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Diabetic Red Eye

Could My Diabetes Cause One Of My Eyes To Be Red And Painful?

Could My Diabetes Cause One Of My Eyes To Be Red And Painful?

Diabetes can cause eye problems. Pain or pressure in one or both of your eyes could be a sign of damage to your retinas. Blurry or double vision, dark spots or blank areas and trouble seeing out of the corners of your eyes are other symptoms to watch for. The high blood sugar associated with diabetes, sometimes coupled with high blood pressure, can cause the tiny blood vessels of the eyes to swell and weaken, and possibly leak blood into the vitreous (the gel-like fluid within the eye). This can keep light from reaching the retina. Those damaged blood vessels may also develop scar tissue that could eventually pull the retina away from the back of the eye, a potentially dangerous problem called retinal detachment. You can minimize your risks of eye problems by keeping your diabetes under control. Getting regular eye exams can help you catch problems before they become too serious. Report any unusual eye symptoms to your doctor. It is more common to have red, painful eyes from a viral infection or allergic reaction. Allergies to pollens and dust in the air are the most common cause of red eyes, but this rarely causes pain. An eye infection that can cause red eyes is viral conjunctivitis, or "pink eye." Unfortunately, this infection has to run its course because antibiotics cannot help speed recovery. Serious bacterial infections can start on the surface or behind the eye of a person with diabetes and require strong antibiotics to cure. A common complaint of patients with either viral or bacterial infections is that they wake up in the morning with their eyelashes sticking together from the pus that has collected over the night. If your pain is more like a pressure sensation, then you may have glaucoma (although most glaucoma is painless). Glaucoma is too much pressure in Continue reading >>

Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetic retinopathy is a condition that occurs in people who have diabetes. It causes progressive damage to the retina, the light-sensitive lining at the back of the eye. Diabetic retinopathy is a serious sight-threatening complication of diabetes. Diabetes interferes with the body's ability to use and store sugar (glucose). The disease is characterized by too much sugar in the blood, which can cause damage throughout the body, including the eyes. Over time, diabetes damages the blood vessels in the retina. Diabetic retinopathy occurs when these tiny blood vessels leak blood and other fluids. This causes the retinal tissue to swell, resulting in cloudy or blurred vision. The condition usually affects both eyes. The longer a person has diabetes, the more likely they will develop diabetic retinopathy. If left untreated, diabetic retinopathy can cause blindness. Symptoms of diabetic retinopathy include: Seeing spots or floaters Blurred vision Having a dark or empty spot in the center of your vision Difficulty seeing well at night When people with diabetes experience long periods of high blood sugar, fluid can accumulate in the lens inside the eye that controls focusing. This changes the curvature of the lens, leading to blurred vision. However, once blood sugar levels are controlled, blurred distance vision will improve. Patients with diabetes who can better control their blood sugar levels will slow the onset and progression of diabetic retinopathy. Often the early stages of diabetic retinopathy have no visual symptoms. That is why the American Optometric Association recommends that everyone with diabetes have a comprehensive dilated eye examination once a year. Early detection and treatment can limit the potential for significant vision loss from diabetic retinopathy. T Continue reading >>

Diabetic Eye Disease

Diabetic Eye Disease

A A A Do I need to follow-up with my doctor after being diagnosed with diabetic eye disease? Diabetes is one of the leading causes of irreversible blindness worldwide, and, in the United States, it is the most common cause of blindness in people younger than 65 years of age. Diabetic eye disease also encompasses a wide range of other eye problems, for example, Diabetes may cause a reversible, temporary blurring of the vision, or it can cause a severe, permanent loss of vision. Some people may not even realize they have had diabetes for several years until they begin to experience problems with their eyes or vision. Diabetes also may result in heart disease, stroke, kidney failure, and circulatory abnormalities of the legs. The American Diabetes Association estimates that 29.1 million people in the United States have diabetes, and 8.1 million people additional people went undiagnosed. (This population is unaware that they have diabetes.) In the United States 1.2 million new cases of diabetes are diagnosed every year. In the US in 2012, the total annual cost of diagnosed diabetes was 2.45 billion. Eighty-six million people in the US have prediabetes, and 9 out of every 10 don't know they have it. Of the 86 million people with prediabetes, without lifestyle changes 15% to 30% of them will develop type 2 diabetes within 5 years. Lifestyle management has been shown to reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes and prediabetes by at least two-thirds. It can also slow or halt the progression of prediabetes to diabetes. People can try to avoid the problems associated with diabetes, including those that affect the eyes, by taking appropriate care of themselves by the following: Maintain a normal level of weight Watch your diet, especially limiting unhealthy types of fats and Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Your Eyes — More Than Retinopathy

Diabetes And Your Eyes — More Than Retinopathy

You probably know that eye damage (retinopathy) is a major complication of diabetes. So when vision blurs, it’s normal to think the worst. But diabetes can cause blurred vision in several other ways, some of which are reversible. I’m embarrassed to admit I only recently found out that blurred vision is a symptom of diabetes, even without any retinal damage. When blood glucose levels go up, blood gets thicker. Thicker blood pulls in more fluid from surrounding tissues, including the lenses of the eye, impacting the ability to focus. -- Keep an eye on your vision! Learn about preventive steps and treatments for diabetic retinopathy from retinal specialist Dr. Charles Wykoff. >> Blood sugar and blurry vision According to WebMD, [Blurred vision] could just be a temporary problem that develops rapidly and is caused by high blood sugar levels. High blood sugar causes the lens of the eye to swell, which changes your ability to see. Changing the shape of the lens naturally throws off vision. This can be a chronic, 24/7 kind of problem, or it can occur only after a high-carb meal, when glucose is way up. The Harvard Medical School Family Health Guide says that after-meal blurriness can be prevented by avoiding high-carb meals. The cure for chronic, all-the-time blurriness is to get blood glucose down to normal range before meals. It may take as long three months of relatively normal blood glucose levels before vision returns to your baseline normal. Diabetes can also cause blurriness or double vision due to hypoglycemia (low blood glucose). In this case, lens shape is probably not to blame. Low blood glucose can make it hard for the brain to focus on what the eye is seeing. Vision usually returns to normal when glucose levels rise. If blurriness doesn’t go away when glucos Continue reading >>

Sore Dry Eyes In Diabetes

Sore Dry Eyes In Diabetes

Introduction Sore eyes are particularly common in diabetes for various reasons. minor irritation is probably a side effect of all the medications, such as the blood pressure medication. This is common and not serious. part of the reason for this is that people may develop blepharitis, which is inflammation/infection of the eyelids you may have 'dry eyes'. Dry eyes is explained here in detail. if you have had diabetes a long time, and have diabetic neuropathy, this can lead to very serious problems Your eyes may feel tired, scratchy or gritty, as though there is something in them. They also be a little itchy, and they may be red. See animation. They may feel more sore in the wind, or any dry hot atmosphere. Contact lenses, or any thing that reduces blinking may make 'dry eyes' more uncomfortable, such as watching TV or a computer screen, or sewing. Stopping the blood pressure medication can lead to major problems, and it is much safer to put up with and treat the sore eyes than stop the medication. Sore and perhaps slightly dry eyes..treatment There are two parts to the treatment. the lubricants are discussed here. treat the blepharitis, described here. This is mainly eyelid cleaning. Moderately dry eyes..treatment Again, there are two parts to the treatment. the lubricants ... gels are best. treat the blepharitis, described here. This is mainly mainly eyelid cleaning. more severely dry eyes are best treated with preservative free eye drops Severely dry eyes/diabetic corneal neuropathy There are several parts to the treatment. the lubricants are discussed here. treat the blepharitis, described here plugs may be needed Very dry eyes are discussed here. diabetic corneal neuropathy is discussed here. Treatment for the severest cases includes eyelid closure to allow the corn Continue reading >>

Facts About Diabetic Eye Disease

Facts About Diabetic Eye Disease

Points to Remember Diabetic eye disease comprises a group of eye conditions that affect people with diabetes. These conditions include diabetic retinopathy, diabetic macular edema (DME), cataract, and glaucoma. All forms of diabetic eye disease have the potential to cause severe vision loss and blindness. Diabetic retinopathy involves changes to retinal blood vessels that can cause them to bleed or leak fluid, distorting vision. Diabetic retinopathy is the most common cause of vision loss among people with diabetes and a leading cause of blindness among working-age adults. DME is a consequence of diabetic retinopathy that causes swelling in the area of the retina called the macula. Controlling diabetes—by taking medications as prescribed, staying physically active, and maintaining a healthy diet—can prevent or delay vision loss. Because diabetic retinopathy often goes unnoticed until vision loss occurs, people with diabetes should get a comprehensive dilated eye exam at least once a year. Early detection, timely treatment, and appropriate follow-up care of diabetic eye disease can protect against vision loss. Diabetic retinopathy can be treated with several therapies, used alone or in combination. NEI supports research to develop new therapies for diabetic retinopathy, and to compare the effectiveness of existing therapies for different patient groups. What is diabetic eye disease? Diabetic eye disease can affect many parts of the eye, including the retina, macula, lens and the optic nerve. Diabetic eye disease is a group of eye conditions that can affect people with diabetes. Diabetic retinopathy affects blood vessels in the light-sensitive tissue called the retina that lines the back of the eye. It is the most common cause of vision loss among people with diabetes Continue reading >>

Are Bloodshot Eyes A Sign Of Diabetes?

Are Bloodshot Eyes A Sign Of Diabetes?

Well, so sorry to hear that you have bloodshot eyes. So, as you can see, diabetes is one of the most torturous diseases we might have in our lifetime, because once got it, it could give rise to a lot of serious problems, including some problems with our eyes. Of course sometimes diabetes leads to bloodshot eyes. However, it does not mean you have diabetes, you should just consult a doctor and see what happened. We can't tell you have diabetes just based on the bloodshots in your eyes. There are too many reasons which can cause bloodshots in eyes. If you use the computor for too long, you might have bloodshots in eyes. If your eyes are too dry, you might have bloodshots too. Because eyes are composed of very delicate tissues, they are easy to get irritated and allergies. Thus bloodshots would be caused. Meanwhile, diabetes indeed has some effects on eyes. Yet the condition caused by diabetes is named as diabetes retinopathy, which could lead to blindness without proper treatment. So I suggest you not to worry too much about bloodshots in eyes. Usually they will clear out very soon. There are some other obvious symptoms about diabetes, for example, extremely hunger and thirst, unexplained weight loss in a sudden and increased urination frequency. You could check whether any symptoms above fit your situation. If you have, I suggest you go to hospital as soon as possible. Will yes, we can say that bloodshot eyes may be a sign of diabetes. First, you should know that when you suffer diabetes, it may result in cataracts, and glaucoma problems. By the way, because of diabetes, it can lead to weaker blood vessels. So the disorders in your eyes can happen. Anyway, your eyes will turn to bloodshot, even red. Of course, in some cases, it may result in dry eyes, blurred vision too Continue reading >>

Eye Problems And Diabetes

Eye Problems And Diabetes

Eye problems and diabetes introduction If you have diabetes, regular visits to your ophthalmologist for eye exams are important to avoid eye problems. High blood sugar (glucose) increases the risk of diabetes eye problems. In fact, diabetes is the leading cause of blindness in adults age 20 to 74. If you have eye problems and diabetes, don't buy a new pair of glasses as soon as you notice you have blurred vision. It could just be a temporary eye problem that develops rapidly with diabetes and is caused by high blood sugar levels. High blood sugar in diabetes causes the lens of the eye to swell, which changes your ability to see. To correct this kind of eye problem, you need to get your blood sugar back into the target range (90-130 milligrams per deciliter or mg/dL before meals, and less than 180 mg/dL one to two hours after a meal). It may take as long as three months after your blood sugar is well controlled for your vision to fully get back to normal. Blurred vision can also be a symptom of more serious eye problem with diabetes. The three major eye problems that people with diabetes may develop and should be aware of are cataracts, glaucoma, and retinopathy. A cataract is a clouding or fogging of the normally clear lens of the eye. The lens is what allows us to see and focus on an image just like a camera. Although anyone can get cataracts, people with diabetes get these eye problems at an earlier age than most and the condition progresses more rapidly than in people without diabetes. If you have a cataract, there is a cloudy area in the lens of your eye that results in the inability to focus light, and your vision is impaired. Symptoms of this eye problem in diabetes include blurred or glared vision. During cataract surgery, the cloudy lens is removed or cleaned ou Continue reading >>

Understanding Diabetic Eye Conditions

Understanding Diabetic Eye Conditions

Type 2 diabetes can have a terrible impact on your eye health. Learn about the major diabetic eye diseases and get tips for avoiding them. Type 2 diabetes is a systemic disease, and if left untreated it can cause many serious complications in areas throughout the body — including the eyes. In fact, complications that threaten eye health are among the leading problems that can occur with diabetes and put people with type 2 diabetes at a greater risk of blindness. Preventing eye problems such as diabetic retinopathy, cataracts, and glaucoma hinges, in large part, on successfully managing blood sugar levels. Diabetic Retinopathy Unchecked blood sugar levels that spike and plummet can cause damage to the blood vessels of the eyes, resulting in a condition known as diabetic retinopathy. This is the most common vision problem due to diabetes. Retinopathy targets the retina, the tissue lining the back of the eye wall that perceives the images captured by the eye. There are two main types of diabetic retinopathy: Non-proliferative retinopathy. This is the disease's first stage. "The fluctuations in the blood sugar begin to damage the walls of blood vessels," says Victor H. Gonzalez, MD, founder of Valley Retina Institute in McAllen, Texas, and a volunteer for the American Diabetes Association. "The blood vessels begin to leak." The leakage causes the retina to swell, blurring your vision and causing straight lines to appear wavy as the retina takes on an uneven shape. Proliferative retinopathy. This is the disease's second stage, in which the eye tries to compensate for the loss of blood vessels by forming new ones. These new blood vessels are weak, though, and crowd into the retina. "Unfortunately, the blood vessels begin to grow around the central vision," Dr. Gonzalez says Continue reading >>

Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetic Retinopathy

Print Overview Diabetic retinopathy (die-uh-BET-ik ret-ih-NOP-uh-thee) is a diabetes complication that affects eyes. It's caused by damage to the blood vessels of the light-sensitive tissue at the back of the eye (retina). At first, diabetic retinopathy may cause no symptoms or only mild vision problems. Eventually, it can cause blindness. The condition can develop in anyone who has type 1 or type 2 diabetes. The longer you have diabetes and the less controlled your blood sugar is, the more likely you are to develop this eye complication. Symptoms You might not have symptoms in the early stages of diabetic retinopathy. As the condition progresses, diabetic retinopathy symptoms may include: Spots or dark strings floating in your vision (floaters) Blurred vision Fluctuating vision Impaired color vision Dark or empty areas in your vision Vision loss Diabetic retinopathy usually affects both eyes. When to see a doctor Careful management of your diabetes is the best way to prevent vision loss. If you have diabetes, see your eye doctor for a yearly eye exam with dilation — even if your vision seems fine. Pregnancy may worsen diabetic retinopathy, so if you're pregnant, your eye doctor may recommend additional eye exams throughout your pregnancy. Contact your eye doctor right away if your vision changes suddenly or becomes blurry, spotty or hazy. Causes Over time, too much sugar in your blood can lead to the blockage of the tiny blood vessels that nourish the retina, cutting off its blood supply. As a result, the eye attempts to grow new blood vessels. But these new blood vessels don't develop properly and can leak easily. There are two types of diabetic retinopathy: Early diabetic retinopathy. In this more common form — called nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR) Continue reading >>

Red Eye Lesions Could Help Predict Diabetic Retinopathy

Red Eye Lesions Could Help Predict Diabetic Retinopathy

Red eye lesions could help predict diabetic retinopathy Red eye lesions could help predict diabetic retinopathy Eye drops could help treat diabetic retinopathy 02 October 2017 Pioneering eye research has shown there could be a better way of predicting diabetic retinopathy , the most common form of diabetic eye disease. Researchers say the key is looking at the location of red eye lesions which are early indicators that the sight-threatening condition might develop. The lesions are predictive of changes in the blood flow to the retina , and the study aimed to accurately map where the lesions might grow in a bid to predict whether diabetic retinopathy might eventually occur. The research team studied the lesion locations in a group of people with diabetes and retinopathy and compared them to those who also had diabetes but did not go onto to develop retinopathy. Lead author, Dr Giovanni Ometto, a Wellcome Trust-funded researcher in the Crabb Lane in the Division of Optometry and Visual Science at City, University of London, said: "We hope our study - and the use of these occurrence maps - will help predict diabetic retinopathy and reduce the burden of the disease. "As by optimising screening programmes we hope that we can identify high risk diabetics at an early stage and deliver appropriate interventions before severe symptoms appear." The study team added that the information contained in this pattern of development of retinopathy is unlikely to provide a full risk profile, but the basis of the information could be integrated into risk models and be used in daily clinical practice. Diabetic retinopathy can develop in people with diabetes who have poorly controlled blood sugar levels , but obtaining and maintaining good blood glucose levels through eating a healthy diet Continue reading >>

Eye Problems & Diabetes

Eye Problems & Diabetes

The three major eye problems that people with diabetes need to be aware of are cataracts, glaucoma, and retinopathy. To prevent eye problems, you should: Control your blood glucose. Have your eyes checked at least once a year by an ophthalmologist (eye specialist). Control high blood pressure and lipids. Contact your doctor if any of the following occur: Black spots in your vision Flashes of light "Holes" in your vision Blurred vision Cataracts A cataract is a clouding or fogging of the lens inside the eye. When this happens, light cannot enter the eye and vision is impaired. Blurred vision Glared vision Treatment Surgery followed by glasses, contact lenses, or lens implant Glaucoma Glaucoma is a disease of the optic nerve (the "cable" that connects the eye to the brain and transmits light impulses to the brain). If the pressure inside the eye builds up, it can cause damage to this optic nerve. While most often there are NO symptoms from glaucoma, the following symptoms might occur: Loss of vision or visual field Headaches Eye aches (pain) Halos around lights Blurred vision Watering eyes Treatment Special eye drops Laser therapy Medication Surgery Prevention Have your eye doctor screen for glaucoma annually. Retinopathy Problems with the retina are called diabetic retinopathy. Problems develop as a result of fluid leaking from blood vessels into the eye or abnormal blood vessels formed in the eye. In either case, vision can be affected. If retinopathy is not found early or is not treated, blindness can occur. Sometimes there are no symptoms of retinopathy, but two common symptoms are: Blurred vision Spots or lines in your vision Laser therapy Surgery Injections into eye (advanced retinopathy) Have your eye doctor screen for retinopathy annually. Women with preexisting d Continue reading >>

Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetic Retinopathy

About Diabetic Retinopathy Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy and Macular Edema Diabetic Retinopathy FAQ Eye Doctor Q&A Diabetic retinopathy vision-threatening damage to the retina of the eye caused by diabetes is the leading cause of blindness among working-age Americans. The good news: Diabetic retinopathy often can be prevented with early detection, proper management of your diabetes and routine eye exams performed by your optometrist or ophthalmologist . According to the International Diabetes Federation (IDF), the United States has the highest rate of diabetes among 38 developed nations, with approximately 30 million Americans roughly 11 percent of the U.S. population between the ages of 20 and 79 having the disease. About 90 percent of Americans with diabetes have type 2 diabetes, which develops when the the body fails to produce enough insulin a hormone secreted by the pancreas that enables dietary sugar to enter the cells of the body or the body becomes resistant to insulin. This causes glucose (sugar) levels in the bloodstream to rise and can eventually damage the eyes, kidneys, nerves or heart, according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA). In the late stages of diabetic retinopathy, you may have blind spots and/or floaters. Risk factors for type 2 diabetes include obesity, an unhealthful diet and physical inactivity. Unfortunately, the prevalence of obesity and type 2 diabetes has increased significantly in the United States over the past 30 years. According to data released by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in December 2015, there were 1.4 million new cases of diabetes reported in the U.S. in 2014. Though this annual number is down from the historic high of 1.7 million new cases in 2009, it is still three times higher than w Continue reading >>

Eye Doctor Q And A - Diabetes And Its Effect On The Eyes

Eye Doctor Q And A - Diabetes And Its Effect On The Eyes

Q: How does diabetes affect your eyes? L.L., Connecticut A: Diabetes causes problems in the retina with what are collectively called microvascular abnormalities. The small blood vessels develop microaneurysms and leak blood. New blood vessel growth ( neovascularization ) occurs. Unfortunately, these blood vessels are weak and also leak. These leaks (hemorrhages) can cause irreversible damage to the retina and permanent vision loss. Patients with controlled diabetes do better than those with uncontrolled diabetes. However, even a person whose diabetes is under perfect control can still develop diabetic retinopathy hence, the need for yearly retinal exams. Dr. Slonim Q: Does diabetic retinopathy get progressively worse? F.R. A: Yes. When left unrecognized and untreated, diabetic retinopathy can get worse and eventually lead to blindness. Diabetic retinopathy can even get worse despite use of the best treatments that currently exist for it. Dr. Slonim Q: My father has type 2 diabetes and he is seeing double. We went to the hospital about a week ago and they said the diabetes had affected a nerve on the right eye. Can medicine get his sight back to normal? W.C. A: Diabetes can affect any one of the three cranial nerves that are responsible for movement of the eyes. Diabetes is one of the more common conditions associated with sixth nerve (Abducens nerve) palsies. Paralysis of this nerve affects the lateral rectus muscle that allows the eye to look outward. There is no specific medicine for this. The paralysis can be temporary and last a few months or it can be permanent. Dr. Slonim Q: Can diabetes cause you to have eye infections such as pink eye and frequent styes? K.M. A: That's a great question! Yes, people with diabetes are more likely to get bacterial infections, incl Continue reading >>

Blurred Vision And Red (bloodshot) Eyes

Blurred Vision And Red (bloodshot) Eyes

WebMD Symptom Checker helps you find the most common medical conditions indicated by the symptoms blurred vision and red (bloodshot) eyes including Diabetes, type 2, Glaucoma, and Transient ischemic attack (mini-stroke). There are 35 conditions associated with blurred vision and red (bloodshot) eyes. The links below will provide you with more detailed information on these medical conditions from the WebMD Symptom Checker and help provide a better understanding of causes and treatment of these related conditions. Continue reading >>

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