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Diabetic No Appetite

7 Scary Reasons You’re Losing Weight Without Trying

7 Scary Reasons You’re Losing Weight Without Trying

It's natural for your weight to fluctuate during the year. A swing of a few pounds up or down is normal—and nothing to worry about. But if you drop 5% of your body weight in less than six months—and you can't pinpoint a good explanation for that weight loss—it's time to let your doctor know what's up, says Anne Cappola, MD, an endocrinologist and professor of medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. "It's not common to lose a significant amount of weight without an obvious reason," she says. "If you're losing weight and nothing's changed with your diet or activity, you need to worry about that a little bit." Other experts agree. While small or temporary weight fluctuations are normal—gaining a few pounds during the holidays, maybe, or losing a few after a stomach bug—more significant weight shifts that don't have an obvious trigger could be an early sign of a serious health condition, says Kerry Hildreth, MD, an assistant professor of geriatric medicine at the University of Colorado. (Want to pick up some healthier habits? Sign up to get healthy living tips and more delivered straight to your inbox!) Here are 7 health issues that could underlie your unexplained weight loss. Weight loss is a common symptom of hyperthyroidism—or an over-active thyroid, Cappola says. "If I suspected a thyroid issue, I'd probably look for increased hunger or heart palpitations," she explains. Sleeping problems or feeling hot all the time are two more symptoms of an over-active thyroid, she says. Prevention Premium: If You Think Lowering Your Cholesterol Is The Best Way To Prevent Heart Disease, You Need To Read This Celiac disease—an autoimmune disorder tied to gluten—can cause a drop in weight, and tends to be accompanied by other GI symptoms like diarrhea, says Jamile W Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms

The symptoms of type 2 diabetes (also called type 2 diabetes mellitus) develop gradually—so gradually, in fact, that it’s possible to miss them or to not connect them as related symptoms. Some people are actually surprised when they are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes because they’ve gone to the doctor for something else (eg, fatigue or increased urination). The symptoms develop gradually because, if you have the insulin resistant form of type 2, it takes time for the effects of insulin resistance to show up. Your body doesn’t become insulin resistant (unable to use insulin properly) overnight, as you can learn about in the article on causes of type 2 diabetes. If you’re not insulin resistant—and instead your body doesn’t produce enough insulin to process glucose well—the symptoms also develop gradually. Your body will be able to “make do” with lower insulin levels for awhile, but eventually, you will start to notice the following symptoms. Here are some of the common symptoms of type 2 diabetes: Fatigue: Your body isn’t getting the energy it needs from the food you’re eating, so you may feel very tired. Extreme thirst: No matter how much you drink, it feels like you’re still dehydrated. Your tissues (such as your muscles) are, in fact, dehydrated when there’s too much glucose (sugar) in your blood. Your body pulls fluid from the tissues to try to dilute the blood and counteract the high glucose, so your tissues will be dehydrated and send the message that you need to drink more. This is also associated with increased urination. Frequent urination: This is related to drinking so much more in an attempt to satisfy your thirst. Since you’re drinking more, you’ll have to urinate more. Additionally, the body will try to get rid of the excess g Continue reading >>

Not Eating

Not Eating

When your cat refuses to eat, you need to call your veterinarian for an appointment immediately. Some causes for not eating (anorexia) are simple to treat, and others are more complex to identify. Either way, you need to call your veterinarian and have your cat examined. Fortunately, many conditions can have a positive outcome with timely and appropriate medical care. At the Examination Your veterinarian will ask you questions about what you have noticed regarding your cat’s loss of appetite. Have you recently changed the food your cat was used to eating? Have there been any major changes in your home, like the addition of a dog or another cat? Could this be frightening your cat and causing her not to feel comfortable to eat? Have there been changes in your cat’s urination or defecation lately? Were there any loose stools? Has your cat been drinking extra water? During the physical examination, your veterinarian will look for things that might be causing your cat’s lack of appetite. They will look in your cat’s mouth to see if there is any dental disease which might cause your cat to not want to eat. They will take your cat’s temperature to see if your cat has a fever and perhaps has an infection, also leading to a lack of appetite. Often samples of blood, urine, and stool are examined to help your veterinarian determine the cause for the decreased appetite. Your veterinarian may need to do further diagnostic tests like x-rays or an abdominal ultrasound to be able to see why your cat is not eating. Possible Diseases as the Cause Kidney Disease – when the kidneys stop working well. As your cat ages, the risk of kidney disease increases. Kidney disease can also be caused by eating poisonous substances, such as certain plants (e.g. lilies or plants of the Liliu Continue reading >>

4 Signs Of An Impending Diabetic Pet Emergency

4 Signs Of An Impending Diabetic Pet Emergency

Caring for a diabetic pet can be challenging, but there are certain precautions pet owners can take to prevent a diabetic emergency like hypoglycemia. Preventing a health crisis in a dog or cat with diabetes involves employing a consistent daily routine involving diet, exercise, insulin therapy, and supplementation. It also involves avoiding any and all unnecessary vaccinations. Even the most diligent pet parent can find himself facing a diabetic emergency with a dog or cat. Hypoglycemia is the most common health crisis, and is usually the result of an inadvertent overdose of insulin. Symptoms of hypoglycemia can appear suddenly and include lethargy or restlessness, anxiety or other behavioral changes, muscle weakness or twitching, seizures, coma, and death. At-home treatment for a diabetic pet with hypoglycemia is determined by whether or not the animal is alert. Signs of other potential impending diabetic emergencies include ketones in the urine; straining to urinate or bloody urine; vomiting or diarrhea; or a complete loss of appetite or reduced appetite for several days. By Dr. Becker Caring for a diabetic pet can be quite complex and time consuming. It involves regular monitoring of blood glucose levels, making necessary dietary adjustments, giving insulin injections or oral medications, and keeping a careful eye on your pet at all times. Frequent veterinary visits are the norm for dogs and cats with diabetes, as are the costs associated with checkups, tests, medical procedures, and insulin therapy. And unlike humans with the disease, our pets can’t tell us how they’re feeling or help in their own treatment and recovery. Preventing Diabetic Emergencies The key to preventing diabetic emergencies with a pet involves implementing a consistent daily routine and sti Continue reading >>

Loss Of Appetite In The Elderly Reasons And Causes

Loss Of Appetite In The Elderly Reasons And Causes

A gradual reduction in appetite with advancing age is not usually a cause for concern. Most seniors will eat less because of lower energy requirements with advancing age. In fact this is considered as a relatively normal part of health aging. However, there comes a point where this reduction in appetite should be considered as a warning sign of an underlying problem. A drastic reduction in appetite along with weight loss, fatigue and other symptoms needs to attended to by a medical professional. Why do older people eat less? This is a common question among concerned friends, family and relatives. There is no simple answer because the factors affecting appetite in one older person may not apply to another. This is particularly the case when it comes to pathological causes (diseases causing appetite loss) and psychosocial factors. Appetite control is a complex short-term and long-term process involving multiple factors from the feeding centers in the brain to hormones, blood glucose levels and nerve impulses between the digestive tract and central nervous system. It is generally accepted that a moderate reduction in appetite among the elderly is related to normal aging processes. Firstly the resting metabolic rate decreases with age due to dwindling levels of certain hormones, like growth hormone, and reduced levels of physical activity that is common in the retirement years. Second is the impact of food preparation, taste, chewing, swallowing and digestive changes that are also considered part and parcel of growing old. Tea and Toast Diet Some elderly people will experience a significant reduction of appetite that may affect their body weight, health and wellbeing. Studies have shown that a loss of more than 10% of body weight in the elderly is linked to a higher mortali Continue reading >>

Many Cats With Diabetes Can Achieve Remission

Many Cats With Diabetes Can Achieve Remission

If your cat seems to be thirstier than usual, is urinating frequently, is hungry all the time but also losing weight, you should have him checked by your veterinarian for feline diabetes. Other signs to watch for include urinating outside the litter box, sweet-smelling breath, lethargy, dehydration, poor coat condition, and urinary tract infections. Left untreated, diabetes can cause your kitty to lose his appetite and a significant amount of weight, and develop muscle weakness. Uncontrolled, the disease can ultimately result in diabetic neuropathy, a condition in which there is profound rear limb weakness and a plantigrade walk, meaning the ankles are actually on the ground as the cat walks. Feline Diabetes Mellitus Diabetes mellitus is a common disease in older cats, and is especially prevalent in kitties fed dry food diets. In fact, a study published in the Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery concluded that high-protein, low-carb diets are as or more effective than insulin at causing remission of diabetes in cats. The pancreas produces insulin based on the level of glucose in the blood. Insulin is necessary in order for glucose to enter the cells of the body. When glucose levels are high (which normally occurs after a meal), insulin is released. When there is not enough insulin being released from the pancreas, or there is an abnormal release of insulin coupled with an inadequate response of the body’s cells to the insulin, diabetes mellitus is the result. Sugar in the bloodstream cannot get into the cells of the body, so the body starts breaking down fat and protein stores to use as energy. As a result, no matter how much the cat eats, she loses weight. In addition, the glucose builds up in the bloodstream and is eliminated through urination. This leads to exce Continue reading >>

Diabetic Remission In Cats

Diabetic Remission In Cats

To grasp diabetic remission in cats, it helps to have an understanding of feline diabetes, so here is a quick review. Diabetes is a complex disease involving a hormone called insulin. When a cat does not make enough insulin or cannot properly use the insulin it does make, diabetes results. Why is insulin important? Insulin keeps the body’s engine working properly. The body is like a well-tuned machine and needs fuel to run properly. The fuel for a cat is food that contains fats, carbohydrates, and proteins. But this fuel needs to be broken down into smaller parts that the body can utilize. One of these usable fuel components is glucose. Without glucose, the body’s engine stalls. Glucose must enter the body’s individual cells to keep the engine running. That is where insulin comes in to play. Insulin regulates the flow of glucose from the blood stream into the cells where it is needed to sustain life. When there is not enough insulin produced by the pancreas, or the cat does not use it effectively, glucose cannot enter the cells and high levels of glucose build up in the bloodstream. This condition is called diabetes. "The common signs of diabetes include increases in appetite, water consumption, and urination, along with weight loss." Without insulin to steer glucose into the cells, the cat's body looks for alternative sources of fuel and breaks down reserves of fat and protein stored in the body. Fueling the body is not efficient without the insulin/glucose team, so the cat loses weight despite eating more. Meanwhile, the accumulation of glucose in the blood stream is eliminated in the urine. The cat urinates more which makes him thirsty and he drinks more water. The common signs of diabetes include increases in appetite, water consumption, and urination, along w Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

Symptoms of usually develop quickly, over a few days to weeks, and are caused by high blood sugar. At first, symptoms may be overlooked or mistaken for another illness, like the flu. High blood sugar symptoms include: Urinating a lot, which may be more noticeable at night. The kidneys are trying to get rid of the excess sugar in the blood. To do that, they have to get rid of more water. More water means more urine. Being very thirsty. This happens if you urinate so often that you lose enough water to become dehydrated. Losing weight without trying. This happens because you are dehydrated. Weight loss may also happen if you are losing all of those sugar calories in your urine instead of using them. Increased hunger. You feel hungry because your body isn't using all the calories that it can. Many of them leave your body in your urine instead. Blurry vision. When sugar builds up in the lens of your eye, it sucks extra water into your eye. This changes the shape of the lens and blurs your vision. Feeling very tired. You feel tired for the same reason you feel hungry. Your body isn't using the calories you are eating, and your body isn't getting the energy it needs. See more about symptoms of high blood sugar. Symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis are: Flushed, hot, dry skin. Loss of appetite, belly pain, and vomiting. A strong, fruity breath odor. Rapid, deep breathing. Restlessness, drowsiness, difficulty waking up, confusion, or coma. Young children may lack interest in their normal activities. Common symptoms of low blood sugar include: Shakiness. Hunger. Confusion. You can pass out when your blood sugar gets very low. See more about symptoms of low blood sugar. If you aren't able to tell when your blood sugar is too low (hypoglycemic unawareness), it's a good idea to test y Continue reading >>

Lack Of Appetite From Diabetic Cat

Lack Of Appetite From Diabetic Cat

Hi there, My cat was recently diagnosed as diabetic two weeks ago. He was prescribed insulin 2x daily and we slowly changed his diet to the wet foods after researching online with Binky's comparison chart. Our vet was pushing the dry diabetic cat foods which I resisted after reading all the information online. The first week, he was doing very well and enjoying the wet cat food. Now, two weeks later, he has stopped eating his food and is not interested in chicken or turkey. The first day we called the vet and were told by the vet tech not to give his dosage while the vet told us to give the insulin... after almost two days of this, we brought him back to the vet who tested his blood sugar and we were told to hold off on insulin shots because his blood sugar had dropped. The vet has mentioned a pill or injection to stimulate his appetite. Can you please tell me what is recommended as I have doubts about what is actually best for my cat? Thanks ANSWER: When a diabetic cat stops eating for whatever reason, their glucose levels will still stay elevated because they are diabetic. The fact that your kitty's blood glucose got too low means either he got too much insulin and became hypoglycemic or he has lost his insulin requirements and is no longer diabetic (yes, this happens.) However, since he wasn't eating, I would guess that it was the former - his insulin dosage was too high and his glucose went too low and he didn't feel well. This can be an extremely dangerous situation, even leading to death. I think there's more at stake here than using an appetite stimulant. You need to know the underlying cause of his loss of appetite, which seems to be unstable glucose levels and that needs to be addressed. I can't recommend strongly enough purchasing your own glucometer and testi Continue reading >>

What Does A Loss Of Appetite In The Elderly Mean?

What Does A Loss Of Appetite In The Elderly Mean?

Getting older means needing fewer calories than younger adults. But it doesn’t mean that a person should stop eating entirely. Elderly adults have specific nutritional needs. Staying healthy as an older person means ensuring those needs are met. There are some reasons why an older person might lose his or her appetite. Finding the cause is the first step to finding a way to cope with a loss of appetite in elderly people. Elderly Nutrition Needs Older people have slightly different nutritional needs than the average adult. Not only are the old usually less active than younger people, their bodies no longer function as they did in their youth. For that reason, it’s imperative that you pay close attention to the vitamins and nutrients an older adult gets each day. The elderly often need increased amounts of vitamin B12, vitamin D, and calcium to keep their bones and blood healthy. Certain nutrients, such as potassium, help older people avoid chronic diseases associated with aging. Potassium plays a role in regulating blood pressure. It’s an essential mineral for anyone at risk for hypertension. It’s also important that an elderly adult takes in plenty of fiber each day. Fiber helps keep blood sugar levels in check and increases regularity. It’s a must have for older adults who want to lower their risk for heart disease and diabetes. Reasons for a Loss of Appetite If an older adult is healthy, he or she should also have a healthy appetite. A loss of appetite in the elderly doesn’t just happen for no reason. One or more factors are often behind it. In some cases, a person might lose interest in food as a normal part of aging. In others, illness can be behind the loss of appetite. Reduced sense of taste and smell. Two of the five senses, taste and smell, have a si Continue reading >>

Loss Of Appetite

Loss Of Appetite

Loss of appetite may also be called anorexia. Many people with cancer have a loss of appetite. It occurs because cancer or its treatments can affect the way food tastes or you don’t feel like eating. If you don’t eat enough, you can lose weight. Weight loss is one of the most common side effects of cancer and its treatment. Weight loss can weaken the immune system, affect how wounds heal and make you tired and uncomfortable. During cancer treatment, you need to stay well nourished to help your body deal with cancer and its treatment. This is also true for children with cancer who need to stay well nourished for normal growth and development. Causes Loss of appetite can be caused by the cancer itself, especially advanced cancer. Cancer treatments may cause symptoms that may lead to loss of appetite. These treatments include chemotherapy, radiation therapy and surgery. These symptoms include: nausea and vomiting constipation diarrhea sore mouth, dry mouth, difficulty chewing or swallowing, taste and smell changes fatigue Loss of appetite may also be caused by: changes in metabolism, possibly due to the cancer pain or pain medicines unpleasant odours or sights a low red blood cell count, or anemia infection being less active difficulty breathing feeling depressed or anxious feeling of fullness due to a buildup of fluid in the abdomen (called ascites) Symptoms Symptoms of loss of appetite can vary depending on their cause and other factors. Severe loss of appetite can cause weight loss and malnutrition. It can also lead to loss of muscle mass, which is also called muscle wasting or cachexia. A loss of appetite can be temporary. Appetite often returns to normal when treatments such as radiation therapy or chemotherapy are completed. It may take several weeks for the appe Continue reading >>

Gastroparesis

Gastroparesis

What is gastroparesis? Gastroparesis, also called delayed gastric emptying, is a disorder that slows or stops the movement of food from the stomach to the small intestine. Normally, the muscles of the stomach, which are controlled by the vagus nerve, contract to break up food and move it through the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. The GI tract is a series of hollow organs joined in a long, twisting tube from the mouth to the anus. The movement of muscles in the GI tract, along with the release of hormones and enzymes, allows for the digestion of food. Gastroparesis can occur when the vagus nerve is damaged by illness or injury and the stomach muscles stop working normally. Food then moves slowly from the stomach to the small intestine or stops moving altogether. What causes gastroparesis? Most people diagnosed with gastroparesis have idiopathic gastroparesis, which means a health care provider cannot identify the cause, even with medical tests. Diabetes is the most common known cause of gastroparesis. People with diabetes have high levels of blood glucose, also called blood sugar. Over time, high blood glucose levels can damage the vagus nerve. Other identifiable causes of gastroparesis include intestinal surgery and nervous system diseases such as Parkinson’s disease or multiple sclerosis. For reasons that are still unclear, gastroparesis is more commonly found in women than in men. What are the symptoms of gastroparesis? The most common symptoms of gastroparesis are nausea, a feeling of fullness after eating only a small amount of food, and vomiting undigested food—sometimes several hours after a meal. Other symptoms of gastroparesis include gastroesophageal reflux (GER), also called acid reflux or acid regurgitation—a condition in which stomach contents flow back Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Dogs: Symptoms, Causes, & Treatment

Diabetes In Dogs: Symptoms, Causes, & Treatment

Diabetes is a chronic disease that can affect dogs and cats and other animals (including apes, pigs, and horses) as well as humans. Although diabetes can’t be cured, it can be managed very successfully. Diabetes mellitus, or “sugar diabetes,” is the type of diabetes seen most often in dogs. It is a metabolism disorder. Metabolism refers to how the body converts food to energy. To understand what diabetes is, it helps to understand some of this process. The conversion of food nutrients into energy to power the body’s cells involves an ongoing interplay of two things: • Glucose: essential fuel for the body’s cells. When food is digested, the body breaks down some of the nutrients into glucose, a type of sugar that is a vital source of energy for certain body cells and organs. The glucose is absorbed from the intestines into the blood, which then transports the glucose throughout the body. • Insulin: in charge of fuel delivery. Meanwhile, an important organ next to the stomach called the pancreas releases the hormone insulin into the body. Insulin acts as a “gatekeeper” that tells cells to grab glucose and other nutrients out of the bloodstream and use them as fuel. What is diabetes? With diabetes, the glucose-insulin connection isn’t working as it should. Diabetes occurs in dogs in two forms: • Insulin-deficiency diabetes—This is when the dog’s body isn’t producing enough insulin. This happens when the pancreas is damaged or otherwise not functioning properly. Dogs with this type of diabetes need daily shots to replace the missing insulin. This is the most common type of diabetes in dogs. • Insulin-resistance diabetes—This is when the pancreas is producing some insulin, but the dog’s body isn’t utilizing the insulin as it should. The ce Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

As fat is broken down, acids called ketones build up in the blood and urine. In high levels, ketones are poisonous. This condition is known as ketoacidosis. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is sometimes the first sign of type 1 diabetes in people who have not yet been diagnosed. It can also occur in someone who has already been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. Infection, injury, a serious illness, missing doses of insulin shots, or surgery can lead to DKA in people with type 1 diabetes. People with type 2 diabetes can also develop DKA, but it is less common. It is usually triggered by uncontrolled blood sugar, missing doses of medicines, or a severe illness. Continue reading >>

Your Cat And Diabetes: Everything You Need To Know

Your Cat And Diabetes: Everything You Need To Know

Diabetes is a very serious issue – and not just in people either. That’s right, this chronic and potentially debilitating condition also affects cats (and dogs). And while it’s difficult to know the exact incidence of diabetes in cats, best estimates put it somewhere in the range of 1 cat in every 100-200 cats will become diabetic. What’s even sadder is that this incidence seems to be on the increase. Fortunately, armed with some good information, important tips, and a good working relationship with your veterinarian, you can give your cats the best chance at avoiding this frustrating condition. And if they’ve already developed it, know that these same tools can help you best manage your cat’s diabetic state; avoiding the potential complications and perhaps even getting them into diabetic remission. What is diabetes? In the most basic sense, diabetes mellitus is a disorder where blood sugar, or glucose, cannot be effectively utilized and regulated within the body. There are several hormones within the body that play important roles in glucose metabolism. Insulin is one of the most important, if not the most important, and it’s the hormone most central to the development and control of the diabetic state. Glucose fuels the body and insulin is the hormone that helps to get it into most cells within the body. Diabetes is often easily diagnosed and controllable. However, when undiagnosed or poorly managed, diabetes can be devastating. Diabetes can absolutely be managed and your cat can still lead a long and happy life. Routine veterinary care and evaluation are important, as is achieving and maintaining an appropriate weight in your cat and feeding him an appropriate diet. There are two types of diabetes – Type I and Type II. In Type I diabetes, the pancreas Continue reading >>

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