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Diabetic Shopping

Shopping List For Diabetics

Shopping List For Diabetics

Control Type 2 Diabetes, Shed Fat Our Shopping List for Diabetics is based on the Pritikin Eating Plan, regarded worldwide as among the healthiest diets on earth. The Pritikin Program has been documented in more than 100 studies in peer-reviewed medical journals to prevent and control many of our nation’s leading killers – heart disease, high blood pressure, stroke, metabolic syndrome, and obesity as well as type 2 diabetes. If you’ve recently been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, pay special attention. Research on newly diagnosed type 2 diabetics coming to the Pritikin Longevity Center illustrate how profoundly beneficial early intervention can be. Scientists from UCLA followed 243 people in the early stages of diabetes (not yet on medications). Within three weeks of coming to Pritikin, their fasting blood sugar (glucose) plummeted on average from 160 to 124. Research has also found that the Pritikin Program reduces fasting insulin by 25 to 40%. Shopping List for Diabetics – More Features Here’s another big plus to our Shopping List for Diabetics. In addition to icons that are diabetes-focused like “sugar free,” this list uses icons like “low cholesterol” and “low sodium” because many people with diabetes are working to control not just diabetes but related conditions like high cholesterol levels and high blood pressure. This list can help you identify those foods most advantageous in helping you reach your personal health goals. Diabetic Food Taboos? Not Anymore! Have you been told you have to give up juicy watermelon or sweet grapes? What if we told you those foods really aren’t taboo? Watch the Video Our Healthy Shopping List for Diabetics also lists the top 10 things to put back on the shelf if you’re trying to: Lose Weight Lower Blood Pres Continue reading >>

8 Tips For Your Diabetes Grocery Shopping List

8 Tips For Your Diabetes Grocery Shopping List

8 Tips for Your Diabetes Grocery Shopping List By Stacey Hugues | Reviewed by Richard N. Fogoros, MD Grocery shopping can feel totally overwhelming when you are newly diagnosed. Even when armed with a great diabetesmeal plan , it can still be exhausting to try to translate that into a grocery list, and then navigate aisles and aisles of a food store. If you can arrange it, try to carve out an extra hour or two the first time you go grocery shopping for your new diabetes meal plan . It may help to make the trip a little less stressful. As someone with diabetes, it is important to keep your home stocked with wholesome, colorful, and fresh foods. When healthy choices are available at arms-reach, it will be easier to stick to your diabetesmeal plan. So, the best diabetesgrocery shopping list for you may actually be a running list. Hang it on the fridge, or someplace you'll see it every day. When you realize you are running low on a healthy staple, add it to your list so that you can pick it up on your next shopping trip. Next, always take a few minutes to ask yourself these questions before you go grocery shopping: How many people and how many meals will I be serving? Buy the right amount of food for this many people and meals, so that you don't end up with excess food in the house that you may be tempted to eat. Have my healthy staples been going bad before I've had a chance to finish them? If so, next time buy a few less. Does it take me the same amount of days to eat one box of sugar-free cookies as it takes for me to eat two? If so, limit your purchase to one box at a time, look for smaller packaging, or don't buy them on every shopping trip. And remember that sugar-free cookies still have carbohydrate in them. Though a better choice than regular cookies, eating them w Continue reading >>

Grocery Lists For Type 2 Diabetes: What To Buy And What To Avoid

Grocery Lists For Type 2 Diabetes: What To Buy And What To Avoid

Diabetes is best managed by being mindful of carbohydrate intake, eating smaller meals regularly, and choosing nutrient dense, healthful options. Knowing what food to eat can make a huge difference to controlling, and, potentially, reversing type 2 diabetes. Making informed food choices can be helped by writing out a grocery list of foods that improve overall health, and benefit someone who has type 2 diabetes. Contents of this article: Lists of good foods A person who has type 2 diabetes can make it easier to avoid buying unhealthful foods by going to the grocery store armed with a list. Choosing healthful, satisfying foods that meet individual nutrition requirements can help people with type 2 diabetes manage their condition. By making smart food choices and buying the right foods, a person can ensure they have enough diabetic-friendly ingredients on hand to take them from breakfast through to the last meal, or snack, of the day. Vegetables Vegetables are the base of a healthy diet. Not only do they offer excellent sources of vitamins and minerals, but they are fibrous, too, and help the body feel full and satisfied. This in turn can deter overeating, which may cause blood sugar issues. Some vegetables to add to the shopping list include: salad greens broccoli cauliflower squash green beans asparagus Brussel sprouts red, green, orange, or yellow peppers Beans and legumes Beans are an excellent source of dietary fiber and protein. They can often be used in place of a portion of the protein that is needed in a diet. Here are some examples of what beans to pick up in either their canned or dried forms: black beans lentils white beans chickpeas kidney beans pinto beans Fruits Despite their high sugar content, fresh or frozen fruits pack a powerful nutritional punch with t Continue reading >>

Nutritionists’ 9 Tricks For Grocery Shopping With Diabetes

Nutritionists’ 9 Tricks For Grocery Shopping With Diabetes

istock/anandaBGD Have a light snack, such as a string cheese and a small apple, before you leave for the grocery store. The fuel will help prevent excessive hunger pangs and keep your blood sugar steady, both of which can cut down on impulse buys. Don't leave home without a shopping list (another tactic to avoid buying unhealthy fare you didn't plan on purchasing). “This will ensure that you have healthful foods on hand at home all week long,” says Erin Palinski-Wade, RD, a certified diabetes educator and author of the Reader’s Digest book 2-Day Diabetes Diet. istock/bbostjan “The only ingredient listed on the label should be the name of the fruit you are buying,” says Alana Fiorentino, RDN, a certified diabetes educator in New York City. If you prefer canned fruit, make lower-sugar choices by selecting fruits in 100 percent fruit juice or water—and avoiding fruit canned in syrup. “Light syrup” may sound healthy, but it usually has added sugar. A ½ cup portion of Mandarin oranges canned in water, for instance, has 45 calories and 7 grams of sugar, while the light-syrup version has 90 calories and 18 grams of sugar. Here, compelling reasons fruit is healthy for diabetics. Opt for low-sodium soup istock/mrtom-uk If you have diabetes, you also have a higher risk of heart disease. So aim to cap your daily sodium intake at less than 2,300 milligrams and keep in mind that your doctor or dietitian may advise lowering this amount if you have other heart disease risk factors, such as hypertension. Canned soup tends to be high in sodium: A cup of chicken-noodle soup can contain 950 milligrams, a large proportion of your daily intake. A low-sodium version, on the other hand, has less than half that amount. Choose soup with less than 500 milligrams of sodium per se Continue reading >>

Diabetes-friendly Shopping

Diabetes-friendly Shopping

The holiday season can be hectic. And if you have diabetes, it can be a challenge to eat right and keep your blood sugars level. Heres something that can help, and its available at your local Costco! ... read more From CDiabetes.com Diabetes Friendly ShoppingPublished on 11-15-2016 If you have diabetes, pre-diabetes, or just want to have a healthier lifestyle, a good place to start is with your dinner plate. Too many of us focus on what foods to avoid, instead of thinking about what to include in order. When you focus on what to eat to fuel your body properly, you limit the room you have ... read more From CDiabetes.com Diabetes Friendly ShoppingPublished on 11-14-2016 Joe is the friendly pharmacist at the Costco in Wilmington, NC, a Southern coastal town where the Cape Fear River meets the Atlantic Ocean, and where I did a Costco store tour to learn about products for people with diabetes. Blood Glucose Meters Joe showed me several blood glucose meters, including Lifescan, Contour and True Metrix meters. The easy to ... read more From CDiabetes.com Diabetes Friendly ShoppingPublished on 10-06-2016 I have enjoyed shopping at Costco for many years. I buy so many foods and supplements that support the healthy lifestyle I want for myself and my family. Recently I went to Costco to find out whats available for people with diabetes or who are trying to prevent diabetes. The focus of healthy meals is vegetables, and Costcos produce section ... read more From CDiabetes.com Diabetes Friendly ShoppingPublished on 10-06-2016 Shopping At Costco For Healthy Living With Diabetes I recently visited my local Costco, on Commerce Drive in Rochester, MN. I was especially interested in finding out what Costco carries for people with diabetes, or for anyone trying to maintain a healthy li Continue reading >>

Living Well With Type 2 Diabetes

Living Well With Type 2 Diabetes

What can you eat when you have diabetes? A lot! Just print this diabetic food list and use it to find tons of delicious, healthy options. When you stock up at the store, avoid the aisles, and shop the perimeter for fresh produce, low-fat dairy, whole cuts of lean meat, and high-fiber whole-grain bakery items. Continue reading >>

How To Plan A Diabetes-friendly Grocery List

How To Plan A Diabetes-friendly Grocery List

Diabetes and diet: What’s the connection? » When you have diabetes, your body doesn’t break down food to use as energy the way it should. As of 2014, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that approximately 29 million Americans have diabetes. A vast majority of those people have type 2 diabetes. If not managed effectively, diabetes can cause health complications. Common health complications include: kidney disease which leads to kidney failure nerve and vessel disease which leads to limb amputation eye disease which leads to blindness The good news is that weight loss and exercise can have shown enormous potential for preventing, treating, and in some cases reversing type 2 diabetes. Maintaining a diabetes-friendly diet is more complex than just cutting carbs. Don’t let that scare you, though. It’s easy to follow a diabetes-friendly diet, especially if you get in the habit of meal planning. Plan ahead Planning your meals ahead of time may cost you more minutes in the short term, but you’ll reap the rewards later. If you’ve already decided what you’re making each night and have your refrigerator stocked, you’re that much closer to a healthy meal. Getting into a routine of meal planning can save your body from scary health complications and also save your wallet because you’ll be skipping that takeout and those impulse purchases at the grocery store. Not sure where to start? All it takes is a one-day commitment to get on the right path, says Toby Smithson, MS, RDN, LDN, CDE, a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and author of “Diabetes Meal Planning and Nutrition for Dummies.” Pick one day where you can set aside a couple of hours for meal planning. This could be a weekend day or another non-working day. Continue reading >>

Healthy Grocery Shopping When You Have Diabetes

Healthy Grocery Shopping When You Have Diabetes

If you’ve just been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, you may need some help adjusting your grocery list. By working with a dietitian, you can find foods that are healthy for you, and taste good, too. However, to get you started on the right nutritional path, here are some points to keep in mind the next time you go grocery shopping. Focus on fiber. It is recommended that adults should consume about 20-35 grams of dietary fiber per day from a variety of sources such as legumes, whole grains, fruit, and vegetables. But be careful, if you increase your fiber intake too quickly, it can actually cause constipation. Instead, gradually introduce fiber-rich foods into your diet, and remember to drink plenty of water. Think you’re already consuming the recommended daily amount of fiber? Use this Joslin worksheet to determine your intake. Eye some olive oil. This heart-healthy oil is excellent for salads and sautéing vegetables, but be sure to use it in moderation because it is high in calories, warns Elizabeth Staum, Nutrition Educator at the Joslin Diabetes Center. Just a small amount of the rich, nutty oil will add flavor to an otherwise light meal, and it is significantly healthier than butter. Check out seafood. Coldwater fish like salmon, tuna, and halibut are rich in Omega 3 fats, which some people believe are capable of reducing inflammation. Essential fatty acids such as Omega 3’s may also promote a healthier cardiovascular system as well. Seafood is also an excellent choice for people with diabetes because it is lower in saturated fat. Pick the right carbohydrates. Carbs are necessary for energy, so don’t cut them out of your diet—just make smarter choices about the ones you consume. Unprocessed, unrefined carbs such as whole oats, whole-wheat pasta, and beans Continue reading >>

Best And Worst Foods For Diabetes

Best And Worst Foods For Diabetes

Your food choices matter a lot when you've got diabetes. Some are better than others. Nothing is completely off limits. Even items that you might think of as “the worst" could be occasional treats -- in tiny amounts. But they won’t help you nutrition-wise, and it’s easiest to manage your diabetes if you mainly stick to the “best” options. Starches Your body needs carbs. But you want to choose wisely. Use this list as a guide. Best Choices Whole grains, such as brown rice, oatmeal, quinoa, millet, or amaranth Baked sweet potato Items made with whole grains and no (or very little) added sugar Worst Choices Processed grains, such as white rice or white flour Cereals with little whole grains and lots of sugar White bread French fries Fried white-flour tortillas Vegetables Load up! You’ll get fiber and very little fat or salt (unless you add them). Remember, potatoes and corn count as carbs. Best Choices Fresh veggies, eaten raw or lightly steamed, roasted, or grilled Plain frozen vegetables, lightly steamed Greens such as kale, spinach, and arugula. Iceberg lettuce is not as great, because it’s low in nutrients. Low sodium or unsalted canned vegetables Go for a variety of colors: dark greens, red or orange (think of carrots or red peppers), whites (onions) and even purple (eggplants). The 2015 U.S. guidelines recommend 2.5 cups of veggies per day. Worst Choices Canned vegetables with lots of added sodium Veggies cooked with lots of added butter, cheese, or sauce Pickles, if you need to limit sodium -- otherwise, pickles are okay. Sauerkraut, for the same reason as pickles -- so, limit them if you have high blood pressure Fruits They give you carbohydrates, vitamins, minerals, and fiber. Most are naturally low in fat and sodium. But they tend to have more carbs Continue reading >>

College-shopping While Diabetic

College-shopping While Diabetic

Just last year, I was stressing about choosing a college, where I would spend the next 4 years of my life. Choosing a college is a big decision for anyone. But being diabetic, I wanted to make sure that my chosen school had the resources, the people, and the support I needed to live and attend school comfortably. At the same time, I wanted to pick something outside of my comfort zone. But where to start? What were the things that were most important to me when it came to making a decision? Here are four factors I considered before choosing a college as a diabetic: Having a reputable disabilities office is SO important. In high school, I had a 504 plan to cover my diabetes in case any teachers wouldnt let me leave to use the bathroom, eat a snack in class, or manage diabetes in other ways. But in college, I found out that there are no 504s! Instead, institutions require a disabilities letter that the student distributes to all professors. Make sure yours is capable of providing the support you need. I have found my schools Disability Office is a great resource to use because of the staffs friendliness, willingness to help, and commitment to making me feel comfortable in all aspects of college life. Being diabetic can be a challenge in college because of the food on campus. When thinking about enrolling in a college, it is important to consider the quality of the food service on campus. First, how does the food look? Appetizing? Or do the students steer away from it? Second, are there healthy options and a variety of foods available? I avoid red meat, in addition to eating low-carb meals, so it is important for me to have access to a dining hall that can accommodate my diet. Have questions about the dining services? Just ask! Someone from the dining services should be ha Continue reading >>

9 Diabetes-friendly Grocery Shopping Tips

9 Diabetes-friendly Grocery Shopping Tips

Walking into a grocery store unprepared can be a challenge for anyone. Throw type 2 diabetes into the mix, and shopping for food can be downright overwhelming. But by following some simple tips, you can master your grocery shopping and learn how to stock your fridge with foods for a healthy diabetes diet. Your first tip? In general, you want to focus on fresh foods in their original form — fruits, vegetables, fish, and lean protein. “I recommend that people with diabetes eat foods with the shortest lists of ingredients possible,” says Gregory Dodell, MD, an endocrinologist at Mount Sinai St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital Center in New York City. Next, use these nine strategies to get the most nutrients for your money every time you go grocery shopping. Map out your week’s menu in advance. “A must-do before you head to the grocery store is to plan your menu for the week,” says Toby Smithson, RDN, CDE, a spokeswoman for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and author of Diabetes Meal Planning and Nutrition for Dummies. “After you plan what you’ll make, take inventory of what you have in stock and write out your grocery list.” She suggests designating one day a week to do your planning and shopping. “Planning ahead makes it less stressful and much easier to follow a healthy eating plan,” she explains. Don’t shop on an empty stomach. It’s not just an old wives’ tale. “When we’re hungry, we tend to crave the most calorically dense foods as a survival mechanism,” Dr. Dodell says. “And if a person with type 2 diabetes has low blood sugar, he or she may go for the sweetest foods to bring up blood sugar the fastest.” If you're browsing the food aisles in this mode, it's harder to make wise, balanced choices. Stick to the outer rim of the store Continue reading >>

Diabetes-friendly Shopping At Costco

Diabetes-friendly Shopping At Costco

The holiday season can be hectic. And if you have diabetes, it can be a challenge to eat right and keep your blood sugars level. Here’s something that can help, and it’s available at your local Costco! I’m a Diabetes Educator, an RN, and I’ve had type 2 diabetes since my first pregnancy, 25 years ago. I manage my diabetes by keeping my weight steady, taking 10,000 steps every day, ... Read More If you have diabetes, pre-diabetes, or just want to have a healthier lifestyle, a good place to start is with your dinner plate. Too many of us focus on what foods to avoid, instead of thinking about what to include. When you focus on what to eat to fuel your body properly, you limit the “room” you have for unhealthy foods. I’m Laura Poland, Registered Dietitian/Nutritionist. I have been a ... Read More Joe is the friendly pharmacist at the Costco in Wilmington, NC, a Southern coastal town where the Cape Fear River meets the Atlantic Ocean, and where I did a Costco store tour to learn about products for people with diabetes. Blood Glucose Meters Joe showed me several blood glucose meters, including Lifescan, Contour and True Metrix meters. The easy to use True Metrix meter features “triple-sense tecnology” for accuracy, and ... Read More I have enjoyed shopping at Costco for many years. I buy so many foods and supplements that support the healthy lifestyle I want for myself and my family. Recently I went to Costco to find out what’s available for people with diabetes or who are trying to prevent diabetes. The focus of healthy meals is vegetables, and Costco’s produce section has a large variety of fresh, non-starchy vegetables. There are ... Read More I recently visited my local Costco, on Commerce Drive in Rochester, MN. I was especially interested in findi Continue reading >>

Right At Home 8260 Willow Oaks Corporate Drive Ste. 120 | Fairfax, Va 22031 | (703) 538-4584

Right At Home 8260 Willow Oaks Corporate Drive Ste. 120 | Fairfax, Va 22031 | (703) 538-4584

www.rightathomenova.com This list is a guide to assist those with diabetes with making better food choices. However, when you have diabetes, portion control of carbohydrates is important in the management of diabetes. PRODUCE SECTION • All fresh fruits (remember to watch the portions size of your fruit) • All fresh non-starchy vegetables MEAT, POULTRY, SEAFOOD • Beef tenderloin • Beef flank steak • Beef bottom round steak • Eye of the round steak • Lean ground beef and hamburger patties • Swift or Hormel pre-seasoned pork tenderloin • Center cut pork chop • Oscar Mayer Deli Fresh deli meats: roast beef, turkey breast, chicken breast, ham • Boar’s Head deli meats: all varieties • Rotisserie chicken (remove skin) • Oscar Mayer 50% less fat turkey bacon • Oscar Mayer turkey sausage (⅔ less fat) • All fish and shellfish (not stuffed, breaded, or fried) • Yellow fin tuna • Fresh salmon • Catfish • Sea scallops • Tilapia • Crab meat CONDIMENTS, SAUCES, SPREADS • Mrs. Dash’s salt free seasonings and marinades • Tabasco sauce • Stubb’s original BBQ sauce (mild and spicy • A-1 steak sauce • Yellow mustard: any brand • Hellman’s light mayonnaise • Smart Balance Light Buttery Spread • Smart Balance Whipped Butter Spread • I Can’t Believe It’s Not Butter- light • Daisy light sour cream SALAD DRESSINGS • Wish Bone salad spritzers • All balsamic vinegars PEANUT BUTTER/JELLY • Jif creamy or crunchy peanut butter • Peter Pan creamy or crunchy peanut butter • Smucker’s no sugar preserves, jams, or marmalades and jellies Continue reading >>

A Week Of Diabetes-friendly Recipes + Your Grocery List!

A Week Of Diabetes-friendly Recipes + Your Grocery List!

The best part? The items on the shopping list should only cost you around $63! 2 lb. flank steak (2 meals) 2 lb. chicken tenders (2 meals) 1 head of garlic (3 meals) 1 small root fresh ginger 1 large head of broccoli (2 meals) small bag of shredded cabbage small bag of fresh spinach small bag of baby carrots (1/2 lb.) (2 meals) 1 to 2 stalks green onion 1 bunch cilantro (2 meals) 2 limes (2 meals) 1 small zucchini 1 medium head cauliflower 1 bunch asparagus 1 container grape tomatoes small bag frozen corn 1 1/2 cups shredded monterey jack cheese 1 small container plain nonfat Greek yogurt (3/4 cup) 2 pkgs. of 8 low-carb tortillas 15 oz. can low sodium chicken broth 15 oz. can of beef broth 15 oz. can black beans small bottle of salsa small bottle of fat free Italian dressing Pantry List: olive oil sesame oil low sodium soy sauce balsamic vinegar sherry cooking wine (or other cooking wine) honey corn starch kosher or sea salt pepper red pepper flakes onion powder cumin cayenne pepper Italian seasoning dried sage dried rosemary milk butter The Recipes Monday: Chicken Shepherd's Pie Tuesday: Steak Tacos Wednesday: Beef and Broccoli Thursday: Balsamic Chicken and Vegetables Friday: Corn and Black Bean Taquitos What are your go-to diabetic-friendly recipes during the week? Continue reading >>

Tips For Using The Diabetes Food Hub Meal Planner And Grocery List By The Diabetes Food Hub Team

Tips For Using The Diabetes Food Hub Meal Planner And Grocery List By The Diabetes Food Hub Team

Tips for Using the Diabetes Food Hub Meal Planner and Grocery List by The Diabetes Food Hub Team The all-new interactive Meal Planner and Grocery List features on Diabetes Food Hub make planning meals, tracking nutrition, and shopping for groceries a breeze. To make sure youre getting the most out of these features, try these easy-to-follow tips. First things firstif you have not done so already, create your free account with Diabetes Food Hub. Not only will creating an account let you save recipes, create a profile, and enjoy a more personalized experience on the site, but access to the Meal Planner and Grocery List features requires an account. If you have ever donated to the ADA or volunteered for Step Out or Tour de Cure, you probably have an account with the ADA already and can use that user name and password. Simply log in to the site! If you do not have a username and password, setting up an account is easy. Click on the Menu button in the upper right corner and select Log In from the listed options. When the Log In box appears, click on register here at the bottom of the box. Follow the instructions and fill out the necessary informationyoure all set! The Meal Planner uses recipes youve saved to your Recipe Box for building and planning meals. So be sure to save plenty of recipes in order to have a good selection in the Meal Planner . You can save recipes by clicking the star icon on recipes. You can then view these recipes in your Recipe Box . Be sure to save different types of recipes, such as sides, breakfasts, lunches, and main dishes, so you can build complete meals that meet your nutrition needs. Now that youve saved some recipes, its time to start building! Your saved recipes will show up to the right of the interactive Meal Planner . (If want to use rec Continue reading >>

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