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Diabetic Smells

What Does Bad Breath Have To Do With Diabetes?

What Does Bad Breath Have To Do With Diabetes?

Your breath has an interesting ability to provide clues to your overall health. A sweet, fruity odor can be a sign of ketoacidosis, an acute complication of diabetes. An odor of ammonia is associated with kidney disease. Similarly, a very foul, fruity odor may be a sign of anorexia nervosa. Other diseases, such as asthma, cystic fibrosis, lung cancer, and liver disease, also can cause distinct odors on the breath. Bad breath, also called halitosis, can be so telling that doctors may even be able to use it to identify diabetes. Recently, researchers have found that infrared breath analyzers can be effective in identifying prediabetes or early-stage diabetes. Diabetes-related halitosis has two main causes: periodontal disease and high levels of ketones in the blood. Periodontal diseases Periodontal diseases, also called gum diseases, include gingivitis, mild periodontitis, and advanced periodontitis. In these inflammatory diseases, bacteria attack the tissues and bone that support your teeth. Inflammation can affect metabolism and increase your blood sugar, which worsens diabetes. While diabetes can lead to periodontal diseases, these diseases can also create further problems for people with diabetes. According to a report in IOSR Journal of Dental and Medical Sciences, an estimated one in three people with diabetes will also experience periodontal diseases. Heart disease and stroke, which can be complications of diabetes, are also linked to periodontal disease. Diabetes can damage blood vessels, which can reduce blood flow throughout your body, including your gums. If your gums and teeth aren’t receiving a proper supply of blood, they may become weak and more prone to infection. Diabetes may also raise glucose levels in your mouth, promoting bacteria growth, infection, Continue reading >>

What Medical Conditions Cause Body Odor?

What Medical Conditions Cause Body Odor?

There are certain things that we do in every day life that cause us to smell. Excessive sweating while exercising, poor hygiene and some of the foods we eat can give us some pretty bad body odor (B.O. for short). But body odor can sometimes be attributed to more than just the occasional workout or a clove of garlic. Video of the Day Diabetes is one of the more common causes of body odor. When someone who has diabetes fails to monitor and take care of his blood sugar, he can develop a condition called ketoacidosis. With ketoacidosis, not only does the person suffer from breath that is best described as fruity, a pungent body odor is also present. Ketoacidosis is a serious issue and needs to be addressed by a doctor immediately. An overactive thyroid gland is another cause of body odor. The thyroid gland causes us to sweat. When it's working overtime, as with hyperthyroidism, the body excretes an excessive amount of sweat even with little or no exertion. The thyroid should be checked for proper functioning once every year or two. Hyperthyroidism is treatable. If you notice an unnatural amount of sweat and the body odor that comes with it, see a doctor. Bad body odor can also be caused by dysfunction in the kidneys and liver. The kidneys and the liver help to remove toxins from our system through waste product. When they don't do their jobs, toxins can build up in the blood and digestive tract, which in turn creates an odor. This could be a product of either liver or kidney disease. A simple blood test can tell if there is a problem with either of these two vital organs. Continue reading >>

5 Body Odors You Should Never Ignore

5 Body Odors You Should Never Ignore

Whether youve just completed a grueling workout or chowed down on an onion-packed burger, chances are, at one time or another, youve been that guy who stunk up the room. In most cases, a simple shower, swipe of deodorant, or line of minty-fresh toothpaste could remedy the situation. But in other cases, its not so simple. Thats because your body odor can actually speak volumes about your health. In fact, some diseases can actually produce a unique, distinguished odor , according to a recent Swedish study. So which funky fumes should you take note of? Here are 5 common body odors that might signal a serious problemand what you should do if the stench arises. BODY ODOR: FRUITY BREATH IS A SYMPTOM OF DIABETES Credit a complication of diabetes called diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), which occurs when your body runs low on insulin and your blood sugar spikes, says Robert Gabbay, M.D., Ph.D., chief medical officer at the Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston. People with type 1 diabetes generally experience it more than those with type 2 diabetes do. Heres whats happening: Your body cant create the energy it needs to function properly, so it begins to break down fatty acids for fuel. This creates a build up of acidic chemicals called ketones in your blood. One of the main acidsacetone (the same component found in nail polish remover)can leave a fruity smell on your breath, Dr. Gabbay says. You might not notice it until someone else mentions it, but doctors can smell it on you as soon as you walk into a room. The effects of DKA can be seriouseven deadly. It can make you vomit and urinate frequently, causing your body to lose fluids at a dangerous rate, he says. DKA generally occurs with other symptoms of diabetes, like fatigue, blurred vision, and unexplained weight loss, but in many c Continue reading >>

7 Surprising Body Odor Causes

7 Surprising Body Odor Causes

SVGiles via Getty Images We’re going to assume you bathe, at least somewhat regularly. And yet, somehow, you still find yourself wondering... IS THAT ME?! Turns out, there are the occasional smells that no amount of scrubbing or brushing or deodorant-applying can deter. Here are a few of the most surprising. You’re Stressed Believe it or not, there are different types of sweat, chemically speaking. And the stinkiest sweat of all is stress sweat. That’s because it’s produced from a category of sweat glands called apocrine glands. Aprocrine glands produce a less-watery sweat, and bacteria go crazy for the fats and proteins in the mix. That feeding frenzy is what releases the odor, according to the Mayo Clinic. Sweat from your workouts or just because it’s too dang hot outside, on the other hand, is composed mostly of water and electrolytes, according to YouBeauty. You’ve Been “Blessed” With Stinky Feet That same all-you-can-eat buffet for bacteria happens with the sweat on your feet. And since your tootsies are tucked away in a dark, warm, moist environment, they really nurture bacteria — especially if you’re sans socks. But about 10 to 15 percent of people have extra-sweaty feet just by the luck of the genetic draw. Those ultra-moist dogs can then become home to a specific type of bacterium called Micrococcus sedentarius, which produces truly awful smelling sulfur compounds. Lucky you. You Have Too Few Favorite Bras Ladies: ‘fess up. How often do you wash your favorite bra? Yep, we thought so. “Many women overwear — and consequently underwash — bras because they have too few that fit properly,” bra expert (really!) Susan Nethero told Prevention. Because that lacy number is probably made of odor-trapping fabrics and definitely touches skin in Continue reading >>

Body Odor & Diabetes: Does Diabetes Cause Body Odor?

Body Odor & Diabetes: Does Diabetes Cause Body Odor?

Are you diabetic? Does your body emanate bad breath which it has never done before? Do not worry. You are not the only one experiencing something of this sort. The high level of blood glucose combined with many complications in diabetes tends to cause body odor in the patients. In this article, we shall analyze the reasons and the relationship between diabetes and body odor. Join in for the article Body Odor and Diabetes: Does Diabetes Cause Body Odor?” What is Diabetes Body Odor? Diabetes body odor refers to the sudden change of smell that you experience due to diabetes. There are several reasons why diabetes might lead to bad odor in the patients. There are two main types of sweat one of which could be responsible for the bad body odor in a diabetes patient. One of these sweats is called eccrine which is essentially odorless and is mainly responsible for controlling the temperature of the body. The second of these sweats is known as the apocrine. This is the sweat you generally get under your armpits and is secreted by the apocrine gland. This is the one which is mainly responsible for producing bad odor as when it gets hit by bacteria, there is an unpleasant smell that is emitted. The following paragraph explains in detail the causes of bad odor in diabetes patients. Causes of Body Odor in Diabetes There are several reasons and ways in which diabetes can cause body odor in the patients. These reasons and causes of the same are explained in the following points: People with diabetes are known to be affected by a number of complications in the body. One such complication is the infection that can be caused in the urinary tract of the patient. This may very much lead to a fruity smell in the diabetes patients. Another reason for the bad odor could be the high levels o Continue reading >>

Could Sweet Smelling Sweat Be A Sign Of Diabetes?

Could Sweet Smelling Sweat Be A Sign Of Diabetes?

My daughter is 10 monthes old and when she is sleeping her sweat smells sweet, like fruit of some sort. could this be diabetes or something? My family does have a history or diabetes on my mothers side. I am a first time mother and need some help. Please! Some individuals with untreated diabetes can develop a fruity odor, most prominent on the breath, that is caused by the production of certain chemicals called ketones, in response to the prolonged elevation of blood sugar. Most of the time, there are other symptoms present at the same time, such as frequent urination, dehydration, and lethargy. Therefore, it is unlikely that your daughter has diabetes; that being said, it is definitely something you should mention to your pediatrician. If your daughter has any other more concerning symptoms, such as those I mentioned, then you should seek immediate medical evaluation. Additionally, there are a number of rare metabolic conditions which are caused by defects in the way the body breaks down various chemicals. Several of these metabolic conditions - which include phenylketonuria and maple syrup urine disease - can cause strong or unusual body odors. Fortunately, most of these conditions are screened for at birth by a newborn screen, which was probably performed on your daughter when she was born before she was discharged home from the hospital. Assuming this testing was normal, then the possibility that your daughter has one of these conditions is extremely low. You can verify that this testing was done by checking in with your daughter's pediatrician. Again, please discuss with her doctors soon. This answer is for general informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice. If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor or Continue reading >>

10 Sources Of Body Odor That Aren't Just Sweat

10 Sources Of Body Odor That Aren't Just Sweat

Sometimes, diabetes can be a cause of body odor. When untreated, this disease can cause a condition called diabetic ketoacidosis. Without enough insulin to regulate the metabolism, the body starts to break down fat for fuel. This causes a sickeningly sweet aroma comparable to decomposing apples. It's most obvious on a person's breath, but it's also given off by the body as well [source: Liddell]. That's why when a patient seeks treatment for body odor, physicians may order blood or urine tests to determine if there is an underlying medical condition such as diabetes [source: Mayo Clinic]. Do you smell baking? According to a 1976 medical journal article, patients afflicted with typhoid fever "emit a smell comparable to freshly baked brown bread" [source: Liddell]. That may actually sound kind of pleasant, but rest assured that typhoid fever is anything but. Patients with this disease usually develop a sustained fever as high as 103 to 104 degrees F (39 to 40 degrees C), and suffer stomach pains and headaches, as well as weakness. In some cases, they also experience a rash of flat, rose-colored spots. About 21.5 million people die from typhoid fever each year, mostly in developing countries. It's spread by eating food or drinking water handled by someone who already has the disease and is shedding the Salmonella Typhi bacteria [source: CDC]. As we've mentioned before, infectious diseases often cause changes in body odor. But immunizations, interestingly, can have similar effects. In an animal study published in 2014 in the journal Physiology and Behavior, researchers from the Monell Chemical Senses Center and the U.S. Department of Agriculture demonstrated that immunization can trigger a distinct change in scent. Scientists believe that humans and other animals may give o Continue reading >>

Type 2 - I Think My Body/sweat Smells Of Urine | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Type 2 - I Think My Body/sweat Smells Of Urine | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Type 2 I think my body/sweat smells of urine Over the last week I have notice a urine like smell on my body (even after my daily shower). I do have 'ops' moments and wear pads which I change through out the day so thought they might be the smell source. But I don't think it is that. I also still have hot flushes a couple of times a day and hot weather doesn't help. I think I have a general body odour now. On separate occasions different friends have commented. Saying oh it smells like a cat has pissed in here and there is a real fish smell. These were not directed at me but I fear when I see them again they will see that is me smelling. Does anyone know if this is a Diabetes symptom or what I might do to stop this? Art Of Flowers I reversed my Type 2 Well-Known Member It may be ketones. See I had a similar problem years ago..went to East Timor for 4 weeks as part of a uni program for social justice but the diet was rice rice and more rice. My skin took on a perculiar odor which inretrospect may have been ketones. I'm type 2 diabetic, didn't take a glucometer and obviously didn't think it through re diet as I was not on meds at that time. Hope things improve of you. If I get ketosis or ketones you get that sorted of small sent or a sent of berries but it is only for a few days when you go to hospital and get meds sent through you which is normally insulin and antibiotics and glucose via a drip and if you don't get it sorted out you can do a lot of damage to your body and organs as it happened to me a couple of months ago and I was really ill with it and I could have died with it if I hadn't seen a doctor in the hospital and I was back to normal within Continue reading >>

Smell Disorders & Diabetes The Reality Behind It

Smell Disorders & Diabetes The Reality Behind It

By Elisabeth Almekinder RN, BA, CDE Leave a Comment Our sense of smell helps us to remember memories, identify favorite desserts, the least desired food and so much more. The smell of grandmas chicken and dumplings cooking, pumpkin pie at Thanksgiving and other fragrant scents in our life help give our life richness. Without an intact sense of smell, we would not be able to function properly. Think about it: throughout the day, we come across many different smells and scents that are either pleasing or help us determine in making food choices, oralert us about our safety. On top of the good smells that provide aroma and pleasurable feelings surrounding foods or perfumes, scents may also alert us to dangerous and hazardous smells. We can determine if food has gone bad, if the smell of smoke is in the air or if there is a leak in the main gas line. Knowing how much people enjoy smelling the roses, cookies baking and the smell of their loved ones cologne or perfume, its hard to imagine being without a sense of smell. However, there is about one to two percent of the population in the United States that have a certain sort of sensory disorder. My grandmother, Alma, always wanted to go to the cafeteria in Johnson City, Tennessee, to eat. I remember going there with her. The food looked so good. It was visually pleasing and beautifully plated. There was just one problem with the cafeteria food. Even though it looked amazing, it didnt smell or taste good at all. It was quite a disappointment to get this lovely plate of food only to find that it just didnt smell or taste as good as it looked. It didnt own up the look we were being sold. My grandmother thought it was wonderful. All she needed was the sight of it to help her believe that it was the best meal ever. She had lost h Continue reading >>

The Nose Knows: Smell Disorders

The Nose Knows: Smell Disorders

Some of my favorite smells are a Christmas tree, chocolate chip cookies baking in the oven, and freshly cut pumpkins at Halloween — I can’t imagine not being able to smell these delightful things. But according to the National Institutes of Health, between 1% and 2% of people in North America say they have a smell disorder. About 25% of men age 60–69 and 11% of women in this same age range have difficulty being able to smell. Not being able to smell, either somewhat or at all, can be dangerous, as our noses alert us to smells that can signal danger, such as a fire, a gas leak, or spoiled food. It can also be a sign of a serious medical problem. How our sense of smell works We have special cells in our noses called olfactory sensory neurons. These cells are connected to the brain, and when they’re stimulated by something, like popcorn popping at the movie theater, the neurons send a message to the brain, which identifies the smell. Smells reach these sensory neurons through our nostrils and also through our the roof of our throats. When we eat, scents are released that reach the sensory neurons. This is why taste is so closely connected to our sense of smell. Think of when you have a cold or allergies and your nose is all stuffed up: you can’t smell much of anything, and the food that you eat seems to have no flavor. Or it tastes like paste. We also have nerve endings in our eyes, nose, mouth, and throat that can detect more irritating smells, like onion, ammonia, or peppermint. Causes of smell disorders If you have a smell disorder, you may have a reduced ability to smell, called hyposmia, or a complete inability to smell, called anosmia. A condition known as dysosmia is when pleasant odors now smell unpleasant (or vice versa), or when odors otherwise smell un Continue reading >>

Your Urine And Diabetes: What You Should Know

Your Urine And Diabetes: What You Should Know

Paula’s story Paula came to see mcomplaining that her urine smelt funny. She had been referred to through a friend who had diabetes, and who thought that I might be able to help Paula understand why her pee smelled funny. “My friend told me my urine smells like diabetes,” said Paula. “She said she had that same fruity smell when she got diagnosed.” Paula said her urine smelled like, “Sugar Smacks,” of all things. I suspected that Paula may have Type 2 Diabetes, but we needed to run some lab tests in order to confirm this suspicion We tested her urine using a urinalysis. She had high levels of glucose in her urine. After the urinalysis, we ran a random blood sugar, which detected her levels at 798 mg/dL. With the results at hand, Paula was diagnosed with diabetes. She had to start on insulin seemingly right off the bat, as other oral medications wouldn’t control her diabetes. She had weight to lose, and goals to reach. While she’s a work in progress,her urine no longer smells like Sugar Smacks. What exactly is urine made of ? Urine is a clear, yellow liquid produced by the body to handle the wastes from normal body metabolism. When nitrogenous by-products build up in the blood from cellular metabolism, it must be cleared from the bloodstream. In our bodies, some of our toxic waste from metabolism is excreted through perspiration as urea. The rest is handled by an intricate filter system that makes up the human urinary system. The kidneys work through processes of filtering waste, reabsorption, and tubular secretion. They make urine through this complex filtration process, after which then the urine goes through the ureters, which are tubes to the bladder. Once urine reaches the bladder, it is then dispelled out of the body through a tube called the “u Continue reading >>

Diabetes Body Odor–what Is It?

Diabetes Body Odor–what Is It?

This article shows that the three causes of body odor are associated with diabetes. These conditions and diseases are more likely to cause body odor to the patient with diabetes, at risk of diabetes, or has a family history of diabetes. Diabetes could produce a body smell which is much more unusual than what you have been used to. It’s never been a good thing to get an unexpected change in body smell unless you have changed your diet or you have been taking foods like eggs, garlic, onions, liver, red meat, fish, processed foods, legumes, fried foods, curry, or spicy foods too much. If you have not changed your diet, but you suddenly developed body odor, consult your physician immediately. Body odor is commonly described as the smell of perspiration; however, this is not true. In fact, sweat has no smell. Our body produces 2 types of sweat. First one is the eccrine. This is a clear, odorless sweat that is secreted by our body through the eccrine gland. It regulates the temperature of the body. The second one is the apocrine described as a thicker sweat secreted in the armpit and groin parts by the apocrine gland. This sweat is odorless but when it reacts to bacteria on the surface of the skin, it produces unpleasant odor we all try get rid of. People also develop bad odor due to poor hygiene or heredity. Diabetes could as well change how your body smells. Sometimes people with diabetes and urinary tract infections can have an unusual kind of body odor. It is like a fruity body smell. Full blown and not treated diabetes may lead to a condition called ketoacidosis. When this happens, the patient’s skin will taste sweet and produce an instantly recognizable pungent odor. Diabetes may also cause the patient to smell like acetone. This is because of the insulin taken to c Continue reading >>

What Does Insulin Smell Like?

What Does Insulin Smell Like?

Asking what a clear liquid smells like sounds like an oxymoron, although it makes sense. Of course I’m talking about insulin, which was discovered almost a century ago (1922), but while the industry has advanced far beyond those initial batches, there are still a few things that remain the same. Whether we’ve lived around this life-saving substance for years, months or days, we all seem to be able to call up a memory, an idea, or a scent. We posted on our Facebook page asking what you thought about the smell of this life-saving vial. Many of you said it smelled like Band-Aids, which included the old school, cloth kind as well as modern ones. Some of you were more specific: “To me it has the fresh smell of electronics right out of the box with new Band-Aids mixed in.” Another set said it smelled like printer ink, like a “book or poster with fresh printing on it,” or “the smell of freshly mimeographed purple-inked papers, cool from the roller.” April Lynn Weber smelled “new plastic shower curtain liners.” Kelly Weets, whose daughter has diabetes, threw out this one for us to ponder: Barbie legs. I can recall the smell of taking a new toy out of the box and the scent of machine-made plastic, but Barbie doesn’t say insulin for me. Scent is, perhaps, that most personal of senses and tapping in to that reservoir brought up ancient history for some. Kristine Gillihan Woelfel recalled a college professor. “He always had this very familiar scent to him, but I couldn’t quite place it. I didn’t realize it was insulin until I got a pump years later and thought, ‘Aha! He smelled like insulin!’ Having a pump makes me feel like I smell like insulin constantly, so this realization about his scent was years in the making. I wish I had known sooner, we cou Continue reading >>

Does Diabetes Cause Body Odor?

Does Diabetes Cause Body Odor?

The human body produces two different types of sweat. Eccrine is the first type, and it is an odorless, clear sweat. Eccrine is secreted all over the human body by the eccrine glands, which regulate body temperature. The second type of sweat is apocrine, which is a thicker sweat secreted in the underarm and groin regions by the apocrine glands. Effects of Diabetes on Body Odor Sweat is odorless until it reacts with lingering bacteria on the skin's surface, which creates body odor. A foreign element, defect in the human body, or poor hygiene can be a factor in bacteria build-up. Diabetes can change the way body odor smells. Diabetics often produce a sweet-smelling, somewhat fruity body odor. The scent is very distinctive. Insulin used to treat diabetes can also cause an acetone-like smell. Ketoacidosis When diabetes isn't controlled or corrected, it can lead to ketoacidosis. Ketoacidosis occurs when sugar, also known as glucose, is not available as a fuel source by the body. When this happens, fat is used instead. At this point, byproducts of fat called ketones emerge. The ketones then build up in the body. When this occurs, the skin of a diabetic patient may taste sweet and produce a detectable odor. Often times the odor can be detected in the mouth, with fruity breath. What to Try Taking medicine regularly, eating properly, and maintaining good hygiene habits may help with odor associated with diabetes. A diabetic should ask his health care provider how much fat, protein, and carbohydrates are required in his daily diet. A registered dietician or nutritionist can help with dietary needs as well. Amber Taylor attended American Broadcasting School and East Central University, but her writing days began in high school as a reporter for her high school newspaper. Amber's w Continue reading >>

Why Does My Breath Smell Like Acetone?

Why Does My Breath Smell Like Acetone?

People often associate strong smelling breath with the food someone has eaten or poor dental hygiene. But it may reveal much more than that. If a person's breath smells like acetone or nail polish remover, it could indicate health conditions, including diabetes. The way a person's breath smells can be an indicator of their overall health. This article explores why a person's breath might smell like acetone and what this might mean about their health. Contents of this article: How diabetes can affect breath Diabetes can affect the way a person's breath smells and can cause bad breath, or halitosis. In a 2009 study, researchers found that analyzing a person's breath helped to identify prediabetes when diabetes is in its early stages. There are two conditions associated with diabetes that can cause bad breath: gum disease and a high ketone level. The proper name for gum diseases in periodontal disease, and its forms include: Diabetes can be associated with an increased risk of gum disease, which may cause a person's breath to smell bad. However, gum disease does not cause a person's breath to smell like acetone. If a person has diabetes and their breath smells like acetone, this is usually caused by high levels of ketones in the blood. Diabetes and acetone breath When diabetes is not managed well, the body does not make enough insulin to break down glucose in the blood. This means that the body's cells do not receive enough glucose to use as energy. When the body cannot get its energy from sugar, it switches to burning fat for fuel instead. The process of breaking down fat to use as energy releases by-products called ketones. Ketone bodies include acetone. Acetone is the same substance that is used in nail varnish remover and is distinguished by its fruity smell. When a pe Continue reading >>

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