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Diabetic Retinopathy Youtube

Diabetes And Youtube

Diabetes And Youtube

University of Alaska Anchorage nursing student Ben McCormack was excited when a professor showed a YouTube video in his pathophysiology class. She tries to bring in a lot of multimedia stuff to each unit, he reports. And Diabetes Rap actually has all the information about [type 1] diabetes right in the video. The Diabetes Rap, starring diabetic Luke Widbin, was the 2008 winner of the World Diabetes Day Young Voices video contest, thanks in part to Lukes willingness to make rhymes like Sugar overdoses give me ketoacidosis. With well over 100,000 views, this video does an educational and entertaining job of relating the facts about diabetes. See it here . More recently, three Temple University students have created a whole YouTube channel dedicated to diabetes. Diabetes Diaries currently features just a few videos, but the channel hopes to serve as a place where people with diabetes can come together to share their stories, struggles, and triumphs. Emily Hooven, who has type 1 diabetes, along with Tom Simon and Matthew Law-Phipps, made the channel for people with both type 1 and type 2. Our hope is that Diabetes Diaries will provide a kind of release for [people with diabetes], that they can come out with their true thoughts and feelings about the disease via the video, says Hooven, noting that many she spoke to dont really talk to anyone about the issues that come with their disease. Whether you have diabetes yourself or have a close relationship with someone who does, Diabetes Diaries can serve as a place to talk about what it means to live life with this condition. The American Diabetes Association also has a YouTube channel, hosting public service announcements and informational videos. Its Living With Diabetes series is a go-to place for the newly diagnosed, and the Continue reading >>

Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetic Retinopathy

- Did you know that diabetes is the most common cause of blindness in individuals from the ages of 25 to 65? And blindness can be caused by multiple different complications associated with diabetes including glaucoma and cataracts, however in this tutorial, let's discuss the most common cause of blindness due to diabetes which is a condition known as diabetic retinopathy. And if we break down the term, we can receive generally, an understanding of what this disease is, so you have retino here meaning the retina, and pathy meaning disease. So, diabetic retinopathy is a disease of the retina that's caused by diabetes. And to describe what the retina is, let's bring in a diagram of the eye and go through some of the structures as it will help us as we learn more about this condition. Over here on the left, we have a cross-section of the eye and there's a few important structures to note. So this is the front of the eye here, and this is the back of the eye, and this part right here is known as the cornea. And it is where light initially passes through as it goes through the eye, and then it hits this structure right here, which is known as the lens. And the lens focuses the light on this structure in the back of the eye, this kind of brownish structure, and this is the retina. And then exiting the back of the eye here, this is the optic nerve. Then, you can also see all of these blood vessels that are traveling through the retina and then exit the back of the eye in the middle of the optic nerve. So if you look over here on the right, this is a front view of the eye. So this is kind of what it looks like when a doctor looks in to your eye. So here, right here we have what's called the optic disc, and the optic disc is really just the convergence of the retina and where it Continue reading >>

Diabetic Eye Care | New Vision Eye Center

Diabetic Eye Care | New Vision Eye Center

Eyesight is one of our most valued and vulnerable senses. Without consistently clear eyesight, life slows and becomes increasingly difficult. People who are already suffering from a physical disorder may already experience obstacles in functioning. For example, people with diabetes suffer from chronic physical symptoms due to the high levels of glucose in their bodies. Additionally, they may also suffer from diabetic retinopathy. This eye disease occurs when abnormally high glucose levels from diabetes harm the retina's blood vessels. This is a dangerous condition because vessels can form on the retina, in addition to stopping the proper passage of blood. Ultimately, this can severely harm your sight. If ignored, diabetic retinopathy has the ability to cause serious vision loss or worse. Diabetic retinopathy is an eye disease affecting the retina and is a frequent complication of diabetes. Diabetes damages the small blood vessels in the retina and can lead to poor vision and even blindness. During the early stages, the tiny blood vessels in the eye weaken. The blood vessels develop small bulges that may burst and leak into the retina and into the gel-like fluid inside the eye called the vitreous gel. As the condition progresses, new fragile blood vessels grow on the surface of the retina, impairing vision. This is called proliferative retinopathy. If you currently have diabetes and are worried about developing diabetic retinopathy, the best way to prevent it is to have regular, thorough eye examinations. Even if you do not have symptoms like blurry vision, it is important to still schedule regular eye exams, while specifying that you have diabetes. This will help eye doctors stay on guard for undetectable aspects of it. Through regular eye exams, they will be able to d Continue reading >>

Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetic Retinopathy

Tweet Diabetic retinopathy is the most common form of diabetic eye disease. Diabetic retinopathy usually only affects people who have had diabetes (diagnosed or undiagnosed) for a significant number of years. Retinopathy can affect all diabetics and becomes particularly dangerous, increasing the risk of blindness, if it is left untreated. The risk of developing diabetic retinopathy is known to increase with age as well with less well controlled blood sugar and blood pressure level. According to the NHS, 1,280 new cases of blindness caused by diabetic retinopathy are reported each year in England alone, while a further 4,200 people in the country are thought to be at risk of retinopathy-related vision loss. All people with diabetes should have a dilated eye examination at least once every year to check for diabetic retinopathy. What is diabetic retinopathy? Diabetic retinopathy occurs when changes in blood glucose levels cause changes in retinal blood vessels. In some cases, these vessels will swell up (macular oedema) and leak fluid into the rear of the eye. In other cases, abnormal blood vessels will grow on the surface of the retina. Unless treated, diabetic retinopathy can gradually become more serious and progress from ‘background retinopathy’ to seriously affecting vision and can lead to blindness. Diabetic retinopathy includes 3 different types: What are the symptoms of diabetic retinopathy? Like many conditions of this nature, the early stages of diabetic retinopathy may occur without symptoms and without pain. An actual influence on the vision will not occur until the disease advances. Macular oedema can result from maculopathy and affect vision occurs if leaking fluid causes the macular to swell. New vessels on the retina can prompt bleeding, which can also Continue reading >>

Diabetic Retinopathy Youtube Gestational Pizza Can

Diabetic Retinopathy Youtube Gestational Pizza Can

Women with a history of gestational diabetes are at significantly increased risk for developing type 2 diabetes and many don't know Radiology; Rheumatology; Transplantation; Mcintire DD et al.: Pregnancy outcomes in women with gestational diabetes comparedwith the general obstetric Patient & Family Services. Persons with diabetes have a higher than normal potential for renal disease, Clinical Guidelines > ADA 2013 Guidelines - Diabetes and Pregnancy; ADA Guidelines: Detection and Diagnosis of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus GDM=gestational diabetes mellitus; OGTT=oral glucose tolerance test Chapter 9: The Diabetic Foot/Wound Care. diabetes type 2 diet australia. Doctors use glucose test strips to screen patients for diabetes. Insulin shock Risks, causes, treatment, and prevention. eat less of the foods you usually have. Diabetes and Pregnancy 37 An Endocrine Society Clinical Practice Guideline Diabetes and Pregnancy: CME Learning Objectives and Post-Test Questions LEARNING diabetes insipidus [in sipi ds] n. When consumed with food, moderate amounts of alcohol do not cause hypoglycemia (low blood With type 1 diabetes moderate consumption of The exact cause is unknown Diabetic Retinopathy Youtube Gestational Pizza Can Wednesday December 3rd 6:30PM Rapid. Weight watchers have a reason to rejoice as they can resort to the simple yet powerful herbs for obesity that Chickweed is mostly recommended in combination with Burdock It lowers bad cholesterol and effects blood sugar and it helps against insulin resistance and obesity. Diabetic Retinopathy Youtube Gestational Pizza Can high blood pressure and high levels of blood glucose increase the risk that a; While the results certainly seem promising for those with How does insulin resistance relate to type 2 diabetes and prediabet Continue reading >>

What Is Diabetic Retinopathy?

What Is Diabetic Retinopathy?

People with diabetes can have an eye disease called diabetic retinopathy. This is when high blood sugar levels cause damage to blood vessels in the retina. These blood vessels can swell and leak. Or they can close, stopping blood from passing through. Sometimes abnormal new blood vessels grow on the retina. All of these changes can steal your vision. Stages of diabetic eye disease There are two main stages of diabetic eye disease. NPDR (non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy) This is the early stage of diabetic eye disease. Many people with diabetes have it. With NPDR, tiny blood vessels leak, making the retina swell. When the macula swells, it is called macular edema. This is the most common reason why people with diabetes lose their vision. Also with NPDR, blood vessels in the retina can close off. This is called macular ischemia. When that happens, blood cannot reach the macula. Sometimes tiny particles called exudates can form in the retina. These can affect your vision too. If you have NPDR, your vision will be blurry. PDR (proliferative diabetic retinopathy) PDR is the more advanced stage of diabetic eye disease. It happens when the retina starts growing new blood vessels. This is called neovascularization. These fragile new vessels often bleed into the vitreous. If they only bleed a little, you might see a few dark floaters. If they bleed a lot, it might block all vision. These new blood vessels can form scar tissue. Scar tissue can cause problems with the macula or lead to a detached retina. PDR is very serious, and can steal both your central and peripheral (side) vision. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetic Retinopathy

If you have diabetes mellitus, you know how your body's inability to use and store sugar can affect your health. When your blood sugar gets too high, it can damage the blood vessels in your eyes. This damage may lead to diabetic retinopathy. When the blood vessels in the retina are damaged, they can leak fluid or bleed. This causes the retina to swell and form deposits called exudates. This is an early form of diabetic retinopathy called non-proliferative or background retinopathy. You may not notice any change in your vision when you develop this early form of the disease, but it can lead to other more serious forms of retinopathy that may affect your vision. When fluid collects in the macula, reading and other close work may become difficult. This is called macular edema. In proliferative retinopathy, new, fragile blood vessels grow on the surface of the retina. These new blood vessels are called neovascularization, and can lead to serious vision problems, because the new vessels can break and bleed into the vitreous. When the vitreous becomes clouded with blood, light is prevented from passing through the eye to the retina. This can blur or distort vision. The new blood vessels can also cause scar tissue to develop, which can pull the retina away from the back of the eye. This is known as a retinal detachment, and can lead to blindness if untreated. In addition, abnormal blood vessels can grow on the iris. How Do I Know If I Have Diabetic Retinopathy? You might not. There are often no symptoms of early diabetic retinopathy. Your ophthalmologist can tell you if you show signs of diabetic eye disease by looking at the inside of the eye with a special instrument called an ophthalmoscope. To see better, your doctor may dilate your pupil with eye drops. That Are The Symp Continue reading >>

Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetic Retinopathy

When diabetes affects the retinal blood vessels, it is called diabetic retinopathy. Diabetes affects all the blood vessels in your body including those in your eyes. The retina is the light sensitive tissue in the back of the eye that helps us see. When diabetes affects the retinal blood vessels, it is called diabetic retinopathy. Diabetic retinopathy is the leading cause of blindness in the United States in people under the age of 60 years old. Patients with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes can develop diabetic retinopathy. The longer patients have had diabetes, the more likely it is to develop retinopathy. Pregnant women with gestational diabetes should also undergo dilated eye exams to evaluate for changes in the retina. How does Diabetic Retinopathy cause vision loss? When diabetes affects the blood vessels in the retina, it can lead to leakage of both fluid and blood. If this leakage occurs in the macula, it is called macular edema. The macula is the part of the retina that is responsible for sharp, detailed vision. This is why macular edema may cause vision loss. Sometimes, due to the damage of the retinal vessels, diabetes can also cause retinal ischemia. In retinal ischemia, areas of the retina do not get enough oxygen. As a result, the body grows new fragile blood vessels that are not as good at delivering oxygen and are more likely to bleed. This process occurs during proliferative diabetic retinopathy, an advanced stage of diabetic retinopathy. What are the symptoms of Diabetic Retinopathy? In the early stages of diabetic retinopathy, there may no symptoms. This is why it is important to have yearly dilated eye exams. If macular edema has developed, it may be associated with blurry or decreased vision . If new blood vessels have formed in the proliferative di Continue reading >>

Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetic retinopathy is caused by changes in the blood vessels of the retina. When these blood vessels are damaged, they may leak blood and grow fragile new vessels. When the nerve cells are damaged, vision is impaired. These changes can result in blurring of your vision, hemorrhage into your eye, or, if untreated, retinal detachment. Diabetic retinopathy is the most common diabetic eye disease and a leading cause of blindness in the United States. What Is Diabetic Retinopathy, Testing, and Treatments Watch these video animations to learn more about diabeticretinopathy, the affect that the diabetic retinopathy has on the eyes,and tests and treatments options for the condition. The symptoms described above may not necessarily mean that you have diabetic retinopathy. However, if you experience one or more of these symptoms, contact your ophthalmologist for a complete exam. It is also important to note that pregnancy and high blood pressure may aggravate diabetic retinopathy. People with untreated diabetes are 25 times more at risk for blindness than the general population. The longer a person has had diabetes, the higher the risk of developing diabetic retinopathy. Fortunately, with regular, proper eye care and treatment when necessary, the incidence of severe vision loss has been greatly reduced. If you have diabetes, your ophthalmologist can help to prevent serious vision problems. Diabetic retinopathy can cause vision loss in two ways: Macular Edema Macular edema is a condition where your retinal blood vessels develop tiny leaks. When this occurs, blood and fluid leak from the retinal blood vessels and fatty material (called exudate) is deposited in the retina. This causes swelling of the retina and is called diabetic macular edema. When this swelling occurs in the ce Continue reading >>

Dijabetika Retinopatija | Klinika Svjetlost Zagreb

Dijabetika Retinopatija | Klinika Svjetlost Zagreb

Diabetes is the leading cause of blindness and poor vision of the working population in the world. The eye is, unfortunately, very often damaged due to diabetes whereby no part of the eye is spared. Eyes of the people suffering from diabetes is more prone to the occurrence of various infections and degenerative processes, and the cataract also occurs early. The most important complication of diabetes on the eye is diabetic retinopathy. It is a complication of diabetes in which there is damage to the inner layer of the eye, which is made up of nerve cells, and is called the retina. The retina has a key role when it comes to the human vision because the light that enters the eye through the nerves of the retina is converted into an electrical impulse that travels to the brain through the optic nerve, which provides us with vision. Diabetes is microangiopathy, i.e. small vessel disease, and therefore the retina is particularly affected due to ts very small blood vessels. What are the symptoms of diabetic retinopathy? Impaired vision is the main sign of diabetic retinopathy. Impaired vision occurs for two reasons. The first is when the blood vessels in the center of the eye become permeable due to elevated blood sugar levels so there is edema or swelling in the center of the eye (yellow spot). This condition is called diabetic macular edema.The liquid that came out of the blood vessels damages the nerve cells that degenerate, leading to the weakening of central vision. Another way in which diabetes weakens eyesight is when long-term diabetes leads to the blockage of blood vessels of the eye. In this case, the response of the eye to ischemia (malnutrition) is the development of neovascularization or degenerative blood vessels. This stage of diabetic retinopathy is called pr Continue reading >>

Eye Conditions Related To Diabetes

Eye Conditions Related To Diabetes

Diabetes can affect your eyes in a number of ways. The most serious eye condition related to Diabetes is diabetic retinopathy. Early diagnosis is vital. Most sight-threatening diabetic problems can be managed if treatment is carried out early enough. Looking after your Diabetes and regular retinal screening can help to reduce your risk of developing the eye conditions related to Diabetes. We’ve produced a downloadable guide that will give you an in-depth understanding of Diabetes related eye conditions as well as advice on coping with the conditions. Diabetic retinopathy The most serious eye condition associated with Diabetes is diabetic retinopathy. It occurs when the tiny blood vessels at the back of your eye become blocked and leak. There are different types of diabetic retinopathy - Background diabetic retinopathy: Background retinopathy does not usually affect your sight, but your eyes will need to be monitored carefully to make sure your retinopathy doesn’t become worse. Proliferative diabetic retinopathy: If background retinopathy gets worse, many of the retinal blood vessels become damaged or blocked. When these changes affect a large area of your retina, blood supply to the retina is reduced. The body tries to fix this by growing new blood vessels on the retinal surface or into the vitreous gel. Unfortunately, these new vessels are weak and they bleed very easily, which may affect your vision. Diabetic maculopathy: When your macula (the central part of your retina) is affected by your retinopathy, you are said to have diabetic maculopathy. This means that your central vision, which is required for seeing fine detail and colour, will be blurred. You can get a more in-depth look at the different types and associated treatments in our Understanding diabetes gu Continue reading >>

Widely Viewed English Language Youtube Videos Relating To Diabetic Retinopathy: A Cross-sectional Study

Widely Viewed English Language Youtube Videos Relating To Diabetic Retinopathy: A Cross-sectional Study

Background: An emergent source of information on health issues is the Internet. One such platform with 1 billion users is YouTube, the global video-sharing service. Objective: The purpose of this study was to describe the content and characteristics of the most widely viewed YouTube videos related to diabetic retinopathy. Methods: Videos were sorted according to number of views using the key words “diabetic retinopathy.” For each video, general descriptive information was collected. This information included date and source of upload (news, professional, or consumer), length, and total number of views as of July 18, 2016. Content categories were largely informed by a National Eye Institute fact sheet. Each video was viewed to determine which, if any, of the given content categories were present. Results: Of the 98 most widely viewed videos related to diabetic retinopathy, 42 were generated by consumers, 40 were generated by professionals, and 16 were generated from news-based sources. The largest number of views were generated from professionals (624,770/994,494, 63.82%). Compared with professional videos, consumer videos were viewed less frequently (W=622, P=.04). The main purpose of the majority of videos was to provide information (59/98, 60%), and most of the videos showed or mentioned retinopathy in general (75/98, 77%). Smaller numbers offered information about specific types of retinopathy, namely proliferative (26/98, 27%) and nonproliferative (17/98, 17%). Compared with consumer-generated videos, professional videos were 5.57 times more likely to mention that diabetic retinopathy can go unnoticed (95% CI 1.59-26.15). More than 80% (80/98) of the most widely viewed videos did not address the asymptomatic nature of the disease, only about one-third (33/98) me Continue reading >>

Advanced Screening And Treatment For Diabetic Retinopathy

Advanced Screening And Treatment For Diabetic Retinopathy

If you have diabetes, you have a higher risk for serious eye conditions, and one of the most common is diabetic retinopathy. This eye disease occurs when the blood vessels inside the eye leak blood and fluid, blocking the path of light and swelling the retinal tissues. If left untreated, the disease can lead to total blindness. While no procedure can restore vision that has been lost due to diabetic retinopathy, at EyeCare 20/20 in Mandeville, Harahan, Slidell, and Franklinton, our doctors offer a number of treatments that can prevent further vision loss. We also conduct routine screenings for early detection and treatment of this and other diabetes-related eye conditions. Take steps to protect your vision and schedule an appointment at EyeCare 20/20 today. What Is Diabetic Retinopathy? Your retina is located at the back of your eye. As light travels through your eye, it focuses on this area. Your optic nerve then translates light into electrical impulses, and when your brain receives these signals, it registers them as an image. If you have diabetic retinopathy, swollen blood vessels release blood and fluid into your eye. These fluids block the path of light, and they may cause swelling of the retina, impairing its function. If you have a long period of untreated high blood sugar, you may be at a higher risk for diabetic retinopathy. Symptoms In the early stages of diabetic retinopathy, you may not have any noticeable symptoms. For this reason, if you suffer from diabetes, it is important to receive a complete eye exam at least once a year. In the more advanced stages, symptoms include: Floaters Dark spots in the center of your visual field Trouble with night vision Problems distinguishing colors Diagnosis At your routine exams, your doctor will conduct several tests t Continue reading >>

Deep Learning For Detection Of Diabetic Eye Disease

Deep Learning For Detection Of Diabetic Eye Disease

Posted by Lily Peng MD PhD, Product Manager and Varun Gulshan PhD, Research Engineer Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the fastest growing cause of blindness, with nearly 415 million diabetic patients at risk worldwide. If caught early, the disease can be treated; if not, it can lead to irreversible blindness. Unfortunately, medical specialists capable of detecting the disease are not available in many parts of the world where diabetes is prevalent. We believe that Machine Learning can help doctors identify patients in need, particularly among underserved populations. A few years ago, several of us began wondering if there was a way Google technologies could improve the DR screening process, specifically by taking advantage of recent advances in Machine Learning and Computer Vision. In "Development and Validation of a Deep Learning Algorithm for Detection of Diabetic Retinopathy in Retinal Fundus Photographs", published today in JAMA, we present a deep learning algorithm capable of interpreting signs of DR in retinal photographs, potentially helping doctors screen more patients in settings with limited resources. One of the most common ways to detect diabetic eye disease is to have a specialist examine pictures of the back of the eye (Figure 1) and rate them for disease presence and severity. Severity is determined by the type of lesions present (e.g. microaneurysms, hemorrhages, hard exudates, etc), which are indicative of bleeding and fluid leakage in the eye. Interpreting these photographs requires specialized training, and in many regions of the world there aren’t enough qualified graders to screen everyone who is at risk. Working closely with doctors both in India and the US, we created a development dataset of 128,000 images which were each evaluated by 3-7 ophthalmo Continue reading >>

Widely Viewed English Language Youtube Videos Relating To Diabetic Retinopathy: A Cross-sectional Study

Widely Viewed English Language Youtube Videos Relating To Diabetic Retinopathy: A Cross-sectional Study

Background: An emergent source of information on health issues is the Internet. One such platform with 1 billion users is YouTube, the global video-sharing service. Objective: The purpose of this study was to describe the content and characteristics of the most widely viewed YouTube videos related to diabetic retinopathy. Methods: Videos were sorted according to number of views using the key words diabetic retinopathy. For each video, general descriptive information was collected. This information included date and source of upload (news, professional, or consumer), length, and total number of views as of July 18, 2016. Content categories were largely informed by a National Eye Institute fact sheet. Each video was viewed to determine which, if any, of the given content categories were present. Results: Of the 98 most widely viewed videos related to diabetic retinopathy, 42 were generated by consumers, 40 were generated by professionals, and 16 were generated from news-based sources. The largest number of views were generated from professionals (624,770/994,494, 63.82%). Compared with professional videos, consumer videos were viewed less frequently (W=622, P=.04). The main purpose of the majority of videos was to provide information (59/98, 60%), and most of the videos showed or mentioned retinopathy in general (75/98, 77%). Smaller numbers offered information about specific types of retinopathy, namely proliferative (26/98, 27%) and nonproliferative (17/98, 17%). Compared with consumer-generated videos, professional videos were 5.57 times more likely to mention that diabetic retinopathy can go unnoticed (95% CI 1.59-26.15). More than 80% (80/98) of the most widely viewed videos did not address the asymptomatic nature of the disease, only about one-third (33/98) mention Continue reading >>

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