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Diabetic Retinopathy Vitamins

Vitamin D Deficiency Linked To Diabetic Retinopathy

Vitamin D Deficiency Linked To Diabetic Retinopathy

Vitamin D Deficiency Linked to Diabetic Retinopathy Vitamin D Deficiency Linked to Diabetic Retinopathy ORLANDO, Fla. A new meta-analysis of 9 large observational studies suggests that there is a significant association between vitamin D deficiency and diabetic retinopathy. The authors of the meta-analysis reported at the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) 25th Annual Scientific & Clinical Congress that there was a quantifiable statistically significant difference in mean serum vitamin D levels between patients with diabetic retinopathy and control groups. Consequently, they called for patients with diabetes who have low vitamin D levels to be screened for diabetic retinopathy. Our study shows that patients with diabetic retinopathy tend to have vitamin D deficiency, while patients without diabetic retinopathy tend to have normal vitamin D. Although this is a meta-analysis of observational studies, it signifies a role of future research on vitamin D supplementation use to prevent or slow progression of diabetic retinopathy in patients with diabetes, said study author Anawin Sanguankeo, MD, an internal medicine resident at Bassett Medical Center, Cooperstown, New York. Currently, the role of vitamin D in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy remains unknown. Dr Sanguankeo and his colleagues performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to comprehensively determine the strength of association between vitamin D deficiency and diabetic retinopathy. They examined whether there were any significant differences in serum vitamin D levels between patients with diabetic retinopathy and controls. There is a statistically significant association between diabetic retinopathy and vitamin D deficiency with each severity of diabetic retinopathy, with a poole Continue reading >>

Common Vitamins And Supplements To Treat Diabetic Retinopathy

Common Vitamins And Supplements To Treat Diabetic Retinopathy

Learn about User Reviews and read IMPORTANT information about user generated content Conditions of Use and Important Information: This information is meant to supplement, not replace advice from your doctor or healthcare provider and is not meant to cover all possible uses, precautions, interactions or adverse effects. This information may not fit your specific health circumstances. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified health care provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor or health care professional before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your health care plan or treatment and to determine what course of therapy is right for you. This copyrighted material is provided by Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Consumer Version. Information from this source is evidence-based and objective, and without commercial influence. For professional medical information on natural medicines, see Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Professional Version. Therapeutic Research Faculty 2009. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetic retinopathy is a potentially blinding complication of diabetes that damages the eye's retina. It effects half of all Americans diagnosed with diabetes. However, only 6% of diabetics lose their vision. Blindness is largely preventable if patient and the medical team work together diligently. Prevention relies upon the proper use of medications, daily blood sugar testing, correct lifestyle habits, diet and supplementation. Complications related to sugar/glucose imbalances in the blood can result in damage to the retina which may not be noticeable at first, but the consequences can get worse with time severely threatening vision. Next: Nutrition, vitamins, diet, & lifestyle for diabetic retinopathy. Symptoms It is possible to have diabetic retinopathy for a long time before you realize it. In many cases, the symptoms of diabetic retinopathy are not apparent until the retina has been quite damaged and your sight has been compromised. Symptoms of diabetic retinopathy and its complications may include: Blurry or distorted vision Difficulty reading and other close work Increased number of eye floaters Partial or total vision loss or what feels like a permanent shadow cast across your field of vision Eye pain Causes of Diabetic Retinopathy The blood/ocular barrier layer of the retina is a compound structure in the eye that prevents large particles in large capillaries from entering the retina. The retinal pigmented layer is responsible for the outer layer of this barrier and diabetic retinopathy incidence is related to its breakdown. 11 Photoreceptor cell death/damage may play a central role in deterioration of microcapillaries in the eye that leads to diabetic retinpathy. Their deterioration is another hallmark of development of the condition.12 Researchers now report Continue reading >>

Vitamin D Deficiency Linked To Diabetic Retinopathy

Vitamin D Deficiency Linked To Diabetic Retinopathy

Vitamin D Deficiency Linked to Diabetic Retinopathy ORLANDO, Florida Diabetic retinopathy may be yet another ill effect associated with vitamin D deficiency, a new meta-analysis and systematic review suggests. The findings were presented May 27, 2016 here at the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists 2016 Annual Meeting by Anawin Sanguankeo, MD, a second-year resident in the department of internal medicine, Bassett Medical Center, Cooperstown, New York. "Patients with diabetes and low vitamin D levels may develop earlier or more severe diabetic retinopathy," Dr Sanguankeo told Medscape Medical News in an interview. The mechanism could be twofold, he said. Studies suggest that vitamin D might improve insulin secretion in type 2 diabetes and may also directly reduce vascular endothelial growth factors. (Thus, deficiency would have the opposite effects.) Animal studies have demonstrated vitamin D receptors in the retina, and when given vitamin D, vascularization was reduced in animal models. "But in humans, there are very few studies that assess how vitamin D supplementation affects diabetic retinopathy," Dr Sanguankeo commented. And such research would be needed before vitamin D supplementation could be recommended as an intervention to prevent diabetic retinopathy, he explained during a press briefing, adding that he plans to start such a study soon. Asked to comment, W Reid Litchfield, MD, an endocrinologist in private practice in Henderson, Nevada, and an AACE board member, called the study "hypothesis-generating" but cautioned that the location of the individual trials would have a major effect on the outcome, given that people living in more northern climates naturally have lower vitamin D levels. Indeed, a UK cross-sectional study that was too recent to Continue reading >>

Relation Between Intake Of Vitamins C And E And Risk Of Diabetic Retinopathy In The Atherosclerosis Risk In Communities Study

Relation Between Intake Of Vitamins C And E And Risk Of Diabetic Retinopathy In The Atherosclerosis Risk In Communities Study

Relation between intake of vitamins C and E and risk of diabetic retinopathy in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study From the Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences (AEM, RK, and JAM) and the Departments of Population Health and Biostatistical Medical Informatics (MP), University of Wisconsin Medical School, Madison; the Division of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis (ARF); and the Department of Nutrition, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (JS) Search for other works by this author on: From the Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences (AEM, RK, and JAM) and the Departments of Population Health and Biostatistical Medical Informatics (MP), University of Wisconsin Medical School, Madison; the Division of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis (ARF); and the Department of Nutrition, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (JS) Search for other works by this author on: From the Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences (AEM, RK, and JAM) and the Departments of Population Health and Biostatistical Medical Informatics (MP), University of Wisconsin Medical School, Madison; the Division of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis (ARF); and the Department of Nutrition, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (JS) Search for other works by this author on: From the Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences (AEM, RK, and JAM) and the Departments of Population Health and Biostatistical Medical Informatics (MP), University of Wisconsin Medical School, Madison; the Division of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis (ARF); and the Department of Nutrition, University of North Carolina, Chap Continue reading >>

Plasma Mda And Antioxidant Vitamins In Diabetic Retinopathy

Plasma Mda And Antioxidant Vitamins In Diabetic Retinopathy

Plasma MDA and antioxidant vitamins in diabetic retinopathy Department of Biochemistry, SCB Medical College, Cuttack, 753007 Orissa India S. Kumari, Phone: 9861181957, Email: [email protected]_nukir . Copyright Association of Clinical Biochemists of India 2008 This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia in diabetes mellitus induce increased lipid peroxidation and peroxyl radical formation, an important mechanism in genesis of microangiopathy. We took up a study on oxidative stress, measured by plasma MDA and antioxidant vitamin status in type 2 DM patients with and without retinopathy and compared them with a control non-diabetic group. Lipid peroxidation marker MDA was significantly elevated (p < 0.001) in both the diabetic groups whereas, serum vitamin E and vitamin C registered a significant fall (p<0.001) as compared to controls. Our correlation study revealed a significant positive association between plasma MDA with both fasting and 2hr post prandial plasma glucose (r=0.81, p < 0.001, r=0.92, p <0.001) suggesting the role of hyperglycemia in free radical production. Plasma MDA also depicted significant positive relation (p< 0.001) with all lipid parameters except serum HDLc pointing the role of dyslipidemia towards lipid peroxidation. Plasma MDA level was also found to be negatively correlated with both the vitamins (p<0.001, p<0.001) in the study group explaining their protective consumption in the oxidative process prevailing in diabetic retinopathy. Key Words: Oxidative stress, Microangiopathy, Peroxy radical The Full Text of this article is available as a PDF (139K). These references are in PubMed. This may not be the complete list of references from this article. 1. Sulochana K.N., Ramakrishnan S., Rajesh M., Coral K., Continue reading >>

~diabetic Retinopathy (dr)

~diabetic Retinopathy (dr)

Diabetic retinopathy (DR), the leading cause of visual disability and blindness among adults in the developed world, may affect as many as 20 million people. Early detection and treatment are keys to preventing the vision loss and blindness associated with the disease. Unfortunately, only about half of those with diabetes have proper eye examinations on a yearly basis. It is very important that diabetics have a dilated eye exam each year. Retinopathy damages the retina by destroying the capillaries (minuscule blood vessels connecting arteries and veins) that provide blood to the retina, the light-sensitive nerve tissue that sends visual images to the brain. With the onset of retinopathy, these vessels weaken or bulge with microaneurysms that may hemorrhage, leaking blood or fluid into surrounding tissue. When new blood vessels grow on the retina (and into the vitreous), they can cause blurred vision and even temporary blindness. The real danger lies in the scar tissue that ultimately forms, detaching the retina from the back of the eye and often causing permanent loss of vision. Chronically elevated blood insulin and glucose levels induce retinopathy. Fortunately, research shows that even after having long-term diabetes, lowering glucose has a positive effect on slowing the progression of retinopathy. A study took place involving 834 people who were over the age of 30 when they developed diabetes and who were approximately 65 at the start of the study. A glycohemoglobin test was performed at the start of the study, along with two follow-ups, 4 and 10 years later, which included a physical and eye exam. Glycohemoglobin (also known as hemoglobin A1C) is the best measurement of long-term glucose control. A high glycohemoglobin number correlates with uncontrolled diabetes. Continue reading >>

Can Supplements Help People With Diabetes Avoid Retinopathy?

Can Supplements Help People With Diabetes Avoid Retinopathy?

Follow all of ScienceDaily's latest research news and top science headlines ! Can Supplements Help People with Diabetes Avoid Retinopathy? In theory, Vitamins C and E and magnesium could help prevent or limit diabetic retinopathy (DR), a potentially blinding disease, since each nutrient causes the body to respond in ways that alter retinopathy mechanisms. In theory, Vitamins C and E and magnesium could help prevent or limit diabetic retinopathy (DR), a potentially blinding disease, since each nutrient causes the body to respond in ways that alter retinopathy mechanisms. For example, in animal models Vitamins C and E suppress production of a growth factor, VEG-F, which can promote abnormal blood vessels in the retina. And high dietary levels of magnesium are associated with lower blood pressure and blood sugar, both of which correlate with a lower risk of retinopathy. A research team led by Amanda Adler, MD, PhD, Institute of Metabolic Science, Cambridge, United Kingdom, surveyed studies published from 1988 through 2008 on the impact of these micronutrients on DR. Based on 15 selected studies comprising 4,094 individuals, Dr. Adler says to the evidence is not strong enough yet to recommend Vitamins C or E or magnesium supplements for patients with diabetes. She thinks the research should continue, though, and recommends specific parameters. "It is a very attractive proposition that what one eats, rather than a medication, might reduce the risk of diabetic complications. Ideally, future studies would include frequent measurement of intake of these three nutrients through diet and supplements, standardized exams to identify DR, and agreed-upon biomarkers to assess DR progression," Dr. Adler said. "If such studies showed apparent protection against DR, then a randomized cl Continue reading >>

Supplements With Retinopathy

Supplements With Retinopathy

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community So ive not long received a letter with my eye results saying that I have pre proliferative retinopathy, and just wondered if using lutein, billberry and ginko bilboa is safe to use? I no there ment to help with eye health but don't want to use something that may infact make it worse, I have an apt at the eye hospital on the 30th Jan. I take all three supplements (including zeaxanthine) myself but I do not have any traces of retinopathy at present; only very early stage cataracts. I take the supplements for eye health maintenance or as a preventative. It should be quite safe to use but may not reverse an existing diseased condition. Two other supplements that have been shown to have possible benefit in pre proliferative retinopathy are pine bark extract and C-peptide . You might want to read Ray Sahelian's article on supplements for diabetic retinopathy for his viewpoints on the topic. As someone who has had retinopathy problems in the past I asked my Ophthalmologist if supplements were worth buying, he said he didn't think they were and insisted that a diet rich if fruit & vegetables provided all the nutrients to aid eye health. Chalky, if you've not seen the following website I suggest you have a good read around, it has a wealth of information on diabetic retinopathy: When I saw a consult for check up after cataract surgery, I asked his opinion about vitamins and supplements, he said the only one he would recommend was fish oil to keep eye in good order. I asked his opinion about vitamins and supplements, he said the only one he would recommend was fish oil to keep eye in good order. I've no traces of retinopathy but I've been using goji berries and Continue reading >>

Vitamin D And Retinopathy In Adults With Diabetes Mellitus.

Vitamin D And Retinopathy In Adults With Diabetes Mellitus.

Arch Ophthalmol. 2012 Jun;130(6):756-60. doi: 10.1001/archophthalmol.2011.2749. Vitamin D and retinopathy in adults with diabetes mellitus. Office of Health Outcomes Research, Winthrop University Hospital, Mineola, NY 11501, USA. [email protected] OBJECTIVE To explore a hypothesized association between vitamin D inadequacy and diabetic retinopathy. METHODS This cross-sectional study analyzed data from individuals aged 40 years and older with diabetes mellitus who participated in the interview and medical examination components of the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey conducted from October 1, 1988, through September 30, 1994. The relationship between diabetic retinopathy and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration was evaluated using regression analysis in the presence of demographic and clinical covariates, such as age, race, obesity, and persistent hyperglycemia. RESULTS On the basis of the 1790 adults with diabetes who met the study's inclusion criteria, the percentage of individuals with vitamin D deficiency increased with severity of retinopathy: no retinopathy, 27.9%; mild, 28.2%; moderate to severe, 43.2%; and proliferative, 64.6% (P=.01). Regression analysis of retinopathy severity vs serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration did not demonstrate a statistically significant relationship between the two variables (P=.07). CONCLUSIONS This study found an association between severity of diabetic retinopathy and prevalence of vitamin D deficiency, but the findings were inconclusive about the existence of a relationship between retinopathy severity and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration. Given previous research indicating possible anti-inflammatory and antiangiogenic properties of vitamin D, the connection between vitamin D and diabetic re Continue reading >>

Can A Supplement Fight Diabetic Retinopathy?

Can A Supplement Fight Diabetic Retinopathy?

Excerpted from page 53 of the September 2015 edition of AOA Focus. Through his years treating patients with diabetes, A. Paul Chous, O.D., has advised plenty of patients on using supplementation to slow or prevent diabetic retinopathy. "If our hypothesis is true, the greatest benefit may be to patients before they get sight-threatening disease." "There are so many nutrients and compounds that may play a part and have shown some success in animal models or small human trials with single nutrients," says Dr. Chous, optometric representative to the National Diabetes Education Program of the National Institutes of Health. "We wanted to move this into something more substantial, with a multicomponent nutritional supplement." The result is "The Diabetes Visual Function Supplement Study," published online in June 2015 in the British Journal of Ophthalmology. Dr. Chous and colleagues performed a 6-month randomized, controlled trial in 67 adults, all with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Participants had either no diabetic retinopathy or mild to moderate nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy, and all had no significant differences on key study measures at baseline. The supplement contained a mix of vitamins and nutrients tied to inhibiting retinopathy in previous work. For instance, benfotiamine, a lipid-soluble analog of vitamin B1, has been shown to shunt glucose metabolites away from the biochemical pathways involved in diabetic retinopathy. Other constituents included Pycnogenol, lipoic acid, vitamin D3, curcumin extract, and zeaxanthin and lutein. At six months, study participants taking the supplement had better visual function (contrast and visual field sensitivity, and color vision) than those taking placebo, had improvements in serum lipid measures and hsCRP (95 percent p-val Continue reading >>

Possible Link Between Vitamin D Deficiency And Diabetic Retinopathy: Meta-analysis

Possible Link Between Vitamin D Deficiency And Diabetic Retinopathy: Meta-analysis

Possible link between vitamin D deficiency and diabetic retinopathy: Meta-analysis Related tags: Diabetes mellitus , Vitamin d deficiency There is a statistically significant link between diabetic retinopathy and vitamin D deficiency, according to a new review. This was based on a meta-analysis of 10,007 diabetic individuals aged 18 and above, from countries such as the US, Japan, Italy, India, Iran, the Netherlands and China. They were assessed for both vitamin D deficiency and diabetic retinopathy, and those suffering from diabetic retinopathy were shown to have considerably lower serum vitamin D levels than non-sufferers. The review said, Diabetic retinopathy is one of the leading causes of blindness worldwide and is the leading cause of blindness for individuals aged 20 to 64 years in the United States. It went on to state that 20 years after the onset of diabetes, almost all type 1 diabetes patients and over 60% of type 2 diabetes patients are found to have diabetic retinopathy. Vitamin D is well established as useful in treating inflammation and the formation of new blood vessels. But despite vitamin D receptors having been identified in the human retina and implicated in the development of diabetic retinopathy, the part it plays in the condition has been obscured in clinical studies by disease pathogenesis, varied diabetic retinopathy classifications, and differing patient ethnic populations. Additionally, there are currently no English-language reports on the effect of vitamin D supplementation on diabetic retinopathy in diabetics with a deficiency. It was also discovered that latitude influences the production of vitamin D under the skin. A previous study had found that people living close the equator had the highest vitamin D levels when compared to people li Continue reading >>

12 Natural Tips For Diabetic Retinopathy Prevention & Management

12 Natural Tips For Diabetic Retinopathy Prevention & Management

by Katherine Brind’Amour, PhD Diabetic retinopathy is an eye disease that can affect people with any form of diabetes: Type 1, Type 2 or gestational diabetes. The condition is caused when blood sugar and blood pressure in the tiny blood vessels in the eye “spring a leak” and release blood into the eye. This leads to blurry vision, seeing floaters or even complete vision loss in severe cases. The tricky thing about diabetic retinopathy is that not everyone has symptoms right away. Many people may have some damage from this condition without realizing the cause, and still others may attribute the vision problem to something else, such as getting older. As many as 45 percent of the 29 million Americans with diabetes have some degree of diabetic retinopathy, and half of them may not even know it. (1, 2) The good news is that people with diabetes can prevent or delay diabetic retinopathy through a variety of natural approaches. And if the disease does begin, there are natural ways to manage the condition and keep it from getting worse. The bad news? It requires long-term effort, since vision loss from diabetic retinopathy is a lifelong risk for people with diabetes. What Is Diabetic Retinopathy? To define diabetic retinopathy, you first have to understand diabetes. Diabetes is a disease in which the body has difficulty making or using sugar (glucose). This leads to periods of high or low blood sugar, which can make it hard for the rest of the body to function at times. In diabetic retinopathy, high blood sugar starts to damage the tiny blood vessels in the retina, which is part of the eye. The blood vessels may close or swell and leak. (3) The eye may also start to grow new blood vessels. These changes in blood vessel health eventually cause changes in vision. (4) Ther Continue reading >>

Vitamin C And Superoxide Dismutase (sod) For Diabetic Retinopathy

Vitamin C And Superoxide Dismutase (sod) For Diabetic Retinopathy

PubMed Health. A service of the National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet]. Chichester, UK: John Wiley & Sons, Ltd; 2003-. doi: 10.1002/14651858.CD006695.pub2 Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet]. Vitamin C and superoxide dismutase (SOD) for diabetic retinopathy Link to full article: [ Cochrane Library ] Diabetic retinopathy or eye disease is the leading cause of blindness in developed countries. Laser therapy currently is the primary means in the treatment of diabetic retinopathy. It nevertheless is a procedure which destroys important cells in the eye. There are theories that socalled free radicals (substances which are thought to be harmful to body tissues ) might be influenced by new medications to prevent or slow down vision loss in people with diabetes . Preliminary studies with vitamin C and 'superoxide dismutase' suggest that they may have an important role in treatment of diabetic retinopathy. Unfortunately, our thorough search to detect sound clinical studies with these compounds did not identify any relevant trial. Future updates of this review may find important new information about this potentially hopeful new therapy . Background: There is increasing evidence that diabetic retinopathy is caused by the action of free radicals. Radical scavengers like vitamin C and superoxide dismutase (SOD) may influence the outcome and progression of diabetic retinopathy, but no systematic review of the literature has been published to examine this hypothesis. Objectives: The aim of the current research was to review the literature in a standard systematic way in order to assess the effects of vitamin C and superoxide dismutase on diabeti Continue reading >>

Best Eye Vitamins For Diabetics

Best Eye Vitamins For Diabetics

Diabetes is a condition that is the direct result of having an excessive amount of glucose in the blood, which can affect many different areas of your body, including the eyes. It has been reported that the related conditions of the eyes that are directly related to diabetes are the leading cause of blindness in adults ages 20 all the way to 74. In order to prevent blindness and other types of vision damage related to diabetes, you should talk with your doctor about the options that are available, including natural vitamins. Eye Disease Related to Diabetes The most common condition that affects the eyes and is directly related to diabetes is known as retinopathy. This is a disorder that will damage the actual blood vessels that are present in your eye’s retina. Additionally, the disorder will affect the tissue that provides the lining at the back area of your eyes. Sometimes, your doctor can correct the disorder with laser treatments that will eliminate the bleeding, as well as reduce the chance for further damage to the blood vessels. However, diabetics also run the risk of developing conditions and disorders such as glaucoma and cataracts, which can both reduce vision capabilities. But, it may be possible to take the matter into your own hands. If you’re serious and diligent about fixing your eyesight naturally, there are many vitamins that are available to help you to reduce and prevent the chance of developing eye conditions due to diabetes. How Vitamins Help Diabetic retinopathy cannot be aided by vitamins. However, antioxidant nutrients may help in the promotion of overall retinal health and reduce the chance of developing retinal damage. Some of the vitamins that have been proven to do this include vitamin C, vitamin A, and vitamin E. These antioxidants will Continue reading >>

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