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Diabetic No Appetite

4 Signs Of An Impending Diabetic Pet Emergency

4 Signs Of An Impending Diabetic Pet Emergency

Caring for a diabetic pet can be challenging, but there are certain precautions pet owners can take to prevent a diabetic emergency like hypoglycemia. Preventing a health crisis in a dog or cat with diabetes involves employing a consistent daily routine involving diet, exercise, insulin therapy, and supplementation. It also involves avoiding any and all unnecessary vaccinations. Even the most diligent pet parent can find himself facing a diabetic emergency with a dog or cat. Hypoglycemia is the most common health crisis, and is usually the result of an inadvertent overdose of insulin. Symptoms of hypoglycemia can appear suddenly and include lethargy or restlessness, anxiety or other behavioral changes, muscle weakness or twitching, seizures, coma, and death. At-home treatment for a diabetic pet with hypoglycemia is determined by whether or not the animal is alert. Signs of other potential impending diabetic emergencies include ketones in the urine; straining to urinate or bloody urine; vomiting or diarrhea; or a complete loss of appetite or reduced appetite for several days. By Dr. Becker Caring for a diabetic pet can be quite complex and time consuming. It involves regular monitoring of blood glucose levels, making necessary dietary adjustments, giving insulin injections or oral medications, and keeping a careful eye on your pet at all times. Frequent veterinary visits are the norm for dogs and cats with diabetes, as are the costs associated with checkups, tests, medical procedures, and insulin therapy. And unlike humans with the disease, our pets can’t tell us how they’re feeling or help in their own treatment and recovery. Preventing Diabetic Emergencies The key to preventing diabetic emergencies with a pet involves implementing a consistent daily routine and sti Continue reading >>

How To Put On Weight When You Have Diabetes

How To Put On Weight When You Have Diabetes

Not everybody with diabetes needs to lose weight. Some people have the opposite problem; the pounds just won’t stay on. Although certainly a great source of calories, filling up on hot fudge sundaes isn’t the best way to fill out your frame if you have diabetes. Before we talk about some healthful strategies for weight gain, it is important to make sure your efforts to add a few pounds are not sabotaged by out of control blood glucose numbers. If your glucose level is very high, all the extra calories in the world won’t have the desired effect. When the body perceives it is starving –that is essentially what occurs when it can’t use all the glucose building up in the blood stream– glucose (energy or calories) spills into the urine. So instead of keeping those precious calories to add muscle and some fat you will end up losing weight. If you are losing weight and your glucose levels are in good control then a visit to your health care provider is in order to look for other causes of weight loss. The old adage says; to gain a pound a week, add 500 calories a day to your current calorie level. Now new research tells us that this isn’t entirely accurate, but it is still a good place to start. You can find out about how many calories you are eating now by using any one of a hundreds of nutrition management websites on the internet: Caloriecount.com, Myfitnesspal.com and Fitday.com are three options. One of the first things to look at when you are trying to gain weight is low calorie foods to eliminate. Plain beverages such as black coffee or tea, broth soups, low calorie salads all fill you up without providing much in the way of calories. All of your food chooses should be as calorie dense as possible. If you like salads for example, keep the lettuce to a mini Continue reading >>

What Does A Loss Of Appetite In The Elderly Mean?

What Does A Loss Of Appetite In The Elderly Mean?

Getting older means needing fewer calories than younger adults. But it doesn’t mean that a person should stop eating entirely. Elderly adults have specific nutritional needs. Staying healthy as an older person means ensuring those needs are met. There are some reasons why an older person might lose his or her appetite. Finding the cause is the first step to finding a way to cope with a loss of appetite in elderly people. Elderly Nutrition Needs Older people have slightly different nutritional needs than the average adult. Not only are the old usually less active than younger people, their bodies no longer function as they did in their youth. For that reason, it’s imperative that you pay close attention to the vitamins and nutrients an older adult gets each day. The elderly often need increased amounts of vitamin B12, vitamin D, and calcium to keep their bones and blood healthy. Certain nutrients, such as potassium, help older people avoid chronic diseases associated with aging. Potassium plays a role in regulating blood pressure. It’s an essential mineral for anyone at risk for hypertension. It’s also important that an elderly adult takes in plenty of fiber each day. Fiber helps keep blood sugar levels in check and increases regularity. It’s a must have for older adults who want to lower their risk for heart disease and diabetes. Reasons for a Loss of Appetite If an older adult is healthy, he or she should also have a healthy appetite. A loss of appetite in the elderly doesn’t just happen for no reason. One or more factors are often behind it. In some cases, a person might lose interest in food as a normal part of aging. In others, illness can be behind the loss of appetite. Reduced sense of taste and smell. Two of the five senses, taste and smell, have a si Continue reading >>

Loss Of Appetite Dangerous For Diabetics

Loss Of Appetite Dangerous For Diabetics

Q: Dear Donovan, I enjoy your column and see where you give advice to people who want to lose weight, and some of the advice is given to people with lifestyle diseases such as diabetes. However, my issue is a bit different. What if you're a diabetic who is losing too much weight and whose appetite is waning? How can this be treated? A: Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease which interferes with the body's ability to control the blood glucose level. Diabetes can cause a number of symptoms including a loss of appetite, which can last for a few days. In your specific situation I wish you had given me more information. For example, are you currently on medication for diabetes? How did your loss of appetite occur: gradually or sudden? What do you eat on a daily basis? Also, are you exercising? Furthermore, are you having any stomach pain, vomiting or feeling nauseous? Overall, it is very important to find out the underlying cause of your lack of appetite. I would strongly suggest that you consult with your doctor. Until your appetite returns to normal you are at great risk of malnutrition and other health problems. In diabetes mellitus, the body does not produce enough insulin or functional insulin. The cells are therefore unable to properly use glucose to produce energy. As a result, the body will break down fat for energy. This further results in the production of ketones, which can make the body acidic as well as reduce the appetite. However, it should be noted that some diabetics do experience an increase in appetite. Therefore, it is very important that you consult with your doctor. In a nutshell, if your appetite is low, this can lead to weight loss. Hence, in order for you to regain your weight you will have to get the appetite back up and increase your intake of cal Continue reading >>

Cerebral Blood Flow And Glucose Metabolism In Appetite-related Brain Regions In Type 1 Diabetic Patients After Treatment With Insulin Detemir And Nph Insulin

Cerebral Blood Flow And Glucose Metabolism In Appetite-related Brain Regions In Type 1 Diabetic Patients After Treatment With Insulin Detemir And Nph Insulin

OBJECTIVE To test the hypothesis that insulin detemir, which is associated with less weight gain than other basal insulin formulations, exerts its weight-modulating effects by acting on brain regions involved in appetite regulation, as represented by altered cerebral blood flow (CBF) or cerebral glucose metabolism (CMRglu). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Twenty-eight male type 1 diabetic patients (age 36.9 ± 9.7 years, BMI 24.9 ± 2.7 kg/m2, A1C 7.5 ± 0.6%) successfully completed a randomized crossover study, consisting of two periods of 12-week treatment with either insulin detemir or NPH insulin, both in combination with prandial insulin aspart. After each treatment period, patients underwent positron emission tomography scans to measure regional CBF and CMRglu. RESULTS After 12 weeks, A1C, daily insulin doses, fasting insulin, and blood glucose levels were similar between treatments. Insulin detemir resulted in body weight loss, whereas NPH insulin induced weight gain (between-treatment difference 1.3 kg; P = 0.02). After treatment with insulin detemir relative to NPH insulin, CBF was higher in brain regions involved in appetite regulation, whereas no significant difference in CMRglu was observed. CONCLUSIONS Treatment with insulin detemir versus NPH insulin resulted in weight loss, paralleled by increased CBF in appetite-related brain regions in the resting state, in men with well-controlled type 1 diabetes. These findings lend support to the hypothesis that a differential effect on the brain may contribute to the consistently observed weight-sparing effect of insulin detemir. From January 2009 until May 2011, patients were included in this randomized controlled crossover trial; the last follow-up visit was on 13 December 2011. Thirty-five patients with type 1 diabet Continue reading >>

Loss Of Appetite And Nausea

Loss Of Appetite And Nausea

The symptoms of loss of appetite and nausea can be common expressions that are present for a variety of conditions. These characteristics are often a signal from the body that there is something out of balance in the system, and addressing the root cause can be more important than just suppressing the symptoms. While no appetite and mild nausea may be a periodic concern for anyone, the persistence of these issues could be an indication that greater medical intervention is required. Headache and Feelings of Nausea In many cases, when nausea develops during the progression of headache, it can be an associated effect that is triggered by the pressure and pain, especially if there are ocular disturbances. This is especially true in cases of a migraine, where the spasmodic reactions in the body affect all the major organ systems, including the digestive track. Migraines and regular headaches may be triggered by: Being tired Adverse reactions to food or medications Hormonal changes Environmental factors including pressure and light changes For these occurrences of nausea, the feeling will generally subside as the headache is alleviated. However, there are also a number of conditions where headaches and constant nausea are symptomatic of the illness. Some of these conditions include: Meningitis Cold and flu Mononucleosis Food poisoning Meniere’s disease If headache, nausea, and the loss of appetite are occurring daily for more than three days, then it is highly indicated that medical attention be sought. This action can help to identify the underlying causes of the symptoms so that an appropriate intervention is offered as treatment. Occurrences of Nausea After Eating When nausea occurs after eating, it may be the result of poor food combinations, overeating, and reactions t Continue reading >>

Belle Mead Animal Hospital

Belle Mead Animal Hospital

Diabetes mellitus is a common disorder in middle-aged and older dogs, particularly those who are overweight or obese. It affects all breeds and both sexes, although it is somewhat more common in female dogs. Diabetes mellitus is also referred to as “sugar diabetes” because it results from the failure of the pancreas to regulate blood sugar, or glucose. Juvenile diabetes, which occurs in puppies less than a year of age, is uncommon. This handout focuses strictly on diabetes mellitus in older dogs.In healthy dogs, insulin is secreted by the pancreas after a meal and moves blood sugar into cells, where it is converted into energy. Diabetes mellitus occurs when the pancreas does not produce enough insulin (Type 1) or when the body’s cells don’t respond well to insulin (Type 2). In either case, glucose can not enter the cells, blood glucose levels build up in the bloodstream, and glucose spills over into the urine. A complicated cycle ensues, as sugar in the urine causes the dog to pass large amounts of dilute urine and to drink large quantities of water. Appetite is controlled by glucose levels in the brain. Without insulin, the brain doesn’t receive the signal that appetite has been satisfied, and the pet responds by eating more and more. Paradoxically, the pet will lose musclemass despite the increased appetite because the glucose can not be used by the body. Thus, the classic signs of diabetes in dogs are: Excessive urination is often the sign that prompts owners to bring their dog in to the clinic for an exam. Laboratory tests showing persistent high levels of glucose in the blood and urine will confirm the diagnosis. Your veterinarian will run additional blood and urine tests to look for other conditions that often occur in dogs with diabetes, such as bladder Continue reading >>

Why Metformin (glucophage) Causes Weight Loss And Reduced Appetite Despite Stimulating Ampk?

Why Metformin (glucophage) Causes Weight Loss And Reduced Appetite Despite Stimulating Ampk?

In regard to weight loss, Metformin provides two primary benefits. First, it significantly improves glycemic control. This stabilizes your blood sugar, and makes you less likely to experience the up-and-down rollercoaster experience that often comes along with dieting. The second benefit of Metformin (partially a result of the first benefit) is suppressed appetite. Users typically note a measurable improvement from their usual cravings for food. By simply not desiring as much food, and still feeling normal despite eating less (due to the improved glycemic control), the result can be profound weight loss. That’s the good news, but you can’t just take the pill and expect everything to change on its own. Weight loss just doesn’t work that way. Metformin won’t work for you – rather, it will work with you. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

As fat is broken down, acids called ketones build up in the blood and urine. In high levels, ketones are poisonous. This condition is known as ketoacidosis. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is sometimes the first sign of type 1 diabetes in people who have not yet been diagnosed. It can also occur in someone who has already been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. Infection, injury, a serious illness, missing doses of insulin shots, or surgery can lead to DKA in people with type 1 diabetes. People with type 2 diabetes can also develop DKA, but it is less common. It is usually triggered by uncontrolled blood sugar, missing doses of medicines, or a severe illness. Continue reading >>

Lack Of Appetite In Haemodialysis Patients—associations With Patient Characteristics, Indicators Of Nutritional Status And Outcomes In The International Dopps

Lack Of Appetite In Haemodialysis Patients—associations With Patient Characteristics, Indicators Of Nutritional Status And Outcomes In The International Dopps

Background. Identification of haemodialysis patients with problems related to lack of appetite should help prevent adverse outcomes. We studied whether a single question about being bothered by lack of appetite within the prior 4 weeks is related to nutritional status, inflammation and risks of death and hospitalization. Additionally, we assessed associations of lack of appetite with depression, dialysis dose and length of haemodialysis. Methods. This study is an analysis of baseline and longitudinal data from 14 406 patients enrolled in the Dialysis Outcomes and Practice Pattern Study. Cox regression was used to assess whether the degree (not, somewhat, moderately, very much, extremely) that patients were bothered by lack of appetite is an independent predictor of death and hospitalization. Logistic regression was used to identify baseline characteristics associated with being bothered by lack of appetite. Results. The risk of death was more than 2-fold higher [relative risk (RR) = 2.23; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.90–2.62] and the risk of hospitalization 33% higher (RR = 1.33; 95% CI = 1.19–1.48) among patients extremely bothered, compared with not bothered, by lack of appetite. These associations followed a dose–response fashion and remained statistically significant after adjustments for 14 comorbidities. Depression, shorter haemodialysis session, hypoalbuminaemia, lower concentration of serum creatinine and normalized protein catabolic rate, lower body mass index and higher leucocyte and neutrophil counts were independently associated with higher odds of being bothered by lack of appetite. Conclusions. The data suggest that a single question about lack of appetite helps identify haemodialysis patients with poorer nutritional status, inflammation, depress Continue reading >>

Loss Of Appetite

Loss Of Appetite

Loss of appetite may also be called anorexia. Many people with cancer have a loss of appetite. It occurs because cancer or its treatments can affect the way food tastes or you don’t feel like eating. If you don’t eat enough, you can lose weight. Weight loss is one of the most common side effects of cancer and its treatment. Weight loss can weaken the immune system, affect how wounds heal and make you tired and uncomfortable. During cancer treatment, you need to stay well nourished to help your body deal with cancer and its treatment. This is also true for children with cancer who need to stay well nourished for normal growth and development. Causes Loss of appetite can be caused by the cancer itself, especially advanced cancer. Cancer treatments may cause symptoms that may lead to loss of appetite. These treatments include chemotherapy, radiation therapy and surgery. These symptoms include: nausea and vomiting constipation diarrhea sore mouth, dry mouth, difficulty chewing or swallowing, taste and smell changes fatigue Loss of appetite may also be caused by: changes in metabolism, possibly due to the cancer pain or pain medicines unpleasant odours or sights a low red blood cell count, or anemia infection being less active difficulty breathing feeling depressed or anxious feeling of fullness due to a buildup of fluid in the abdomen (called ascites) Symptoms Symptoms of loss of appetite can vary depending on their cause and other factors. Severe loss of appetite can cause weight loss and malnutrition. It can also lead to loss of muscle mass, which is also called muscle wasting or cachexia. A loss of appetite can be temporary. Appetite often returns to normal when treatments such as radiation therapy or chemotherapy are completed. It may take several weeks for the appe Continue reading >>

Diabetic Nephropathy

Diabetic Nephropathy

Diabetic nephropathy is kidney damage that occurs as a result of diabetes. Diabetic nephropathy causes illness and sometimes death for people with diabetes. Diabetes affects approximately seven percent of people in the United States. In fact, diabetes is the leading cause of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and kidney failure in the nation. People who already have diabetes are susceptible to developing diabetic nephropathy if they: are of African American, Hispanic or Native and Alaskan American origin have a family history of kidney disease or high blood pressure have poor control of blood sugar had type 1 diabetes before age 20 are a smoker Not everyone with diabetes develops chronic kidney disease, but researchers believe that those who do not properly control their blood glucose levels are at risk. The kidneys are each made up of around 1 million nephrons that remove extra fluid and wastes out from the blood. These nephrons help regulate water, salts, glucose, urea, phosphorus and other minerals. Those with diabetes have a lot of glucose that comes out in their urine. High blood sugar levels can damage the tiny blood vessels in the nephrons by thickening and scarring them so that over time they are damaged. When this happens, protein leaks through the kidneys into the urine. The nephrons are no longer able to filter properly and this is when kidneys damage can lead to kidney failure. Symptoms of diabetic nephropathy In the beginning stages of diabetic nephropathy, people may not experience any symptoms. Symptoms of diabetic nephropathy are similar to symptoms of chronic kidney disease and tend to occur in the late stages of kidney disease. These symptoms include: A metallic taste in the mouth or ammonia breath Nausea and vomiting Loss of appetite No longer wanting to ea Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms

The symptoms of type 2 diabetes (also called type 2 diabetes mellitus) develop gradually—so gradually, in fact, that it’s possible to miss them or to not connect them as related symptoms. Some people are actually surprised when they are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes because they’ve gone to the doctor for something else (eg, fatigue or increased urination). The symptoms develop gradually because, if you have the insulin resistant form of type 2, it takes time for the effects of insulin resistance to show up. Your body doesn’t become insulin resistant (unable to use insulin properly) overnight, as you can learn about in the article on causes of type 2 diabetes. If you’re not insulin resistant—and instead your body doesn’t produce enough insulin to process glucose well—the symptoms also develop gradually. Your body will be able to “make do” with lower insulin levels for awhile, but eventually, you will start to notice the following symptoms. Here are some of the common symptoms of type 2 diabetes: Fatigue: Your body isn’t getting the energy it needs from the food you’re eating, so you may feel very tired. Extreme thirst: No matter how much you drink, it feels like you’re still dehydrated. Your tissues (such as your muscles) are, in fact, dehydrated when there’s too much glucose (sugar) in your blood. Your body pulls fluid from the tissues to try to dilute the blood and counteract the high glucose, so your tissues will be dehydrated and send the message that you need to drink more. This is also associated with increased urination. Frequent urination: This is related to drinking so much more in an attempt to satisfy your thirst. Since you’re drinking more, you’ll have to urinate more. Additionally, the body will try to get rid of the excess g Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes: What Are The Symptoms?

Type 1 Diabetes: What Are The Symptoms?

What Is Type 1 Diabetes (Juvenile)? Type 1 diabetes is a chronic condition that usually starts in childhood, but can occur in adults (30 to 40-year-olds). In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas produces very little insulin. Insulin helps cells in the body convert sugar into energy. When the pancreas cannot make enough insulin, sugar starts to build up in the blood, causing life-threatening complications. Individuals with type 1 diabetes must take some form of insulin for the rest of their lives. Unusual Thirst Symptoms Unusual thirst is a very common symptom of type 1 diabetes. This condition causes the kidneys to remove excess sugar in the blood by getting rid of more water. The water is removed through urinating, causing dehydration and dehydration causes you to drink more water. Weight Loss Symptoms Patient with type 1 diabetes develop unintentional weight loss and an increase in appetite because blood sugar levels remain high and the body metabolizes fat for energy. Disrupted glucose metabolism also causes patient to feel a lack of energy and drowsy for extended periods Excess urination also cause weight loss because many calories are leaving the body in urine. Skin Problems Symptoms The disruption in glucose metabolism in patient with type 1 diabetes causes skin changes. Type 1 diabetics are at a higher risk for bacterial infections and fungal infections. Poor blood circulation in the skin may also occur. Patient with type 1 diabetes are often infected with fungal infections caused by the yeast Candida albicans. Common fungal infections include athlete's foot, vaginal yeast infection in women, jock itch, ringworm, and diaper rashes in babies. Diaper rash caused by the yeast Candida albicans can spread to other areas of the body such as the stomach and legs. Other Dangero Continue reading >>

Dealing With Loss Of Appetite In The Elderly

Dealing With Loss Of Appetite In The Elderly

Loss of appetite in the elderly is considered to be a normal part of the aging process. That said, it’s still important to understand why your loved one’s appetite may be diminishing. This way you’ll be able to understand what the cause may be so you can help try to stimulate their appetites, which can play a huge role in maintaining overall health. You’ll also know if you have other causes for concern; a decreased appetite, while typical in seniors, can also be a sign of serious medical problems, especially when a noticeable weight loss is involved. Loss of Appetite Causes There are a variety of factors that can play a role in loss of appetite in the elderly, including: Problems with dentures: Ill-fitting dentures and continuous wear can cause discomfort in the gums. If your loved one’s mouth hurts, they may find the idea of eating solid foods unappealing due to the pain it causes. Medication side effects: Some medications can cause nausea and loss of appetite in seniors. If you are concerned that medications may be the source of your loved one’s diminished appetite, make sure to talk to a doctor or health professional. Depression or loneliness: Being socially isolated causes depression and loneliness in the elderly; the prospect of eating a meal alone is enough to reduce one’s appetite. Changes to the senses: As we age, it’s common for our sense of taste and smell to change. Foods our loved ones once enjoyed may no longer seem appealing, or the changes to their taste buds may cause them to make poor food choices. Illness or disease: Although a decreased appetite in the elderly is somewhat normal, it’s important to know that it can be a result of certain serious illnesses. Thyroid disorders, certain cancers, periodontal disease, and Alzheimer’s can Continue reading >>

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