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Diabetic Nighttime Snacks

How To Tame Late-night Snack Attacks

How To Tame Late-night Snack Attacks

A. If you are craving a snack after dinner, you aren’t alone. Many people do, and there are a few reasons as to why. If you are eating too little at dinner, or choosing foods that are not filling, you may start to crave an evening snack due to hunger. But it’s not always hunger that has you headed toward the kitchen either. It’s possible that sweet craving is coming from a desire to “treat yourself” as you relax and unwind from the day. It can also stem from boredom at night and eating is an “activity” that gives you something to do. To stop these evening cravings, first you need to identify if you are truly hungry or if your desire to snack is coming from boredom or emotional reasons. Before reaching for that snack, ask yourself if you are truly hungry. Is your stomach growling? If you aren’t sure, a good strategy is to wait 15 minutes before reaching for a snack. If you are still feeling the need to eat after this time, you are most likely hungry whereas a craving would typically pass. Another strategy is to allow yourself to snack on only vegetables or fruit. If you are truly hungry, any food choice will help to fill you up. If you are just craving a snack or “sweet treat” for emotional reasons or due to boredom, the idea of having produce may not be as appealing as the cookie you've been eyeing. If hunger is the cause of your need to snack at night, look at your current dinner choices and see how you can improve them to make your meal more filling. Can you add an extra serving of vegetables to boost fiber without adding many calories? Can you increase your serving of lean protein to improve your feeling of fullness, or drink an extra glass of water with your meal? Changes like this will not elevate blood sugar levels, but will help to leave you m Continue reading >>

Impact Of Bedtime Snacks On Glucose Control In Type 2 Diabetes

Impact Of Bedtime Snacks On Glucose Control In Type 2 Diabetes

Approximately 3 million Canadians have type 2 diabetes, a condition where the blood sugar levels are too high, uncontrolled blood sugars lead to cardiovascular disease and other complications. Patients with type 2 diabetes are often advised to consume a snack before bed in order to help control morning blood sugar levels. However, scientific evidence for this dietary approach is limited and there is no data to help elucidate what the ideal bedtime snack is. We hypothesize that a high protein, high fat snack with very little carbohydrate, will be an effective bedtime snack for lowering morning glucose without spiking glucose levels in the night. In this study we will determine if a bedtime snack that is high in protein and fat but low in carbohydrate can help improve morning glucose control in people with type 2 diabetes. This information will provide scientific evidence for the potential health benefits of strategically-timed high protein, high fat snack consumption in people with type 2 diabetes. Fifteen patients with physician diagnosed type 2 diabetes (HbA1c 6.5-9%), between the ages of 30-80 years, and not on exogenous insulin therapy, will complete three, 3-day intervention periods (proof-of-concept randomized trial). Participants will consume a standardized diet for three days with either i) two hard-boiled eggs, ii) fruit yogurt; or iii) control no-bedtime snack, thirty minutes prior to bedtime. Fasting blood samples will be obtained on Day 4 in the morning after following each 3-day dietary intervention. Blood glucose will be monitored continuously across the intervention period using continuous glucose monitoring (CGM). CGM allows for the moment-to-moment changes in blood glucose to be examined for several days, allowing the unique opportunity to examine the gl Continue reading >>

Diabetic Bedtime Snack Ideas

Diabetic Bedtime Snack Ideas

Low blood sugar during the night can be a concern for people with diabetes, especially those on insulin. A 2003 study published in "Diabetes Care" investigated the impact of snack composition on nightly blood sugars in adults with Type 1 diabetes. The researchers concluded that bedtime snacks consisting of a carbohydrate and protein worked best in preventing low blood sugars when the bedtime blood sugar was less than 126 mg/dL. Video of the Day Most bedtime snacks contain about 15 to 30 g of carbohydrate, or two servings of a carbohydrate-containing food, and a serving of protein. It is not quite understood why protein helps to prevent nightly hypoglycemia, according to the authors of the "Diabetes Care" study, but it is believed to be related to the way protein is metabolized. Cereal and milk provides both carbohydrate and protein. A good bedtime snack consists of 3/4-cup serving of whole-grain cereal and 1-cup of low-fat milk. During cold months, you can try 1/2 cup of hot cereal with 2 tbsp. of raisins and 1 cup of skim milk as a cereal bedtime snack. Crackers and Peanut Butter Crackers provide the carbohydrate and peanut butter provides the protein. Spread 12 whole-grain crackers with 3 tsp. of peanut butter or you can also try six whole-grain crackers with 3 tsp. of peanut butter and 1-cup of skim milk. Each of these snacks contain 30 g of carbohydrate. Sandwiches also make a good bedtime snack for diabetics. Choose lean sources of meat to decrease your intake of saturated fat. Too much saturated fat in the diet increases blood cholesterol levels, another risk factor for heart disease. Bedtime sandwich ideas include two slices of whole wheat bread with 1 oz. of turkey, 1 oz. of lean ham, 1oz. of low-fat cheese or 1 oz. of canned tuna packed in water mixed with 1 ts Continue reading >>

How To Snack Smart At Bedtime

How To Snack Smart At Bedtime

Im hungry, I said to my husband. He sighed then asked what I needed to eat. We had just crawled into bed when my stomach grumbled. He was used to this because it happens to me often. I need to learn to be proactive about my bedtime snacking, though, and eat something before we go to bed. Late-night snacking has pros and cons for people with diabetes, depending on the type of diabetes and the type of snack. Well look at who should be having a snack and what kinds of snacks are good for different types of problems. How You Can Tell What Kind of Bedtime Snack Is Okay? So, how can you tell if its okay to snack at all and, if so, how many carbs that snack should have? One of your clues is your fasting morning blood glucose levels. See what happens to your numbers the morning after snacking and on mornings after you dont snack. How do they compare? Unfortunately, its not often that simple. Your fasting blood glucose reading is only the start. To get a better sense of your overall patterns, try testing before you go to bed at night, and again around 3 a.m., in addition to your morning test. Do this for several days in a row and you will begin to see your bodys typical nighttime blood sugar cycle. Armed with this information, you may want to consult with your doctor, nutritionist, and/or diabetes educator about how best to work with whatever pattern you discovered. However, we give some tips and ideas below to help you figure out what kinds of snacks you can indulge in, depending on the particular diabetes challenge youre dealing with. Bedtime Snacks Can Add Weight, Not Good for Diabetics Snacking at night can lead to weight gain because we dont always choose carefully when we have the post-dinner munchies. And we sit in front of the television or hang out with friends and don Continue reading >>

Eating With Diabetes: Smart Snacking

Eating With Diabetes: Smart Snacking

By Amy Poetker, Registered Dietitian and Certified Diabetes Educator 12/21/2010 Whether you want to lose weight or simply eat healthier, enjoying a couple of snacks each day is a smart habit for many people. Eating a planned snack between meals can help curb your hunger (and therefore prevent overeating at mealtime) and also increase your energy levels when you need a boost. Snacks offer an additional benefit for people with type 2 diabetes: They can help optimize your blood glucose control. So if you haven't incorporated snacks into your diabetes meal plan yet, now may be the time to start. Here's what you need to know to snack smart, along with some carbohydrate-controlled snack ideas you can try today! The number of snacks a person with diabetes should eat during the day depends largely on your eating preferences, your weight-management goals, and the timing of your major meals. People with diabetes can eat snacks throughout the day for a number of reasonssimply enjoying a mid-morning snack or planning them into their day for better blood glucose control. Exactly how many snacks you should eatand when you eat themis very individualized. Meeting with a registered dietitian or certified diabetes educator is the best way to make sure your diabetes meal plan meets your needs. However, here are a few basic guidelines that can be helpful when planning snacks. How many hours pass between your meals? In general, people with diabetes who want to optimize blood glucose control should not go longer than five hours without eating. If you consistently eat your main meals every 4 to 5 hours, then you may not need any snacks between meals. However, if your main meals are generally spaced out at longer intervals, snacking between meals can help you achieve your best blood glucose c Continue reading >>

A Bedtime Snack And Blood Sugar: Diabetes Questions & Answers

A Bedtime Snack And Blood Sugar: Diabetes Questions & Answers

A Bedtime Snack and Blood Sugar: Diabetes Questions & Answers Q: Does a bedtime snack help or hurt the wake-up blood sugar reading? A: Like most things having to do with diabetes, it depends. If you are not taking insulin, bedtime snacks can either cause your wake-up reading to be elevated or force your pancreas to produce extra insulin during the night to offset the effects of the snack neither of which is a good thing. If you take insulin, a bedtime snack may be needed if your blood sugar tends to drop overnight.This is often a sign that your basal insulin dose (via injection or a pump) is a bit too high.Basal insulins job is to keep your blood sugar steady overnight.So if youre dropping, you may be getting too much basal insulin.In this case, without a snack, you might wind up with low blood sugar in the middle of the night. And if you overeat or rebound from the low, your wake-up reading could wind up too high.So with basal insulin doses that are a bit too high, a snack at night may be necessary. However, it would be better to get the basal insulin dose set properly. If your basal insulin dose is correct and your blood sugar holds steady through the night without a snack, a bedtime snack will make your blood sugar rise.A dose of rapid-acting insulin would likely be needed to offset the effects of the carbohydrates in the snack. While we sleep, the body produces a hormone called leptin that curbs appetite. So if youre trying to shed some body fat, a bedtime snack may be counterproductive. And since excess body fat leads to insulin resistance , all those extra bedtime snacks can lead to higher-than-desired blood sugars in the morning that persist around the clock. Want to learn more about maintaining target blood sugar levels during sleep? Read Exorcising the Specter Continue reading >>

What Is A Good Evening Snack?

What Is A Good Evening Snack?

My mom, who has diabetes, likes having her tea and a snack before bedtime. Is eating a slice of American or cheddar cheese good for her? Continue reading >>

Late-night Eating: Ok If You Have Diabetes?

Late-night Eating: Ok If You Have Diabetes?

Are late-night snacks a no-no for people who have diabetes? Answers from M. Regina Castro, M.D. If you have diabetes, late-night snacks aren't necessarily off-limits — but it's important to make wise choices. Late-night snacks add extra calories, which can lead to weight gain. And if you snack after your evening meal — especially if the foods contain carbohydrates — you may wake up the next morning with a high blood sugar level. If you're hungry after dinner, choose a "free" food, such as: One sugar-free frozen cream pop Five baby carrots One cup of light popcorn A small handful of goldfish-style crackers A can of diet soda Or swap the snack for a piece of gum or small hard candy. These "free" foods have few, if any, carbohydrates and calories, so they won't contribute to weight gain or increased blood sugar. If you take insulin or other diabetes medications and feel that you must snack before bedtime to prevent low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) during the night, talk to your doctor. He or she may recommend adjusting the dose of your medications to prevent the need for a late-night snack. Continue reading >>

The Best Midnight Snacks For Diabetes Management

The Best Midnight Snacks For Diabetes Management

1 / 7 Midnight Snacking Isn't Off Limits If You Have Diabetes Midnight snacking doesn’t typically have the healthiest connotations. But being hungry late at night doesn’t mean you have to derail your diabetes diet by standing in front of the refrigerator spooning ice cream out of the tub, as delicious as that may sound. In fact, satisfying a late-night craving with a healthy snack may be good for diabetes. That’s because fasting for too long can, in some cases, make the liver overproduce glucose, which can raise blood sugar — an effect that can be harmful for people with type 2 diabetes, says Lori Chong, RDN, CDE, at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center in Columbus. Next time you have a hankering for something salty, savory, or sweet, get your hands on one of these diabetes-friendly snacks to ward off hunger and help you get back to sleep. Continue reading >>

Nighttime Snack- A Blood Sugar Must

Nighttime Snack- A Blood Sugar Must

Over and over again, I have heard people say “Don’t eat after 8pm, its bad for your health” with no evidence to back up this supposed claim. Your body will not magically turn all calories into fat if you eat a piece of fruit, a cracker or even your dinner the second the clock strikes 8pm, but for those with type 2 diabetes, not eating a nighttime snack may actually be contributing to high blood sugars in the morning. Medications for diabetes-especially insulin – work by helping glucose enter the cells and lowering blood sugar values. This medication is adjusted specifically for each individual in order to make sure that blood sugars don’t stay too high or drop too low. However, insulin may act in your body for an extended period of time, depending on the type. During the day, we are constantly providing our body with sources of carbohydrates either by eating three distinct meals every several hours or grazing throughout the day. For those who choose not to eat anything between dinner and breakfast the next morning, this provides a window of potentially twelve hours with no carbohydrates entering the bloodstream. As mentioned before, insulin often works over an extended period of time, and may still be helping lower your blood sugar at night when you are sleeping and will cause a low blood sugar at night. You might be wondering how this will lead to high blood sugars in the morning right about now. Our bodies have a unique system of storing some extra glucose in our liver, and these stores are called glycogen. When we eat foods that are turned into glucose as they are digested, a limited amount of this glucose is stored in the liver for emergency purposes in case we need a boost of energy to run away from a bear that is about to eat us. For the average American Continue reading >>

6 Smart Bedtime Snacks For Diabetics

6 Smart Bedtime Snacks For Diabetics

Many people with diabetes deliberately nosh at night to keep glucose levels from plummeting while they sleep. A snack before bed isn’t a bad impulse, says Fran Cogen, M.D., director of the childhood and adolescent diabetes program at Children’s National Health System. But the wrong kind of snack can actually make things worse. Instead of high-carb fare like chips, “aim for a bedtime snack of protein plus carbohydrate,” she says. Also keep in mind that blood sugar levels are highly individual and will vary based on how active you are each day. So before you hit the kitchen, it’s best to test your glucose level. The Best Bedtime Snacks 10 Goldfish crackers + 1/2 cup skim milk String cheese + whole-grain crackers Apple slices + peanut butter 1 slice whole wheat bread + 2 oz turkey Hummus + raw veggies 1/4 cup cottage cheese + 1/2 cup berries Continue reading >>

The 21 Best Snack Ideas If You Have Diabetes

The 21 Best Snack Ideas If You Have Diabetes

The 21 Best Snack Ideas If You Have Diabetes Written by Brianna Elliott, RD on January 14, 2018 Choosing healthy snacks can be difficult when you have diabetes. The key is to choose snacks that are high in fiber, protein and healthy fats. These nutrients will help keep your blood sugar levels under control. Its also important to snack on nutrient-dense foods that promote overall health. This article discusses 21 excellent snacks to eat if you have diabetes. Hard-boiled eggs are a super healthy snack for people with diabetes. Their protein content really makes them shine. One large hard-boiled egg provides 6 grams of protein, which is helpful for diabetes because it keeps your blood sugar from rising too high after you eat ( 1 , 2 ). In one study, 65 people with type 2 diabetes ate two eggs daily for 12 weeks. By the end of the study, they experienced significant reductions in their fasting blood sugar levels. They also had lower hemoglobin A1c, which is a measure of long-term blood sugar control ( 3 ). Eggs are known to promote fullness, an important aspect of managing type 2 diabetes. This disease is associated with a greater likelihood of becoming overweight and developing heart disease ( 4 , 5 , 6 , 7 ). You can enjoy a hard-boiled egg or two for a snack on their own, or garnish them with a healthy topping like guacamole. Yogurt with berries is an excellent diabetes-friendly snack for a variety of reasons. First, the antioxidants in berries may reduce inflammation and prevent damage to cells of the pancreas, the organ responsible for releasing hormones that lower blood sugar levels ( 8 , 9 ). Additionally, berries are a great source of fiber. For example, a 1-cup (148-gram) serving of blueberries provides 4 grams of fiber, which helps slow digestion and stabilize bl Continue reading >>

Understanding Healthy Late-night Snacks For People With Diabetes | Rite Aid

Understanding Healthy Late-night Snacks For People With Diabetes | Rite Aid

The Dos and Donts of Late-Night Snacking Post Date: July 2018 | Category: Diabetes Diet & Fitness A nighttime snack isn't for everyone with diabetes, but it can be a good tool for some people. It's not uncommon to assume that healthy late-night snacks are a key part of preventing overnight blood sugar lows. While it might be true for some people, the latest research shows that's not always the case. Nighttime blood sugar can be affected by many factors including activity level, medication, and type of diabetes . If you're trying to decide whether you need a bedtime snack, here's what you need to know. If your overnight blood sugar is typically steady, you probably don't need a snack at all. In fact, if you have type 2 diabetes, nighttime noshing might work against you. Even if they're low in carbs, snacks can be a sneaky source of extra calories. Over time, that can spell weight gain that eventually leads to additional problems with blood sugar control. Do: Be open to trying different healthy nighttime snacks. Don't: Assume that what works for someone else will work for you. If you're prone to overnight blood sugar lows, snacking may be a helpful strategy but it shouldn't be the first one. Before heading for the pantry, talk to your doctor about whether a medication adjustment can help. Certain diabetes medications, especially insulin, can cause drops in blood sugar while you sleep, and changing the dose or timing of your insulin may do the trick. Drugs like sulfonylureas glipizide or glyburide, as well as Prandin and Starlix, are sometimes used in treating type 2 diabetes and can also cause low blood sugarif you're taking one of them, a simple medication change may be all you need. Do: Remember that food isn't the only factor that affects blood sugar levels. Don't: Ad Continue reading >>

Healthy Snack Ideas For People With Type 2 Diabetes Small Snacks

Healthy Snack Ideas For People With Type 2 Diabetes Small Snacks

Healthy snack ideas for people with type 2 diabetes Small Snacks If you have type 2 diabetes, a snack can help you manage your blood glucose levels. If your Registered Dietitian suggests that a small snack fits into your diabetes meal plan, youll find many healthy ideas below. Your snack choices should be based on the four food groups in Canadas Food Guide . The amount of carbohydrate in your snack is very important since carbohydrate-rich foods make the biggest difference to blood glucose levels. Smaller snacks should have about 15 grams of carbohydrate. This is the amount found in one slice of bread or one small apple. Carbohydrates are also found in sugary sweets like pastries, chocolate bars and candy. Because they are not very nutritious, they should be chosen less often, if at all. Heres a good rule to remember when choosing carbohydrate -rich foods: Choose more vegetables, fruit, legumes and whole grains like oats , barley, brown rice and whole wheat. Choose fewer products that are made from sugar, white flour and white rice. The smaller snacks listed below have about 15 grams of carbohydrate each. They each have 85-150 calories. Your eating plan may include a snack in the morning or the mid-afternoon. Here are some delicious options. 1 slice whole grain bread with 10 mL (2 tsp) peanut butter 1 small orange and 175 mL ( cup) edamame (green soybeans in the pod) 250 mL (1 cup) latte, cappuccino, unsweetened cocoa or chai tea made with skim milk 250 mL (1 cup) cantaloupe with 125 mL ( cup) low fat cottage cheese 15 baby carrots with 30 mL (2 tbsp) hummus These snacks can be left in your briefcase, knapsack, car or your desk drawer. They will come in handy when you have a very busy day and need to grab a quick snack. 1 single-serve (125 mL) unsweetened applesauce sp Continue reading >>

Favorite Night Time Snacks?

Favorite Night Time Snacks?

D.D. Family T2/2004 gave up meds in favor of vitamins I would love to hear what sort of variety there is in the snacks that people eat in the evening or before bed. My favorite is a bean burrito and an avocado. my evening snack is very light. it is usually a 15g carb snack and sometimes some form of protein. occasionally i consume half a glass of low fat milk before i sleep. but usually my snack is one of the following - a small apple, 2 real foods rice crispbreads spread with a bit of low-fat peanut butter or half a slice of low-fat cheese each, or one slice 0f multi-grain toast with either low fat cheese, low fat peanut butter, or diabetic-friendly fruit spread (all very thinly spread). sometimes i'll have a handful of roasted unsalted almonds. but that is once in a blue, blue moon. D.D. Family Type 1 since 02/2005, OmniPod I'm bad and I usually don't eat a night time snack. I stopped when I got on the pump... but when I was on Lantus, I would usually have a hard boiled egg or a few slices of turkey... some crackers with peanut butter are always good too, or a half of a graham cracker is always delicious! D.D. Family Type 1 since 2002, pumper since 2004 I don't usually eat a bedtime snack either, but when I do, it is a snack bag of Ritz peanut butter sandwich bites - 20 g carbs. My Diabetes blog , Personal Blog or my diabetes365 pictures "I did then what I knew how to do. Now that I know better, I do better." D.D. Family T2 for 24 years, pumping 3/07/07,no complications If I am hungry at betime, I have a ham and cheese omlet. Almost no carbs. i don't snack at night anymore, ok I rarely do, but I used to like: D.D. Family Dx..DKA 4/07..T2..A1c upon Dx 19.4 I usually have cheese and crackers and a cup of milk....(I get afraid I will get Lows in the nite time)....But, s Continue reading >>

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