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Diabetic Retinopathy In Only One Eye

Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetes can affect your sight. Diabetic Retinopathy is the leading cause of preventable blindness in the United States in people 20 to 65 years of age. Severe vision loss can usually be prevented with early diagnosis and treatment. Patients with both insulin dependent and non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus should have yearly dilated eye exams. Diabetic retinopathy is a progressive disease, and careful monitoring can usually prevent severe vision loss. Patients with diabetes mellitus do not process and store sugar properly so that high sugar levels cause retinal blood vessel damage (diabetic retinopathy). Types of diabetic retinopathy There are two types of diabetic retinopathy: nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR) and proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR). NPDR is an early stage of diabetic retinopathy. In this stage, small blood vessels within the retina leak blood or fluid. The leaking fluid causes retinal swelling, deposition of exudates and blurred vision. Many people with diabetes have mild NPDR, which may not yet affect their vision. When vision is affected it is the result of macular edema and/or macular ischemia. Macular edema is swelling or thickening of the macula, a small area in the center of the retina that is needed for fine visual acuity. The swelling is caused by fluid leaking from damaged retinal blood vessels. It is the most common cause of visual loss in diabetes. Vision loss may be mild to severe, but even in the worst cases, peripheral vision continues to function. Macular ischemia occurs when small blood vessels close. Vision blurs because the macula no longer receives sufficient blood supply to work properly. PDR is present when abnormal new vessels (neovascularization) begin growing on the surface of the retina or optic nerve. Th Continue reading >>

Diabetic Retinopathy At Eye Care Center Of Lake County, Ltd. Serving Greater Chicago, Northern Illinois & Southern Wisconsin

Diabetic Retinopathy At Eye Care Center Of Lake County, Ltd. Serving Greater Chicago, Northern Illinois & Southern Wisconsin

There are many patients with Diabetes Mellitus who believe that it is simply an inability to effectively metabolize and process glucose. Unfortunately, the reality is that the affects of diabetes are considerably more widespread and actually affect many organs and tissues throughout your body. Diabetes causes damage to the small blood vessels throughout the body. When diabetes damages these small blood vessels it can impair the normal circulation of blood in organs and tissues. It is quite common for patients with diabetes to experience difficulty with the circulation in their legs, kidneys, heart, brain and eyes--especially the very small blood vessels of the eye found in the Retina. When diabetes causes damage to the small blood vessels in the retina, it is called Diabetic Retinopathy. Diabetic Retinopathy is the most frequent cause of new cases of blindness among adults aged 20-74 years old. However, with early diagnosis and treatment, progression of the disease and its associated vision loss can at a minimum be slowed, and in many cases vision loss from Diabetic Retinopathy can be prevented. Stages of Diabetic Retinopathy Diabetic Retinopathy tends to appear and progress in Stages beginning with Mild Nonproliferative Retinopathy, progressing to Moderate Nonproliferative Retinopathy, further advancing to Severe Nonproliferative Retinopathy and without proper attention progressing into the most severe stage, Proliferative Retinopathy. Mild and Moderate Nonproliferative Retinopathy Mild Nonproliferative Retinopathy is the earliest stage of Diabetic Retinopathy. It is characterized by the presence of “dot” and “blot” hemorrhages and “microaneurysms” in the Retina. Microaneurysms are areas of balloon like swelling of the tiny blood vessels in the Retina cause Continue reading >>

Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetic Retinopathy

There are two types of diabetic retinopathy: nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR) and proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR1. NPDR, commonly known as background retinopathy, is an early stage of diabetic retinopathy. In this stage, tiny blood vessels within the retina leak blood or fluid. The leaking fluid causes the retina to swell or to form deposits called exudates. Many people with diabetes have mild NPDR, which usually does not affect their vision. When vision is affected it is the result of macular edema and/or macular ischemia. Macular edema is swelling or thickening of the macula, a small area in the center of the retina that allows us to see fine details clearly. The swelling is caused by fluid leaking from retinal blood vessels. It is the most common cause of visual loss in diabetes. Vision loss may be mild to severe, but even in the worst cases, peripheral vision continues to function. Macular ischemia occurs when small blood vessels (capillaries) close. Vision blurs because the macula no longer receives sufficient blood supply to work properly. PDR is present when abnormal new vessels (neovascularization) begin growing on the surface of the retina or optic nerve. The main cause of PDR is widespread closure of retinal blood vessels, preventing adequate blood flow. The retina responds by growing new blood vessels in an attempt to supply blood to the area where the original vessels closed. Unfortunately, the new, abnormal blood vessels do not resupply the retina with normal blood flow. The new vessels are often accompanied by scar tissue that may cause wrinkling or detachment of the retina. PDR may cause more severe vision loss than NPDR because it can affect both central and peripheral vision. Proliferative diabetic retinopathy causes visual loss in Continue reading >>

Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetic Retinopathy

Overview Diabetic retinopathy is a complication of diabetes, caused by high blood sugar levels damaging the back of the eye (retina). It can cause blindness if left undiagnosed and untreated. However, it usually takes several years for diabetic retinopathy to reach a stage where it could threaten your sight. To minimise the risk of this happening, people with diabetes should: ensure they control their blood sugar levels, blood pressure and cholesterol attend diabetic eye screening appointments – annual screening is offered to all people with diabetes aged 12 and over to pick up and treat any problems early on How diabetes can affect the eyes The retina is the light-sensitive layer of cells at the back of the eye that converts light into electrical signals. The signals are sent to the brain and the brain turns them into the images you see. The retina needs a constant supply of blood, which it receives through a network of tiny blood vessels. Over time, a persistently high blood sugar level can damage these blood vessels in three main stages: tiny bulges develop in the blood vessels, which may bleed slightly but don’t usually affect your vision – this is known as background retinopathy more severe and widespread changes affect the blood vessels, including more significant bleeding into the eye – this is known as pre-proliferative retinopathy scar tissue and new blood vessels, which are weak and bleed easily, develop on the retina – this is known as proliferative retinopathy and it can result in some loss of vision However, if a problem with your eyes is picked up early, lifestyle changes and/or treatment can stop it getting worse. Read about the stages of diabetic retinopathy. Am I at risk of diabetic retinopathy? Anyone with type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes i Continue reading >>

Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetic Retinopathy

Tweet Diabetic retinopathy is the most common form of diabetic eye disease. Diabetic retinopathy usually only affects people who have had diabetes (diagnosed or undiagnosed) for a significant number of years. Retinopathy can affect all diabetics and becomes particularly dangerous, increasing the risk of blindness, if it is left untreated. The risk of developing diabetic retinopathy is known to increase with age as well with less well controlled blood sugar and blood pressure level. According to the NHS, 1,280 new cases of blindness caused by diabetic retinopathy are reported each year in England alone, while a further 4,200 people in the country are thought to be at risk of retinopathy-related vision loss. All people with diabetes should have a dilated eye examination at least once every year to check for diabetic retinopathy. What is diabetic retinopathy? Diabetic retinopathy occurs when changes in blood glucose levels cause changes in retinal blood vessels. In some cases, these vessels will swell up (macular oedema) and leak fluid into the rear of the eye. In other cases, abnormal blood vessels will grow on the surface of the retina. Unless treated, diabetic retinopathy can gradually become more serious and progress from ‘background retinopathy’ to seriously affecting vision and can lead to blindness. Diabetic retinopathy includes 3 different types: What are the symptoms of diabetic retinopathy? Like many conditions of this nature, the early stages of diabetic retinopathy may occur without symptoms and without pain. An actual influence on the vision will not occur until the disease advances. Macular oedema can result from maculopathy and affect vision occurs if leaking fluid causes the macular to swell. New vessels on the retina can prompt bleeding, which can also Continue reading >>

Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetic retinopathy is an ocular manifestation of diabetes, a systemic disease, which affects up to 80% of all patients who have had diabetes for 10 years or more. The longer a person has diabetes, the higher his or her chances of developing diabetic retinopathy. Despite these intimidating statistics, research indicates that at least 90% of new cases could be reduced. Education on diabetic eye disease and retinopathy is especially important because it is often preventable or treatable. Unfortunately, this means it can go unnoticed in the early stages. As the disease progresses, permanent vision loss is a real possibility if the patient does not receive treatment. There are multiple forms of diabetic retinopathy, and only your doctor can determine your particular form. With one form, blood vessels may swell and leak fluid. In another, abnormal new blood vessels grow on the surface of the retina. Stages of Diabetic Retinopathy In the early stages of diabetic retinopathy, many do not notice a change to their vision because there are little to no symptoms. If an eye doctor does not catch diabetic retinopathy early, one could sustain mild blurriness at near or in the distance, as well as floaters. In severe cases, a sudden loss of vision may occur. Unfortunately, diabetic retinopathy can result in permanent damage that cannot be reversed. However, if caught in time, prescribed treatments may slow development and prevent vision loss. Concerned about the onset of diabetic retinopathy? Please call us at Greenville EyeCare to schedule a preventative eye examination today with one of our optometrists. Learn more about this type of diabetic eye disease by watching our video. Continue reading >>

You Only Need Good Vision In One Eye To Keep Driving!

You Only Need Good Vision In One Eye To Keep Driving!

In most states, you only need one eye to maintain a driver’s license. Most states require one eye to have at least 20/40. In addition, a certain degree of peripheral vision, or continuous field of vision, is required to qualify for an unrestricted license. A restricted license may still be obtained with slightly lower requirements. Please check your own state laws. Can I Drive? Obviously, loss of independence is one of the biggest concerns a patient has after being told of permanent vision loss. While many eye doctors may not be comfortable with this conversation, most retina specialists, dealing with diabetic retinopathy and macular degeneration, have to be well versed. Professional Driving Fortunately, in most circumstances where there may be significant vision loss in one eye, the fellow eye is still in good shape. I am usually quick to point out that one eye is all that is required to maintain a driver’s license. There are a few professional exceptions; those with commercial driver’s license (CDL), pilots and locomotive engineers require both eyes to see well. I am sure there are a few others, but my point is that loss of vision in one eye does NOT usually cause a change in careers. Failing the Vision Test When you take the vision test at the motor vehicle department, keep in mind that these are screening tests. Patients that do not see well out of both eyes will fail, but this does not mean loss of the driver’s license. Screening tests are designed to make sure that “one-eyed” patients are seen by an eye doctor. Most states have a separate form that must be completed by an eye doctor upon failing the screening test. Completion of this form ensures passing or failing the vision requirements of the driver’s license exam. The Visual Requirements One eye Continue reading >>

Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetic Retinopathy

On this page: Diabetes and diabetic retinopathy • DR symptoms • Types of diabetic eye disease • Who gets diabetic retinopathy? • Minorities and diabetic eye disease • When is DR a disability? • Eye exam assistance program • Prevention • Diabetic retinopathy videos Diabetic retinopathy — vision-threatening damage to the retina of the eye caused by diabetes — is the leading cause of blindness among working-age Americans. The good news: Diabetic retinopathy often can be prevented with early detection, proper management of your diabetes and routine eye exams performed by your optometrist or ophthalmologist. According to the International Diabetes Federation (IDF), the United States has the highest rate of diabetes among 38 developed nations, with approximately 30 million Americans — roughly 11 percent of the U.S. population between the ages of 20 and 79 — having the disease. About 90 percent of Americans with diabetes have type 2 diabetes, which develops when the the body fails to produce enough insulin — a hormone secreted by the pancreas that enables dietary sugar to enter the cells of the body — or the body becomes resistant to insulin. This causes glucose (sugar) levels in the bloodstream to rise and can eventually damage the eyes, kidneys, nerves or heart, according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA). Risk factors for type 2 diabetes include obesity, an unhealthful diet and physical inactivity. Unfortunately, the prevalence of obesity and type 2 diabetes has increased significantly in the United States over the past 30 years. According to data released by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in December 2015, there were 1.4 million new cases of diabetes reported in the U.S. in 2014. Though this annual number is d Continue reading >>

Risk Of Diabetic Retinopathy At First Screen In Children At 12 And 13 Years Of Age

Risk Of Diabetic Retinopathy At First Screen In Children At 12 And 13 Years Of Age

Abstract To investigate the relationships between age at diagnosis of diabetes, age at diabetic eye screening and severity of diabetic retinopathy at first and subsequent screenings in children aged 12 or 13 years. Data were extracted from four English screening programmes and from the Scottish, Welsh and Northern Irish programmes on all children with diabetes invited for their first and subsequent screening episodes from the age of 12 years. Retinopathy levels at first and subsequent screens, time from diagnosis of diabetes to first screening and age at diagnosis in years were calculated. Results Data were available for 2125 children with diabetes screened for the first time at age 12 or 13 years. In those diagnosed with diabetes at 2 years of age or less, the proportion with retinopathy in one or both eyes was 20% and 11%, respectively, decreasing to 8% and 2% in those diagnosed between 2 and 12 years (P < 0.0001). Only three children (aged 8, 10 and 11 years at diagnosis of diabetes) had images graded with referable retinopathy and, of these, two had non-referable diabetic retinopathy at all subsequent screenings. Of 1703 children with subsequent images, 25 were graded with referable diabetic retinopathy over a mean follow-up of 3.1 years, an incidence rate of 4.7 (95% confidence interval, 3.1–7.0) per 1000 per year. In this large cohort of children, the low prevalence and incidence rates of referable diabetic retinopathy suggest that screening earlier than age 12 is not necessary. What's new? This is the largest reported study in the literature of baseline levels of diabetic retinopathy in the age group 12 or 13 years. This is the largest reported study showing the rate of progression of diabetic retinopathy in adolescents. Of 2125 children with diabetes screened Continue reading >>

Diabetic Retinopathy: Why You Should Care

Diabetic Retinopathy: Why You Should Care

Don’t have diabetes? Arm yourself with information! Simple steps can protect your health and vision. Al Ruíz, a Dallas accountant, considered himself lucky to have perfect eyesight. While most of his co-workers wore eyeglasses or contact lenses, he was proud to have never had a vision problem. In fact, he hadn’t seen an eye care professional in several years. So he became worried when, during his drive home from work, signs along the highway began to blur. Reluctantly, he decided that it was time to have his eyes checked. Al sat in stunned silence in the office of Dr. Jordan, his optometrist, a few weeks later. After a thorough eye exam, Al learned that he suffered from an eye disease called diabetic retinopathy. According to the doctor, he was also diabetic. Diabetes is a growing epidemic that carries the risk of glaucoma, cataracts and the most common diabetic eye disease, retinopathy. Untreated diabetes can lead to complete vision loss, many times without warning symptoms. Yet one-quarter of the 23.6 million Americans over age 20 who have diabetes are unaware that they have the disease. Al was lucky after all: He experienced symptoms, which led him to prompt treatment and the prevention of significant vision loss. How Diabetes Affects Eyes Prevent Blindness America has designated November as Diabetic Eye Disease Month to warn Americans of the potentially blinding effects of diabetic retinopathy. This disease is the leading cause of new blindness cases among adults aged 20-74. Up to 24,000 Americans are blinded by diabetic retinopathy each year. The American Optometric Association predicts that by 2050, the number of Americans over 40 years old with diabetic retinopathy will triple to 16 million. Diabetes is a metabolic disorder in which the body does not produce Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Eye Disease

Diabetes And Eye Disease

Diabetic retinopathy is caused by damage from diabetes to blood vessels of the retina. The retina is the layer of tissue at the back of the inner eye. It changes light and images that enter the eye into nerve signals, which are sent to the brain. Diabetic retinopathy is a main cause of decreased vision or blindness in Americans ages 20 to 74 years. People with type 1 or type 2 diabetes are at risk of this condition. The chance of developing retinopathy and having a more severe form is higher when: You have had diabetes for a long time Your blood sugar (glucose) has been poorly controlled You also smoke or you have high blood pressure If you already have damage to the blood vessels in your eye, some types of exercise can make the problem worse. Check with your health care provider before starting an exercise program. Other eye problems that can occur in people with diabetes include: Macular edema. Blurry vision due to fluid leaking into the area of the retina that provides sharp central vision. Retinal detachment. Scarring that may cause part of the retina to pull away from the back of your eyeball. High blood sugar or rapid changes in blood sugar level often cause blurred vision. This is because the lens in the middle of the eye cannot change shape when it has too much sugar and water in the lens. This is not the same problem as diabetic retinopathy. Continue reading >>

What You Should Know About Diabetes And Eye Exams

What You Should Know About Diabetes And Eye Exams

Overview Diabetes is a disease that profoundly affects many areas of your body, including your eyes. It increases your risk for eye conditions, such as glaucoma and cataracts. The primary concern for eye health in people with diabetes is the development of diabetic retinopathy. Diabetic retinopathy is a condition that develops when the blood vessels in your retina become damaged. The retina is the light-sensitive portion of the back of your eye. As the damage worsens, you may begin losing your vision. Your eyesight may become blurry, less intense, and begin to disappear. This condition can affect people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. The longer you live with diabetes, the more likely you are to develop complications like diabetic retinopathy. This is why adopting lifestyle changes and learning to manage diabetes is so important. In its earliest stages, diabetic retinopathy may cause no symptoms. The initial symptoms may be barely noticeable or mild. Over time, the condition can worsen and lead to partial and then complete blindness. You should see your doctor if you experience any of these symptoms: floaters, or dots and dark strings, in your field of vision dark or empty areas in your field of vision blurry vision difficulty focusing vision changes that seem to fluctuate altered color vision partial or total vision loss Diabetic retinopathy most often affects both eyes at the same time and in equal measure. If you’re experiencing issues with only one eye, it doesn’t mean you don’t have diabetic retinopathy. However, it might indicate another eye issue. Make an appointment to see your doctor to find an appropriate treatment plan. The buildup of excess sugar in your blood can lead to a number of health issues. In your eyes, too much glucose can damage the tiny ves Continue reading >>

Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetic retinopathy is damage to the retina caused by complications of diabetes and is the leading cause of blindness in American adults. It is an ocular manifestation of diabetes, a systemic disease, which affects up to 80 percent of all patients who have had diabetes for 10 years or more. The longer a person has diabetes, the higher his or her chances of developing diabetic retinopathy. Despite these intimidating statistics, research indicates that at least 90% of new cases could be reduced by preventative monitoring during regular eye examinations and proper treatment. There are multiple forms of diabetic retinopathy, and only your doctor can determine your particular form. With one form, blood vessels may swell and leak fluid. In another, abnormal new blood vessels grow on the surface of the retina. In the early stages of diabetic retinopathy, many do not notice a change to their vision because there are little to no symptoms. If an eye doctor does not catch the disease early, one could sustain mild blurriness at near or in the distance, as well as floaters. In severe cases a sudden loss of vision may occur. Unfortunately, Diabetic Retinopathy can result in permanent damage that cannot be reversed. However, if caught in time, prescribed treatments may slow development and prevent vision loss. If you have diabetes and are concerned about diabetic retinopathy, schedule an appointment with Dr. Tweedy for a comprehensive eye exam and be sure to include it on your patient history form. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetic Retinopathy

What Is Diabetic Retinopathy? Diabetic retinopathy is caused by changes in the blood vessels of the retina. When these blood vessels are damaged, they may leak blood and grow fragile new vessels. When the nerve cells are damaged, vision is impaired. These changes can result in blurring of your vision, hemorrhage into your eye, or, if untreated, retinal detachment. Diabetic retinopathy is the most common diabetic eye disease and a leading cause of blindness in the United States. What Is Diabetic Retinopathy, Testing, and Treatments Watch these video animations to learn more about diabetic retinopathy, the affect that the diabetic retinopathy has on the eyes, and tests and treatments options for the condition. Topics covered Symptoms Blurred vision Sudden loss of vision in one eye Seeing rings around lights Dark spots or flashing lights The symptoms described above may not necessarily mean that you have diabetic retinopathy. However, if you experience one or more of these symptoms, contact your ophthalmologist for a complete exam. It is also important to note that pregnancy and high blood pressure may aggravate diabetic retinopathy. Causes People with untreated diabetes are 25 times more at risk for blindness than the general population. The longer a person has had diabetes, the higher the risk of developing diabetic retinopathy. Fortunately, with regular, proper eye care and treatment when necessary, the incidence of severe vision loss has been greatly reduced. If you have diabetes, your ophthalmologist can help to prevent serious vision problems. Diabetic retinopathy can cause vision loss in two ways: Macular Edema Macular edema is a condition where your retinal blood vessels develop tiny leaks. When this occurs, blood and fluid leak from the retinal blood vessels and f Continue reading >>

Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetic Retinopathy is the most common diabetic eye disease and a leading cause of blindness in American adults. It is caused by changes in the blood vessels of the retina. There are approximately 29 million Americans age 20 and older that have diabetes and almost one third of those are at risk for vision loss because they do not know they have the disease. This is a tragedy waiting to happen because people with diabetes --both type 1 and type 2--are at risk to develop diabetic retinopathy, a degenerative disease of the retina (the sensitive area at the back of the eye), which affects 5.3 million Americans age 18 and older. More than one third of those diagnosed with diabetes do not adhere to vision care guidelines by forgoing a dilated eye exam every year. It is extremely important that anyone with diabetes get a dilated eye exam every year! Pregnant women with diabetes should have an eye exam in the first trimester, since diabetic eye disease can progress rapidly during pregnancy. The longer a person has diabetes, the greater the risk for developing diabetic retinopathy. However, diabetic retinopathy does not only affect people who have had diabetes for many years, it can also appear within the first year or two after the onset of the disease. For some people, diabetic retinopathy is one of the first signs of the disease. High blood sugar levels can weaken blood vessels in the eye's retina causing them to leak blood or fluid. This causes the retina to swell and can lead to vision loss. Blood sugar fluctuations can also promote growth of new, fragile blood vessels on the retina, which can break easily and leak blood into the vitreous (the clear, jelly-like substance that fills the center of the eye.) This can blur vision and lead to permanent vision impairment. High b Continue reading >>

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