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Diabetic Personality Disorder

Type 1 - Type 1 Diabetes And Borderline Personality Disorder | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Type 1 - Type 1 Diabetes And Borderline Personality Disorder | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Type 1 Type 1 diabetes and borderline personality disorder Is there anybody out there with brittle diabetes and borderline personality disorder ? Not quite - I'm the one with T1D and my daughter has been diagnosed with BPD. Therefore I cannot fully understand exactly how you feel but from my experiences with my daughter I know life isn't easy for you. I do hope that you have some good support around you. Are you seeing a psychiatrist or psychologist? Are you doing anything like DBT? There is enough stigma and discrimination around diabetes, let alone BPD, but with the right help you can recover from BPD, contrary to what a lot of the literature says. If you happen to live in Melbourne Australia I can certainly help put you in contact with some good people Well I am in a group a Pycho drama group but nobody a type 1 diabetic and they don't understand how I can't self care with diabetes and find it hard coping in a group..I was just hoping to find someone who is a brittle type 1 diabetic with borderline personality disorder..I live in Bristol England ..how is your daughter? X Hi @Tinyface . Sorry for taking so long to reply to you - I've been away with no phone reception. My daughter is doing very well now due to a very good DBT clinic in our area. Nobody can understand what another feels because we're all different. As no one else in your group has diabetes they have no clue and of course brittle diabetes just makes it that much harder for you. You have a right to tell them to not judge you - to me, saying you can't self care is judgmental. With regards to your diabetes, how do you manage that - MDI, pump? This could be an area that could be investigat Continue reading >>

New Focus On Multiple Personality

New Focus On Multiple Personality

Archives |NEW FOCUS ON MULTIPLE PERSONALITY PETER, in his late 30's, is a smooth talker who seduces women for their money; his motto is ''Pleasure is where it's at.'' Paul, his twin, is kind and decent, and prides himself on caring for people in need. David, in his early 20's, is a highly talented sculptor. Tom, a teen-ager, is so mechanically adept that he can pick a five-tumbler lock with a paper clip. Dorothy, a frightened 10-year-old girl, is prone to run away from home. All these people, in fact, exist only as aspects of John, an air-traffic controller who broke down on the job, babbling to pilots in baby talk, and who was diagnosed during therapy as having a multiple personality. Cases like John's, once considered psychiatric oddities, have taken on new significance in the eyes of researchers, who say that the disorder represents a unique experiment of nature that provides opportunities for exploring the intricate web that connects mind, body and behavior. ''The multiple personality offers a special window into psychosomatics,'' said Frank Putnam, a psychiatrist at the National Institute of Mental Health and a leading researcher in the field. ''With a multiple personality you can do research that holds the body constant while you vary the personality, so you can sort out how psychological states affect the body.'' ''Multiples exhibit some remarkable medical phenomena.'' Dr. Putnam said. He gives the example of one patient who reacted normally to a sedative drug in one personality, but was totally unaffected by it in another. ''Some multiples carry several different eyeglasses, because their vision changes with each personality,'' said Bennett Braun, who directs a unit devoted to treating multiple personalities at the Rush-Presbyterian-St. Luke's Medical Center in Continue reading >>

Psychiatric Issues In Children And Adolescents With Diabetes

Psychiatric Issues In Children And Adolescents With Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is one of the most common chronic, unremitting medical conditions that develops in childhood or adolescence.1 There is a bimodal age of onset, with the first peak at 4 to 6 years and the second peak in early adolescence.2 Classic T1DM is an autoimmune disease that occurs because of loss of insulin production by the pancreas as a result of destruction of the beta cells. Ideal treatment requires close monitoring of blood glucose levels by finger pricks 5 to 10 times daily and insulin injections with all carbohydrate intake and as often as every 2 hours for corrections of blood glucose levels. Basal insulin injections are also needed once or twice daily. A subcutaneous insulin pump can substitute for multiple injections in some cases. Children with T1DM are at increased risk for other autoimmune diseases, such as celiac disease, autoimmune thyroid disease, and adrenal insufficiency. First-degree relatives of those with TIDM are at increased risk for this disease. For those afflicted with celiac disease, dietary modifications necessitate a gluten-free diet in addition to the recommended restrictions for simple sugars and the need to avoid grazing. Needless to say, for the child or teen with both T1DM and celiac disease, the dietary modifications can significantly affect the quality of their lives (eg, no pizza with friends, no cake and ice cream at birthday parties, and no on-the-go diet favored by teens). Poorly controlled T1DM can lead to potentially life-threatening short- and long-term conditions that range from subtle neurocognitive changes to organ-destroying macrovascular and microvascular damage (Table 1).3 The age at onset of the illness has implications for complications that can arise from hypoglycemia (tremor, confusion, seizures) Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Mood Swings: Effects On Relationships

Diabetes And Mood Swings: Effects On Relationships

Diabetes is a condition that impacts the way a person's body uses sugar for energy. However, diabetes affects much more than blood sugar. It can impact nearly every body system and have an effect on a person's mood. Stress associated with managing diabetes as well as concerns about potential side effects can all contribute to changes in mood. In addition, the actual highs and lows of blood sugar levels may also cause nervousness, anxiety, and confusion. It is important for people to recognize their own individual symptoms of high or low blood sugar. They must also ensure they seek support for any concerning mental health symptoms they might experience. Watching these mood swings can often be difficult for friends and family to understand. However, learning why a person may experience mood changes related to diabetes and being supportive can help to promote a stronger, healthier relationship. Contents of this article: How do diabetes and mood swings go together? Diabetes can have many effects on a person's mood. For example, managing diabetes can be stressful. A person may be constantly worried about their blood sugar and whether it is too high or too low. Adjustments to their diet and constantly checking their blood sugar can also add to a person's stress and enjoyment of life. As a result, they are more likely to experience feelings of anxiety and depression. Blood sugar swings can cause rapid changes in a person's mood, such as making them sad and irritable. This is especially true during hypoglycemic episodes, where blood sugar levels dip lower than 70 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL). Hyperglycemic episodes where levels spike higher than 250 mg/dL may cause confusion in people with type 1 diabetes, but are much less likely to in those with type 2 diabetes. When a pe Continue reading >>

Borderline Personality Disorder And Type 1 Diabetes

Borderline Personality Disorder And Type 1 Diabetes

Borderline Personality Disorder and Type 1 Diabetes Borderline Personality Disorder and Type 1 Diabetes Treato found 40 discussions about Type 1 Diabetes and Borderline Personality Disorder on the web. Symptoms and conditions also mentioned with Borderline Personality Disorder in patients' discussions Diabetes means your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. With type 1 diabetes, your pancreas does not make insulin. Insulin is a hormone that helps glucose get into your cells to give them energy. Without insulin, too much glucose stays in your blood. Over time, high blood glucose can lead to serious problems with your heart, eyes, kidneys, nerves, and gums and teeth. Read more on MedlinePlus.gov. Mayo Clinic Johns Hopkins Hospital Rhode Island Hospital New York-Presbyterian Hospital University Hospital Major Hospital Catholic Medical Center Yaz Methimazole Zoladex Tylenol Oxycodone Treato does not review third-party posts for accuracy of any kind, including for medical diagnosis or treatments, or events in general. Treato does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Usage of the website does not substitute professional medical advice. The side effects featured here are based on those most frequently appearing in user posts on the Internet. The manufacturer's product labeling should always be consulted for a list of side effects most frequently appearing in patients during clinical studies. Talk to your doctor about which medications may be most appropriate for you. The information reflected here is dependent upon the correct functioning of our algorithm. From time-to-time, our system might experience bugs or glitches that affect the accuracy or correct application of mathematical algorithms. We will do our best to update the site if we are made Continue reading >>

Diabetes Linked To Brain Disorders

Diabetes Linked To Brain Disorders

MORE Malfunctions in how the body processes sugar that occur in diabetes and obesity could also explain mood and other mental disorders such as schizophrenia, researchers now reveal. People with diabetes have problems processing insulin, the hormone that helps regulate sugar in the body. Scientists knew diabetics had an increased risk of psychiatric disorders, said researcher Kevin Niswender, an endocrinologist at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, Tenn. "In the diabetic population, 25 percent are depressed — in the normal population, it's only 10 percent," researcher Aurelio Galli, a biophysicist at Vanderbilt, told LiveScience. Galli had earlier helped find that insulin also regulates the brain's supply of dopamine, a neurotransmitter with roles in attention, reward and motor activity. Disruptions in dopamine activity have been linked to brain disorders such as depression, Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. In new experiments, the researchers developed mice with an insulin-processing defect present only in their neurons. This was aimed at mimicking the disruptions in the insulin system caused by diabetes, high-fat diets, drug abuse and natural genetic variations in the brain. The scientists found that rodents with this insulin defect had behavioral anomalies similar to ones frequently seen in patients with schizophrenia. "So these abnormalities are quite simple," Galli explained. "Let's say you scare a person by yelling at them from behind. If you prepare this person with a sound test before you yell at them, they will normally be startled less, because they're more prepared for it. In people with schizophrenia, they're startled even if you prepare them beforehand. Now it doesn't mean that you have schizo Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Psychiatric Disorders

Diabetes And Psychiatric Disorders

Patterns of co-occurrence of diabetes and psychiatric disorders Comorbidity of diabetes and psychiatric disorders can present in different patterns. First, the two can present as independent conditions with no apparent direct connection. In such a scenario both are outcome of independent and parallel pathogenic pathways. Second, the course of diabetes can be complicated by emergence of psychiatric disorders. In such cases diabetes contributes to the pathogenesis of psychiatric disorders. Various biological and psychological factors mediate the emergence of psychiatric disorders in such context. Third, certain psychiatric disorders like depression and schizophrenia act as significant independent risk factors for development of diabetes. Fourth, there could be an overlap between the clinical presentation of hypoglycemic and ketoacidosis episodes and conditions such as panic attacks. Fifth, impaired glucose tolerance and diabetes could emerge as a side effect of the medications used for psychiatric disorders. Treatment of psychiatric disorders could influence diabetes care in other ways also as discussed in subsequent sections [Box 1]. Diabetes and psychiatric disorders interact in other ways as well. Certain substances of abuse such as tobacco and alcohol can alter the pharmacokinetics of the oral hypoglycemic agents. Moreover, the presence of a comorbid psychiatric disorder like depression could interfere with the management of diabetes by influencing treatment adherence. Similarly certain disorders such as phobia of needles and injections can present difficulties with investigations and treatment processes such as blood glucose testing and insulin injection. Also patients with psychiatric disorders are less likely to seek treatment. Such delays would postpone detection Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Your Brain

Diabetes And Your Brain

By Terri D'Arrigo WebMD Feature Your brain is a finely tuned organ. But it’s sensitive to the amount of sugar, or glucose, it receives as fuel. Whether you have type 1 or type 2, both the high blood glucose of uncontrolled diabetes and the low blood glucose that sometimes comes with diabetes treatment can affect your brain. The Dangers of High Blood Glucose Some of diabetes’ effects on the brain aren’t obvious right away, especially when they are related to high blood sugar. “With diabetes, you have an increased risk of damage to blood vessels over time, including damage to the small blood vessels in the brain. This damage affects the brain’s white matter,” says Joseph C. Masdeu, MD, PhD, of the Houston Methodist Neurological Institute. White matter is the part of the brain where nerves talk to one another. When the nerves in the brain are damaged, you can have changes in thinking called vascular cognitive impairment or vascular dementia. Vascular cognitive impairment can happen with either type 1 or type 2 diabetes, but there are some differences in risk, says Joel Zonszein, MD, director of the Clinical Diabetes Center at Montefiore Medical Center in New York. “The longer you have diabetes [in general], the more of a chance there is of developing dementia, but we see much less of it in people with type 1 whose diabetes is well-controlled,” he says. People with type 2 may face a double-whammy because they tend to have other problems that also can cause blood vessel damage. “These patients tend to be less metabolically fit overall, with low HDL [“good”] cholesterol, high triglycerides, and high blood pressure, and they are more likely to be obese,” Zonszein says. Diabetes can combine with these other problems to create inflammation that damages bl Continue reading >>

Are People With Diabetes More Prone To Aggression?

Are People With Diabetes More Prone To Aggression?

Relationship Between Blood Glucose Level and Self-Control Blood sugar can make people do crazy things. According to a recent scientific study on the link between low blood glucose level and relationship clashes (Bushman et al, 2014), being hungry makes an individual generally cranky and act more hostile to others. In the study, couples who are hungry tend to have a much higher tendency to exhibit aggression towards each other and become more impulsive in their reactions. This phenomenon is often referred to “hangry” (meaning feeling angry when you are hungry). If this irritable state can happen to any healthy person who experiences a change in their blood glucose level, imagine the ordeals individuals with diabetes frequently go through on a daily basis. However, do not jump to the conclusion that diabetes leads to aggression. In fact, scientists find a more direct correlation between blood glucose level and self-control. I recommend reading the following articles: In a way, you can visualize self-control as a muscle that requires a lot of energy to sustain so that it does not become ineffective quickly. This energy source comes from the glucose in the blood. So what kind of activities can wear out this “muscle”? Any daily activities that require self-discipline such as forcing yourself to get out of bed early to exercise, resisting from having a soda drink or another cookie with your meal, stopping yourself from smoking, dealing with stressful situations at work and at home, and abstaining yourself from road rage. As you can see, self-control plays a crucial part in restraining inappropriate and aggressive behaviors. So when people are low in glucose, the self-control mechanism cannot function properly to prevent these outbursts of hostile actions. In a researc Continue reading >>

Helping Diabetics With Borderline Personality Disorder

Helping Diabetics With Borderline Personality Disorder

Helping Diabetics with Borderline Personality Disorder Karie was admitted to an adolescent residential treatment facility to treat her self-harm, depression, and borderline personality disorder. She also suffered from diabetes, a disease that requires careful and consistent dietary and medication management. Karie had a history of being unmanageable at home and tended to cut herself when upset. Through the course of treatment it became obvious that she also used her diabetes as a way to self-harm-intentionally failing to comply with her dietary and medication protocol. The staff watched her very carefully, keeping her within sight and away from objects that she could cut with. But it was harder to control her eating. She manipulated her blood sugar by overeating, sneaking food, and not giving herself enough insulin. Consequently her hemoglobin levels were dangerously high on a regular basis. If Karie had a difficult interaction during the day, she may later overestimate how much insulin she needed at bedtime, causing her blood sugar to plummet while she slept. Consequently she would wake up in the middle of the night trembling with a blood sugar of 38 (dangerously low). It was easy for her to pass this off as an accident, but over time a pattern developed and it was clear that she used her diabetes as a way to self harm. Patients with borderline personality disorder are notorious for manipulation. They are very good at making others feel responsible for their choices, and for finding a way around the rules. When combined with the normal adolescent tendency to feel indestructible, it is hard to convince them that taking care of their diabetes is important. Parents and medical professionals do well to remember that addressing the borderline personality disorder tendencie Continue reading >>

I Have Type 1 Diabetes And Borderline Personality Disorder

I Have Type 1 Diabetes And Borderline Personality Disorder

Welcome to an exclusive club: In 2012, between 1.6%-5.9% of the US population was estimated to have BPD . Meanwhile roughly 0.4% of the population had diagnosed Type 1 Diabetes (using 2012 total population). That number is actually higher when accounting for undiagnosed cases. Having Type 1 Diabetes is easier if your mental health is in order. Likewise, as difficult as BPD is, having good physical health improves treatment outcomes. Both at the same time? Well, now you have an epic silent struggle on your hands. While the stigma of Type 1 Diabetes is decreasing, it is still quite high for those with BPD. Having BPD is hell on earth. Suicide rates approach 10% . Few people will care to help you. Like Type 1, it is a self-managed condition, in conjunction with a superb therapist. Marsha Linehans DBT (Dialectical Behavioral Therapy) is noted as efficacious psychotherapy, while some meds can decrease comorbid feelings of anxiety, depression and poor mood regulation. Is Mental Illness Common with Type 1 Diabetes? First, its important to note many Type 1 diabetics will experience depression and anxiety in their lives. That doesnt mean they have BPD. Rather, it is collateral damage from the stress and demands of managing chronic illness. Incidence of depression, in particular, is more common among those with poor glucose control. That said, these conditions are fully treatable and beatable. Throwing BPD into the mix complicates things: the sadness, rage and emptiness of BPD make managing Type 1 a herculean task. Why bother pricking fingers, taking insulin and eating healthily if your world is falling apart? If you just want to die? If you feel misunderstood, alone, dejected and miserable? In 18 years with Type 1 and 14 years with BPD, I will admit it: I pondered overdosing on Continue reading >>

Diabetes Information - Diabetes Support & Resources | Healthyplace | Healthyplace

Diabetes Information - Diabetes Support & Resources | Healthyplace | Healthyplace

Nearly 24 million, or about 8% of U.S. children and adults have diabetes. Another 57 million have pre-diabetes. Unfortunately, what people living with mental illness don't realize is that Type 2 diabetes, a disease associated with obesity, is appearing with alarming frequency among the mentally ill. In fact, among the mentally ill, roughly one in every five appear to develop diabetes - about double the rate of the general population. And unfortunately, the very medications that are supposed to help people with bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and other mental illnesses, antipsychotic drugs, have been linked to swift weight gain and diabetes itself. Additionally, studies associate the onset of diabetes with depression. The mentally ill are also at high risk for Type 2 diabetes because they tend to eat fattening food, get little exercise and have limited access to health care. In the HealthyPlace.com Diabetes Community, we have authoritative, in-depth information on all aspects of diabetes; from signs and symptoms to diagnosis and diabetes treatments. We also have a must-read section on diabetes and mental illness written by award-winning mental health writer, Julie Fast. For family members and friends, learn how to support someone with diabetes. We believe that the more you understand about diabetes, issues like metabolic syndrome and the special relationship between diabetes and mental illness, the more likely you are to get the full benefit of treatment. And we invite you to join the HealthyPlace.com Diabetes Support Network (our social network). Sometimes, communicating with others who have common experiences or faced similar problems can be a great help as well as a source of comfort. Read why some atypical antipsychotic drugs can induce weight gain quickly and lead Continue reading >>

Diabetes Symptoms

Diabetes Symptoms

People with diabetes are always at risk for swings in blood sugar and other related complications. The serious health consequences of these risks can be minimized through careful attention to blood sugar management. If you or a loved one have diabetes it is very important that you become aware of the symptoms of hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia so that you know when to self-administer medication, or to seek immediate professional medical care. If you have multiple risk factors for diabetes, be aware of the symptoms and visit your physician if you believe you exhibit them. The classic symptoms of hyperglycemia (too much blood sugar) are Additional symptoms that can accompany hyperglycemia are: loss of appetite which may be accompanied by weight loss skin changes (infections, slowed healing) nerve problems/pain (tingling, shooting or stabbing sensations) If left untreated, hyperglycemia can progress into ketoacidosis. Warning signs associated with ketoacidosis include the following: Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) is accompanied by a similar set of symptoms: While it is likely that people with diabetes will experience one or more of these symptoms during the course of their illness, it is possible for people to have diabetes and experience only mild symptoms if any are noticeable at all. The above symptoms can be signs that a person has developed diabetes. It is worth consulting with a doctor if you experience any of the symptoms associated with diabetes described above. This is especially true if you are at a higher risk for diabetes (e.g., you are older, overweight, and have a family history of diabetes). Continue reading >>

Borderline Personality Disorder, Depression And Type 1

Borderline Personality Disorder, Depression And Type 1

I also had gestational diabetiesbut was lucky enough to be told, and 5 yrs later was dx with type 2 in 2003. In 98' I was diagnosed with Depression and Anxiety, and then 5 yrs ago with Bi-Polar Disorder believe me I know how difficult it is it's something you never get over. There are times I go into a deep depression and it hard to get out of the rut, but only you can pull yourself out. I thank the Dr. for the meds that he has me on to help control the symptoms and depression those are meds I know I'll be on the rest of my life like my Diabetic meds. Please don't ever feel alone, I'm here if you ever need to talk just send me a friend request I'm here anytime and I have a big shoulder. I have had 4 kids and they were all big babies. I wasn't told that I had gestational diabetes until my 4th one. They only told me that I could become fullblown diabetes within 7 years of his birth. They didn't tell me anything else. Sure enough 7 years later I was diagnosed Type 2 insulin dependant. I also have Borderline Personality Disorder, BiPolar Disorder and Anxiety Disordr. So I know what you are going through. I've had Diabetes for 16 years now and am just now getting a grip on it. When you are ready to get a grip on it, you will. Just be patient. Good Luck!! It is normal to go through what I call the roller coaster of diabetes. We do great at first, then we get tired of it as it sets in that this is for life. It does suck. It does suck a lot. But you have a baby and a family. You have a right to be pissed, but I would not stay there. Diabetes is something that will bring you enough mood swings on it's own, so don't hold on to those feelings for too long or they will eat you alive. You are not alone at all. We all feel the same things, to different degrees, but we do understand. Continue reading >>

Type Ii Diabetes And Personality; A Study To Explore Other Psychosomatic Aspects Of Diabetes

Type Ii Diabetes And Personality; A Study To Explore Other Psychosomatic Aspects Of Diabetes

Journal of Diabetes & Metabolic Disorders As one of the most common chronic diseases, diabetes and its control are affected by the patients psychological and spiritual attributes. The present study investigates the relationship between glycemic control in patients with type II diabetes and personality traits, defense mechanisms and spirituality. The present cross-sectional study was conducted on 400 Iranian patients with type II diabetes, 64% were men. Participants completed the NEO Personality Inventory, the Defense Style Questionnaire (DSQ) and the Spiritual Assessment Inventory (SAI) and then underwent a blood sampling for the assessment of HbA1C levels. Of the five personality traits, extraversion (r = -0.13 and P < 0.01) and conscientiousness (r = -0.13 and P < 0.01) had significant negative relationships with HbA1C HbA1C levels, while neuroticism had a significant positive relationship with HbA1C levels (r = 0.12 and P < 0.05). Of the defense styles assessed, the neurotic style was found to have a significant negative relationship with HbA1C levels (r = -0.1 and P < 0.05). Also, of the spirituality elements, impression management had significant relationship with glycemic control (r = 0.17 and P < 0.001). According to data, Extraversion and conscientiousness can help control blood sugar while anxiety and negative emotions have detrimental effects on glycemic control. As a result considering psychological counselling beside medical interventions can help to better treatment. Personality traitsDefense stylesSpiritualityGlycemic controlType II diabetes Diabetes is one of the most common chronic diseases that affect every aspect of a patients life. In recent years, lifestyle changes and the growing prevalence of obesity appear to have led to an increased prevalence o Continue reading >>

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