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Diabetic Recipes With Nutrition Facts

33 Low-carb Lunch And Dinner Ideas (with Nutrition Facts)

33 Low-carb Lunch And Dinner Ideas (with Nutrition Facts)

33 Low-Carb Lunch and Dinner Ideas (With Nutrition Facts) By Joe (MSc Nutrition), Dietitian Leave a Comment If your health has not improved or worsened following a low-fat eating pattern, a low-carbohydrate approach is worth a try. Studies consistently show that low-carb diets have metabolic health benefits for many people, especially those with poorly managed type 2 diabetes ( 1 ). A low-carb diet can be broadly classified as restricting total carbohydrate intake to about 50-100 grams per day. The average diet contains more than 250 grams per day. The following 33 low-carb lunch and dinner recipe ideas can help you stay within that range. With each recipe is a photo and detailed nutrition facts including carbohydrate content per serving. Click the recipe photo or name for the full instructions and more photos. Grilled Chicken with Spinach and Melted Mozzarella Grilled chicken doesnt have to be boring, top it with sauteed spinach with garlic, mozzarella cheese and roasted peppers and you have a quick and easy chicken dish your family will love! This is perfect for any busy weeknight; serve with a simple salad for a low carb meal. Nutritional facts per serving: 153 calories (640 kilojoules), 4.0g carb, 24.5g protein, 4.2g fat, 1.3g fibre Get game day ready with these healthier low calorie Grilled Buffalo Chicken Lettuce Wraps. All the same great flavor with half the calories! Nutritional facts per serving: 53 calories (222 kilojoules), 2.0g carb, 5.0g protein, 3.0g fat, 1.0g fibre, 412mg sodium Chicken and vegetables seasoned with sage, rosemary and balsamic vinegar, then baked in the oven. A delicious healthy meal, with very little clean-up. Nutritional facts per serving: 347 calories (1452 kilojoules), 19.2g carb, 31.1g protein, 17g fat, 5.8g fibre A healthier riff on Continue reading >>

Diabetic Recipes

Diabetic Recipes

Take charge of the battle against diabetes with the help of the experts at Cooking Light magazine, including these recipes, study reports, videos and more. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Dinner Recipes

Diabetic Dinner Recipes

Find healthy, delicious diabetic dinner recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell. Getting dinner on the table is easier when it's already planned out for you. Enjoy a month off from meal planning with 30 days of delicious, diabetes-friendly dinners to help you keep your blood sugar levels in check. The recipes in this plan limit carbohydrates, saturated fat and sodiumfactors that can negatively impact your diabetes if you eat too muchand can still be enjoyed by the whole family. Managing diabetes never tasted so good! Potatoes were first to benefit from the Hasselback techinique--making thin slices crosswise toward the bottom of the vegetable, but not all the way through, so the potato becomes fanned, seasoned and baked until crisp. Here we've adapted the concept to garlic bread and updated it with cheese for an easy and completely mouthwatering cheesy bread side dish. ADVERTISEMENT 2 ADVERTISEMENT These homemade sausage balls are a healthy riff on the original--we add riced cauliflower for moisture and a veggie boost, whole-wheat flour stands in for prepared biscuit mix, and sharp Cheddar adds flavor. Serve these sausage balls for brunch, as an appetizer, or mix them with your favorite marinara for dinner. Of all the vegetables in the supermarket, cabbage gives you some of the best value for your dollar. It's inexpensive and low in calories, but packed with nutritional benefits (vitamin C, fiber, cancer-fighting phytochemicals). This easy vegetable side dish gets a boost of flavor from shallot, caraway seeds and a delicious finish of crisp bacon. This good-for-your-gut-health food gets super-silky when slowly cooked in the oven. Serve these flavorful braised leeks with roast chicken or fish. 1 With a whopping 19 grams of protein, this one-dish meal wi Continue reading >>

The American Diabetes Association's Recipe For Health

The American Diabetes Association's Recipe For Health

The American Diabetes Association's Recipe for Health By Madelyn L. Wheeler, MS, RD, FADA, CD, and Robyn Webb, MS, LN What makes a recipe diabetes-friendly? The American Diabetes Association promotes general nutrition guidelines that are geared toward blood glucose control, reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease, and encouraging individualized eating plans that people can maintain over time. What makes a recipe diabetes-friendly for you depends on your situation and conditions. Is calorie control important because you're aiming to lose weight? Does high blood pressure mean you're intent on reducing sodium? Are you fueling for a triathlon? That's why the recipes printed in Diabetes Forecast list full nutrition informationso that you can decide what best fits your needs and concerns. There's no single diabetes "diet," and an eating plan (which a registered dietitian can help you create) includes what you eat over days, weeks, and years, not just a single recipe. Recipes presented in this magazine go through a rigorous process of development, testing, tasting, and nutritional analysis to be sure they "work" (produce the noted number of servings, taste good, and look attractive) and also meet nutritional guidelines. Only then are they deemed ready for publication. So, a serving of a recipe printed in Diabetes Forecast is: Lower in saturated fat, containing fewer than 1.5 grams of saturated fat for a side dish, fewer than 2.5 grams for a main dish, and fewer than 3.5 grams for a one-dish meal. Lower in sodium, with fewer than 480 milligrams of sodium for a side dish and fewer than 600 mg for a main dish or meal. Moderate in carbohydrate and lower in added sugars. Translating specific numbers from guidelines into healthy recipes can be difficult without a calculator or Continue reading >>

Important Tips About The Nutrition Facts Label For People With Diabetes

Important Tips About The Nutrition Facts Label For People With Diabetes

Important Tips About the Nutrition Facts Label for People With Diabetes As a dietitian, I always instruct my clients who are looking to reach certain health and nutrition goals to never try to make more than three major changes at once. Drastic changes to food intake or exercise usually result in eventual rebounding. I wanted to take this time to review what my tips are for interpreting the Nutrition Facts label so that you are armed with some of the information you need to decide what dietary goals to pursue. Whether you meet with a dietitian or diabetes educator and create plans together, or you have the motivation to do it on your own, here is something to keep in mind: Being realistic is key! It is critical that your goals are in fact doable given your time, budget, and lifestyle. Another tip for those of us with diabetes who are also looking to maintain or improve our weight: Blood sugar management is going to be a priority, because if your blood sugars are all over the place, this can disrupt your metabolism, hunger cues, and insulin needs, which will cause erratic eating and an overall yucky feeling. Keeping blood sugar control as your number one priority will help allow all of the other positive changes you are seeking to fall right in line. And now without further ado, here is some information to keep in mind when reviewing a Nutrition Facts label: Serving size. Make sure you can estimate and stick to the serving size suggested on the label. Dont ever just eat out of the box or bag, since you will almost definitely go over the serving size. Calories. Its important to note the source of the calories youre thinking of eating and determine whether it is beneficial for your blood sugars and overall health. Fat. Providing nine calories per gram, fat is an extremely Continue reading >>

Treatment Of Diabetes: The Diabetic Diet

Treatment Of Diabetes: The Diabetic Diet

The mainstays of diabetes treatment are: Working towards obtaining ideal body weight Following a diabetic diet Regular exercise Diabetic medication if needed Note: Type 1 diabetes must be treated with insulin; if you have type 2 diabetes, you may not need to take insulin. This involves injecting insulin under the skin for it to work. Insulin cannot be taken as a pill because the digestive juices in the stomach would destroy the insulin before it could work. Scientists are looking for new ways to give insulin. But today, shots are the only method. There are, however, new methods to give the shots. Insulin pumps are now being widely used and many people are having great results. In this Article Working towards obtaining ideal body weight An estimate of ideal body weight can be calculated using this formula: For women: Start with 100 pounds for 5 feet tall. Add 5 pounds for every inch over 5 feet. If you are under 5 feet, subtract 5 pounds for each inch under 5 feet. This will give you your ideal weight. If you have a large frame, add 10%. If you have a small frame, subtract 10%. A good way to decide your frame size is to look at your wrist size compared to other women's. Example: A woman who is 5' 4" tall and has a large frame 100 pounds + 20 pounds (4 inches times 5 pounds per inch) = 120 pounds. Add 10% for large frame (in this case 10% of 120 pounds is 12 pounds). 120 pounds + 12 pounds = 132 pounds ideal body weight. For men: Start with 106 pounds for a height of 5 foot. Add 6 pounds for every inch above 5 foot. For a large frame, add 10%. For a small frame, subtract 10%. (See above for further details.) Learn More about Treating Type 2 Diabetes The Diabetic Diet Diet is very important in diabetes. There are differing philosophies on what is the best diet but below is Continue reading >>

Nutrition Facts Tool And Tips

Nutrition Facts Tool And Tips

The Nutrition Facts Panel on the food label is a handy tool for making smart food choices that fit your diabetes meal plan. Let's look around the label to learn how: Serving Size: The serving size is based on government information about the standard amount people commonly eat, but this isn't necessarily the amount you should eat. Other information on the label (calories, fat, etc.) is based on serving size. Compare the amount you actually eat to the serving size listed and, if they're different, adjust the nutrients up or down. Eating too much or too little can affect your blood glucose level and your weight. Tip: To get the Nutrition Facts for your typical portion size, weigh or measure the amount and compare it to the serving size and nutrition numbers listed on the label. For help estimating serving sizes, see our Portion Size Guide . Calories: The Nutrition Facts Panel lists the number of calories in one serving. This information is especially important when you're managing your weight. Tip: At the grocery store, use labels to compare the calories per serving in similar types of foods so you can make the best choice for your meal plan. Be sure to compare serving sizes, too. Total Fat, Saturated Fat and Trans Fat: When you have diabetes, it's smart to watch the amount of fat in your diet, especially saturated and trans fat, which can increase your risk for heart disease. Use the label to balance higher fat foods with lower fat and fat free choices throughout the day. Tip: Some labels list polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fat. These fats are nutritious choices but have the same number of calories and fat grams as other fats, so keep the amount you eat within the limits of your eating plan. Total Carbohydrate: This number totals up the grams of complex carbohydrat Continue reading >>

Featured Recipes

Featured Recipes

Chicken is often a go-to meat because of its lean protein and high amount of nutrients. Enjoy chicken in a variety of ways with an array of flavors in these diabetes-friend... See recipe › Chicken is often a go-to meat because of its lean protein and high amount of nutrients. Enjoy chicken in a variety of ways with an array of flavors in these diabetes-friend... See recipe › Chicken is often a go-to meat because of its lean protein and high amount of nutrients. Enjoy chicken in a variety of ways with an array of flavors in these diabetes-friend... See recipe › Chicken is often a go-to meat because of its lean protein and high amount of nutrients. Enjoy chicken in a variety of ways with an array of flavors in these diabetes-friend... See recipe › Chicken is often a go-to meat because of its lean protein and high amount of nutrients. Enjoy chicken in a variety of ways with an array of flavors in these diabetes-friend... See recipe › Chicken is often a go-to meat because of its lean protein and high amount of nutrients. Enjoy chicken in a variety of ways with an array of flavors in these diabetes-friend... See recipe › Chicken is often a go-to meat because of its lean protein and high amount of nutrients. Enjoy chicken in a variety of ways with an array of flavors in these diabetes-friend... See recipe › Chicken is often a go-to meat because of its lean protein and high amount of nutrients. Enjoy chicken in a variety of ways with an array of flavors in these diabetes-friend... See recipe › Chicken is often a go-to meat because of its lean protein and high amount of nutrients. Enjoy chicken in a variety of ways with an array of flavors in these diabetes-friend... See recipe › Chicken is often a go-to meat because of its lean protein and high amount of nutr Continue reading >>

Chicken Bella

Chicken Bella

Read more recipes at 24/7 Low-Carb Diner Recipes . Beautiful, roasted tomatoes, fresh spinach, and fresh, cheesy mozzarella make this dish beautiful and mouth watering! Cuisine Chicken, Gluten-Free, Italian, Low-Carb 1 lb chicken thighs or breast, boneless and skinless Slice tomatoes into halves. Line a cookie sheet with parchment paper and roast the tomatoes at 400 degrees for 25 minutes. While the tomatoes are roasting, heat a cast iron or stainless steel skillet. If using full breast of chicken, pound it to an even thickness. Trim any fat from chicken. Slice if desired. Add chicken and pancetta to the pan. Brown until nearly cooked through. Pour chicken broth into the skillet, using a spatula to loosen any browned bits from the base. Over medium heat, stir in cream cheese until melted. When the sauce is smooth, add in the spinach. Stir until wilted. Add the chicken and roasted tomatoes, stirring gently. When up to temperature again, sprinkle with mozzarella. Serve alongside a tasty alongside a green salad with Italian dressing. *You may choose to use whole breasts or thighs for a more formal presentation. I like the sliced thighs for faster cooking and easier eating. The choice is yours. Recipe shared with permission from Lisa of 24/7 Low Carb Diner . Find the original recipe and notes here . Continue reading >>

Diabetic Recipes - Home | Facebook

Diabetic Recipes - Home | Facebook

Beet egg whites to stiff peaks- put aside 4. THEN fold in your dry ingredients slowly. 5. Bring the water to a boil and add it to the vinegar 6. THEN add your wet ingredients slowly to your dry ingredients. Don't over mix the dough, the consistency should resemble Play-Doh. 8. Moisten hands and form dough into 4 or 8 pieces of bread. You can also make hot dog or hamburger buns. Place on a greased baking sheet or parchment paper. 9. Bake on lower rack in oven for 5060 minutes, depending on the size of your bread. They're done when you hear a hollow sound when tapping the bottom of the bun. Serve with butter and toppings of your choice. Store the bread in the fridge or freezer. After you roll your dough into a ball cut it in half, then into smaller rolls. Using wet hands pick up each roll and get the roll wet (not soaked) this will make a nice crust on the outside of the bread. Then you can sprinkle the roll with salt or butter, or herb butter, or whatever you like. Also when I made the 2nd set of rolls yesterday i ran out of almond flour so I did 1 1/2c almond flour and 1 1/2 c Sunflower Flour and they tasted great, and the smell was so yummy when you cut a roll open! My Mother In law said she liked this roll recipe best! Now THAT"S A Compliment! (trust me on this) -------------------------------------------------------------------- This recipe is adapted from an earlier bread recipe by Maria Emmerich. Preheat oven to 325 degrees and line two baking sheets with parchment paper. (For egg-free/vegan) To a small bowl, add flax seeds and water. Whisk together until fully incorporated. Set aside to set for at least 5 minutes. To a mixing bowl, add dry ingredients and whisk together. Melt coconut oil in microwave until liquid, about 30 seconds. To dry ingredients, add melted Continue reading >>

Low Carb Chicken Philly Cheesesteak Bowl

Low Carb Chicken Philly Cheesesteak Bowl

Low Carb Chicken Philly Cheesesteak is the perfect recipe for a delicious, health and quick-fix meal. In less than 30 minutes, you can enjoy a diabetes-friendly meal the whole family will love. CLICK BELOW FOR THE LOW CARB CHEESESTEAK VIDEO: I’m back with more philly cheesesteak!!! Now do you believe me when I say “I’ll never give up my quest for the ultimate low carb philly cheesesteak recipe”? First there was Low Carb Philly Cheesesteak Cups, next there was Philly Cheesesteak Stuffed Mushrooms and then Low Carb Philly Cheesesteak Bowl! Now my fellow cheesesteak lovers, I give you my low carb chicken-based version. ♥ This recipe is perfect if you are cooking for either low carb eaters or people with diabetes and also for those who have no diet restrictions. Just add in a hoagie roll or hamburger bun and dinner is done. It all begins with thinly sliced chicken breasts. I sliced my chicken partially frozen which helps tremendously with getting the super thin slices I wanted. If your chicken is fresh or thawed, simply place it back in the freezer for 15-20 minutes to get it to a semi-frozen state. (You can slice the chicken breasts without freezing them, it just makes things a little easier) Next, I added my seasonings to the raw sliced chicken and made sure all pieces were coated. I let this sit a few minutes while I warmed up a little olive oil in my skillet. (You could complete this step up to a day ahead of time if you’d like. Just store the chicken in fridge until your ready.) When your olive oil is heated, add the chicken slices and spread them out. I used a large skillet here and it allowed enough room for 2 large chicken breasts. As the chicken browns, continue spreading the pieces out and turning them so each side is nicely browned. For this part, you Continue reading >>

6 Easy Salad Recipes To Help Control Diabetes

6 Easy Salad Recipes To Help Control Diabetes

“I don’t want to eat like a rabbit!” This is what I hear when I encourage increased leafy greens and vegetables to people with diabetes. However, there is a proverbial goldmine of nutrients in salad that can help people with diabetes decrease blood sugar and get needed nutrients. Salad doesn’t have to be boring! We can help with 6 easy salad recipes to help control diabetes and make you love eating your greens. According to The American Diabetes Association, as of 2012 over 29.1 million people in the United States were diagnosed with diabetes. This is over 9.3% of the American population. These numbers are shockingly on the rise all because of the way we are choosing to eat. Our diets are too high in fat cholesterol, sodium, and processed foods. Go to your cupboard. Take out a box of packaged food. Turn it over and read the ingredients. Are there things on there you can’t read or understand? Should you really be eating it? Fresh Is Best Think about where you shop. If you go around the perimeter of your local grocery store, all of the fresh non-processed items are around the perimeter of the store. Here you will find all the best ingredients for wholesome and fresh foods. Bare salad would be best for people with diabetes, because it is actually the toppings and dressings that make it bad for you. Choosing the right ingredients can still keep things tasting good and good for you. Our expert taste team found six of the best tasting and easy to make salads that are diabetes friendly. Actually, they are good enough for the whole family to enjoy right along with you! We’ve even included recipes for people watching gluten intake and vegetarians too. Let’s take a look. For more diabetes related information read the following: 1. Salmon Topped Spinach Salad and Lem Continue reading >>

Healthy Diabetic Recipes

Healthy Diabetic Recipes

Find healthy, delicious diabetic recipes including main dishes, drinks, snacks and desserts from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell. Of all the vegetables in the supermarket, cabbage gives you some of the best value for your dollar. It's inexpensive and low in calories, but packed with nutritional benefits (vitamin C, fiber, cancer-fighting phytochemicals). This easy vegetable side dish gets a boost of flavor from shallot, caraway seeds and a delicious finish of crisp bacon. This good-for-your-gut-health food gets super-silky when slowly cooked in the oven. Serve these flavorful braised leeks with roast chicken or fish. 1 1 This simple snack provides the energy you need when you start to drag. Protein-rich Greek yogurt and sweet strawberries make for a super-simple and satisfying snack. Roasting vegetables and salmon together on one sheet pan while the rice cooks makes an easy, satisfying meal packed with protein, whole grains and veggies. To ensure that you're getting 100 percent whole grains, look for a wild rice blend that consists of wild and brown rice. Blitzed cauliflower gives this very easy vegan soup recipe its creamy taste without adding any dairy. To get the silkiest texture, puree the soup in a blender rather than using an immersion blender. Make guacamole at home that tastes just like it came from Chipotle--but don't worry, our version won't be "extra"! This deliciously fresh guac is perfect for topping burrito bowls or tacos, or serve as an appetizer or healthy snack with tortilla chips and veggies. 1 ADVERTISEMENT Mashed avocado and white beans make for a fiber-rich and creamy topping, the perfect partner for a crispy slice of toast. Try it for a quick breakfast or snack. Potatoes were first to benefit from the Hasselback techinique--making thin Continue reading >>

3-day Diabetes Meal Plan: 1,500 Calories

3-day Diabetes Meal Plan: 1,500 Calories

Healthy eating is the cornerstone of managing diabetes, yet it can be a challenge figuring out what to eat to balance your blood sugar. Here we've created a delicious 3-day meal plan that makes it easier to follow a diabetes diet. In this plan you'll find a mix of nutritious foods including fiber-rich complex carbohydrates, like whole grains and fresh fruits and vegetables, lean protein sources, healthy fats and dairy. This plan limits the amount of foods with refined carbohydrates (think white bread, white rice and sugar), added sugars and saturated fats, which can negatively impact your health if you eat too much. The carbohydrates are balanced throughout the day with each meal containing around 3 carb servings (45 grams of carbohydrates) and each snack containing around 1-2 carb servings (15-30 grams grams of carbohydrates). The calorie and carbohydrate totals are listed next to each meal and snack so you can swap foods with similar nutrition in and out as you like. Eating with diabetes doesn't need to be restrictive or complicated. Incorporating a variety of foods, as we do in this meal plan, is a healthy and sustainable approach to managing diabetes. Not sure if this is the right plan for you? Calculate your calorie level and find the diet meal plan that will work best for you. Day 1: Meal Prep Tip: Cook or set aside an extra 2/3 cup of black beans tonight at dinner to have for lunch on Day 2. Be sure to rinse canned beans to get rid of excess salt. Breakfast (344 calories, 39 grams carbohydrates) • 1 1/4 cup nonfat plain Greek yogurt • 3/4 cup blueberries • 1 1/2 Tbsp. chopped walnuts • 2 tsp. honey Top yogurt with blueberries, walnuts and honey. Note: We use a small amount of added sweetener, in this case honey, in plain yogurt. People with diabetes can s Continue reading >>

Top 8 Easiest & Best Snacks For A Diabetic

Top 8 Easiest & Best Snacks For A Diabetic

We all get hungry in between meals. So instead of reaching for those chips and nasty saltine crackers, opt for one of these easy tasty snacks instead. They are all low in carbs and perfectly diabetic friendly – of course! 1. Olives Olives make the perfect snack. They are full of healthy monounsaturated fats and contain all the same benefits extra virgin olive oil offers – the ability to lower blood glucose, increase insulin sensitivity, lower cholesterol, reduced risk of heart disease and just improve overall health. When it comes to diabetes, monounsaturated fats are the best types of fats to eat – you'll also find this type of fat in avocados and nuts. Olives are a great source of antioxidants – vitamin E, flavonoids, and polyphenolic compounds that all reduce oxidative stress and inflammation. Just grab a handful, chew them slowly and thoroughly, and your hunger pangs will soon be entirely satisfied. Nutrition Facts: 10 olives: Calories (Energy): 50g Fat: 4.70g Carbohydrate: 2.80g Fiber: 1g Sugar: 0g Protein: 0.40g. 2. Cucumber Cucumbers are low in calories – being mostly made up of water, which makes them perfect for quenching thirst and hunger. According to Organic Facts: “The flesh of cucumbers is rich in vitamins A, C, and folic acid while the hard skin of cucumbers is rich in fiber and a range of minerals include magnesium, molybdenum, and potassium.” Tip: Cucumber rounds make the perfect cracker replacement. They are crisp, provide a firm base, and aren't overly powerful on taste. So you can top them with whatever you like for a super healthy diabetic snack. Or, even use them as crackers for dips. The idea is to replace your processed crackers with cucumber crackers instead (see recipe below). Nutrition Facts: Half cup slices: Calories (Energy): 8 Continue reading >>

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