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Diabetic Seasoning Salt

How Much Sodium Is There In Seasoning Salt?

How Much Sodium Is There In Seasoning Salt?

How Much Sodium Is There in Seasoning Salt? Angela Ogunjimi has been a prize-winning writer and editor since 1994. She was a general assignment reporter at two newspapers and a business writer at two magazines. She writes on nutrition, obesity, diabetes and weight control for a project of the National Institutes of Health. Ogunjimi holds a master's degree in sociology from George Washington University and a bachelor's in journalism from New York University. Make your own seasoning salt to reduce your sodium. Seasoning salt contains a lot of sodium. The popular spice blend is a mainstay in many kitchens, and if youre using seasoning salt regularly, chances are you are getting more than the recommended amount of sodium. Although your body needs some salt, too much salt is linked with high blood pressure, which in turn ups your risk of heart disease and stroke. Lesser known is too much salt is also associated with osteoporosis and some cancers. Do yourself a favor and make your own seasoning salt to control how much sodium you are getting. Seasoning salt is also sometimes called seasoned salt. The main ingredient of this commercial product is salt but it also includes a blend of spices and herbs. These usually include onions, pepper, garlic and paprika. Its commonly used to enhance the flavor of foods, especially meat and poultry, as well as French fries and some side dishes. Lawrys Seasoned Salt, Morton Seasoned Salt, Morton Season-All Brand Seasoned Salt and Badia Seasoned Salt are among the many popular brands of seasoning salt. Each contains comparable amounts of sodium. In their Nutrition Facts label, they each use one-quarter of a teaspoon as their serving size. For example, Lawrys has 380 mg of sodium in a single serving. Morton has 350 mg per serving and Badia has Continue reading >>

Recipe | Paleo Diabetic

Recipe | Paleo Diabetic

Posted on July 21, 2015 | Comments Off on Recipe: Chicken AvocadoSoup This blew my mind. Avocados in soup? Yeah, I was skeptical, too. But it works amazingly well. Since I provide the nutritional analysis below, you can easily work this into the Low-Carb Mediterranean Diet , Ketogenic Mediterranean Diet , Paleobetic Diet , or Advanced Mediterranean Diet . 1.5 lb (680 g) boneless skinless chicken breast 1/2 jalapeno pepper (or 1 or 2 peppers if you wish), seeded and minced (use the seeds, too, if you want it very spicy hot) 2 roma tomatoes (5 oz or 140 g), seeded and diced salt and pepper to taste (nutritional analysis below assumes no salt added) 3 tbsp (45 ml) fresh lime juice (2 limes should be enough) 3 medium California avocados, peeled, seeded, and cubed Heat up the olive oil in a large pot over medium heat, then add the green onions and jalapeo; saut until tender (12 minutes) then add the garlic and cook another 30 seconds or so. Next into the pot goes the chicken broth, cumin, tomatoes, chicken breasts, and optional salt and pepper. If adding salt, Id wait until just before serving: taste it and then decide if it needs salt.Bring to a boil with high heat, then reduce heat but keep it boiling, covering with a lid while the chicken cooks through-out. Cooking time depends on thickness of the breasts and may be 15 to 45 minutes. When done, it should be easy to shred with a fork. Reduce heat to low or warm then remove the chicken breasts and allow them to cool for 510 minutes. When cool enough, shred the chicken with your fingers and return it to the pot. Add the cilantro. Ladle 1.5 cups (355 ml) into a bowl, add one fifth or sixth of the avocado cubes (half of an avocado) and the juice of 1/4 to 1/2 lime. Enjoy! Serving size: 1.5 cup of soup plus 1/2 of an avocado A Continue reading >>

5 Common Food Myths For People With Diabetes Debunked

5 Common Food Myths For People With Diabetes Debunked

There are many misconceptions that people with diabetes must follow a strict diet, when in reality they can eat anything a person without diabetes eats. Amy Campbell, MS, RD, LDN, CDE, nutritionist at Joslin Diabetes Center and co-author of 16 Myths of a "Diabetic Diet," debunks some common food myths for people with diabetes. 1. People with diabetes have to eat different foods from the rest of the family. People with diabetes can eat the same foods as the rest of their family. Current nutrition guidelines for diabetes are very flexible and offer many choices, allowing people with diabetes to fit in favorite or special-occasion foods. Everyone, whether they have diabetes or not, should eat a healthful diet that consists of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, lean protein foods, and heart-healthy fats. So, if you have diabetes, there's no need to cook separately from your family. 2. People with diabetes should never give in to food cravings. Almost everyone has food cravings at some point, and people with diabetes are no exception. It's not uncommon for people with diabetes to cut out all sweets or even cut way back on food portions in order to lose weight. In turn, your body often responds to these drastic changes by creating cravings. Nine times out of ten, your food choices in these situations tend to be high in fat and/or sugar, too. The best way to deal with food cravings is to try to prevent them by following a healthy eating plan that lets you occasionally fit sweets into your diabetes meal plan. If a craving does occur, let yourself have a small taste of whatever it is you want. By doing so, you can enjoy the flavor and avoid overeating later on. 3. People with diabetes shouldn't eat too many starchy foods, even if they contain fiber, because starch raises your blo Continue reading >>

Salt-free Sugar-free Taco Seasoning Mix

Salt-free Sugar-free Taco Seasoning Mix

My husband is very salt sensitive and diabetic. Many of the taco seasoning packets found in the store contain sugar and lots of salt. Many also contain a thickening agent (usually corn starch) that just adds calories and is not really necessary. Mix this homemade version up ahead to use instead for healthier Mexican-style food. About 2 Tbsp. equals 1 regular packet for seasoning power. Use 1 Tbsp. for a milder flavor. Be sure to read the label on your chili powder. It is a combination of spices. Most do not contain salt or sugar, but some might. If you like the little chunks of onion or garlic in your seasoning, use dried, minced onion or garlic instead of the granulated or powdered version. You will need about twice as much as the amounts listed and it will change the nutritional information slightly. My husband is very salt sensitive and diabetic. Many of the taco seasoning packets found in the store contain sugar and lots of salt. Many also contain a thickening agent (usually corn starch) that just adds calories and is not really necessary. Mix this homemade version up ahead to use instead for healthier Mexican-style food. About 2 Tbsp. equals 1 regular packet for seasoning power. Use 1 Tbsp. for a milder flavor. Be sure to read the label on your chili powder. It is a combination of spices. Most do not contain salt or sugar, but some might. If you like the little chunks of onion or garlic in your seasoning, use dried, minced onion or garlic instead of the granulated or powdered version. You will need about twice as much as the amounts listed and it will change the nutritional information slightly. Continue reading >>

3 Easy Diabetic Diet Secrets

3 Easy Diabetic Diet Secrets

If you have diabetes, its important for you to follow your doctors orders. Many people have diabetes or even pre-diabetes that can be controlled through changes in diet and exercise. Well focus on three simple steps you can take to improve your diet. (Be sure to consult with your physician for the specific diet and exercise plan thats right for you.) Why is this important? To keep your blood sugar levels as consistent as possible. What you eat and when you eat can also affect how your diabetes medicines work. It helps to plan your meals and snacks for each day so you dont lose track of what and when you ate. The less fat in your diet, the betterespecially when you have diabetes. Over time, diabetes can affect the heart and cardiovascular system, so it makes sense to try and prevent further illness by choosing: Healthier carbohydrates Fruits, vegetables, beans, whole grains, low-fat dairy Fiber-rich foods Whole grains, nuts, legumes (beans, lentils, etc.), vegetables, fruits Heart-healthy fish Salmon, mackerel & other fish high in Omega-3 fatty acids, tuna, cod, halibut Good fats Avocados, olive and canola oil, almonds, walnuts, olivesitems with less saturated or trans fats Why less sodiumisnt diabetes more about sugar? Maintaining a healthy body when you have diabetes means adapting your entire dietsugar, fats, carbohydrates, fiber, and salt. Salt added to your meals or sodium existing in the prepared foods you buy can put you at risk for high blood pressure. High blood pressure then puts you at risk for other illnesses, such as kidney disease and heart disease. Two things youre already at risk for if you have diabetes. Thats why it makes sense to reduce your salt intake. Mrs. Dash can help. It is sodium free and adds lots of flavor to your dishes. It now comes in 14 v Continue reading >>

Unsugarize - 5 High Sodium Foods Diabetics Should Avoid

Unsugarize - 5 High Sodium Foods Diabetics Should Avoid

5 High Sodium Foods Diabetics Should Avoid Diabetics should eat less salt than the average person, because they are at risk of high blood pressure. A low-sodium diet is recommended for most diabetics, in order to lessen the risk of high blood pressure and related health issues, such as heart disease. Unfortunately, salt is an all too common ingredient in most packaged and prepared foods. It's very easy to eat far more than the recommended daily values of sodium. Lowering salt intake is a challenge, but it's perfectly possible if you pay close attention to nutrition labels and make an effort to make homemade food rather than store-bought, processed meals. Heres a list of common high sodium foods that diabetics should avoid, along with suitable low sodium alternatives. Most canned beans and other canned vegetables contain unnecessary amounts of salt. Low or no sodium versions of canned veggies can be pricy. Instead, buy dried beans and rehydrate them yourself. Incidentally, legumes like beans and lentils rehydrate better when they arent seasoned with salt, because sodium slows the cooking. Instead, flavor the beans with a salt-free spice mix including seasonings like garlic, onion, cayenne, pepper, and cumin. As for other canned veggies these can easily be substituted with fresh or frozen alternatives. 2. Watch out for high sodium spices and seasoning mixes Certain popular seasonings often contain loads of salt. Many garlic powders and dehydrated onions for example are chock-full of sodium. Be sure to check the nutrition labels on all spices before you purchase or use them, as well as the contents of any premixed seasonings. Youll be surprised by the high sodium levels of these products. When recipes call for garlic salt or onion powder, you can always substitute that wi Continue reading >>

17 Herbs And Spices That Fight Diabetes

17 Herbs And Spices That Fight Diabetes

Are you looking for inspiration, or simply for the perfect recipe to impress your friends? SO COOKBOOK is the perfect app to… Continue reading >>

Add Some Flavor To Your Diabetes Meal Plan

Add Some Flavor To Your Diabetes Meal Plan

1 / 11 Use Portion Control Enhancing your food's flavors through condiments and spices is key to enjoying a healthy type 2 diabetes diet. But before you reach for the ketchup and mayo, know that some choices are a lot better for you than others. You'll also benefit from learning how to read nutrition labels and measuring servings carefully. "Most important is portion control," says Constance Brown-Riggs, RD, CDN, author of The African American Guide to Living Well With Diabetes. "Condiments should be used to enhance the flavor of food and not serve as the main course." Here are the facts on the most popular condiments and spices to help you choose. Continue reading >>

Can Any One Suggest A Good Seasoning For Steamed... | Diabetic Connect

Can Any One Suggest A Good Seasoning For Steamed... | Diabetic Connect

lol that sounds like my husband since he had to go on disability from his work. He still works too just on different things and now-a-days that is mostly on the house and a small tomato patch he dug out along side a fence and a small sweet potato patch in a different spot on the fence-line. My sweet potatoes are doing great but the tomatoes are mostly going to feed all the damned squirrels in the neighborhood. There isn't a house on this block that doesn't have at least 1 pecan tree so squirrels here are very well fed and extremely numerous. Many of the people on the block - as do we - have problems with them chewing their way into our attics. In the almost 12 years we have lived here we have had to go up under the eaves and block at least 1 hole almost every year they have chewed thru. We are thinking of putting up a metal barrier as one of the neighbors did when we reside the back room - the rest is brick - all around the house to keep them out. My husband has begun a major redo for the house since medical retirement - already had a new roof put on and he is doing painting and such inside. When the weather cools he has some plans for outside as well. I'm glad he is doing what he can to stay active as his stroke did curb some of his ability to do so. Vinegar is good on Spinach, raw cauliflower like cucumbers is delicious with vinegar and water and some Mrs Dash table seasoning. We can find it in both our local Wal-Marts and Krogers here in TN so you should be able to find them as well. They are in the seasoning sections right beside the Mrs Dash and others. I didn't even think of the Mrs Dash as I don't use it myself as it has a lot of black pepper in it and I'm allergic to that but my husband often sprinkles some on his veggies when I haven't already seasoned them du Continue reading >>

Spice Up Your Seasoning

Spice Up Your Seasoning

Everyone needs to cut down on the amount of salt in their diets whether they have diabetes or not. Too much salt in your diet can raise your blood pressure, which increases your risk of heart disease and stroke. It can be a challenge, and food may taste bland to begin with. But, with some simple changes to your seasoning, you can reinvigorate your taste buds and enjoy healthy, nutritious food. There are plenty of alternative herbs and spices that you can use in your cooking without having to reach for the salt cellar. Use ginger, lime and coriander to add a tangy flavour to stir-fries. Try a bit of smoked paprika on some sweet potato wedges. Tarragons aniseed flavour works well in sauces for fish and poultry. Aromatic cardamom can add a little extra spice to stews and curries. Although its most commonly used in savoury cooking, particularly Indian cuisine, its also useful when baking occasional sweet treats, as it goes surprisingly well with chocolate. Spicy harissa paste can be used as a marinade for meat and fish, to flavour soups, pasta dishes and couscous, or served in olive oil as a dip for bread. Use sparingly a little goes a long way. Try these spicy dishes for a change, which are so full of flavour you wont miss the salt pot. Serves 2 gluten free 5 portions of fruit & veg per serving prep 15 minutes cook 15 minutes Preheat the oven to 200C/gas 6. Cube the chicken and add to a bowl with the yogurt, paprika, cumin and turmeric, then mix well to coat the chicken. Lightly oil a baking tray and arrange the onion and pepper evenly over it, then place the chicken pieces on the onion and pepper, and arrange the tomatoes on top. Roast for 15 minutes, or until the chicken is thoroughly cooked, and serve with basmati rice or salad. Per serving*331Kcal 38.8g protein 28.5g Continue reading >>

How To Spice Up A Diabetes Diet - How To Eat With Diabetes

How To Spice Up A Diabetes Diet - How To Eat With Diabetes

"Seasoning foods creatively wakes up the taste buds and helps us to use less added salt, sugar, and fats," says Jill Weisenberger, MS, RDN, CDE, FAND , author of Diabetes Weight Loss: Week by Week . Even better, favoring food with certain seasonings and spices can actually enhance your overall health by reducing inflammation in the body, which can cause many health problems, including insulin resistance, says Francisco Arredondo, MD, MPH , a board-certified endocrinologist at RMA of Texas. "Many spices contain polyphenols, a micronutrient with anti-inflammatory properties." Ready to take a trip to Flavortown? Buckle up! Start your morning off right with some cinnamon in your breakfast. "Some studies show that this delicious, sweet spice might help with blood sugar and cholesterol control among people with type 2 diabetes ," Weisenberger says. Try making a bowl of cottage cheese, grapefruit slices, and cinnamon. But you don't have to stop there: Cinnamon can be sprinkled onto cereal, fresh fruit, or even coffee or tea as a sugar alternative. "If you are baking, you can reduce the amount of sugar up to 25% without affecting the structure of the recipe," says Melissa Joy Dobbins, RD, CDE . Two of the best opportunities for incorporating and experimenting with seasonings are in lunch and dinner dishes. Fish, for instance, makes a great match for many different herbs and spices, especially basil. Just be sure to skip calorie-laden toppings, sauces, breading, and deep-frying. which will increase the amount of added sugar and saturated fat, advises Jaclyn London, MS, RD, CDN , Nutrition Director at the Good Housekeeping Institute . "Sprinkle fresh basil with lemon over salmon to get those heart-shielding omega-3 fatty acids," Weisenberger adds. "Or slip a few leaves onto your Continue reading >>

How Salt Affects Diabetes - Mindbodygreen

How Salt Affects Diabetes - Mindbodygreen

To say that diabetes and pre-diabetes have become huge problems in the United States is an understatement. These conditions now affect more than one out of two adults in this country. Type 2 diabetes and pre-diabetes generally begin with insulin resistance. Insulin is a hormone that helps bring glucose into our cells. However, when our cells become resistant to insulin, glucose levels in the blood rise drastically, eventually causing pre-diabetes or type 2 diabetes. Research has shown that insulin resistance, pre-diabetes, and type 2 diabetes are likely induced by a diet high in sugar. And insulin resistance may explain why diabetics and prediabetics are at a greater risk of hypertension, also known as high blood pressure. Its been long thought that eating salt is the cause of high blood pressure. In truth, cutting the sugar from your diet may actually fix your insulin resistance and in turn fix your "salt-sensitive" high blood pressure. However, the focus has always been to cut salt intake to lower blood pressure rather than cutting the sugar. And this could be a huge mistake, especially in those with prediabetes and type 2 diabetes. In fact, eating more salt may actually improve prediabetes and type 2 diabetes, whereas cutting back on the salt may actually make things worse. In my book, The Salt Fix , I dispel these beliefs and explore why salt has been so unfairly villainized. A low-salt diet may harm those with pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes because it can make insulin resistance worse. In fact, low-salt diets in healthy people can cause insulin resistance . Low-salt diets may even cause hypertension by inducing vascular insulin resistance , which is a fancy way of saying a reduced vasodilatory response when insulin acts upon our arteries and blood vessels. High Continue reading >>

Flavoring Foods Without Salt

Flavoring Foods Without Salt

Home / Health Library / Articles / Flavoring Foods Without Salt Cutting back on salt doesnt mean sacrificing flavor. Here is a list of options for adding taste to your food without picking up the saltshaker. What seasonings can be used in place of salt that will still add flavor to foods? There are many ways to lower your sodium intake without sacrificing flavor. You might try herbs, spices, and seasoning blends when cooking. Here is a list of some options for adding taste and zest to your food without using extra salt. Create your favorite flavors using herbs and spices: Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy Cleveland Clinics Endocrinology & Metabolism Institute is committed to providing the highest quality healthcare for patients with diabetes, endocrine and metabolic disorders, and obesity. Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy Copyright 1995-2018 The Cleveland Clinic Foundation. All rights reserved. This information is provided by the Cleveland Clinic and is not intended to replace the medical advice of your doctor or healthcare provider. Please consult your healthcare provider for advice about a specific medical condition. This document was last reviewed on: 01/29/2013 Continue reading >>

Seasoned Cod | Diabetic Living Online

Seasoned Cod | Diabetic Living Online

Lemon wedges and/or fresh parsley sprigs (optional) Preheat broiler. Thaw fish, if frozen. Rinse fish; pat dry with paper towels. In a small bowl, combine paprika and seasoned salt. Sprinkle paprika mixture over both sides of each fish fillet. Measure thickness of fish. Place fish on the greased unheated rack of a broiler pan. Broil 4 inches from the heat for 4 to 6 minutes per 1/2-inch thickness of fish or until fish flakes easily when tested with a fork. If desired, garnish with lemon wedges and/or parsley sprigs. Makes 8 servings. Microwave directions: Prepare as directed through Step 1. In a microwave-safe 2-quart square baking dish, arrange fish in a single layer (fish may be tight in the dish but do not overlap). Cover with vented plastic wrap. Microwave on 100% power (high) for 5 to 7 minutes or until fish flakes easily when tested with a fork, turning dish once halfway through cooking if necessary. If desired, garnish with lemon wedges and/or parsley sprigs. PER SERVING: 93 cal., 1 g total fat 48 mg chol., 156 mg sodium, 20 g pro. Continue reading >>

How Salt Intake Affects Diabetes

How Salt Intake Affects Diabetes

Aubri John has been a contributing researcher and writer to online physical and mental health oriented journals since 2005. John publishes online health and fitness articles that coincide with her licensed clinical skills in addictions, psychology and medical care. She has a master's degree in clinical social work and a Ph.D. in health psychology. Diabetes, a chronic metabolic disease, affects millions of Americans. People with diabetes have a higher likelihood of developing health complications that impact the heart, nervous system and kidneys. High blood pressure, or hypertension, is twice as common in diabetics as in nondiabetics, which increases the risk of a range of cardiovascular diseases. High salt intake contributes to hypertension, but salt does not have an effect on blood sugar. You get energy from the nutrients in foods containing proteins, fats and carbohydrates, but carbohydrates are the only types of foods that directly affect your blood sugar. Diabetes prevents your body from properly using blood sugar, or glucose, the main source of energy for your cells. Normally, when you eat a carbohydrate, it is metabolized into smaller sugar molecules, or glucose, sent into your bloodstream and met by the hormone insulin, which then transports the glucose into your cells. A diabetic does not produce or use insulin properly, and the glucose gets left in the bloodstream. Salt has no effect on the blood sugar process, but excess salt does have other implications for the health of a diabetic. People with diabetes have an increased risk of high blood pressure, notes the American Diabetes Association, because excess sodium in your diet causes blood pressure to rise. Common table salt contains 40 percent sodium, an essential mineral your body uses in small amounts for ma Continue reading >>

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