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Diabetic Restaurant App

Restaurant Foods To Avoid For Diabetics

Restaurant Foods To Avoid For Diabetics

If youre one of the nearly 30 million Americans who suffer from diabetes, youre well aware of the challenges caused by dietary restrictions. Eating out in particular can pose a number of challenges, as preparation methods and hidden sugars can be difficult to identify. But that doesnt mean you cant enjoy yourselfyou just need to be armed with the proper knowledge of what to look out for. Here are six common foods people with diabetes should avoid when eating out, plus tips for making healthy choices so you can feel good about every meal. 1. Fatty cuts of meat and processed meats make for popular menu items, especially at many fast casual or comfort food restaurants, but theyre one of the biggest no-nos for diabetics. Unprocessed red meats (think lean cuts of meat like pork loin or roast beef) are fine in moderation , but youll want to know exactly how theyre being cooked. Your best bet is to opt for white meat like chicken, fish, and shellfish thats either grilled, broiled, or roasted. 2. White riceis a key ingredient in many cuisines, but too many servings of it can actually increase risk of diabetes. Experts suggest switching to brown rice, which hasnt been stripped of nutrients like fiber and magnesium that help regulate blood sugar) An even better alternative is quinoa, which is higher in protein, fiber, and antioxidants. But if youre sticking with rice, go with brownand make sure its not fried in butter! 3. Bread can be a tricky food to avoid if youre in the mood for a sandwich, but diabetes-friendly options are hard to come by when youre eating out. Most breads are high in carbs, and even whole grain options arent a safe bet. The way whole grains are broken down leads to poor digestion, which can cause blood sugar spikes . Your best bet is to avoid bread when eat Continue reading >>

Top 12 Free Diabetic Apps

Top 12 Free Diabetic Apps

By Beth Michaels – In-house Dietitian Gone are the days of having to thumb through pages and pages of Bowes and Church’s Food Values to look up the nutrition facts of every single food consumed. Such a labor intensive process requiring about an hour to calculate a day’s worth of intake by hand – yes, that’s what Dietitian’s used to spend many a waking hour engrossed in! While technology certainly comes with its challenges and limitations, the opportunities for people to take a more active role in their health has been a great blessing. Whether you’re an apple or android fan, there are many apps available to help you better manage your blood glucose and make healthier lifestyle choices. Here are some of the top free diabetes and healthy lifestyle apps available: 1. My Fitness Pal While not an app specific to diabetes, My Fitness Pal seems to be the most popular app used for tracking diet, exercise and weight. It draws on a large database of over 5,000 commonly consumed foods. Creating an account is very simple and will sync from PC to mobile devices. With My Fitness Pal you can log foods daily, create recipes, track nutrients, and get reports and statistics. Weight and exercise can also be recorded to track progress toward your goals. And, if you're working with a Dietitian or Nutritionist, share your login directly with them so they can monitor your progress, too. 2. Sparkpeople Featuring an enormous database of food and recipes, Sparkpeople tracks over 3 million foods (includes a barcode for scanning packaged foods), contains over 600 exercise videos, and contains a vast array of nutrition and fitness articles. Be aware that all the information posted on the interactive site can be added to by anybody, which means things aren't necessarily diabetic friend Continue reading >>

Diabetes Management? Theres An App For That!

Diabetes Management? Theres An App For That!

Diabetes Management? Theres an App for That! Managing diabetes can be complicated. Fortunately, we live in a world where technology makes things easier. Theres an app for nearly everything today. Want to read a magazine? Check the weather? Track fitness goals? Just pull out your smartphone and open an app. The same goes for diabetes management. There are now several apps that can help diabetics to manage diabetes care. This app is used for tracking blood sugar levels. It can also be used to keep track of carbs eaten, medicines, exercise, and more. The app produces charts that allow diabetics to see trends in their blood sugar levels, which could lead to better management. In addition, the app can be used to set reminders to take medications or test blood sugar. GlucOracle was developed by Columbia University. Its an app that helps to predict blood sugar levels. Users enter a meal into the app and the app projects what their blood sugar level is likely to be after eating that meal. This helps to prevent blood sugar spikes. The app uses an algorithm to personalize the information so that after entering about a weeks worth of meals, the information produced becomes more accurate. This app comes from the publishers of Diabetic Cooking and allows users to control a cookbook using their voice. The app walks users through a recipe step by step as theyre cooking. The development of the app included a team of dieticians and food experts, so the hundreds of recipes that diabetics can search are all diabetes-friendly. Users can even select recipes to add to their meal plan, make a grocery list, and share their favorite recipes with others using social media. Go Meals is a carb tracking tool. The app has a database of more than 40,000 foods, including many restaurant selections. U Continue reading >>

Kidneydiet App: A New Tool To Help Kidney Patients Decide What To Eat

Kidneydiet App: A New Tool To Help Kidney Patients Decide What To Eat

KidneyDiet App: a new tool to help kidney patients decide what to eat Posted December 2, 2010 in Tips , Tags: Kidney Diet , nutrients for kidney diet , Phosphorus , Potassium , protein , Sodium by Sara Colman, RD, CDE. Have you ever wished you could instantly peak at the nutrient content of a food while makingweeklymenus, grocery shoppingoreating out on a kidney diet? The latest tool for people with chronic kidney disease or on dialysis gives you the ability to do just that. KidneyDiet is an iPhone appthat allowsa quick, easy way to view thousands of foods from the USDA food database, including some of the major restaurant chains. The featured nutrients are focused on those most important in a kidney diet: protein , potassium , phosphorus and sodium . In addition to providing nutrient data, the KidneyDiet app highlightsin red values that may require cautionfor a kidney diet. While this app is not a replacement for advice from your doctor or dietitian, itisa welcome newtool to help make the challenge of following a kidney diet easier. Future versions will include expanded nutrients andfeatures to help track and analyze daily intake. KidneyDiet was created by Pain Free Living, Inc.They providehealth-related applications for mobile devices . Visit their website at www.KidneyDiet.com for more information. Sara is a renal dietitian with over 20 years experience working with people with diabetes and kidney disease. She is co-author of the popular kidney cookbook "Cooking for David: A Culinary Dialysis Cookbook". Sara is currently the Manager of Kidney Care Nutrition for DaVita. She analyzes recipes and creates content, resources and tools for the kidney community. In her spare time Sara loves to spend time with her young grandson, including fun times together in her kitchen. Continue reading >>

Type 1& 2: Free Iphone Diabetes Applications

Type 1& 2: Free Iphone Diabetes Applications

Type 1& 2: FREE iPhone Diabetes Applications With the rise of the iPhone and the creation of hundreds of thousands of iPhone applications, its only natural that several wonderful apps have appeared to make life easier for diabetes patients. Here is a quick look at 10 FREE applications, in no particular order, to help you choose the right ones for you. Diabetes Health Mobile gives you access to the top news articles and blogs posted to our website. You can read articles from our main Top News & Blogs as well as from your favorite categories; Type 1, Type 2, Pre-Diabetes, Kids & Teens, or Professional. See something you like? Post it straight to Twitter and share it with your friends, or email it instead, its easy with one tap! Feel free to change the tabs across the bottom of the screen to add your favorite categories for one tap access. The application offers the two most recent editions in our Digital Edition library and the two most recent posts in our Diabetes Health TV library for you to watch from anywhere at any time. Created by Tom Xu and Matthew Tendler, Glucose Buddy was ranked the #1 diabetes iPhone application by Manny Hernandez, founder of TuDiabetes.com. It has also been featured in several publications, including Wired Magazine. Glucose Buddy is a data storage utility into which you manually enter glucose numbers, carbohydrate consumption, insulin dosages, and activities. You can view all of your data on your free Glucosebuddy.com online account, where your iPhone automatically syncs your logs. You can also use your phone to access the Glucose Buddy Forum, where you can post and read articles, questions, comments, and other useful information. This app looks great. It has many fine features, and both the app and the website are very easy to use. Diabetes Continue reading >>

A Diabetes Guide To Eating In Restaurants

A Diabetes Guide To Eating In Restaurants

The American Diabetes Association recently published a new book by Hope S. Warshaw called Eat Out, Eat Well, The Guide to Eating Healthy in Any Restaurant. Ms. Warshaw is a registered dietitian, certified diabetes educator, and has written many other books on the subject of eating with diabetes, including a book similar this one. Eat Out, Eat Well, however, is a more comprehensive and updated version of her previous work. What The Little Brown Handbook is to writers, this book may be for those with diabetes who eat out often and feel they lack information about the food they are eating. Eat Out, Eat Well serves those looking for hefty coverage of nutrition and how it relates to diabetes, and any type of restaurant eating, from fast food to ethnic cuisines to the upscale restaurant. Eat Out, Eat Well isn’t a book you will sit down to read and be done with. At over 550 pages, it is a large resource that you’re likely to spot read and refer to as needed. Warshaw starts with giving a modern assessment of today’s restaurant landscape. One of the most helpful things I found in the book was a chapter on “The 10 Skills and Strategies for Healthier Restaurant Eating” where she targets common behaviors we all have and suggests ways we can set ourselves up for success when we do eat out. Those ten tips alone would make an enormous difference for anyone who eats out often. There is a chapter on specific dilemmas a person with diabetes may have when eating out and tips on how to cope. Warshaw has also written a chapter on the subject of Celiac disease and gluten sensitivity. I’m someone who has studied nutrition and I’ve had diabetes for many years. I find that eating out is generally not conducive to healthy eating. However, when looking at this book I had to recogniz Continue reading >>

5 Of The Best Smartphone Apps For Diabetic Patients

5 Of The Best Smartphone Apps For Diabetic Patients

5 of the best smartphone apps for diabetic patients 5 of the best smartphone apps for diabetic patients Along with EHRs and telemedicine platforms, smartphone apps are changing the way that both patients and physicians manage healthcare. Apps can be used for a variety of health-related functions and can help manage or provide information about a wide array of conditions. For example, there are apps that can provide information about different cancers, apps that can be used to monitor symptoms associated with cardiovascular disease and so on. Indeed, smartphones have proven particularly useful in the management of a chronic yet fairly common condition - diabetes. Diabetes is a metabolic condition that engenders high blood sugar levels in patients, Healthline detailed. A hormone called insulin, produced by the pancreas, is used by the body to regulate glucose in blood and move sugar into the cells for energy. Diabetes occurs when a patient's body is unable to utilize insulin in a proper fashion or make enough of it. The result is abnormally high blood sugar, which, if untreated, can lead to a host of critical health problems, including nerve damage and kidney failure. The Centers for Disease Control noted that in extreme cases untreated diabetes can lead to amputations and potentially even death.The CDC reported around 1in 11 Americans will develop diabetes in their lifetime. As discussed, there are several different forms of diabetes - type one, type two and gestational. Healthlineexplained that type one diabetes is a less common autoimmune disease whereby the immune system impedes the production of insulin in the pancreas. Type two diabetes, which is more common, in a usually a consequence of age and lifestyle: Overweight patients with poor diets are more at risk. Type Continue reading >>

Nutrition Smartphone Apps

Nutrition Smartphone Apps

With so many nutrition and food apps available to download, it can be hard to know which ones have the most accurate and relevant information. Below is a review of a few of the best apps to help you make healthier food choices, track your nutrition goals and help you count your carbohydrates (if you wish). helps you make healthier choices when shopping at the supermarket. scans the barcode of a food packet and the nutrition information is highlighted in green, yellow or red. This gives you an idea of how healthy that food might be. lists products in the same category that are healthier choices, with lower levels of fat, saturated fat, sugar and salt 'GlutenSwitch' option will tell you if the product is gluten-free and will also list a gluten-free alternative, if there is one available. helps you to manage your weight and carbohydrate counting over 22,000 Australian foods, including common restaurant and take-away foods enables you to look up the nutrient values of the foods that you are eating, including energy (kilojoules/calories) and carbohydrates auto-calculate function simply enter in your own portion size of food or drink and it does all the nutrient calculations for you. keeps you on track with your healthy eating and physical activity goals and calculates the total amount of carbohydrate in your meals allows you to look up the nutrient and energy values of the foods you are eating has an auto-calculate function that enters your own portion size of food or drink based on an Australian food database has the ability to save your favourite meals and foods so that you don't need to keep searching for them every time allows you to record your food intake and the amount of physical activity you have done. You can then see how much energy you have consumed and how much Continue reading >>

High-tech Diabetes Self-care

High-tech Diabetes Self-care

Technological advances in continuous glucose monitoring systems, mobile apps, and online services are transforming diabetes self-management. Managing diabetes can seem like a full-time job for many clients and patients, but as with any job, having the proper tools can streamline the work and reduce frustration. However, which tools work best depends on the individual. Technology is one of those tools that can play an important role in helping people self-manage diabetes. Yet, it requires a flexible approach on the part of both dietitians and their patients. Patients have to be willing to make some changes in their self-care routines, and dietitians need to determine which technologies may work best for their clients. "The management strategies you use with a person with diabetes depend on many factors, such as type of diabetes, level of control, the person's goals and, most importantly, their willingness and ability to actively self-manage," says Hope Warshaw, MMSc, RD, CDE, the 2015 president-elect of the American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) and the author of Eat Out, Eat Well: The Guide to Eating Healthy in Any Restaurant and its companion app, Eat Out WellRestaurant Nutrition Finder from the American Diabetes Association. "There are people with prediabetes who need to focus on losing a few pounds and keeping that weight off, so their focus may be counting calories, fat grams, and steps. And there are people with type 1 diabetes who take four or five shots of insulin a day or are using an insulin pump along with a continuous glucose monitor (CGM). They're willing to share their data with their health care provider for consideration and feedback." One of the most significant technological advances in diabetes self-care in recent years has been the develop Continue reading >>

17 Great Apps For Anyone Trying To Eat Healthier

17 Great Apps For Anyone Trying To Eat Healthier

17 Great Apps For Anyone Trying to Eat Healthier You don't have to base every smoothie on bananas or kale, and Blender Girl will teach you all the alternatives. Just plug in your need, mood, and craving, and this app will look through Blender Girl's 100 best smoothie recipes to find the ideal blend for you. 2. Nom (free, iOS ) lets you explore new cuisines through live videos. Instead of looking through static food photos for dinner inspiration, scroll through daily live videos from food bloggers and award-winning chefs. And unlike your favorite food channel, you can even read tips from fellow eaters and chime in with your own. This community-based app helps health-conscious food lovers stay up to date on food trends, recalls, better dietary practices, and events in the area. 4. Harvest (free, iOS ) lets you know what produce and fruit is in season. There's no bigger turn-off to healthy eating than bland and underripe produce and fruit (ever tasted a blueberry in October?). Harvest lets you know exactly what items will be at their flavorful peak at the grocery store, and teaches you how to select the ripest of the bunch. 5. Thrive Market (free, iOS , Android ) lets you order healthy groceries at seriously discounted prices. Thrive Market is the Costco of healthy foods. The app lets you browse through healthy cooking ingredients, snacks, and beverages, with the option to search for exclusively gluten-free, vegan, Paleo, or organic options. Best of all, all items are offered at budget-friendly wholesale prices. 6. Fooducate (free, iOS , Android ) makes you aware of the quality of your calories. Calorie counts matter, but 300 calories of cake isn't the same as 300 calories of kale. Macronutrients (protein, carbs, fat) and micronutrients (vitamins, minerals) are important, Continue reading >>

Suggestic: Precision Eating

Suggestic: Precision Eating

Cardiologist and New York Times Bestselling Author Smart choices in food empower health and avert hundreds of health conditions. Food is more powerful than any nutrional supplement, any form of exercise, any prescription drug nothing matches the power of the choices you make in food. Neurologist and New York Times Bestselling Author We live in a country where there are 28 million diabetics and by and large this is a choice, you choose to become diabetic based upon what you choose to eat. Associate Director of Nutrition at International Food Information Council Foundation Americans rely on many different sources for their information when it comes to what foods to eat and what foods to avoid. Not all of these sources are really highly trusted, and it is likely that these sources share inconsistent information. Physician and New York Times Bestselling Author Dr Ludwig had one study where he put people on isocaloric diets. Same calories, one was 60%, one was 10% fat. The 60% fat burned 325 calories more a day by doing nothing else except eating fats. Thats like running an hour a day by sitting on the couch. Know your diet compliant options at 500,000+ restaurants, access 1+ million uniquely matched home recipes or automatic creation of the right shopping list for you. Know your diet compliant options at 500,000+ restaurants, access 1+ million uniquely matched home recipes or automatic creation of the right shopping list for you. By tailoring suggestions around an individuals dietary preference and nutritional portfolio, the chat-like app essentially becomes your lifestyle GPS, providing actionable suggestions in the right place at the right time. By adapting machine-learning models, Suggestic culls and analyzes correlated patterns between the users genes, diet and metabol Continue reading >>

These Are A Few Of My Favorite… Apps

These Are A Few Of My Favorite… Apps

I’m borrowing the words from one of my favorite movies of all times (***do you know what it is??? answer at the end of the blog!). In the world of diabetes management, anything that makes living with diabetes better and easier is worth putting on my favorite things list. Apps that help track nutrient intake and exercise While not specific to diabetes, noting how much you eat, the timing, and balance of nutrients, can make an impact on your BG (blood glucose) management. There are a few really nice apps in this category that are easy to use. MyNetDiary Maximum – allows tracking of all food, water & exercise and allows you to set targets for weight loss/gain/maintenance. It works with a comprehensive web membership that includes blood glucose and cholesterol tracking. The searches in the app include a bar code scanner for packaged foods and an extensive online database (including restaurants). Calorie Counter & Diet Tracker by Myfitnesspal – enables tracking of all the same items as MyNetDiary, but doesn’t include the ability to log glucose or cholesterol. This is a very user-friendly app which allows you to create recipes for favorite meals/dishes and also has a bar code scanner for packaged foods. This app syncs with an online account so that you can access your data regardless of where you log in. Apps that help with tracking diabetes data All of the following apps are great in their own way. I list several options because everyone is a bit different in their tracking/logging and reporting/charting preferences. My recommendation: Try each one and see what works best for you. dbees.com is an app for the iPhone and iPod touch. It allows you to customize/track the meds you use, doses, and times of day for your usual diabetes management activities. It applies to al Continue reading >>

Everything You Wanted To Know About Diabetes

Everything You Wanted To Know About Diabetes

Everything you wanted to know about diabetes Diabetes affects four million people in the UK, and more are diagnosed each year. But what is it and how is technology revolutionising the lives of those who have it? Last modified on Sat 25 Nov 2017 00.00EST A nurse gives a patient a diabetes test.Photograph: Peter Byrne/PA Four million people in the UK live with diabetes and nearly a quarter of a million more are being diagnosed each year. Ninety per cent of those with diabetes have type 2 diabetes (T2D) and youre more prone to it if youre overweight, it runs in your family or youre of south Asian or African descent. In T2D, the body doesnt respond properly to insulin, the hormone produced in the pancreas that dispatches glucose from the food we eat to the cells of the body to be used for energy or stored as fat. T2D is treated by weight loss, lifestyle changes and oral drugs. Type 1 diabetes (T1D), which accounts for 10% of cases, can appear in childhood and is treated with injectable insulin. In T1D, the pancreas gradually stops making insulin for reasons that are still unclear but may be triggered by a viral illness. High blood-glucose levels damage blood vessels supplying many parts of the body, so theres an increased risk of kidney failure, blindness, strokes, heart attacks and gangrene. Life expectancy is reduced by 20 years for people with T1D and up to 10 years for T2D. The good news is that careful control hugely reduces these risks and that new developments are coming on stream at a rapid rate. T1D cant be prevented, but T2D can. NHS England is rolling out an ambitious national Diabetes Prevention Programme to try to prevent up to 100,000 people each year developing it. Professor Jonathan Valabhji , NHS Englands national clinical director for obesity and diabetes Continue reading >>

Seattle Mexican Restaurant Creates Diabetes-friendly Menu

Seattle Mexican Restaurant Creates Diabetes-friendly Menu

Seattle Mexican restaurant creates diabetes-friendly menu Originally published August 22, 2010 at 10:00 pm Ramiro Rubio, of Galerias Gourmet, has made the menu of his Mexican eatery on Capitol Hill more diabetes-friendly. Last March, Seattle restaurant owner Ramiro Rubio came to a realization: Diabetes was likely in his future. He was overweight, and several family members had the disease Last March, Seattle restaurant owner Ramiro Rubio came to a realization: Diabetes was likely in his future. He was overweight, and several family members had the disease. In addition, his Latin American heritage meant he was 1 times more likely than whites to be diagnosed with the disease. Its a big crisis right now with the Latino community, he said. Rubio wanted to do something about it, and not just for himself. He eventually decided to create a diabetes-friendly menu for his Capitol Hill restaurant, Galerias Gourmet. But what exactly was better for diabetics? He had no idea. And how do you make Mexican food healthful? Most Mexican restaurants offer free bowls of fried tortilla chips; they often drench entrees in cheese or deep-fry them; and virtually everything comes with a hefty side of carbohydrate-heavy beans and rice. Customers come to expect that sort of thing, Rubio said. For help, he turned to local health authorities, who educated him and enlisted a nutritionist to review his menu. Its part of a major health initiative funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, to change health outcomes in high-risk communities. REACH, a part of Public Health Seattle and King County, has long been involved in fighting diabetes, but its been targeted at individuals, Blishda Lacet said. Were now looking more at what we can do to impact the community at a higher level, she said Continue reading >>

45 Top Carb-counting Tips

45 Top Carb-counting Tips

Tried-and-true tactics for fine-tuning your techniques and attitudes Carb counting sounds simple. After all, anyone who's passed third grade knows the basics of adding numbers. Unfortunately, counting carbohydrate grams isn't as easy as one, two, three. That's why Diabetes Forecast went to the experts for help. Who better to give tips on carb counting than the people who do it day in and day out? Read on for 45 tried-and-true carb-counting how-tos. "It's really important to work with your doctor," says Tammy Walker, 36, who was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes four years ago. "If you're newly diagnosed and your doctor doesn't have the experience, have your doctor refer you to a dietitian to teach you how to eat." "It's getting past that initial 'I can't do it,' " says Daniele Hargenrader, 31, who's had type 1 diabetes since she was 8. "The first days and weeks are the hardest. Anyone can change." Count total carbohydrate grams, not just the sugar grams listed on the food label, says David Frank, 41, who was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes a year ago. A cereal may only have 1 gram of sugar, for instance, but 21 grams of carbohydrate. "You have to look at the carbohydrates because carbohydrates break down into sugar." "The only way you can really know what your blood sugar is doing is if you have a readout. You can't guess what your blood sugar is," says Hargenrader. "And you can't guess how many carbs you need if you don't check your blood sugar." Checking before a meal and about two hours after the first bite shows you how what you eat affects your blood glucose. Intensive insulin users may do this frequently; for others, it can be helpful to do so when starting new medication or making other treatment changes. "They start to remember things," says Gabrielle Brits, whose Continue reading >>

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