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Diabetic Rice India

Coming Soon, Low Gi Rice Fit For Diabetics

Coming Soon, Low Gi Rice Fit For Diabetics

Coming soon, low GI rice fit for diabetics Coming soon, low GI rice fit for diabetics Diabetics, who miss having rice, will soon have something to cheer about. A low glycemic index (GI) rice variety that goes by RNR-15048 moniker is expected to be released for commercial seed production. HYDERABAD: Diabetics , who miss having rice, will soon have something to cheer about. A low glycemic index (GI) rice variety that goes by RNR-15048 moniker is expected to be released for commercial seed production. It has a low GI of 51. Compared to this, the popular Sona Masuri rice variety registers 72 as its GI. Higher GI foods are generally not recommended for consumption by diabetics. They can contribute to increase in blood sugar levels and make medical management of diabetes more intensive and sometimes challenging. The RNR-15048 rice variety was developed after six years of research at Prof Jayashankar Telangana State Agricultural University near here. This variety of rice has been in production for the past three years, but in limited quantities as the scientists went about establishing the crop's growth and yields as well as consistency in the GI. The low GI levels of RNR-15048 have been tested independently by the National Institute of Nutrition and the Indian Institute of Chemical Technology. "We are awaiting a final approval from the State Level Varietal Approval Committee before introducing this rice variety with a brand name into the seed production chain," V Praveen Rao, the university registrar told TOI on Tuesday. Incidentally, a previous rice variety developed by the university some years ago, BPT-5204 popularly known as Samba Masuri, has a low GI of 57 and the new variety is even better with a lower GI and can be attractive for use by those suffering from diabetes, Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Rice? - The Wellthy Magazine

Can Diabetics Eat Rice? - The Wellthy Magazine

Expert-reviewed by Ashwini S.Kanade, Registered Dietician and Certified Diabetes Educator with 17 years of experience Fact-checked by Aditya Nar, B.Pharm, MSc. Public Health and Health Economics As a diabetic, one of the first foods you are asked to give up is rice (and sugar, of course!). Which, lets face it, is not easy for most of us. But why do you have to give up something thats been part of your staple diet all your life? Do you have to eliminate it altogether? Are any healthier substitutes just as satisfying to the taste buds? Are all types of rice bad for you? Get all your diet queries solved and get one-on-one coaching to help reduce your blood sugar levels. Enrol for our Home-based Diabetes Management package , endorsed by Asias largest diabetes organization. To understand how rice causes fluctuations in blood sugar levels, you first need to understand what glycemic index or GI score is. GI is a score given to different food items (between 0-100) and indicates how they affect your blood sugar levels. For eg., refined sugar with a high GI of 100, instantly increases your blood sugar levels but a natural form like those found in fruits with a medium GI range increases it slowly.[1] You mustve figured out by now that you need to include food with a low or medium GI in your diet and try to avoid ones with a high GI. High GI foods fall in the range of 70 and above, medium GI foods in the range of 56 to 69, and low GI foods in the 55 or less range. The rice variety most of us eat unfortunately falls into the first category. However, you dont have to give it up completely (but dont start celebrating just yet). Is there a way to continue eating rice safely? Try other varieties of rice: Brown rice, wild rice or wholegrain basmati rice. Brown rice is white rice that ha Continue reading >>

Low Glycemic Index Foods For Indians

Low Glycemic Index Foods For Indians

You are here because you may be already knowing that Low glyacemic index foods are good for diabetics. But I still want to explain in brief why glyacemic index is a important factor? Foods with carbohydrates that break down quickly during digestion and release glucose rapidly into the bloodstream tend to have a high Glyacemic index. Glyacemic index is a complex subject and in coming we shall cover topics like Fruits more ripe have a different glyacemic index and Cooking method can bring down or make up for glyacemic index. For sake of todays article we shall make it simple low glyacemic index is good for diabetics. Rice is not always bad, Good news is if you are Biriyani lover! you may not worry enjoying it because of fear of deiabetes. Because Reserachers found that Basmati rice is having medium glyacemic index around 60 and there are also low gi basmati rice avaialable in the market. and one more variety of rice which is known to have lowest Glyacemic index among different varieties of rice is Swarna and Mahsuri with a GI Value of 55. 2) Brown Rice : Brown rice also has a lower glyacemic index, GI- 55 . It is believed that Brown rice and and basmati rice have the smae glyacemic index but brown rice has lot more fibre and is considered nutritious. 3) pongal is a Low GI Breakfast Option: Pongal is a famous south indian breakfast, if you are from tamilnadu you might very well know it for other people you can learn how to cook pongal from google. Glyacemic index of pongal is around 55 , which means pongal is one amongst low glyacemic foods. 4) Grilled Meat Have No Glyacemic Index: Meat is a high protien food whihc contains no carbohydrates at all, but it can contribute to fats growing in your body you should limit taking them, But for Glyacemic index point of view Meta is Continue reading >>

Birdseed Turned Superfood May Help Curb India’s Diabetes Scourge

Birdseed Turned Superfood May Help Curb India’s Diabetes Scourge

Millets are poised for a comeback amid government subsidies Diabetes may afflict 123.5 million people in India by 2040 Podiatrist Vinaya A.S. has bumped across southern India in a bus-turned mobile clinic for 17 years, going village to village checking feet for the ulcer-causing effects of diabetes. These days, her key to staving off limb amputations comes down to one thing: food. Millets, to be precise. The ancient grains were a staple in India for thousands of years, but largely spurned since a so-called Green Revolution last century led to cheaper, more abundant supplies of refined rice and wheat flour that can bolster blood-sugar. Now a surge in type-2 diabetes is pushing doctors and government officials to recommend a return to wholegrains, like “ragi” or finger millet, that healthfully sustained previous generations. “Food is your medicine — you need to eat right,” Vinaya, 48, told a group of villagers in Doddaballapur, on the outskirts of Bangalore, last month. “Bring the fiber-rich ragi back to your plates, along with fruits and vegetables.” Healthy food choices are becoming critical in India, where diabetes is ripping through the population with deadly consequences. The number of adults living with the disease has risen more than five fold since 1980, though more than half of sufferers aren’t aware they have it. Left uncontrolled, high blood-sugar levels can damage organs and tissues, including the nerves and blood vessels in the feet, making them susceptible to injuries that fail to heal and eventually turn gangrenous. When that happens, amputations can be life-saving. Diabetes Around the World Countries with the largest number of adults with diabetes 1980 2014 Source: Worldwide trends in diabetes since 1980: a pooled analysis of 751 population Continue reading >>

In India, Why Do Doctors Advise Diabetes Patients To Eat Chapati Over Rice?

In India, Why Do Doctors Advise Diabetes Patients To Eat Chapati Over Rice?

Chapati is rich in whole grains and fiber. Major portion of carbohydrate intake should come from whole grains rather than refined grains to facilitate the prevention of type 2 diabetes. Rice, mainly white rice has rich carbohydrates - high glycemic value and hence should be avoided. I would recommend you to consult your dietitian before you take any action. Disclaimer: I am the co-founder of DeeveHealth. DeeveHealth is a mobile platform to prevent Type 2 diabetes. Based on the scientific behavior of human and science of prevention using data points. For more information check out our web-site Continue reading >>

Is Basmati Rice Good For Diabetics

Is Basmati Rice Good For Diabetics

With the rise of type 2 diabetes, there are many people looking for alternative foods that can help combat the effects of this disease. By eating the right food, people can help control the complications that result from diabetes and even lose weight to help reverse the threat to their health. Carbohydrates have been noted as the key nutrient in terms of controlling blood sugar levels. This is because when digested carbohydrates turn into glucose or sugar and enters the blood stream. By controlling the amount the is consumed, carbohydrates can effectively be used to keep blood sugar levels from spiking. One of the most interesting foods that have been cited as one that helps control the effects of diabetes is basmati rice. It is a food that is a good source of carbohydrates, but also contains a low amount of calories, a solid amount of proteins and fiber as well. However, is basmati rice the answer when it comes to the type of foods that those suffering from type 2 diabetes should consume? The Advantages of Basmati Rice There are a number of reasons why you should choose this type of rice to be part of your meals. One of the most important reasons is because of the type of carbohydrate that basmati rice is and how it affects your blood sugar levels. There are two types of carbohydrates, those that hit high on the glycemic index (GI) and those that have a low to moderate effect. The foods that have a high GI number are to be avoided while low to moderate GI amounts are acceptable. Basmati rice is a food that ranges from the low to moderate levels in terms of GI. That means it can be consumed during meals as long as other foods that have a higher GI count are left out so that the effect is not magnified. So, for example when you are eating steak you can have a serving of Continue reading >>

Certification For Low Glycemic Index Rice Soon

Certification For Low Glycemic Index Rice Soon

Certification for low glycemic index rice soon THE HANS INDIA | Dec 15,2016 , 04:15 AM IST Hyderabad: With a little experience and expertise, consumers may perhaps be able to make out the difference between high-quality and low-quality rice just by its appearance or physical attributes. However, it is difficult for anyone to discern the intrinsic qualities and properties just from the external appearance. Low glycemic index rice good for diabetes Rice millers and traders dishing out fake varieties IIRR initiatives to curb manipulation by rice millers For instance, consumers can pick and choose the most palatable variety, when it comes to health-related rice with low-glycemic index value we have to rely solely on information printed on the package or that given by the traders. Low-index glycemic rice varieties which is considered as a healthy option for persons with Type 2 diabetes and a host of other conditions, is fast becoming a hot favourite among consumers in India and abroad. Glycemic index comprises a set of parameters based on the duration for rice to be digested. Low-index rice is considered ideal because of long time it takes to be digested accompanied by slow and controllable rise of blood sugar and insulin levels. Preference for this variety has gained momentum because of its good carbohydrate and slow digestion characteristics. Millers and traders who could envision some fast bucks come their way are capitalizing on the high demand are branding fake varieties as low index glycemic rice and pushing them into the markets. Millers are also exploiting the rice farmers those who are not aware of the true value of this variety by procuring this variety at a cheap price. Hyderabad-based Indian Institute of Rice Research (IIRR) which was instrumental in identifying Continue reading >>

15 Low Glycemic Index Foods Indian Diabetics Can Eat

15 Low Glycemic Index Foods Indian Diabetics Can Eat

The number of diabetics is continuously on the rise. More and more members of the younger generations are getting affected. It is important to know that though Diabetes does not have a cure it can be well managed. One major change diabetics got to make in their diet is to consume more of low index glycemic foods in their daily diet. What is Glycemic Index? Glycemic Index (GI) refers to a scale of 1-100 that measures how fast and how much a food item raises blood glucose levels. Carbohydrate-containing foods are compared with glucose or white bread as a reference food, which is given a GI score of 100. As these foods control your blood sugar levels, they regulate your hunger pangs and eating habits. The GI rating of various carbohydrates include: low GI (less than 55) – foods that induce a relatively gradual rise in blood sugar medium GI (55 to 70) – the foods that lead to an average rise in blood sugar high GI (greater than 70) – foods that cause a rapid rise in blood sugar levels As we all know, artificial sweeteners have alarming long-term side effects, you can opt for a Low-Glycemic Sugar which has no bitter aftertaste. Buy the DiaBliss Low-GI Sugar which has a GI of 44, compared to normal sugar which has a GI of 65. This Low-GI Sugar can be used in making desserts and Mithais (Sweets) at home. Low GI foods, because of their slow digestion and absorption properties, cause only a gradual rise in blood sugar and insulin levels. Chickpeas – help prevent elevated blood sugar levels, making it a good choice for diabetics. You can toss them in your green salads, make a tasty curry for chapati or prepare hummus to eat along with pita bread. Beans (kidney beans, black beans, white beans) – if you are looking for a food item that has high-quality carbohydrates, lean Continue reading >>

Fruit For Diabetes – Is It Actually Safe To Eat?

Fruit For Diabetes – Is It Actually Safe To Eat?

If you are living with diabetes, you've probably been told to minimize or eliminate your intake of fruit because "fruit is high in sugar." And if this is the case, maybe you refrain from eating fruits because it causes your blood glucose to spike. Attracted by the smell, color and taste, you may find yourself asking a simple question: "Should I avoid fruit in the long-term? And if so, will I ever be able to eat fruit again?” It turns out that this ant-fruit message is a perfect example of pseudoscience at its best. A recent study published in PLOS medicine tracked the health of 512,891 Chinese men and women between the ages of 30 and 79 for an average of 7 years, in order to understand the effect that their diet had on their overall health (1). We like these types of studies because they are: For those who did not have diabetes at the beginning of the study, those who had a higher fruit consumption were 12% less likely to develop diabetes, compared with those who ate zero pieces of fruit per day. The researchers found a dose-response relationship, which means that the more frequently these nondiabetic individuals ate fruit, the lower the risk for developing diabetes. Amongst those living with diabetes at the beginning of the study, those who ate fruit 3 times per week reduced their risk of all-cause mortality (death from any cause) by 17%, compared with diabetic individuals who ate zero pieces of fruit per day. In addition, researchers uncovered that those who ate fresh fruit 3 days per week were 13-28% less likely to experience macrovascular complications (heart disease and stroke) and microvascular damage (kidney disease, retinopathy and neuropathy). Even though this study was observational, the results of the study have profound implications for people living with Continue reading >>

Which Rice Is Best For People With Diabetes?

Which Rice Is Best For People With Diabetes?

If you have type 2 diabetes, you may be familiar with the glycemic index and that foods with a low glycemic index are best for managing your disease. Knowing which foods have a low value can be confusing at times, but now a new study my help consumers make a choice concerning at least one food: rice. Which rice is best for people with diabetes? People with diabetes can eat rice The glycemic index is a tool to measure a food's effect on blood sugar. Generally, foods with a glycemic index of 55 or less are considered low (good), while values of 56 to 69 are medium and those 70 or higher are high (bad) glycemic index values. Foods with a high glycemic index make a person's blood sugar levels rise and fluctuate, which can increase the chance of getting diabetes and also make managing type 2 diabetes a challenge. Some of the items typically placed in the high glycemic index category include white bread (see "Best and Worst Breads for Diabetes"), baked goods, pasta, and rice. However, not all rice has a high glycemic index value, and indeed some varieties fall into the low category. Investigators from the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI) and CSIRO's Food Futures Flagship evaluated 235 varieties of rice and discovered that the glycemic index values ranged from 48 to 92. That means people with diabetes have healthful options when it comes to choosing rice as part of their diet. Investigators also discovered that the main gene associated with glycemic index in all the varieties is the Waxy gene. This information will allow rice breeders to develop more varieties of rice with low glycemic index values and expand the options for people with type 2 diabetes. According to Dr. Melissa Fitzgerald, who headed the IRRI group, "Rice varieties like India's most widely grown ri Continue reading >>

A Low Gi Rice For Diabetics Identified In India

A Low Gi Rice For Diabetics Identified In India

/ A low GI rice for diabetics identified in India A low GI rice for diabetics identified in India All you diabetics out there! You don't have to give up rice anymore. Read to know more. Anusha Iyengar | Published: December 11, 2015 4:30 pm Tags: Blood sugar level Healthy food A good news for all you diabetics out there. You wont have to quit rice to control your blood sugar level anymore. Researchers in Chhattisgarh have identified a high-yielding variety of white rice which has low Glycemic Index (GI) measurement of how foods affect blood sugar levels. The finding is not only for people with diabetes, or at a risk of the disease; it can also be part of a healthy diet for the average consumers as reported by The Times Of India. These 10 everyday things increase your blood sugar level. A team of researchers from Indira Gandhi Agriculture University (IGAU), Raipur has identified the variety of low GI rice. Since past few years, we have been working to develop or identify a rice variety with low GI that could be fruitful for sugar patients. Interestingly, we found it on the Chapati Gurmatiya race of rice, which is a traditionally cultivated variety of paddy in Chhattisgarh, Dr Chandel. Try this diet plan to control your blood sugar level. He said that this new development is significant as rice is a staple diet for a larger part of the population.People cant give it up in Chhattisgarh, which is popularly known as a rice bowl, as well as in the entire country because food habits are an entrenched cultural habit thats hard to change.But consumption of white rice with GI more than permissible limits can be harmful to diabetic patients. During the study, data was collected from mouse feeding trial at Chhattisgarh Council of Science and Technology. The mouse model data clearly Continue reading >>

Ccmb-iirr Tie-up For Low Gi Rice

Ccmb-iirr Tie-up For Low Gi Rice

New variety is considered suitable for those with diabetics Centre for Cellular and Molecular Biology (CCMB) in association with the Indian Institute of Rice Research (IIRR) has come out with an Improved Samba Masuri (ISM) which is not only resistant to bacteria blight but also has a low Glycemic Index (GI) considered suitable for those with diabetes. National Institute of Nutrition (NIN), a constituent of the Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR), has done extensive human trials on the new variety and had come to the conclusion that ISM has low GI of 50.99 which is among the lowest value for several rice varieties tested and usually in the range of 53 to 69, explained IIRR director P. Ananda Kumar and his colleague R.M. Sundaram, CCMBs Ramesh Sonti, Vishnupriya and others on Monday. GI value of a food is determined by feeding 10 or more healthy people a portion of the food containing 50 grams of digestible (available) carbohydrate and then measuring the effect on their blood glucose levels over the next two hours. Consumption of food with low GI results in slow release of glucose into the bloodstream reducing the ill-effects of diabetes. Plus, ISM also has desirable attributes like better yield and fine grain type enhancing market potential and profit for farmers, they told a press conference. With financial support from National Agricultural Technology Project of the Indian Council of Agricultural Research (ICAR) and CSIR800 program of Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) work began in 1999 and completed in 2006, it was validated in 10 different locations for two years across the country. It was released in 2008. We did molecular breeding in CCMB and actual traditional rice breeding at the rice research institute. Its not a transgenic plant. It is Continue reading >>

Fruit For Diabetes – Is It Actually Safe To Eat?

Fruit For Diabetes – Is It Actually Safe To Eat?

If you are living with diabetes, you've probably been told to minimize or eliminate your intake of fruit because "fruit is high in sugar." And if this is the case, maybe you refrain from eating fruits because it causes your blood glucose to spike. Attracted by the smell, color and taste, you may find yourself asking a simple question: "Should I avoid fruit in the long-term? And if so, will I ever be able to eat fruit again?” It turns out that this ant-fruit message is a perfect example of pseudoscience at its best. A recent study published in PLOS medicine tracked the health of 512,891 Chinese men and women between the ages of 30 and 79 for an average of 7 years, in order to understand the effect that their diet had on their overall health (1). We like these types of studies because they are: For those who did not have diabetes at the beginning of the study, those who had a higher fruit consumption were 12% less likely to develop diabetes, compared with those who ate zero pieces of fruit per day. The researchers found a dose-response relationship, which means that the more frequently these nondiabetic individuals ate fruit, the lower the risk for developing diabetes. Amongst those living with diabetes at the beginning of the study, those who ate fruit 3 times per week reduced their risk of all-cause mortality (death from any cause) by 17%, compared with diabetic individuals who ate zero pieces of fruit per day. In addition, researchers uncovered that those who ate fresh fruit 3 days per week were 13-28% less likely to experience macrovascular complications (heart disease and stroke) and microvascular damage (kidney disease, retinopathy and neuropathy). Even though this study was observational, the results of the study have profound implications for people living with Continue reading >>

Basmati Rice And Diabetes By Dr Sarah Schenker

Basmati Rice And Diabetes By Dr Sarah Schenker

Basmati rice, particularly wholegrain Basmati rice can and should be a regular addition to the diets of people who suffer from Type 2 diabetes. Basmati rice is a naturally low to medium energy food but as with all carbohydrate foods, it’s the portion size that is important: an average serving of boiled rice is 150-180g providing 207-248 calories; a small serving (100g) provides approximately 138 calories. By contrast a typical takeaway portion of fried rice is 300g providing 558 calories, so it’s important not to assume all rice types are the same. Wholegrain Basmati rice has the lowest GI (glycaemic index) of all rice types, which means once digested it releases its energy slowly keeping blood sugar levels more stable, which is a crucial part of diabetes management. On the other hand, sticky and risotto type rices have much higher GIs, so less suitable in a diabetic diet. The varying GIs of rice depends on the type of carbohydrate present in the grains. Basmati rice has the greatest amount of a type known as amylose which does not gelatinize during cooking and results in fluffy, separate grains. Whereas grains with more amylopectin burst on cooking resulting in sticky rice that can be eaten with chopsticks. The more intact the structure of a grain of rice the lower the GI because once consumed the particle size maintains intact for longer, slowing the digestive process. The higher quality brands of rice like Tilda have the technology to reject broken grains from their products, further guaranteeing the low GI of the rice. Steaming rice helps to better maintain the structure of the grain compared with boiled rice so generally steamed rice has a lower GI than boiled. Wholegrain Basmati rice is also a source of fibre which is important for gut health and improves bowe Continue reading >>

Healthy Basmati Rice

Healthy Basmati Rice

Part of what makes choosing the healthiest rice difficult is the many, many varieties. Last week, Padmaja asked whether a particular brand of rice that claims to be good for diabetics because it has a low Glycemic Index (GI) number is truly good. (TheGI describes how quickly a food is converted into glucose or blood sugar, and how much of it. The lower the GI number, the better.) Here is the Basmati rice brand she asked about: . It's too bad I don't have a good answer about this specific brand. This is because I can't find a GI number done by an independent (and thus unbiased) academic lab for this particular rice, as I can for others. But by looking at the various rice varieties studied by academic centers for their GI values, I am able to explaingeneral principles that I feel will help Padmaja and also yourself make an educated decision on what rice to eat for good health. Here they are: 1. Whitebasmati rice has a lower GI value(which is good) than other varieties of white rice. 2.Brown rice has sometimes the same and sometimes lower GI valuesthan white rices. 3.Parboiled rice, which is rice that is cooked in a way to make the white version soak up some nutrients (like thiamine) naturally found in the parts (bran and germ) discarded by the manufacturers,has variable GI values. Let me address whyBasmati rice seems to have a lower GI number (and is thus better if you want to control your blood glucose level) than other varieties. It turns out the starch in rice is made of mostly amylopectin and some amylose. According to a 1992 American Journal of Clinical Nutrition paper ( ), most rice starch is about 20% amylose. But one rice variety had more amylose, about 28% of total starch. And this rice was the rice with the lowest GI number. And it seems Basmati rice also has m Continue reading >>

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