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Diabetic Shin Spots

Diabetic Dermopathy Symptoms

Diabetic Dermopathy Symptoms

What is Diabetic Dermopathy? This is a common skin condition that is found in diabetic people on their lower legs. The word dermopathy refers to all complications and skin problems that occur with diabetes. They are also referred to as pigmented pretibial patches or shin spots. Up to fifty percent of people with diabetes may have or have had diabetic dermopathy with it being more common in ones who have diabetes that is poorly controlled or have had diabetes for ten to twenty years and older than the age of sixty. They have appeared after an injury in people who do not have diabetes. Although it is more common after the age of sixty it can affect diabetics of any age, race, or sex. Although you find it primarily on the lower legs it can appear on your thighs, forearms, shins, and sides of your feet. Initially diabetic dermopathy will appear as patches that range in color from tan to dark brown or pink to red. Other symptoms you may have include: The patches are usually slightly scaly. They can be oval or round in shape. The patches may become indented faintly if they are long-standing, which is called atrophic. There can be a number of these spots and will cover a big area. Very seldom do these patches sting, itch, burn, become open sores, or hurt. In some people with diabetic dermopathy they look like age spots. Causes Diabetic dermopathy lesions will usually appear more often after trauma or an injury in the area where you see them the most but there is not specific reason. The reason is that this medical condition is all related to the blood vessels and nerve damage that happens when a person has diabetes. It is also thought to happen when there is minor leakage of blood products from the vessels into your skin and also there could be changes in the small blood vesse Continue reading >>

10 Diabetic Skin Problems

10 Diabetic Skin Problems

1 / 11 Are You Suffering From a Diabetes-Related Skin Complication? About a third of people with diabetes will develop skin problems at some point. In fact, some skin issues can be warning signs of diabetes. The good news is that most skin conditions can be treated easily if they’re caught early. Keeping proper control of your blood sugar (glucose) can prevent skin problems and many other diabetes symptoms from happening in the first place. “For the most part, control of diabetes can help with related skin issues,” says Justin Ko, MD, the medical director and service chief of medical dermatology at Stanford Health Care, in Redwood City, California. “I’m always adamant that my diabetic patients take aggressive care of their skin and health in general. For the skin, moisturization, checking feet and legs daily for any blisters, sores, and skin breaks (especially between the toes), and nail care is extremely important. Nail and foot fungus can lead to skin cracks and breaks, allowing bacteria to enter and cause infection.” Continue reading >>

Below Is More Detail On How Diabetes Affects The Skin, Common Conditions And Pointers To Protect The Skin You’re In.

Below Is More Detail On How Diabetes Affects The Skin, Common Conditions And Pointers To Protect The Skin You’re In.

Diabetes can affect every part of the body, including your skin. In fact, according to the American Diabetes Association, about one-third of people with type 2 diabetes will develop a skin problem caused or affected by diabetes at some point in their lives. The statistics aren’t surprising considering that people with diabetes often suffer from nerve damage (diabetic neuropathy) that can lead to numb, injuryprone hands and feet, while poor circulation and high blood sugar slows down healing. There are some conditions that most anyone can have, such as bacterial and fungal infections and itching. However, people with diabetes are more prone to these and others including diabetic blisters, diabetic dermopathy [der-mop’ă-thē], small, round, brown atrophic skin lesions that occur on the shins of patients with diabetes, and eruptive xanthomatosis [zan’thō-mă-tō’sis], firm, yellow, pea-like skin growths. Most of these skin conditions can be treated with due diligence and a simple daily skin care routine, while others need treatment right away to prevent serious problems. Below is more detail on how diabetes affects the skin, common conditions and pointers to protect the skin you’re in. The Basics If you have diabetes, there are several basic steps you can take to prevent skin problems: Keep your diabetes well managed. When blood sugar levels run high, it causes the body to lose fluids and the skin to become dry, causing skin that may crack, itch and lead to infections. Moisturize your skin to prevent cracking and chapping, especially in windy or cold weather. Neuropathy can also lead to dry skin, as the nerves in the legs and the feet may not get the message to sweat, which is necessary to keep the skin soft and moist. So, the main message is moisturize, moistu Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Skin Care

Diabetes And Skin Care

Tweet Skin care is an important factor for people with diabetes. Skin conditions can be more likely amongst diabetics, and reduced sensitivity of nerves and circulation can often make it harder to spot emerging skin problems. The skin on our feet need particular attention as the presence of diabetic neuropathy can sometimes lead to skin issues not being identified until an advanced stage, when they can cause serious problems. Why are diabetics more prone to skin problems? People with diabetes may experience greater loss of fluid from the body due to high blood glucose levels, which can cause dry skin on the legs, elbows, feet and other areas of the body. If dry skin becomes cracked, germs can get into these areas and cause infection, meaning that taking care of the skin is essential. If not checked regularly, even minor skin care problems can evolve into serious diabetes complications, such as diabetic foot ulcers and even amputation. Keeping the skin, particularly of your feet, in good condition should be a priority for people with diabetes. What skin problems particularly affect people with diabetes? As well as dry and cracked skin, a number of specific skin problems are closely linked to diabetes. Necrobiosis Lipoidica Diabeticorum (NLD) Necrobiosis Lipoidica Diabeticorum (NLD) affects the shins and occurs gradually. It is a patch of plaque that can range in colour from yellow to purple. The skin in this area can get thin and ulcerate. When it heals, NLD can leave a brownish scar. The causes of NLD are unknown, but it affects more people with type 1 diabetes. Diabetic Dermopathy Diabetic Dermopathy is also a common skin problem for people with diabetes. Sometimes known as shin spots, this condition leaves round, raised lesions that can turn into ulcers. Bullosis Diab Continue reading >>

Diabetic Dermopathy (“shin Spots”) And Diabetic Bullae (“bullosis Diabeticorum”) At The Same Patient

Diabetic Dermopathy (“shin Spots”) And Diabetic Bullae (“bullosis Diabeticorum”) At The Same Patient

Go to: We present a diabetic patient with associated two diabetic dermatoses: diabetic dermopathy (“shin spots”) and diabetic bullae. A 34-year-old man, with long history of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and moderate obesity presented to Dermatology Unit for diagnosis of his skin lesions. On clinical examination multiple, light brown, irregular patches, with atrophic scars and crusts over large bullae were observed on the anterior aspect of both legs. KEY WORDS: Diabetes mellitus, Microvascular, Insulin, Metabolic, Dermatosis A 34-year-old man, with long history of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and moderate obesity presented to Dermatology Unit for diagnosis of his skin lesions. On clinical examination multiple, light brown, irregular patches, with atrophic scars and crusts over large bullae were observed on the anterior aspect of both legs (Fig.1). The skin lesions were totally asymptomatic, no previous trauma reported by the patient, no drug intake apart from insulin. Thepatient reported the appearance of lesions in crops, over the last one year, despite good control of metabolic status. His glycemic control was good with glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) under 6-6.8%, he had no neuropathy or vascular associated pathology. For excluding chronic venous insufficiency clinically expressed by edema, pruritus stasis dermatitis, hair loss, lipodermatosclerosis with or without venous ulceration, duplex ultrasonography was performed and found to be within normal limits. A diagnosis of diabetic dermopathy (“shin spots”) and diabetic bullae in the same patient was taken into consideration. Antibiotics administered orally, careful hygiene, topical steroids class III and emollients were recommended and a close follow-up of the patient was ensured for the next 6 months Continue reading >>

Diabetes: 12 Warning Signs That Appear On Your Skin

Diabetes: 12 Warning Signs That Appear On Your Skin

Diabetes can affect many parts of your body, including your skin. When diabetes affects the skin, it’s often a sign that your blood sugar (glucose) levels are too high. This could mean that: You have undiagnosed diabetes, or pre-diabetes Your treatment for diabetes needs to be adjusted If you notice any of the following warning signs on your skin, it’s time to talk with your doctor. This skin condition often begins as small raised solid bumps that look like pimples. As it progresses, these bumps turn into patches of swollen and hard skin. The patches can be yellow, reddish, or brown. You may also notice: The surrounding skin has a shiny porcelain-like appearance You can see blood vessels The skin is itchy and painful The skin disease goes through cycles where it is active, inactive, and then active again The medical name for this condition is necrobiosis lipodica (neck-row-by-oh-sis lee-poi-dee-ka). TAKE ACTION Get tested for diabetes if you have not been diagnosed. Work with your doctor to better control your diabetes. See a dermatologist about your skin. Necorbiosis lipodica is harmless, but it can lead to complications. A dark patch (or band) of velvety skin on the back of your neck, armpit, groin, or elsewhere could mean that you have too much insulin in your blood. AN is often a sign of prediabetes. The medical name for this skin condition is acanthosis nigricans (ay-can-THOE-sis NIE-gri-cans). TAKE ACTION: Get tested for diabetes. 3. Hard, thickening skin When this develops on the fingers, toes, or both, the medical name for this condition is digital sclerosis (sclear-row-sis). On the hands, you’ll notice tight, waxy skin on the backs of your hands. The fingers can become stiff and difficult to move. If diabetes has been poorly controlled for years, it can f Continue reading >>

Current Insights On Diabetic Dermopathy

Current Insights On Diabetic Dermopathy

Alison J. Garten DPM I often see patients with diabetes in my office and wound center. These patients commonly present with diabetic dermopathy. Diabetic dermopathy consists of small, round, brown atrophic skin lesions that occur on the shins of patients with diabetes.1 The lesions are asymptomatic and reportedly occur in up to 55 percent of patients with diabetes but the incidence can vary.1 The condition is more common in older patients and those with longstanding diabetes. It is associated with other microvascular complications of diabetes such as retinopathy, nephropathy and neuropathy, and also with large vessel disease. Other names for diabetic dermopathy include pigmented pretibial patches, shin spots, spotted leg syndrome or diabetic dermangiopathy. Diabetic dermopathy appears as small, circumscribed, brownish atrophic skin lesions less than 1 cm in diameter although some may be elongated and up to 2.5 cm.1 Lesions begin spontaneously as non-blanching, scaly, red or purple, round or oval macules or papules. There may be induration with a central depression or vesiculation. These lesions subsequently progress to the characteristic scar-like lesions of diabetic dermopathy. The intensity of pigmentation corresponds to the degree of atrophy with the darkest lesions also being the most atrophic. Lesions last on average 18 to 24 months before fading to minimally atrophic macules or clearing completely. In some cases, the brownish color disappears and is replaced by a slight depigmentation. As older lesions clear, new lesions appear. Diabetic dermopathy occurs on the shins in a bilateral asymmetrical distribution. It is more common in patients over the age of 50.2 The histology of diabetic dermopathy includes epidermal atrophy with flattening of the rete ridges, dermal Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Skin Health

Type 2 Diabetes And Skin Health

What Is Type 2 Diabetes? Skin problems are often the first visible signs of diabetes, according to the American Diabetes Association. Type 2 diabetes can make existing skin problems worse, and also cause new ones. Type 2 diabetes is a chronic metabolic condition that affects how your body absorbs glucose (sugar). This happens when the body either rejects insulin or doesn’t produce enough insulin to maintain a normal blood sugar level. While it’s most common in adults, some children and adolescents can be diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. According to the Mayo Clinic, risk factors include being overweight, having a family history of diabetes, and inactivity. While there is no cure, patients can manage their type 2 diabetes by eating well, exercising, and (in some cases) taking medications recommended by your doctor. Monitoring your blood sugar is also important. Sometimes even maintaining a healthy weight isn’t enough to manage this condition. In some cases, your doctor will determine that medication intervention is needed. Common treatments for type 2 diabetes include: insulin therapy (insulin “shots,” usually reserved for those who don’t do well with oral medications) sulfonylureas (medications that stimulate your pancreas to secrete more insulin) metformin (widely prescribed drug which increases the body’s sensitivity to insulin) DPP-4 inhibitors (medications which reduce blood sugar levels) Causes of Diabetes-Related Skin Problems Long-term type 2 diabetes with hyperglycemia (high blood glucose) tends to reduce blood flow to the skin. It can also cause damage to blood vessels and nerves. Decreased blood circulation can lead to changes in the skin’s collagen. This changes the skin’s texture, appearance, and ability to heal. Damage to the skin cells can Continue reading >>

Diabetic Dermopathy

Diabetic Dermopathy

THE IRAQI POSTGRADUATE MEDICAL JOURNAL VOL.12, NO. 3,2013 Diabetic Dermopathy as Marker for Early Detection of Myocardial Infarction. Amanj A. Khaznadar*, Ali M. Dhahir Elethawi**, Ali Zyden Khalif *** INTRODUCTION: Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a worldwide disease and the most common endocrine disorder. Its prevalence is increasing in the present time with changes in lifestyle of general population (1) . The metabolic dysregulation associated with DM causes secondary pathophysiological changes in multiple organ systems that impose a tremendous burden on the individual with diabetes and on the *School of Medicine, University of Sulaimania **Lecturer of Dermatology and Venereology, School of Medicine, University of Sulaimania. ***Dermatology and Venereology department General Teaching Hospital . health care system. DM is the leading cause of end stage renal disease, non traumatic lower extremities amputation and adult blindness. It also predisposes to cardiovascular disease (1, 2) . The affected organs include cardiovascular, renal and nervous system, the eyes and the skin. Approximately 30% of patients with diabetes mellitus develop a skin disorder sometime during the course of disease. (3, 4) The cutaneous disorders associated with DM are characterized by disorders with evidence for metabolic, vascular, neurological or immunological pathogenesis induced by glucose and insulin abnormalities and by disorders associated with diabetes, but without a clear pathogenesis (5, 6,7). ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: There are many cutaneous signs in diabetes mellitus (DM) which is the most common endocrine disorder among the general population. Diabetic Dermopathy (DD) or Shin Spots are the most common cutaneous signs of diabetes. Although they occur individually in people who do not have diab Continue reading >>

Skin Problems Associated With Diabetes Mellitus

Skin Problems Associated With Diabetes Mellitus

Introduction It is estimated that 30% of patients with diabetes mellitus will experience a skin problem at some stage throughout the course of their disease. Several skin disorders are more common in diabetic patients, particularly those due to infection such as candida and impetigo. Patients with type 2 diabetes also have twice the risk of developing the common scaly disease, psoriasis, as non-diabetics. Specific skin conditions associated with diabetes mellitus are described below. Diabetics with renal failure are also prone to reactive perforating collagenosis and Kyrle disease. Diabetic dermopathy Diabetic dermopathy is a skin condition characterised by light brown or reddish, oval or round, slightly indented scaly patches most often appearing on the shins. Although these lesions may appear in anyone, particularly after an injury or trauma to the area, they are one of the most common skin problems found in patients with diabetes mellitus. It has been found to occur in up to 30% of patients with diabetes. Diabetic dermopathy is sometimes also referred to as shin spots and pigmented pretibial patches. What causes diabetic dermopathy? The exact cause of diabetic dermopathy is unknown but may be associated with diabetic neuropathic (nerve) and vascular (blood vessels) complications, as studies have shown the condition to occur more frequently in diabetic patients with retinopathy (retinal damage of the eye), neuropathy (nerve/sensory damage) and nephropathy (kidney damage). Diabetic dermopathy tends to occur in older patients or those who have had diabetes for at least 10-20 years. It also appears to be closely linked to increased glycosylated haemoglobin, an indicator of poor control of blood glucose levels. Because lesions often occur over bony parts of the body such Continue reading >>

Diabetic Dermopathy

Diabetic Dermopathy

Diabetic Dermopathy As those with diabetes know, the disease, especially when poorly treated or monitored, may lead to other complications like infections, wounds, and other health complications. Diabetic dermopathy is one of these many health risks for those with diabetes, and may effect patients of all genders, ages, and races if diabetes is not well monitored and cared for. Why do diabetics have skin problems? Diabetic people are more prone to dry skin, especially when the blood glucose level is high. This results in the body to lose fluids and skin tends to get dry. Dry skin cracks easily. If left untreated it turns itchy and leads to numerous infections. Skin problems associated with diabetes mellitus According to researchers, 30% of the individuals with diabetes mellitus experience skin problems at different stages of the ailment. These skin problems are quite common, mainly the ones that occur as a result of infection like candida and impetigo. Common skin conditions include: Diabetic dermopathy Diabetic bullae Diabetic stiff skin Other not so common ailments include: Foot ulcers Necrobiosis lipoidica What is Diabetic Dermopathy? Diabetic dermopathy is a variety of skin lesion. It is seen in individuals suffering from diabetes mellitus. The most common features include dull-red papules that develop in to small, round, atrophic hyper pigmented skin lesions appearing mainly on the shin area. One of the most popular diabetic skin ailment, it is found in more than 50% of individuals suffering from diabetes. One can find similar lesions in non diabetic individuals as well. They appear because of an injury or trauma in the shin area. What are the symptoms of Diabetic Dermopathy? In the initial stages diabetic dermopathy appear as patches that vary in color from light b Continue reading >>

Diabetic Dermoangiopathy:a Clinico-pathological Correlation

Diabetic Dermoangiopathy:a Clinico-pathological Correlation

Impact Factor for 2016 is 1.948 Click here to view optimized website for mobile devices Journal is indexed with MEDLINE/Index Medicus and Science Citation Index ExpandedFacebookTwitter CiteULike Google BookmarkLinkedIn Addthisvar addthis_config = {"data_track_clickback":true};var tWidth=screen.width-400; var tHeight='20px';var tcolour='#eaeaea'; var moStop=true; var fontfamily = 'arial,sans-serif'; var content='        Impact Factor for 2016 is 1.948   Click here to view optimized website for mobile devices       Journal is indexed with MEDLINE/Index Medicus and Science Citation Index Expanded';var cps=2;var aw, mq; var fsz = 12 ; function startticker(){if (document.getElementById) {var tick = '<\/div><\/div>'; document.getElementById('ticker').innerHTML = tick; mq = document.getElementById("mq"); mq.style.left=(parseInt(tWidth)+10)+"px"; mq.innerHTML=''+content+'<\/span>'; aw = document.getElementById("tx").offsetWidth; lefttime=setInterval("scrollticker()",30);}};function scrollticker(){mq.style.left = (parseInt(mq.style.left)>(-10 - aw)) ?parseInt(mq.style.left)-cps+"px" : parseInt(tWidth)+10+"px";};startticker(); STUDIES Year : 1992 | Volume : 58 | Issue : 3 | Page : 173-178 Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None Skin biopsies from 25 diabetics and an equal number of nondiabetic controls were stained with H and E, PAS, alcian blue and iron hemotoxyline. Thirteen (52 percent) diabetics showed evidence of microangiopathy as compared to 1 (4 percent control). PAS positive thickening of capillary basement membrane and endothelial proliferation each were seen in 44 percent of cases. There was evidence of microangiopathy Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes In Relation To Shin Spots, Insulin Resistance And Its Complications

Type 2 Diabetes In Relation To Shin Spots, Insulin Resistance And Its Complications

Type 2 Diabetes in Relation to Shin Spots, Insulin Resistance and Its Complications Shin spots (diabetic dermopat Shin spots (diabetic dermopathy) are the most common cutaneous manifestation in diabetes which occurs in 50% of diabetes. They are atrophic, hyper pigmented macules located on the shin. Relationship of shin spots and insulin resistance is not studied in the past, though its relationship with complication has been established. A cross sectional study of 100 patients out of which 50 patients were cases (diabetes with shin spots) and 50 were controls (diabetes without shin spots).Patients on insulin, gestational diabetes type 1 diabetes and acanthosis nigricans were excluded. Clinical co-relation was studied between shin spots and its complication. Insulin resistance was calculated using HOMA-ir calculator. Number of patients with shin spots having insulin resistance was 82% as compared to controls 80% with no statistical correlation. Association of shin spots with neuropathy (p[lt]0.001), nephropathy (p[lt]0.001) , retinopathy(p[lt]0.001), ischemic heart disease(p=0.004) was statistically significant. To conclude shins shots are not associated with insulin resistance. There is a statistical correlation between insulin resistance and complications. Presence of shins spots should prompt to investigate for complications of diabetes. SYDNEY C. D SOUZA, A. V. SAMEER, RAJARAM A. PRASAD 2236-PO Mangalore, Karnataka, India Macrovascular - Atherosclerotic CVD and Human Diabetes Continue reading >>

How To Get Rid Of Diabetic Dermopathy

How To Get Rid Of Diabetic Dermopathy

How to Get Rid of Diabetic Dermopathy in an Easy way It is a normal condition of skin that is located in people who suffers from diabetes on their lower part of legs. Dermopathy refers to every skin problems and complications that happen with diabetes. They are even referred to as shin spots or pigmented pretibial patches. Up to 50 percent of persons with diabetes might have had or have diabetic dermopathy with it is usually common on persons. Many people want to know how to get rid of diabetic dermopathy in a right way. People who suffer from diabetes that is not controlled properly or suffering from diabetes for 10-20 years and already cross 60 years of age. They have shown after harm in people who are not suffering from diabetes. While it is generally common after sixty years of age as it can affect people who are suffering from diabetes of any age, sex or race. Although you get it mainly on the lower part of legs it can look on thighs, shins, forearms and your feet sides. It is necessary to completely understand about it to try a good diabetic dermopathy treatment. Primarily diabetic dermopathy might appear like patches that are available in different colors from pink to red or tan to dark brown. Other types of symptoms one might have include; ·The patches are normally slightly scaly. ·They can be round or oval in shape. ·The patches might become indented weakly if they are long-lasting, which is known as atrophic. ·A huge amount of these spots are there and will include a big area. ·Very rarely do these patches itch, sting, burn, become hurt or open sores. Persons those are suffering from diabetic dermopathy looks like age spots. Lesions of Diabetic dermopathy will usually look more often after an injury or trauma in the part where you mostly seen but no speci Continue reading >>

What Is Diabetic Dermopathy:

What Is Diabetic Dermopathy:

I’ve been a type 1 diabetic now for the past 9 years and I’ve heard of most of the associated complications associated with the disease, but I came across an article the other day talking about Dermopathy in diabetics. Never hearing of it, it automatically peaked my interest so I started to research what it was all about. Diabetic dermopathy,a harmless condition, is likely the most common skin problemin people who have had diabetes for a while, or whose blood sugar levels have remained high. What Causes Dermopathy? The exact cause of diabetic dermopathy is unknown but may be associated with diabetic neuropathic (nerve) and vascular (blood vessels) complications, as studies have shown the condition to occur more frequently in diabetic patients with retinopathy(retinal damage of the eye), neuropathy (nerve/sensory damage) and nephropathy (kidney damage). Diabetic dermopathy tends to occur in older patients or those who have had diabetes for at least 10-20 years. It also appears to be closely linked to increased glycosylated haemoglobin, an indicator of poor control of blood glucose levels. Because lesions often occur over bony parts of the body such as the shins, it is thought that diabetic dermopathy may also be a magnified response to injury or trauma to these areas. Studies have shown that shin spots have appeared in response to trauma with heat, cold or blunt objects in patients with diabetes. Signs and Symptoms of Dermopathy? Diabetic dermopathy appears as pink to red or tan to dark brown patches, and it is most frequently found on the lower legs. The patches are slightly scaly and are usually round or oval. Long-standing patches may become faintly indented (atrophic). Locations Of Dermopathy: Shins (the pretibial area) Thighs Sides of feet Forearms It should als Continue reading >>

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