-free and that the ingredient list does not read like a whos who of food additives. Definitely a more viable option for my hungry crowd. The Jalapeo & Pepper Jack are the lowest carb option, with only 2 Continue reading >>

Best Pasta For Diabetics

Best Pasta For Diabetics

We ALL love pasta, right?! It's just one of those foods that is such a comfort food. I know for me it's always been like that BUT I also know that because it is such a comfort food it is VERY easy to over eat it! Seriously…I know there have been times when I've eaten an enormous bowl and still gone back for more. SOund familiar? But when you're a diabetic it's not really possible to eat an enormous bowl of pasta because you will soon see your blood sugar sky rocketing. And even if you're not diabetic, you will soon see those pounds stacking on if you over consume the carbs! So let's go over some facts and talk about the best pasta options for diabetics. Pasta Nutrition Facts Let's compare the nutrition facts for 1 serving of pasta. One serving is equivalent to half a cup. As you can see from these comparisons there is between 18-22 g total carbs and between 15-20 net carbs. If you're confused about carb counting, check out our easy tutorial over here. Realistic Serving Sizes These images show the reality of pasta servings. The first one is only half a cup and as you can see it doesn't really amount to much when put on a normal sized dinner plate. Then we have what might be someones typical serving of pasta (if not more). In the second image we see about 3 times as much, so 3 serves of white spaghetti like this amounts to 64.8 g total carbohydrates. Too Many Carbs I love using visual comparisons because it really lets you see the difference. While you could try to justify that eating whole wheat spaghetti would be okay with 2 serves being around 30 g net carbs, over the long term this is just too many carbs and you will find you can't control your blood sugar properly. So What's The Best Pasta For Diabetics? Sure, the traditional pasta might not be the best pasta for d Continue reading >>

Problem Foods: Can Diabetics Eat Pasta?

Problem Foods: Can Diabetics Eat Pasta?

Amy Reeder is a Certified Diabetes Educator with a master’s degree in nutrition from the University of Utah. She has worked in the diabetes field since 2005 and has been a Certified Diabetes Educator since 2007. Ahhh, pasta. Everyone loves it! But it is one of those foods that has confusing messages attached to it. It’s a carbohydrate and sometimes carbs get a bad rap, as we all know. Any carbohydrate-rich food is going to cause a rise in blood sugar, whether you have diabetes or not. If you have diabetes, however, you need to manage that rise in blood sugar in order to stay healthy and avoid complications over time. So how do you enjoy pasta and manage blood sugar? One way is to choose different types of non-traditional pasta. Regular pasta is made from white flour, which is digested and absorbed easily by the body causing a spike in blood sugar after eaten. But there are many different types of pasta on the market shelves these days that can be part of a healthy diet and not cause such havoc with blood sugar. Most of these pastas are referred to as “whole grain,” but can have very different properties and tastes. Whole Wheat/Whole Grain Pasta Whole wheat pasta is commonly referred to as whole grain pasta. It is made from whole wheat flour and contains five grams of fiber per serving. Compared to regular pasta that has two grams of fiber per serving, this is a wise choice. Fiber slows down the digestion process and allows for a slower release of sugar in to the bloodstream, resulting in more even blood glucose levels as opposed to sharp spikes. Whole wheat pasta has a different look and taste than regular pasta. It is brown and tastes a little nuttier. If you are sensitive to this different color or taste, try this type of pasta in soups or in a dish that has a Continue reading >>

Pork Balls With Tomato Sauce And Spaghetti

Pork Balls With Tomato Sauce And Spaghetti

Pork balls with tomato sauce and spaghetti The meatballs are grilled rather than fried to reduce the fat content. Each 431g serving contains (excludes serving suggestion) Cook the spaghetti according to the packet instructions. Meanwhile, mix together the mince, onion, garlic (if using) and oregano. Season well and shape into 6 balls. Preheat the grill. Place the meatballs onto a baking tray and grill for 6-7 minutes, turning occasionally, until browned and cooked through. Drain the pasta, stir through the passata and tomato pure. Add the meatballs and heat through. You could also use beef or lamb mince. For a lower-fat version, use turkey mince. You can also use wholewheat pasta to keep you fuller for longer. Freeze in portions with the pork balls in the sauce. Defrost in the fridge or microwave and reheat until piping hot throughout. Pork balls with tomato sauce and spaghetti Diabetes UK Someone is diagnosed with diabetes every two minutes. Your donation can change lives. Continue reading >>

Spaghetti And Meatballs

Spaghetti And Meatballs

Ingredients Nonstick cooking spray 6 ounces uncooked multigrain or whole wheat spaghetti 3/4 pound extra-lean ground beef 1/4 pound hot turkey Italian sausage, casing removed 1 egg white 2 tablespoons plain dry bread crumbs 1 teaspoon dried oregano 2 cups tomato-basil pasta sauce 3 tablespoons chopped fresh basil 2 tablespoons grated Parmesan cheese Directions Preheat oven to 450°F. Coat baking sheet with cooking spray. Cook spaghetti according to package directions, omitting salt and fat. Drain; keep warm. Combine beef, sausage, egg white, bread crumbs, and oregano in medium bowl; mix well. Shape mixture into 16 (1 1/2-inch) meatballs. Place on prepared baking sheet; coat with cooking spray. Bake 12 minutes, turning once. Pour pasta sauce into large skillet; add meatballs. Cook and stir over medium heat 9 minutes or until sauce is heated through and meatballs are cooked through (160°F). Divide among four plates. Top with meatballs and sauce; sprinkle with basil and Parmesan cheese. Yield: 4 servings. Serving size: 3 meatballs, 3/4 cup spaghetti and 3/4 cup sauce. Nutrition Facts Per Serving: Calories: 388 calories, Carbohydrates: 41 g, Protein: 34 g, Fat: 10 g, Saturated Fat: 3 g, Cholesterol: 69 mg, Sodium: 760 mg, Fiber: 5 g Exchanges per serving: 2 Bread/Starch, 2 Vegetable, 3 Meat. Copyright Diabetic Cooking. Disclaimer Statements: Statements and opinions expressed on this Web site are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the publishers or advertisers. The information provided on this Web site should not be construed as medical instruction. Consult appropriate health-care professionals before taking action based on this information. Continue reading >>

Turkey Meatballs With Spaghetti

Turkey Meatballs With Spaghetti

Our Best Low-Carb Recipes: 30 Low-Carb Dinner Recipes, Desserts, and More Eating healthy has never tasted so good with this FREE eCookbook. From low-carb breakfast recipes to low-carb dinners and even low-carb desserts, you'll be able to stick to your healthy eating lifestyle with ease! Bonus: Get our newsletter & special offers for free. We will not share or sell your email address. View our Privacy Policy Home > Pastas > Turkey Meatballs with Spaghetti You must be logged in to add a private note. Login | Register We are adding the recipe to your Recipe Box. You must be logged in to add a recipe. Login | Register Traditional Italian recipes for spaghetti and meatballs are too high in fat, carbs and calories for anyone with diabetes, so our Test Kitchen took on the task to lighten it up. The result is our healthier Turkey Meatballs and Spaghetti! 1 (8-ounce) pacakge fresh mushrooms, sliced 1 (26-ounce) jar low-sodium marinara sauce 1 (12-ounce) package reduced-carb spaghetti, prepared according to package directions In a large bowl, combine turkey, onion, egg, breadcrumbs, garlic powder, salt and pepper. Mix well and form into 12 meatballs. In a large skillet, heat oil over medium heat. Add meatballs, cover, and cook 8 to 10 minutes, or until no pink remains, turning occasionally to brown on all sides. Remove to a platter when finished. In the same skillet, cook mushrooms 5 minutes, or until tender, stirring occasionally. Stir the marinara sauce and basil into the mushrooms. Add the turkey meatballs to the sauce and cook for 10-12 minutes or until heated through. Continue reading >>

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