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Diabetic Neuropathy Vs Peripheral Neuropathy

The Four Types Of Diabetic Neuropathy

The Four Types Of Diabetic Neuropathy

One of the most serious complications of diabetes is nerve damage, known as diabetic neuropathy. Diabetes can damage a single nerve or an entire network of nerves, which will affect you in different ways. For example, you might lose feeling in one foot or you could have trouble digesting food. More than 60% of people with diabetes will develop diabetic neuropathy at some point. The longer you have diabetes, the more likely you are to develop nerve damage. The key to preventing diabetic nerve damage is blood sugar control. The better you control blood sugar levels and maintain your health in general, the better you can protect yourself. Nerve damage from diabetes can occur just about anywhere in your body. There are four different types of neuropathy, named for where and how they occur. Being aware of the symptoms of each type can help you know when it’s time to see your doctor. Peripheral Neuropathy Peripheral neuropathy is the most common type of diabetic neuropathy. It affects your peripheral — or outer — body parts, including your feet, legs, hands, and arms. The most common symptoms are numbness, pain or tingling in your lower extremities. But peripheral neuropathy can also occur in your upper extremities. When peripheral neuropathy affects your legs and feet, you might feel less coordinated, be unable to balance yourself, or have a hard time walking. This can lead to foot, ankle, or other injuries. Neuropathy in your feet is especially dangerous if you don't notice a blister or other injury to your foot because you have lost feeling. That's why it's important to check your feet daily for cuts or sores when you have peripheral neuropathy. Nerve damage and poor circulation to your feet can delay healing and lead to dangerous infection. Left untreated, an infect Continue reading >>

Peripheral Neuropathy

Peripheral Neuropathy

What is peripheral neuropathy? Your peripheral nervous system connects the nerves from your brain and spinal cord, or central nervous system, to the rest of your body. This includes your: arms hands feet legs internal organs mouth face The job of these nerves is to deliver signals about physical sensations back to your brain. Peripheral neuropathy is a disorder that occurs when these nerves malfunction because they’re damaged or destroyed. This disrupts the nerves’ normal functioning. They might send signals of pain when there’s nothing causing pain, or they might not send a pain signal even if something is harming you. This can be due to: an injury systemic illness an infection an inherited disorder The disorder is uncomfortable, but treatments can be very helpful. The most important thing to determine is whether peripheral neuropathy is the result of a serious underlying condition. More than 100 different types of peripheral neuropathy exist. Each type has unique symptoms and specific treatment options. Peripheral neuropathies are further classified by the type of nerve damage involved. Mononeuropathy occurs when only one nerve is damaged. Polyneuropathies, which are more common, occur when multiple nerves are damaged. The three types of peripheral nerves are: sensory nerves, which connect to your skin motor nerves, which connect to your muscles autonomic nerves, which connect to your internal organs Peripheral neuropathy can affect one nerve group or all three. The symptoms of peripheral neuropathy include: tingling in the hands or feet a feeling like you’re wearing a tight glove or sock sharp, stabbing pains a weak, heavy feeling in the arms and legs, which sometimes may feel like your legs or arms lock in place regularly dropping things from your hands a bu Continue reading >>

Peripheral Neuropathy

Peripheral Neuropathy

Peripheral neuropathy is a type of damage to the nervous system. Specifically, it occurs when there is a problem with your peripheral nervous system, the network of nerves that transmits information from your central nervous system (your brain and spinal cord) to the rest of your body. Peripheral Neuropathy: What You Need to Know There are more than 100 types of peripheral neuropathy, each with its own set of symptoms and prognosis. Peripheral neuropathy has many different causes. One of the most common causes of peripheral neuropathy in the U.S. is diabetes. The most common type of peripheral neuropathy is diabetic neuropathy, caused by a high sugar level and resulting in nerve fiber damage in your legs and feet. Symptoms can range from tingling or numbness in a certain body part to more serious effects, such as burning pain or paralysis. Peripheral Neuropathy Causes Peripheral neuropathy has many different causes. The most common causes are metabolic conditions, such as diabetes, and chronic kidney insufficiency or toxicity from alcohol or medications, such as chemotherapy drugs. Some peripheral neuropathy cases are caused by inflammation in nerves, and others are inherited. Diabetes accounts for about half of all causes of peripheral neuropathy cases in the U.S. About 60 to 70 percent of Americans with diabetes have some form of nerve damage. Could Preservatives Prevent Disabling Chemotherapy Side Effect? Johns Hopkins researchers find that common preservative may thwart pain and damage of peripheral neuropathy. Peripheral Neuropathy Types There are more than 100 types of peripheral neuropathy, each with its own set of symptoms and prognosis. To help doctors classify them, they are often broken down into the following categories: Motor neuropathy. This is damage to t Continue reading >>

Peripheral Neuropathy

Peripheral Neuropathy

Not to be confused with Nephropathy or Neuropathology. Peripheral neuropathy (PN) is damage to or disease affecting nerves, which may impair sensation, movement, gland or organ function, or other aspects of health, depending on the type of nerve affected. Common causes include systemic diseases (such as diabetes or leprosy), vitamin deficiency, medication (e.g., chemotherapy, or commonly prescribed antibiotics including Metronidazole and the fluoroquinolone class of antibiotics (Ciprofloxacin, Levaquin, Avelox etc.), traumatic injury, including ischemia, radiation therapy, excessive alcohol consumption, immune system disease, Coeliac disease, or viral infection. It can also be genetic (present from birth) or idiopathic (no known cause).[1][2][3] In conventional medical usage, the word neuropathy (neuro-, "nervous system" and -pathy, "disease of")[4] without modifier usually means peripheral neuropathy. Neuropathy affecting just one nerve is called "mononeuropathy" and neuropathy involving nerves in roughly the same areas on both sides of the body is called "symmetrical polyneuropathy" or simply "polyneuropathy". When two or more (typically just a few, but sometimes many) separate nerves in disparate areas of the body are affected it is called "mononeuritis multiplex", "multifocal mononeuropathy", or "multiple mononeuropathy".[1][2][3]mononeuritis multiplex Peripheral neuropathy may be chronic (a long-term condition where symptoms begin subtly and progress slowly) or acute (sudden onset, rapid progress, and slow resolution). Acute neuropathies demand urgent diagnosis. Motor nerves (that control muscles), sensory nerves, or autonomic nerves (that control automatic functions such as heart rate, body temperature, and breathing) may be affected. More than one type of nerve m Continue reading >>

Types Of Peripheral Neuropathy & Risk Factors | The Foundation For Pn

Types Of Peripheral Neuropathy & Risk Factors | The Foundation For Pn

30-40% of cancer patients are affected by PN. 30-40% of all cancer patients have Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN). CIPN is caused by chemotherapy drugs used in cancer treatments. Chemotherapy is hardest on the nervous system due to the fact the nerve cells are more sensitive than other cells. Sensory nerves are at an increased risk to chemotherapy-associated damage compared to motor nerves. The onsets and resolution of symptoms is variable. Some drugs may cause symptoms during or immediately after the first dose and some have a delayed onset of symptoms, up to several weeks, months, or even years, after the last dose. 23% of patients have PN of unknown origin. Idiopathic peripheral neuropathy has no identifiable known cause and therefore is considered the primary disease. If a cause is detected, then the neuropathy is secondary to that and not idiopathic. Idiopathic peripheral neuropathies occur typically in middle-aged and elderly individuals. Its estimated that 23% of all neuropathy patients are diagnosed with idiopathic neuropathy. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) or AIDS are often accompanied by the development of peripheral neuropathic conditions. Of all HIV/AIDs patients, 33% have PN. Continue reading >>

Peripheral Neuropathy

Peripheral Neuropathy

Print Overview Peripheral neuropathy, a result of damage to your peripheral nerves, often causes weakness, numbness and pain, usually in your hands and feet. It can also affect other areas of your body. Your peripheral nervous system sends information from your brain and spinal cord (central nervous system) to the rest of your body. Peripheral neuropathy can result from traumatic injuries, infections, metabolic problems, inherited causes and exposure to toxins. One of the most common causes is diabetes mellitus. People with peripheral neuropathy generally describe the pain as stabbing, burning or tingling. In many cases, symptoms improve, especially if caused by a treatable condition. Medications can reduce the pain of peripheral neuropathy. Symptoms Every nerve in your peripheral system has a specific function, so symptoms depend on the type of nerves affected. Nerves are classified into: Sensory nerves that receive sensation, such as temperature, pain, vibration or touch, from the skin Motor nerves that control muscle movement Autonomic nerves that control functions such as blood pressure, heart rate, digestion and bladder Signs and symptoms of peripheral neuropathy might include: Gradual onset of numbness, prickling or tingling in your feet or hands, which can spread upward into your legs and arms Sharp, jabbing, throbbing, freezing or burning pain Extreme sensitivity to touch Lack of coordination and falling Muscle weakness or paralysis if motor nerves are affected If autonomic nerves are affected, signs and symptoms might include: Heat intolerance and altered sweating Bowel, bladder or digestive problems Changes in blood pressure, causing dizziness or lightheadedness Peripheral neuropathy can affect one nerve (mononeuropathy), two or more nerves in different areas Continue reading >>

What Is Peripheral Neuropathy?

What Is Peripheral Neuropathy?

Peripheral neuropathy refers to a problem with the peripheral nerves. These nerves send messages from the central nervous system, the brain and the spinal cord to the rest of the body. The peripheral nerves tell the body when, for example, the hands are cold. It can lead to tingling, prickling, numbness, and muscle weakness in various parts of the body. Peripheral neuropathy can affect a range of different nerves, so it can impact a variety of locations in different ways. It can affect a single nerve, or several nerves at the same time. It is also associated with a number of different underlying medical conditions. Sometimes there is no identifiable cause. It affects some 20 million people in the United States (U.S.). Here are some key points about peripheral neuropathy. More detail is in the main article. Neuropathy is a common complication of a number of different medical conditions. It can involve the autonomic nerves, the motor nerves, and the sensory nerves. Sometimes it affects a single nerve or nerve set, for example, in Bell's Palsy, which affects a facial nerve. Physical trauma, repetitive injury, infection, metabolic problems, and exposure to toxins and some drugs are all possible causes. Treatment Treatment either targets the underlying cause, or it aims to provide symptomatic pain relief and prevent further damage. In the case of diabetic neuropathy, addressing high blood sugars can prevent further nerve damage. For toxic causes, removing the exposure to a suspected toxin, or stopping a drug, can halt further nerve damage. Medications can relieve pain and reduce burning, numbness, and tingling. Drug treatment for neuropathic pain Medications that may help include: Opioid painkillers come with warnings about safety risks. Doctors can also prescribe skin patch Continue reading >>

Types Of Peripheral Neuropathy -

Types Of Peripheral Neuropathy -

Diabetic Neuropathy Diabetic neuropathy, or nerve damage caused by diabetes, is one of the most common known causes of neuropathy. It is one of many complications associated with diabetes, with nearly 60 percent of diabetics having some form of nerve damage. It is a progressive disease that can involve loss of sensation, as well as pain and weakness, in the feet and sometimes in the hands. Peripheral neuropathy may be more prevalent in people who have difficulty managing their blood sugar levels, have high blood pressure, are overweight, and are over 40 years old. A clinical examination may identify early signs of neuropathy in diabetics without symptoms. The first sign of diabetic neuropathy is usually numbness, tingling or pain in the feet, legs or hands. Over a period of several years, the neuropathy may lead to muscle weakness in the feet and a loss of reflexes, especially around the ankle. As the nerve damage increases, the loss of sensation in the feet can reduce a person's ability to detect temperature or to notice pain. Because the person can no longer notice when his/her feet become injured, people with diabetic neuropathy are more likely to develop foot problems such as skin lesions and ulcers that may become infected. Diabetic neuropathy may suddenly flare up and affect a specific nerve or group of nerves. When this occurs, the result may be weakness and muscle atrophy in various parts of the body, such as involvement of the eye muscles or eyelid (e.g., causing double vision or a drooping eyelid) or thigh muscles. Alternatively, neuropathy caused by diabetes may slowly progress over time. It also can interfere with the normal functioning of the digestive system and sexual organs. SYMPTOMS AND SIGNS (Not all symptoms and signs may be present.) Numbness, tingli Continue reading >>

Is There Any Difference Between Diabetic Neuropathy And Other Forms Of Neuropathy?

Is There Any Difference Between Diabetic Neuropathy And Other Forms Of Neuropathy?

The reason I decided to write this article is because I've had many people question the difference. I've even had several people tell me that when they went to their doctor complaining about neuropathy symptoms, the doctor took a blood test and dismissed it as neuropathy because their blood sugars weren't high. The term neuropathy has been strongly associated with Diabetes. Diabetes is a major cause of peripheral neuropathy. Current estimates say that 60-70% of people with diabetes have mild to severe neuropathy. However, it is not the only cause. Neuropathy is nerve damage. Nerve cells are vulnerable to damage from disease or anything that impairs the body’s ability to turn nutrients into energy, to process waste products, to circulate oxygen or to make cellular repair. Diabetes does create the nerve cells vulnerable to damage, but there are many ways in which nerves can get damaged. What are the different ways that someone will get neuropathy? Diabetic neuropathy is a result of prolonged elevated levels of blood glucose. Chemotherapy Neuropathy is caused by damage that is done by the drugs that are attempting to destroy the cancer cells. Alcoholic neuropathy - Alcohol use creates vitamin deficiencies that can lead to nerve damage. Medications – certain drugs have possible side effects of nerve damage (neuropathy). The biggest known drug is the anti-cholesterol drugs since it blocks cholesterol which the nerves need to repair themselves. It can create deficiencies that contribute to nerve damage. Autoimmune Disorders – these are disorders where the body attacks its own cells. If it attacks nerve cells it will create neuropathy. Bacterial and Viral Infections Viruses can attack nerve cells. Bacterial and viral infections can create autoimmune reactions. Pressure o Continue reading >>

Understanding Peripheral Neuropathy -- The Basics

Understanding Peripheral Neuropathy -- The Basics

What Is Peripheral Neuropathy? The name of the condition tells you a bit about what it is: Peripheral: Beyond (in this case, beyond the brain and the spinal cord.) Neuro-: Related to the nerves -pathy: Disease Peripheral neuropathy refers to the conditions that result when nerves that carry messages to and from the brain and spinal cord from and to the rest of the body are damaged or diseased. The peripheral nerves make up an intricate network that connects the brain and spinal cord to the muscles, skin, and internal organs. Peripheral nerves come out of the spinal cord and are arranged along lines in the body called dermatomes. Typically, damage to a nerve will affect one or more dermatomes, which can be tracked to specific areas of the body. Damage to these nerves interrupts communication between the brain and other parts of the body and can impair muscle movement, prevent normal sensation in the arms and legs, and cause pain. Types of Peripheral Neuropathy There are several different kinds of peripheral neuropathies that stem from a variety of causes. They range from carpal tunnel syndrome (a traumatic injury common after chronic repetitive use of the hands and wrists, such as with computer use) to nerve damage linked to diabetes. As a group, peripheral neuropathies are common, especially among people over the age of 55. All together, the conditions affect 3% to 4% of people in this group. Neuropathies are typically classified according to the problems they cause or what is at the root of the damage. There also are terms that express how extensively the nerves have been damaged. Mononeuropathy Damage to a single peripheral nerve is called mononeuropathy. Physical injury or trauma such as from an accident is the most common cause. Prolonged pressure on a nerve, caused Continue reading >>

Types Of Diabetic Neuropathy

Types Of Diabetic Neuropathy

Diabetic neuropathy can be broken into several types. This is because we have different kinds of nerves in our bodies that serve different functions. Your symptoms and treatments depend on which type of diabetic neuropathy you have. There are four types of diabetic neuropathy: Peripheral diabetic neuropathy goes by various names: peripheral diabetic nerve pain and distal polyneuropathy. In this Patient Guide, we’ll refer to it as peripheral diabetic neuropathy, or simply peripheral neuropathy. Peripheral neuropathy is the most common form of neuropathy caused by diabetes. It affects nerves leading to your extremities—to your feet, legs, hands, and arms. The nerves going to your feet are the longest in your body: after they branch off the spinal cord in the lumbar region (low back), they have to go all the way down your legs and into the feet—quite a distance. Because the nerves leading to your feet are so long, it’s most often these nerves that are damaged; there’s more of them to be damaged. This nerve damage can lead to the foot problems often associated with diabetes, including foot deformities, infections, ulcers, and amputations. The article on diabetic neuropathy symptoms will help you learn more about the specific symptoms associated with peripheral diabetic neuropathy. Proximal neuropathy can also be called diabetic amyotrophy. That myo in the word means muscle, so this is a form of neuropathy that can cause muscle weakness. It specifically affects the muscles in the upper part of your leg(s), buttocks, and hips. Sometimes, proximal neuropathy can also involve nerve pain, especially pain that shoots from the low back and down the leg. The technical medical term for that is radiculopathy, although most people refer to it as sciatica. If there’s also s Continue reading >>

Neuropathy

Neuropathy

A A A Neuropathy What Causes Neuropathy? What Are the Symptoms of Neuropathy? What is Neuropathy Treatment? Are There Home Remedies for Neuropathy? What Medications Are Used to Treat Neuropathy? What Are Neuropathy Medications? Neuropathy is a term that refers to general diseases or malfunctions of the nerves. Nerves at any location in the body can be damaged from injury or disease. Neuropathy is often classified according to the types or location of nerves that are affected. Neuropathy can also be classified according to the disease causing it. (For example, neuropathy from the effects of diabetes is called diabetic neuropathy.) Peripheral neuropathy: Peripheral neuropathy is when the nerve problem affects the nerves outside of the brain and spinal cord. These nerves are part of the peripheral nervous system. Accordingly, peripheral neuropathy is neuropathy that affects the nerves of the extremities- the toes, feet, legs, fingers, hands, and arms. The term proximal neuropathy has been used to refer to nerve damage that specifically causes pain in the shoulders, thighs, hips, or buttocks. Cranial neuropathy: Cranial neuropathy occurs when any of the twelve cranial nerves (nerves that exit from the brain directly) are damaged. Two specific types of cranial neuropathy are optic neuropathy and auditory neuropathy. Optic neuropathy refers to damage or disease of the optic nerve that transmits visual signals from the retina of the eye to the brain. Auditory neuropathy involves the nerve that carries signals from the inner ear to the brain and is responsible for hearing. Autonomic neuropathy: Autonomic neuropathy is damage to the nerves of the involuntary nervous system. These nerves that control the heart and circulation (including blood pressure), digestion, bowel and bladd Continue reading >>

Neuropathy Causes, Types & Complications | Everyday Health

Neuropathy Causes, Types & Complications | Everyday Health

Neuropathy affects about 8 percent of people over age 55. Your nervous system consists of two parts: the central nervous system and the peripheral nervous system. The nerves of your peripheral nervous system transmit messages between your central nervous system your brain and spinal cord and the rest of your body. These nerves regulate a large range of functions throughout the body, including voluntary muscle movement (motor nerves), involuntary organ activity (autonomic nerves), and the perception of stimuli (sensory nerves). Peripheral neuropathy, which is often simply referred to as "neuropathy," is a condition that occurs when your peripheral nerves become damaged or disrupted. It is estimated that neuropathy affects about 2.4 percent of the general population, and about 8 percent of people older than age 55. However, this estimate doesn't include people affected by a neuropathy resulting from physical trauma to the nerves. Neuropathy can affect any of the three types of peripheral nerves: Sensory nerves, which carry messages from your sensory organs (eyes, nose, etc.) to your brain Motor nerves, which monitor the conscious movement of your muscles Autonomic nerves, which regulate the involuntary functions of your body Sometimes, neuropathy will only affect a single nerve. This is called mononeuropathy and examples include: Occasionally, two or more isolated nerves in separate areas of the body become damaged, resulting in mononeuritis multiplex neuropathy. Most often, however, multiple peripheral nerves malfunction at the same time, a condition known as polyneuropathy . According to the National Institute for Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), there are more than 100 types of peripheral neuropathies. Neuropathies are either inherited at birth or acquired l Continue reading >>

Everything You Should Know About Diabetic Neuropathy

Everything You Should Know About Diabetic Neuropathy

What is diabetic neuropathy? Diabetic neuropathy is a serious and common complication of type 1 and type 2 diabetes. It’s a type of nerve damage caused by uncontrolled high blood sugar levels. You may not initially have any symptoms. The condition usually develops slowly, sometimes over the course of several decades. If you have diabetes and are experiencing numbness, tingling, pain, or weakness of your hands or feet, call your doctor. These are the early symptoms of peripheral neuropathy. In cases of severe or prolonged peripheral neuropathy, you may experience injuries or infections in your extremities. In some cases, these can lead to amputation. Damage to other nerves of the body can cause other symptoms. That’s why it’s important to regularly monitor your blood sugar levels and contact your doctor if have any symptoms of neuropathy. It’s common for symptoms of neuropathy to appear gradually. In many cases, the first type of nerve damage to occur involves the nerves of the feet. This can lead to symptoms such as the sensation of pins and needles in your feet. Symptoms vary depending on the nerves affected. Common signs and symptoms of diabetic neuropathy include: sensitivity to touch loss of sense of touch difficulty with coordination when walking numbness or pain in your extremities muscle weakness or wasting nausea and indigestion diarrhea or constipation dizziness upon standing excessive sweating vaginal dryness in women and erectile dysfunction in men Symptoms may vary depending on the type of neuropathy you’re experiencing. The term neuropathy is used to describe several types of nerve damage. In people with diabetes, there are four main types of neuropathy you may develop. Peripheral neuropathy The most common form of neuropathy is peripheral neuropa Continue reading >>

Diabetic Neuropathy: Practice Essentials, Background, Anatomy

Diabetic Neuropathy: Practice Essentials, Background, Anatomy

Author: Dianna Quan, MD; Chief Editor: Romesh Khardori, MD, PhD, FACP more... Diabetic neuropathy is the most common complication of diabetes mellitus (DM), affecting as many as 50% of patients with type 1 and type 2 DM. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy involves the presence of symptoms or signs of peripheral nerve dysfunction in people with diabetes after other possible causes have been excluded. [ 1 ] In type 1 DM, distal polyneuropathy typically becomes symptomatic after many years of chronic prolonged hyperglycemia, whereas in type 2, it may be apparent after only a few years of known poor glycemic control or even at diagnosis. Symptoms include the following: Sensory Negative or positive, diffuse or focal; usually insidious in onset and showing a stocking-and-glove distribution in the distal extremities Motor Distal, proximal, or more focal weakness, sometimes occurring along with sensory neuropathy (sensorimotor neuropathy) Autonomic Neuropathy that may involve the cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, and genitourinary systems and the sweat glands Physical examination should include the following assessments: Peripheral neuropathy testing Gross light touch and pinprick sensation; vibratory sense; deep tendon reflexes; strength testing and muscle atrophy; dorsal pedal and posterior tibial pulses; skin assessment; Tinel testing; cranial nerve testing Autonomic neuropathy testing Objective evaluation of cardiovagal, adrenergic, and sudomotor function in a specialized autonomic laboratory; may be preceded by bedside screening to assess supine and upright blood pressure and heart rate, with measurement of sinus arrhythmia ratio Two classification systems for diabetic neuropathy are the Thomas system and the symmetrical-versus-asymmetrical system. The Thomas system (modified Continue reading >>

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