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Diabetic Retinopathy And Exercise

No Lifting With Retinopathy???

No Lifting With Retinopathy???

Member Parent of 22yr old Type 1 "17 yrs w/complications I have a question regarding some of the posts I have read warnings about "not lifting" heavy objects when you have retinopathy. My 21 yr. old daughter who has prolif. retinopathy and is currently being treated with lasers & shots for new bleeds, is moving this weekend into a new house and she has been lifting boxes and doing lots of other "weighty" tasks preparing to move. I asked her if her retinop dr. has ever mentoioned anything to her about not lifting heavy things and she said "NO". I have met a 25 yr. old (Type 1) young mother of 6 miracle (premature) babies on the Preeclampsia forum and she developed Retinopathy with her 4th baby and has had lots of laser treatments over the past few years. Her last baby was born 74 days ago @ 25 weeks and is doing well in the NICU. (Sorry I got off on a rabbit trail...) Anyway, her Retinopathy has gotten really bad again due to her pregnancy and she has a lot of new bleeds and her dr's have also warned her not to lift anything heavy too. So, I am really curious as to why my daughters dr's have not warned her about lifting? She mentioned yesterday that her eyes are starting to get blurry again and she thinks she needs another shot and more lasers, she has a post laser 6 wk checkup on Feb. 26 and we where really hoping that her Retinopathy would start to settle down soon so that she could catch a break from lasering. She has had laser treaments and shots of Avastin every 4 to 6 wks since August and she is tired of it, but also knows that it has been very helpful (but still a pain in the behind!!!). I am guessing that lifting puts a strain on the eyes and that is the cause for concern of bleeds??? What about straining when you cough or (not to be graphic) going to the bathro Continue reading >>

Exercise In Diabetes

Exercise In Diabetes

Adults should take at least 30 minutes of moderate exercise five days a week. For people who need to manage their weight and are at risk of putting on weight and becoming obese, 45 to 60 minutes a day. For people who have been obese, or are still obese and have lost weight, 60-90 minutes a day. For older people the above recommendations are appropriate depending on their ability. Children should get at least one hour a day of moderate physical activity, which should include activities to improve bone health, muscle strength and flexibility at least twice a week. Moderate exercise is classified as brisk walking, playing golf, badminton, tennis (doubles), cycling, painting, decorating and hoovering. Moderate intensity activity will cause an increase in breathing rate, an increase in heart rate to the level where you can feel your pulse and a feeling of increased warmth, possibly sweating on hot or humid days. Doctors should recommend pedometerss ...at least they help increasing weight loss in the short term. They encourage an increase in exercise of about 26%. People with diabetes should buy a pedometer and generally need to try and walk 10,000 steps a day. 10,000 a day to keep the doctor away (about 5000 if you are not overweight). reduces breakfast novarapid 25%, with lighter breakfast Usual insulin with increase CHO for lunch If exercises before breakfast- Less sugary drink during the run - just as needed - normal insulin with breakfast after run Football team, both midfield player and goalie have type 1 and are treated with basal bolus insulin Pre match meal-- Midfielder reduces bolus insulin by 50-75% -- Goalie by 25% Pretraining meal-- Both midfielder and goalie reduce insulin by 40% -- And basal by 10% Rower...training - reduce insulin, more so if cold, hot or win Continue reading >>

Diabetes: The Basics - Being Active

Diabetes: The Basics - Being Active

Listen to Diabetes: The BasicsBeing Active Audio Regular physical activity is essential to diabetes management. It helps keep the heart and blood vessels healthy, prevents diabetes complications, and, if you have type 2 diabetes, is important for keeping blood glucose near normal. Vision loss may affect your ability to participate in the physical activities you once enjoyed, but with proper rehabilitation and attention to the modest safety measures that follow, most people can easily incorporate vigorous and rewarding physical activity into their daily routine. Vision loss need not impede an active lifestyle, whether or not diabetes is a factor. Many physical activities that sighted people enjoy canwith your doctor's OKbe easily adapted and enjoyed by people with visual impairment. These include walking, jumping rope, dancing (especially with a partner), gardening, swimming, and tandem biking. With diabetes, however, there are potential trouble areas that you will have to pay close attention to as you proceed with your exercise plan. Keep in mind: You should consult your doctor before beginning an exercise program; it's especially important to do so if you've lived with diabetes for five or more years. Diabetes is a strong risk factor for heart disease. Your doctor can help you plan an exercise program that is safe for you and can help prevent heart disease. If you have any foot problems, discuss your physical activity plans with your doctor or podiatrist before beginning. Even if you don't have foot problems, you need to protect your feet. Remember: Always use proper footwear for the activity you are planning. Inspect your feet before and after exercising. If you have active diabetic retinopathy and you have useful remaining vision, try to avoid any activity that can Continue reading >>

For Those With Diabetes, Keep Diabetic Retinopathy Away With Exercise

For Those With Diabetes, Keep Diabetic Retinopathy Away With Exercise

Home | Health | For those with diabetes, keep Diabetic Retinopathy away with exercise For those with diabetes, keep Diabetic Retinopathy away with exercise Diabetic retinopathy is a condition that occurs in people who have diabetes. It causes progressive damage to the retina. It is a diabetes complication that affects eyes It is caused by damage to the blood vessels of the eye It may cause no symptoms in the early stages Spots or dark strings floating in vision (floaters) Over time, diabetes damages the blood vessels in the retina. leading to affected or blurred vision. The condition usually affects both eyes. If left untreated, diabetic retinopathy can cause blindness. Make physical activity part of the daily routine Keep blood pressure and cholesterol under control Avoid smoking to reduce the risk of diabetes complications Contact an ophthalmologist in case of sudden vision changes Often, the early stages of diabetic retinopathy have no symptoms. Regular eye examination is must for a diabetic. Early detection and treatment can limit the potential for significant vision loss from diabetic retinopathy. Todays Forecast Max Temp : 16.0C Min Temp : 11.0C Rainfall : 8.90mm 24-03-2018 Max Temp : 17.0C Min Temp : 10.0C 25-03-2018 Max Temp : 17.0C Min Temp : 10.0C 26-03-2018 Max Temp : 18.0C Min Temp : 10.0C 27-03-2018 Max Temp : 18.0C Min Temp : 11.0C 28-03-2018 Max Temp : 17.0C Min Temp : 11.0C 29-03-2018 Max Temp : 17.0C Min Temp : 11.0C Todays Forecast Max Temp : 15.0C Min Temp : 12.0C Rainfall : 999.00mm 24-03-2018 Max Temp : 16.0C Min Temp : 10.0C 25-03-2018 Max Temp : 17.0C Min Temp : 10.0C 26-03-2018 Max Temp : 18.0C Min Temp : 11.0C 27-03-2018 Max Temp : 18.0C Min Temp : 11.0C 28-03-2018 Max Temp : 17.0C Min Temp : 12.0C 29-03-2018 Max Temp : 17.0C Min Temp : 12.0C T Continue reading >>

Exercising With Diabetes Complications

Exercising With Diabetes Complications

If you have had diabetes for a long time and have developed complications, you may have questions about whether you should be engaging in physical activityand if so, what kind of physical activity is best for your condition. According to Jacqueline Shahar, MEd, RCEP, CDE, a clinical exercise physiologist and manager of Exercise Services in the Joslin Clinic at Joslin Diabetes Center, patients with diabetes complications should definitely continue to find appropriate opportunties for physical activity. In the Joslins Easy Start program many patients have significant diabetes complications and are able to exercise regularly and safely as part of their diabetes self-management plan. There is always some type of exercise people with complications can do. Not remaining activity can lead to developing additional complications and loss of functional capacity (the ability to do the activities of daily living). Here are some of the more common diabetes complications and recommendations for exercise for each Peripheral neuropathy is nerve damage in the extremities, causing tingling, pain or loss of sensation in your toes, feet and fingers. Peripheral neuropathy increases the risk of loss of balanceand subsequently the increased risk of falling. In addition, the pain and burning can make it difficult to walk. Incorporate balance exercises and avoid weight-bearing activities such as walking or jogging. Good choices are the stationary bike and swimming. Charcot Foot is a specific type of peripheral neuropathy in which there is destruction of the nerves on the bottom of the foot. The foot eventually becomes deformed and loses sensation. It is important to stay off your feet as much as possible. Use a stationary or arm bike, or do chair exercises using free weights in a seated positi Continue reading >>

Diabetic Retinopathy: Causes, Symptoms And Prevention

Diabetic Retinopathy: Causes, Symptoms And Prevention

Diabetic Retinopathy: Causes, Symptoms And Prevention Diabetic Retinopathy (DR) is the leading cause of blindness among working adults in developed countries such as Singapore and United States. It is a complication of diabetes that affects the blood vessels in the eye. Diabetes is a systemic disease where your body is unable to produce enough insulin or use the insulin properly to normalize blood sugar level. According toU.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, this number will grow to 16 million by 2050! It is possible to have DR without knowing it due to the lack of early signs. As RD progresses, you may discover the following symptoms. If you do, check out with your doctor ASAP. Blank or dark areas in your field of vision Near vision problems unrelated to presbyopia Patients usually develop DR after 10 years of having diabetes (sometimes earlier). Uncontrolled diabetes allows unusually high levels of blood sugar to accumulate in and damage the tiny blood vessels in the eye. Some blood vessels are blocked completely. As more and more the blood vessels become clogged, the blood supply to the retina is cut off. To make up for lack of blood supply, the eye attempts to grow new blood vessels. However, these immature blood vessels are feeble and can leak easily. Such leakages cause several complications which may damage the eyes retina thus resulting in vision loss. Duration that the person is diabetic (longer = greater risk) Ethnicity (African Americans, Latinos and Native Americans have higher risk) Nonproliferative Diabetic Retinopathy (NPDR) Also known as background diabetic retinopathy, is the earlier stage of DR. This condition is usually identified by the deposits formed around the retina due to leakage from the blood vessels. This leakage includes blood, Continue reading >>

Get Moving: Exercising With Complications

Get Moving: Exercising With Complications

Get Moving: Exercising with Complications Different diabetic complications may require different modifications to your exercise routine, but if you can move you can still be active. The following are some general guidelines for safe physical activity with diabetic complications. Cardiac Complications: If you have cardiac complications, such as heart disease, you should have an evaluation to measure your blood flow, heart rate, and blood pressure during exercise. Your doctor can then recommend the length and intensity of your exercise sessions. If you are not sure if you have cardiac disease, you should have a stress test. If a stress test is not available, you should follow a low-intensity program. You should definitely obtain the stress test if you are older than 35, have had type 2 diabetes for 10 or more years, have had type 1 diabetes for 15 or more years, or have any additional cardiac risk factors. Peripheral Vascular Disease (PVD): PVD means poor circulation in your legs. The following are symptoms of PVD: cold feet, weak pulse in feet, numbness and tingling, weakness in the legs, burning or aching in the feet and toes, slow-healing leg and foot sores, and discoloration in the leg down to the toes. These occur because the lower leg muscles are deprived of oxygen and nutrient-rich blood. PVD is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD). If you experience these symptoms or have PVD you should be evaluated for CVD before exercising (1,2). Retinopathy: Retinopathy, or eye damage, can be either mild or severe, and either proliferative or non-proliferative. Non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy occurs when the blood vessels in the eye leak fluid into the retina causing blurred vision. Proliferative retinopathy is present when the new, fragile blood vessels begin Continue reading >>

How To Prevent Diabetes | Exercising With Diabetic Retinopathy

How To Prevent Diabetes | Exercising With Diabetic Retinopathy

Can you exercise with diabetic retinopathy? The simple answer is yes. However this is a serious condition that could be made worse if caution is not used. It is one of the major complications that could potentially happen to diabetics. Your retina is the tissue located at the back of your eye that is sensitive to light. When its healthy your vision is nice and clear. However, problems occur over time when the arteries supplying blood to the retina become blocked. This condition can be classified as non-proliferative or proliferative retinopathy. In the non-proliferative form of retinopathy the blood vessels at the back of the eye become blocked and begin to swell. This blockage is mostly caused by high levels of glucose being forced through tiny blood vessels. It can also be due to high cholesterol which indicates the importance of a proper diet. Fluid then leaks into the retina causing blurred vision. New blood vessels (capillaries) will form to take the place of the blocked ones but these can break which would lead to proliferative retinopathy which is a more serious condition. Proliferative retinopathy can actually cause vision loss. Exercising with non-proliferative retinopathy Both types of this condition will put certain restrictions on the forms of exercises you will be able to do. In the non-proliferative form of this disease you can have mild, moderate or severe retinopathy. With mild retinopathy you can take part in most forms of exercises with your doctors approval. In moderate and severe non-proliferative retinopathy you need to proceed with caution. Any exercise that increases blood pressure can exacerbate the condition. In the moderate condition you can generally take part in most exercises after getting clearance from your doctor. These include swimming, Continue reading >>

Diabetic Retinopathy Is Associated With Early Autonomic Dysfunction Assessed By Exercise-related Heart Rate Changes

Diabetic Retinopathy Is Associated With Early Autonomic Dysfunction Assessed By Exercise-related Heart Rate Changes

Braz J Med Biol Res, December 2008, Volume 41(12) 1110-1115 Diabetic retinopathy is associated with early autonomic dysfunction assessed by exercise-related heart rate changes C.K. Kramer1, C.B. Leito1, M.J. Azevedo1, F.B. Valiatti2, T.C. Rodrigues1, L.H. Canani1 and J.L. Gross1 1Servio de Endocrinologia, Hospital de Clnicas de Porto Alegre, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS, Brasil 2Diviso de Retina e Vtreo, Hospital Banco de Olhos de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, RS, Brasil Diabetic retinopathy has been associated with cardiac autonomic dysfunction in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) patients. Heart rate (HR) changes during exercise testing indicate early alterations in autonomous tonus. The aim of the present study was to investigate the association of diabetic retinopathy with exercise-related HR changes. A cross-sectional study was performed on 72 type 2 and 40 type 1 DM patients. Autonomic dysfunction was assessed by exercise-related HR changes (Bruce protocol). The maximum HR increase, defined as the difference between the peak exercise rate and the resting rate at baseline, and HR recovery, defined as the reduction in HR from the peak exercise to the HR at 1, 2, and 4 min after the cessation of the exercise, were determined. In type 2 DM patients, lower maximum HR increase (OR = 1.62, 95%CI = 1.03-2.54; P = 0.036), lower HR recovery at 2 (OR = 2.04, 95%CI = 1.16-3.57; P = 0.012) and 4 min (OR = 2.67, 95%CI = 1.37-5.20; P = 0.004) were associated with diabetic retinopathy, adjusted for confounding factors. In type 1 DM, the absence of an increase in HR at intervals of 10 bpm each during exercise added 100% to the odds for diabetic retinopathy (OR = 2.01, 95%CI = 1.1-3.69; P = 0.02) when adjusted for DM duration, A1c test and Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus And Exercise

Diabetes Mellitus And Exercise

CLINICAL DIABETES VOL. 17 NO. 4 1999 POSITION STATEMENT American Diabetes Association Reprinted with permission from Diabetes Care 22 (Suppl 1):S49-53, 1999. The recommendations in this article are based on the evidence reviewed in the following publications: Exercise and NIDDM (Technical Review). Diabetes Care 13:785-89, 1990; and Exercise in individuals with IDDM (Technical Review). Diabetes Care 17:924-37, 1994. During exercise, whole-body oxygen consumption may increase by as much as 20-fold, and even greater increases may occur in the working muscles. To meet its energy needs under these circumstances, skeletal muscle uses, at a greatly increased rate, its own stores of glycogen and triglycerides, as well as free fatty acids (FFAs) derived from the breakdown of adipose tissue triglycerides and glucose released from the liver. To preserve central nervous system function, blood glucose levels are remarkably well maintained during exercise. Hypoglycemia during exercise rarely occurs in nondiabetic individuals. The metabolic adjustments that preserve normoglycemia during exercise are in large part hormonally mediated. A decrease in plasma insulin and the presence of glucagon appear to be necessary for the early increase in hepatic glucose production during exercise, and during prolonged exercise, increases in plasma glucagon and catecholamines appear to play a key role. These hormonal adaptations are essentially lost in insulin-deficient patients with type 1 diabetes. As a consequence, when such individuals have too little insulin in their circulation due to inadequate therapy, an excessive release of counterinsulin hormones during exercise may increase already high levels of glucose and ketone bodies and can even precipitate diabetic ketoacidosis. Conversely, the pres Continue reading >>

Exercise Training In Individuals With Diabetic Retinopathy And Blindness.

Exercise Training In Individuals With Diabetic Retinopathy And Blindness.

Exercise training in individuals with diabetic retinopathy and blindness. Bernbaum M, et al. Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 1989. Department of Internal Medicine, St. Louis University School of Medicine, MO. Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 1989 Aug;70(8):605-11. Limited guidelines exist for rehabilitation programs for individuals with diabetes mellitus, blindness, and associated autonomic neuropathy. Abnormalities in autonomic function have been postulated to interfere with exercise conditioning and may predispose individuals to exercise-induced hypoglycemia. Twenty-nine individuals with diabetes mellitus underwent standardized noninvasive testing for the evaluation of cardiovascular autonomic function and graded exercise before entering a rehabilitation program. Inadequate responses of heart rate to respiratory variation were observed in 28 patients, abnormal heart rate responses to postural maneuvers were seen in 23, and postural hypotension was noted in nine. Individuals with symptomatic postural hypotension were able to exercise using a stationary bicycle, but developed hypotensive episodes on walking or prolonged standing. Blood glucose consistently decreased by a mean of 76 (+/- 9) mg/dl after each exercise session, even though low levels of exercise were performed (2.9 +/- 0.2 metabolic equivalents, for 28 +/- 1 min). There was no relationship between the degree of autonomic neuropathy and the level of blood glucose fall. There was, however, a significant correlation (r = -0.59, p = 0.001) between the decrease in blood glucose level and the amount of regular insulin used in the routine morning dose. Precautions were taken to avoid hypoglycemia, and insulin and diet were adjusted accordingly to prevent severe hypoglycemic reactions. Continue reading >>

Exercise Reduces The Risk Of Vision Problems In Diabetics

Exercise Reduces The Risk Of Vision Problems In Diabetics

Exercise reduces the risk of vision problems in diabetics A new study has found that staying fit and regularly exercising can reduce the risk of vision and eye problems in diabetics. Vision problems are often a complication of diabetes, especially if its not well managed. The study found that diabetics who stay inactive have a higher risk of vision problems, compared to those who partake in physical activity. The most common cause of vision loss in diabetics, diabetic retinopathy involves changes to retinal blood vessels that can cause them to bleed or leak fluid, distorting vision, according to the U.S. National Eye Institute. The researchers tracked the outcomes of 282 American diabetes patients to assess the impact of exercise on their vision health. The average age of the participants was 62, and nearly one-third of them had mild or severe diabetic retinopathy. The researchers used an accelerometer device to measure activity. On average, participants were active for 8.7 hours a day. The researchers found that every 60-minute daily increase in physical inactivity increased the risk of mild or severe diabetic retinopathy by 16 percent. The researchers believe the association between a sedentary lifestyle and diabetic retinopathy may have to do with an elevated risk of heart disease, which can further increase the risk for diabetic retinopathy. The study reinforces the importance of physical activity, especially in diabetics, as a means to keep possible health complications at bay. Emily Lunardo studied medical sociology at York University with a strong focus on the social determinants of health and mental illness. She is a registered Zumba instructor, as well as a Canfit Pro trainer, who teaches fitness classes on a weekly basis. Emily practices healthy habits in her Continue reading >>

Tips For Exercising With Diabetic Retinopathy

Tips For Exercising With Diabetic Retinopathy

Tips for Exercising With Diabetic Retinopathy Tips for Exercising With Diabetic Retinopathy If you have diabetic retinopathy, blood vessels in your eye can swell, leak, and even bleed. Although you may be concerned that exercise can affect your eyes, neither aerobic exercise nor strength training have been shown to worsen vision, retinopathy, or eye swelling in people with moderate vision problems, according to exercise guidelines published by the American Diabetes Association in 2006 . However, "if you're in an exercise program and have diabetes eye complications, you have to keep up with scheduled eye exams, check your regimen with your eye-care specialist, and report any problems," says A. Paul Chous, an optometrist with a specialty in diabetes who is based in Tacoma, Wash. "Retinopathy is often more severe in people with high blood pressure and might be exacerbated by a sudden increase in blood pressure, which can occur during some exercises such as weight lifting," says Dr. Chous. "Exercise experts with training in diabetes care can advise you on what is safe and what is not, if you have complications." Patients with significant eye complications caused by diabetes are also advised to avoid kickboxing and other contact sports that could injure the eye, as well as anything that elevates blood pressure, such as weight lifting or sprinting. Many patients who have had laser surgery to stabilize blood vessels in the eye are advised to avoid vigorous exercise and contact sports until there's evidence that the laser treatment was effective, which can take several months, says Dr. Chous. Exercise decisions should be made on a case-by-case basis with the ophthalmologist treating the patient. All sports enthusiasts, with diabetes or not, should wear eye protection (such as Continue reading >>

Altered Myocardial Response In Patients With Diabetic Retinopathy: An Exercise Echocardiography Study

Altered Myocardial Response In Patients With Diabetic Retinopathy: An Exercise Echocardiography Study

Altered myocardial response in patients with diabetic retinopathy: an exercise echocardiography study Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) complicated by retinopathy is associated with altered left ventricular (LV) structure and resting myocardial dysfunction unlike T2DM without retinopathy. The myocardial response to stress has not been compared in patients with and without diabetic retinopathy. The aim of this retrospective study was to determine the relationship between retinopathy and myocardial function in patients with T2DM at rest and during exercise echocardiography. 134 patients with T2DM and no evidence of underlying coronary artery disease were recruited. All patients underwent retinal photography to screen for diabetic retinopathy, and resting and exercise echocardiography. Resting echocardiography was analyzed by conventional echocardiographic parameters and speckle tracking derived global longitudinal strain (GLS). Exercise echocardiography parameters included diastolic function reserve index (DFRI) and stress GLS. The mean age of participants was 60years and 49% were male. Diabetic retinopathy was identified in 43 patients (32%). Resting echocardiography revealed that those with diabetic retinopathy had a higher prevalence of impaired diastolic function, higher E/E ratio (LV filling pressures) and impaired resting GLS compared with those without. Exercise echocardiography revealed that those with diabetic retinopathy also had more impaired DFRI and stress GLS. Multivariable analysis showed that the presence of diabetic retinopathy was independently associated with high resting E/E, diastolic dysfunction grade, impaired resting GLS, low DFRI and impaired stress GLS. In conclusion, the presence of diabetic retinopathy was independently associated with impaired Continue reading >>

Exercising With Diabetes Complications

Exercising With Diabetes Complications

Everyday Solutions are created by Everyday Health on behalf of our partners. More Information Content in this special section was created or selected by the Everyday Health editorial team and is funded by an advertising sponsor. The content is subject to Everyday Healths editorial standards for accuracy, objectivity, and balance. The sponsor does not edit or influence the content but may suggest the general topic area. If you have diabetes complications like neuropathy or retinopathy, you might think exercise is out of the question. But in fact, you need to exercise even more. Find out how to safely exercise with diabetes. If you're living with type 2 diabetes , you know that staying active is important. Along with a healthy diet and taking your diabetes medication, exercise is one of the pillars of good diabetes management. But what if you have diabetes complications, such as neuropathy or retinopathy, that limit your ability to exercise? Diabetes complications are no excuse to skip exercise , says Rim Joubran, MD, an endocrinologist at Loyola University Gottlieb Memorial Hospital in Melrose Park, Ill. The benefits outweigh the risk, even with complications. If you cant do moderate or intense activities, there are still great benefits to less intense but regular exercise. You just need an exercise program customized to your capacity. The results of a 2013 diabetes study published in the journal Radiology showed just how much a half-year of exercising can strengthen the heart. After a six-month exercise program involving 12 participants with type 2 diabetes, body imaging studies found decreased fat in liver cells, decreased abdominal fat volume, and decreased fat buildup around the heart all risk factors for heart disease. Guidelines from the Agency for Healthcare Rese Continue reading >>

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