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Diabetic Psychosis Symptoms

Psychosis: Causes, Symptoms, And Treatments

Psychosis: Causes, Symptoms, And Treatments

Broadly speaking, psychosis means a loss of contact with reality; it is a symptom of a number of mental illnesses rather than a medical condition in its own right. This page offers a full description of psychosis, what causes it, some examples of psychotic conditions, and how it is treated. Here are some key points about psychosis. More detail and supporting information is in the main article. Psychosis is not a disease in its own right; it is a symptom A common psychotic delusion is a belief that the individual is an important figure Earlier diagnosis of psychosis improves long-term outcomes Psychosis is a symptom rather than a disease. Psychosis is an umbrella term ; it means that an individual has sensory experiences of things that do not exist and/or beliefs with no basis in reality. During a psychotic episode, an individual may experience hallucinations and/or delusions. They may see or hear things that do not exist. This can be incredibly frightening for the individual and, sometimes, the symptoms can cause them to lash out and hurt themselves or others. Psychosis is classically associated with schizophrenia spectrum disorders, and, although there are other symptoms, one of the defining criteria for schizophrenia is the presence of psychosis. The classic signs and symptoms of psychosis are: Hallucinations - hearing, seeing, or feeling things that do not exist Delusions - false beliefs, especially based on fear or suspicion of things that are not real Disorganization - in thought, speech, or behavior Disordered thinking - jumping between unrelated topics, making strange connections between thoughts Depending on the cause, psychosis can come on quickly or slowly. The same is the case in schizophrenia, although symptoms may have a slow onset and begin with milder ps Continue reading >>

Brief Psychotic Disorder & Psychotic Breaks: Types, Symptoms, & Treatment

Brief Psychotic Disorder & Psychotic Breaks: Types, Symptoms, & Treatment

Changes in eating or sleeping habits, energy level, or weight Experts dont know what causes brief psychotic disorder. It is possible there is a genetic link since the condition is more common in people who have a family history of psychotic or mood disorders , such as depression or bipolar disorder . Another theory suggests that poor coping skills could trigger the disorder as a defense against or escape from a very frightening or stressful situation. In most cases, the disorder is triggered by a major stress or traumatic event. For some women, childbirth can be a trigger. Brief psychotic disorder is rare. It usually happens for the first time when people are in their 20s or 30s, and its more common in women than in men. People who have a condition such as antisocial personality disorder or paranoid personality disorder are more likely to get it. If someone has symptoms, their doctor will give them a checkup, talk to them about their health history, and give them tests such as brain imaging (for instance, MRI scans) or blood tests to rule out other causes. The doctor may refer the person to a psychiatrist or psychologist . These mental health professionals use specially designed interview and assessment tools to evaluate a person for a psychotic disorder. Someone with brief psychotic disorder will probably get psychotherapy (a type of counseling), medication, or both. They may need to be hospitalized for a time if their symptoms are severe or if they might harm themselves or someone else. Psychotherapy is a type of counseling, or talk therapy. The goal is to help the person identify and handle the situation or event that triggered the disorder. Medication : The doctor might prescribe antipsychotic drugs to ease or eliminate the symptoms and end the brief psychotic diso Continue reading >>

The Link Between Schizophrenia And Diabetes

The Link Between Schizophrenia And Diabetes

The link between schizophrenia and diabetes Current Psychiatry. 2012 October;11(10):28-46 Lead Physician, Mental Health and Metabolism Clinic, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Assistant Professor, Departments of Psychiatry and Nutritional Science, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario Vigilant metabolic monitoring informs treatment decisions 1. Kohen D. Diabetes mellitus and schizophrenia: historical perspective. Br J Psychiatry Suppl. 2004;47:S64-S66. 2. Dixon L, Weiden P, Delahanty J, et al. Prevalence and correlates of diabetes in national schizophrenia samples. Schizophr Bull. 2000;26(4):903-912. 3. De Hert M, van Winkel R, Van Eyck D, et al. Prevalence of diabetes, metabolic syndrome and metabolic abnormalities in schizophrenia over the course of the illness: a cross-sectional study. Clin Pract Epidemol Ment Health. 2006;2:14.- 4. Juvonen H, Reunanen A, Haukka J, et al. Incidence of schizophrenia in a nationwide cohort of patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus. Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2007;64(8):894-899. 5. Hales CN, Barker DJ. The thrifty phenotype hypothesis. Br Med Bull. 2001;60:5-20. 6. Ryan MC, Sharifi N, Condren R, et al. Evidence of basal pituitary-adrenal overactivity in first episode, drug naive patients with schizophrenia. Psychoneuroendocrinology. 2004;29(8):1065-1070. 7. Odawara M, Isaka M, Tada K, et al. Diabetes mellitus associated with mitochondrial myopathy and schizophrenia: a possible link between diabetes mellitus and schizophrenia. Diabet Med. 1997;14(6):503.- 8. Siuta MA, Robertson SD, Kocalis H, et al. Dysregulation of the norepinephrine transporter sustains cortical hypodopaminergia and schizophrenia-like behaviors in neuronal rictor null mice. PLoS Biol. 2010;8(6):e1000393.- 9. Strassnig M, Brar JS, Ganguli R. Nut Continue reading >>

Diabetic Psychosis

Diabetic Psychosis

Posted on August 11, 2012 | 1 Comment on Diabetic Psychosis Many studies have demonstrated the correlation between mood and psychotic disorders with diabetes, which is generally termed as Diabetic psychosis . Diabetes is a metabolic disorder in which the body is unable to absorb and use glucose, which is our main source of fuel or energy. The food we eat is broken down to glucose after digestion so that it can be absorbed by our bodies. The inability of the body to absorb glucose into the cells is caused by the lack of insulin, a hormone produced from the pancreas which facilitates the absorption of glucose in the body cells. Psychosis on the other hand is described as a psychological state in which a person is feel depressed, lonely and tormented, which negatively impacts a persons way of thinking, behavior and perception as manifested in the disruption of relationships, alienation, work productivity and the day to day functions of people. The occurrence of diabetes in people essentially causes a very stressful event in the life of a person which in turn can potentially result to psychosis, if not addressed. The stress can be triggered by Diabetes in different ways. For instance, this stress can be attributed to the drastic change in the dietary lifestyle of a person. People suffering diabetes need to strictly regulate their food intake because of the possibility of producing too much sugar/ glucose in the blood, which their bodies cannot absorb. This creates a sense of deprivation on the part of the diabetic patient in ones ability to enjoy the fundamental things in life such as eating what you want. Some diabetic patients also suffer from a sudden weight loss as well as fatigue. The weight loss can have a drastic effect on the physical appearance of a person, which Continue reading >>

Hypoglycaemia And Psychosis

Hypoglycaemia And Psychosis

Acute Hypoglycemia Presenting as Acute Psychosis Tanveer Padder MD, Aparna Udyawar MD, Nouman Azhar MD, Kamil Jaghab MD From the Department of Psychiatry, Nassau University Medical Center, 2201 Hempstead Turnpike, East Meadow NY 11554 USA. We are presenting a unique case of acute hypoglycemia presenting as acute psychosis with an unusual presentation creating a diagnostic dilemma. Medline search was done using the search words hypoglycemia and psychosis and to the best of our knowledge this is the first reported case of hypoglycemia presenting as acute psychosis. Unsuspected hypoglycemia may masquerade as neurologic, psychiatric, traumatic, or toxicologic disorders. Hypoglycemia has been misdiagnosed as cerebrovascular accident, transient ischemic attack, seizure disorder, brain tumor, narcolepsy, multiple sclerosis, psychosis, sympathomimetic drug ingestion, hysteria, and depression and also can masquerade as traumatic head injury with varying degrees of altered mentation, (1) as well as cardiac arrhythmia with bradycardia. (2) Our case provides a unique look at how a simple abnormality when overlooked can present as a difficult diagnostic challenge for both medicine and psychiatry services. Particular care should be exercised when dealing with psychiatric patients with these entities so that hypoglycemia is not missed. Significant medical harm to the patient and medicolegal risks for the emergency physician are issues to consider in cases involving misdiagnosis, incorrect therapy, and inappropriate disposition. (3) Almost 7% patients presenting with altered mental status to the ED are in fact hypoglycemic. In addition to the diabetic patient, numerous other clinical scenarios may involve hypoglycemia, including toxicologic, infectious, psychiatric, and metabolic synd Continue reading >>

Acute Hyperglycemic Psychosis

Acute Hyperglycemic Psychosis

Acute Hyperglycemic Psychosis refers to a state of relative psychosis induced by a rapid spike in serum blood sugar levels. Though mothers worldwide have attested to this phenomenon for centuries, Acute Hyperglycemic Psychosis is now formally recognized by the medical community with its inclusion in the DSM-V. It is characterized by episodes of impulsive, deviant, or hyperactive behavior that follow the consumption of refined sugars, with the addition of psychotic symptoms. This can include inappropriate voice tone or volume, excessive physical activities like running, jumping, or climbing, and sometimes increased incidence of violent or risky behaviors like hitting or biting, as well as emotional instability. An affected individual may suddenly erupt into a rage, exhibit inappropriate laughter, or experience inconsolable despair. Parents often comment that they do not recognize their child while serum levels are elevated, and that the behavior is unlike their child. In severe episodes, physicians have recorded patients who adopted entirely new personas while under the influence of sugar, but exhibited no atypical behaviors or symptoms the following day. The “high” experienced is typically followed by a glucose “crash,” a dramatic drop in blood sugar triggered by the body’s glucose-insulin response. Symptoms include sudden lethargy and drowsiness, irritability, and general malaise. While the severity of such episodes is varied, classification requires that the episodic behavior be outside the realm of behaviors considered clinically appropriate for the child’s developmental stage under normal conditions. This phenomenon seems to disproportionately affect children and those with a low body-mass index, though it often resolves by adulthood. It is speculated th Continue reading >>

Coexistent Mental Health Disorders In Diabetic Patients

Coexistent Mental Health Disorders In Diabetic Patients

US Pharm. 2015;40(11):37-42. ABSTRACT: Depression, anxiety, and schizophrenia are some of the mental health comorbidities seen in the diabetic population. Managing diabetes in the context of these mental health disorders can be extremely challenging. Proper control of diabetes requires active patient participation and is dependent upon compliance with lifestyle modifications, self-monitoring, and prescribed medications. Poorly controlled mental health disorders may likely affect patients’ ability to self-manage diabetes. Identifying and treating mental health disorders is an essential component of diabetes management that can be accomplished in an integrated manner by multidisciplinary team members. Pharmacists working with this patient population can provide a number of services—such as individual assessment, collaborative goal setting, skill building, ongoing monitoring, and medication management—to improve patient outcomes. Diabetic patients may be particularly vulnerable to developing mental health disorders because diabetes is considered one of the most psychologically and behaviorally demanding chronic medical conditions.1 Diabetes is more prevalent in psychiatrically ill patients than in the general population.2 Depression, anxiety, and schizophrenia are a few of the mental health comorbidities seen in the diabetic population. Comorbid psychiatric illness has been linked to worse health outcomes in diabetic patients.2 Comorbid Mental Health Disorders Even nonclinical levels of depressive symptoms and minor depression have been associated with problems with adherence, risk of complications, functional impairment, higher medical costs, and death.3-5 Increased severity of depressive symptoms has been connected to a greater probability of emergency department, Continue reading >>

Acute Psychosis And Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus:should Screening Guidelines Be Revised?

Acute Psychosis And Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus:should Screening Guidelines Be Revised?

Acute Psychosis and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus:Should Screening Guidelines Be Revised? Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston (Dr Bauer); and Department of Psychiatry, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Ohio (all authors) Corresponding author: Leah K. Bauer, MD, Massachusetts General Hospital, 15 Parkman St, Wang 812, Boston, MA 02144 ( [email protected] ). Received 2010 Apr 25; Accepted 2010 Sep 1. Copyright 2011, Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Although psychosis increases the risk for developing type 2 diabetes, the temporal relationship between the onset of psychosis and the onset of diabetes has not been studied. We present 6 cases of acute psychosis, which led to the new diagnosis of type 2 diabetes during inpatient psychiatric admission within days to weeks of the psychotic episode. The implications of these findings and the efficacy of current diabetes screening guidelines are discussed. Prior research suggests that the prevalence of diabetes among individuals with schizophrenia and affective disorders is 1.52 times higher than that of the general population. 1 Most studies have associated the increased risk for diabetes in this population with exposure to atypical antipsychotic agents. 2 4 However, several studies have found a high rate of insulin resistance, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome in those with psychotic and affective disorders, independent of exposure to antipsychotic medication. 5 7 Additionally, the rate of undiagnosed diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance among psychiatric patients in general is also high, over 10% in several samples. 2 , 8 Several precipitating factors to acute psychosis have been identified, including medication noncompliance, amphetamine and excessive cann Continue reading >>

Acid, Tripping & Blood Sugar Levels

Acid, Tripping & Blood Sugar Levels

Individuals with diabetes may struggle with various symptoms caused by high or low blood sugar. High blood sugars tend to cause depressive feelings and mood swings, while low blood sugar may cause scattered thoughts while extreme lows can even cause hallucinations and delusional thinking. Tripping It was November of 1989, my freshman year of college; I had just passed the clock in the center of campus when I felt weak. As my legs gave out, I tripped and fell. My blood sugar had dropped to 17mg/dL, and I didn’t have any glucose on me. Luckily, I had gotten some strength up and stumbled my way to the campus restaurant where I downed a glass of juice and recovered. There wasn’t as much information back then as there is today, but I realized the hard way that having a role of Lifesavers in my pocket at all time was important. Without them, I may have ended up having a diabetes seizure. While working as a diabetes focused psychotherapist, I have listened to multiple stories involving delusions and hallucinations during extreme low blood sugar reactions. I have also experienced that state mind during my last low blood sugar that landed me in the hospital. It was 1994 and my last year of undergrad, and I had just turned 21 years old. I was studying for an exam one afternoon in late October, and it was 3pm. The sun was glaring as it entered my bedroom. I remember looking at the clock. The clock read 11:00 pm and as I believed it was time for bed I went downstairs to the bathroom and brushed my teeth. In reality, I froze at the bottom of the steps, and I spent five minutes staring at my roommate. Then I turned around, went back upstairs to my room and went to bed. At 4pm, I awoke to demons in my room. They strapped me to a board of wood, carried me downstairs and out the fro Continue reading >>

What Makes You Diabetic Can Also Make You Schizophrenic

What Makes You Diabetic Can Also Make You Schizophrenic

What makes you diabetic can also make you schizophrenic Insulin is even more important to your health than we thought - not only can problems with it cause diabetes, but they can also cause schizophrenia. The good news? This new discovery could lead to treatments for both conditions. This link was identified in a study conducted by researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, who discovered a definite link between malfunctioning insulin regulation in the brains of mice and increased incidence of schizophrenia-like behavior. It's not just that the same risk factors for diabetes can also lead to schizophrenia; it's that one condition can actually exacerbate the severity of the other from a behavior perspective. Endocrinologist Kevin Niswender explains that recognition of this link could aid in the development of treatments that better address the multifaceted nature of patients' conditions: "We know that people with diabetes have an increased incidence of mood and other psychiatric disorders. And we think that those co-morbidities might explain why some patients have trouble taking care of their diabetes." The group, led by neurobiologist Aurelio Galli, had already that insulin doesn't just regulate glucose metabolism, but it also plays a major role in regulating the supply of the neurotransmitter dopamine to the brain. Problems in dopamine regulation can lead to depression, ADHD, Parkinson's, and schizophrenia. Now they've developed special mice that have helped them determine the precise molecular link between faulty insulin regulation, improper dopamine function, and schizophrenia-like behavior. They impaired insulin function in mice, but only in their neurons. This allowed them to restrict their analysis purely to the brains of the mice. This impairment led t Continue reading >>

Schizophrenia Directly Linked To Diabetes

Schizophrenia Directly Linked To Diabetes

Schizophrenia Directly Linked to Diabetes New Findings a 'Wake-up Call,' Experts Say There is a direct link between schizophrenia and the development of diabetes, even in the absence of known diabetes risk factors, new research shows. Investigators at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, United Kingdom, found that fasting plasma glucose levels were increased in patients with first-episode psychosis (FEP). In addition, at illness onset, glucose tolerance was reduced, fasting plasma insulin levels were increased, and insulin resistance was increased, even when factors such as antipsychotic use, diet, and exercise, which are known to influence diabetes risk, were taken out of the equation. "This is a wake-up call that we need to consider diabetes prevention right from the onset of schizophrenia," study investigator Toby Pillinger, MRCP, told Medscape Medical News. The study was published online January 11 in JAMA Psychiatry. Research shows that schizophrenia patients die 15 to 30 years earlier than the general population and that most of this premature mortality is due to causes unrelated to the central nervous system. It is estimated that rates of type 2 diabetes are up to threefold higher in schizophrenia patients compared to the general population, the researchers note. It is unclear whether schizophrenia confers an inherent risk for glucose dysregulation in the absence of the effects of chronic illness and long-term treatment. In a systematic review and meta-analysis of 16 case-control studies, the investigators examined whether glucose homeostasis was imparied in patients with FEP in comparision with control persons. The overall sample included 731 patients and 614 healthy control persons. FEP patients were physically healt Continue reading >>

Are People With Diabetes More Prone To Aggression?

Are People With Diabetes More Prone To Aggression?

Relationship Between Blood Glucose Level and Self-Control Blood sugar can make people do crazy things. According to a recent scientific study on the link between low blood glucose level and relationship clashes (Bushman et al, 2014), being hungry makes an individual generally cranky and act more hostile to others. In the study, couples who are hungry tend to have a much higher tendency to exhibit aggression towards each other and become more impulsive in their reactions. This phenomenon is often referred to “hangry” (meaning feeling angry when you are hungry). If this irritable state can happen to any healthy person who experiences a change in their blood glucose level, imagine the ordeals individuals with diabetes frequently go through on a daily basis. However, do not jump to the conclusion that diabetes leads to aggression. In fact, scientists find a more direct correlation between blood glucose level and self-control. I recommend reading the following articles: In a way, you can visualize self-control as a muscle that requires a lot of energy to sustain so that it does not become ineffective quickly. This energy source comes from the glucose in the blood. So what kind of activities can wear out this “muscle”? Any daily activities that require self-discipline such as forcing yourself to get out of bed early to exercise, resisting from having a soda drink or another cookie with your meal, stopping yourself from smoking, dealing with stressful situations at work and at home, and abstaining yourself from road rage. As you can see, self-control plays a crucial part in restraining inappropriate and aggressive behaviors. So when people are low in glucose, the self-control mechanism cannot function properly to prevent these outbursts of hostile actions. In a researc Continue reading >>

Psychosis As Symptom Of Diabetes?

Psychosis As Symptom Of Diabetes?

I know a long term diabetic (he has already gone blind) who has paranoid hallucinations and delusions. But he knows they are not real because he usually won't admit to them when talking to doctors. Or if he does mention it, emergency medicine docs dismiss it as a side effect or a consequence of his diabetes. But this is a long standing problem. It seems to happen without being related to his sugar levels. And I've just never heard of these complex long-running (years) paranoid delusions being related to diabetes. He is 49 years old and on an insulin pump. He won't get psychiatric help because neither he nor his family "believe" in mental illness. Insulin is the most critical hormone in the human body. Its manufactured and secreted by the pancreas and it's primary function: It allows cells throughout the body to utilize glucose to be converted into energy. It also allows the body to store energy. Your body could not sustain life without insulin. Period. Uncontrolled diabetes allows glucose to build up in the blood rather than being distributed to cells or stored. This can result in a multitude of problems throughout your body. Complications of diabetes include kidney disease, nerve damage, blindness, digestion problems, muscle control and balance difficulties, skin disorders, hair loss, gum disease and problems in the brain. Alzheimer's is believed to be a complication of insulin resistance. Without controlled blood sugar, surgery is not permitted because of the threat of blood clots, poor wound healing and threat of infection... "So, what system in the human body is not adversely affected by uncontrolled blood sugar?" Answer: None. &, that's why Type 2 Diabetes is the most destructive metabolic disease of all. That is why Type 2 Diabetes is associated with countless ot Continue reading >>

Acute Hyperglycemia Associated With Psychotic Symptoms In A Patient With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: A Case Report

Acute Hyperglycemia Associated With Psychotic Symptoms In A Patient With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: A Case Report

Go to: CASE PRESENTATION A 36-year-old woman from an urban background presented with acute onset psychotic illness of 15 days duration precipitated by poor adherence to insulin therapy. The patient had a history of T1DM since the age of 12 years, with a well-adjusted pre-morbid personality and no family history of mental illness. Detailed exploration of the history revealed that she had experienced 3 to 4 similar psychotic episodes, each lasting for 7 to 10 days, over the last seven months, during which she would exhibit symptoms of persecution, delusion of grandiosity, smiling and muttering to herself, emotional liability, abusive behavior, angry outbursts, excessive grooming, increased religiosity, poor self-care, decreased sleep, and decreased appetite. During these episodes, there would be no clouding of consciousness, disorientation, diurnal variation in symptoms, or disturbance of other cognitive functions. All of the psychotic episodes had temporal correlation with poor adherence to insulin therapy and a rise in fasting blood glucose levels from normal range to 300mg/dL. The psychotic episodes had no associated histories of fever, infection, high caloric intake, or substance abuse. During the index episode, her fasting blood glucose levels were in the range of 300 to 515mg/dL and post-prandial blood glucose levels were 398mg/dL. All other lab work results, including those for ketoacidosis, were within normal ranges. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of her brain and physical examination did not reveal any abnormality in the patient, and on mental status examination, she was well-oriented to time, place, and person; her mini mental state examination score was 27/30. She had increased speech output, labile affect, delusion of persecution, delusion of reference, dist Continue reading >>

Acute Psychosis Following Diabetic Ketoacidosis In An 11-year-old, Management Challenges In A Resource-limited Setting Aliyu I - Sudan Med Monit

Acute Psychosis Following Diabetic Ketoacidosis In An 11-year-old, Management Challenges In A Resource-limited Setting Aliyu I - Sudan Med Monit

Diabetes mellitus (DM) is the most common endocrine disorder in children and type 1 DM is the most common; however increasing incidence of type 2 DM is being reported, especially in western societies. Occurrence of psychiatric disorders has been associated with type 2 DM but is rare in those with type 1 DM; therefore the case of an 11-year-old girl who was treated for diabetic ketoacidosis, but suddenly developed acute psychotic symptoms shortly after regaining consciousness is reported. Atypical antipsychotic medications were avoided in this case for concerns of their risk of causing abnormal glucose metabolism. Keywords:Acute psychosis, diabetic ketoacidosis, type 1 diabetes mellitus Aliyu I. Acute psychosis following diabetic ketoacidosis in an 11-year-old, management challenges in a resource-limited setting. Sudan Med Monit 2014;9:91-2 Aliyu I. Acute psychosis following diabetic ketoacidosis in an 11-year-old, management challenges in a resource-limited setting. Sudan Med Monit [serial online] 2014 [cited2018 Mar 31];9:91-2. Available from: Diabetes mellitus (DM) is the commonest endocrine disorder in children. [1] Though type 1 DM is the commonest, increasing incidence of childhood obesity especially in industrialized societies has resulted in an upsurge of type 2 DM. [2] , [3] Type 1 DM classically present with polyuria, polydipsia, polyphagia, and weight loss however its initial presentation may be diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). There is an established relationship between type 2 DM and psychotic disorders and there is also the risk of DM [4] related adverse event from the use of some of the atypical antipsychotic drugs [5] , [6] , [7] ] but the association of type 1 DM, DKA with psychosis is a rare event, therefore the case of an 11-year-old girl is reported. An Continue reading >>

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