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Foot Neuropathy: 10 Tips For Managing And Treating Pain And Numbness

Foot Neuropathy: 10 Tips For Managing And Treating Pain And Numbness

Over 10 years ago I began waking up in the middle of the night with searing pain in my feet. It was not every night and not always in the same place, but when it happened it hurt terribly. Almost like someone lit a match and put it out on the bottom of my foot. I was diagnosed with diabetic peripheral neuropathy. My doctor explained that it is a common complication in people with diabetes and that if I keep tight control of my blood glucose levels it may alleviate the pain. Keeping my blood glucose in control is a constant and never ending battle for me, especially when I did not want to pay much attention to my type 1 diabetes. Years have passed and the pain I used to feel has morphed into constant tingling and numbness. It hurts in an entirely different way now, like there are bugs in my shoes and on my feet all the time. Because of the numbness and fear of losing my feet, I have had to adopt some new habits. Here is a list of 10 tips I would give anyone who is living with peripheral neuropathy to help avoid any major issues. Staying one step ahead of my diabetic foot neuropathy 1. Check your feet every night. I am blessed to have a spouse that will inspect my feet each night when get ready for bed. If she can't do it then I grab my feet and look at them as best as I can. There are also some great mirrors made for checking your feet you can use. 2. See a podiatrist. As a person living with diabetes, I recommend seeing a podiatrist at the very least annually for an exam or whenever your doctor requests. I would also suggest going in whenever anything seems to have changed with your feet. If you cannot see a podiatrist then make sure your doctor always has a look at your feet at every appointment. 3. Watch your step. Pain is a warning sign that something is wrong. When Continue reading >>

What Is The Treatment For Diabetic Neuropathy?

What Is The Treatment For Diabetic Neuropathy?

home / diabetes center / diabetes a-z list / what is the treatment for diabetic neuropathy article What Is the Treatment for Diabetic Neuropathy? Medical Author: Ruchi Mathur, MD, FRCP(C) Ruchi Mathur, MD, FRCP(C) is an Attending Physician with the Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism and Associate Director of Clinical Research, Recruitment and Phenotyping with the Center for Androgen Related Disorders, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. Medical Editor: Melissa Conrad Stppler, MD Melissa Conrad Stppler, MD, is a U.S. board-certified Anatomic Pathologist with subspecialty training in the fields of Experimental and Molecular Pathology. Dr. Stppler's educational background includes a BA with Highest Distinction from the University of Virginia and an MD from the University of North Carolina. She completed residency training in Anatomic Pathology at Georgetown University followed by subspecialty fellowship training in molecular diagnostics and experimental pathology. I have diabetic neuropathy all over my body (legs, feet , skin is very sensitive to temperature and clothing). Anything touching my skin feels like sandpaper, and temperature changes cause me to have the shakes and severe pain . The pain medication I have been using isn't working. What are treatment options for a patient with diabetic neuropathy ? There are newer medications on the market that may be of benefit called duloxetine ( Cymbalta ) and Lyrica . You should speak with your doctor about the possibility of trying these agents either alone or in combination with other medication. I would also suggest having a referral to a neurologist for a full evaluation to make certain there is nothing else exacerbating your condition (for example, underlying never diso Continue reading >>

Assistive Devices | Mechanical Aids | The Foundation For Pn

Assistive Devices | Mechanical Aids | The Foundation For Pn

Use handrails and grab bars, if needed, for balance Thermometer to check the temperature of your shower or bath water Use gloves when doing housework. Be sure to check for any cuts, abrasions, burns or injury to your hands Use push button cleaner dispensers, installed at the right height for you Hand or foot braces can compensate for muscle weakness or alleviate nerve compression Cane make sure you are fitted properly so you do not compound the problem with balance Walker have the walker adjusted to the proper height so you are not leaning over too far Finding the ambulatory device that is right for you Many people struggling with peripheral neuropathy need some help getting around they have weakness or instability. Learn how you and your healthcare provider can determine the best mechanical aid for you. There are multiple types of assistive devices: canes, crutches, and walkers. This article will also help you learn how to make sure you get the best fit for you to keep you safe! For pictorial suggestions for devices that may be of help to you, please click here . Our Facebook community has provided some of their favorite products that they have found useful. Maybe something here will be useful for you, too! Continue reading >>

Diabetic Neuropathy Foot Care - Shoes, Products, Symptoms, Treatment

Diabetic Neuropathy Foot Care - Shoes, Products, Symptoms, Treatment

Foot deformities such as bunions , hammertoes or Charcot foot Diabetic Neuropathy - Prevention is the Best Treatment Prevention is the best treatment currently available for diabetic neuropathy. Although pain and discomfort can be controlled with medication and medical therapies, loss of nerve function cannot be reversed. Fortunately, once diabetic neuropathy has been detected, steps can be taken to prevent any further progression of the disorder. Maintaining normal blood sugar levels is the most important step to take when attempting to prevent or control diabetic neuropathy. Protecting your feet by wearing diabetic shoes and diabetic socks at all time and making healthy lifestyle choices such as not smoking, exercising regularly (gentle, low-impact exercise), eating a balanced diet and maintaining healthy blood pressure are also key factors in decreasing the risk of diabetic neuropathy development or advancement. At HealthyFeetStore.com, we carry a wide selection of the industry's leading brand-name diabetic shoes at affordable prices. The shoes in our inventory are specially designed to minimize discomfort and skin deterioration in diabetic feet. When worn in place of regular shoes, they can greatly mitigate the foot-related symptoms of diabetic neuropathy. Use the links provided above to browse our inventory diabetic shoes and find a pair that works for you. Continue reading >>

What Is Peripheral Neuropathy?

What Is Peripheral Neuropathy?

Peripheral neuropathy refers to a problem with the peripheral nerves. These nerves send messages from the central nervous system, the brain and the spinal cord to the rest of the body. The peripheral nerves tell the body when, for example, the hands are cold. It can lead to tingling, prickling, numbness, and muscle weakness in various parts of the body. Peripheral neuropathy can affect a range of different nerves, so it can impact a variety of locations in different ways. It can affect a single nerve, or several nerves at the same time. It is also associated with a number of different underlying medical conditions. Sometimes there is no identifiable cause. It affects some 20 million people in the United States (U.S.). Here are some key points about peripheral neuropathy. More detail is in the main article. Neuropathy is a common complication of a number of different medical conditions. It can involve the autonomic nerves, the motor nerves, and the sensory nerves. Sometimes it affects a single nerve or nerve set, for example, in Bell's Palsy, which affects a facial nerve. Physical trauma, repetitive injury, infection, metabolic problems, and exposure to toxins and some drugs are all possible causes. Treatment Treatment either targets the underlying cause, or it aims to provide symptomatic pain relief and prevent further damage. In the case of diabetic neuropathy, addressing high blood sugars can prevent further nerve damage. For toxic causes, removing the exposure to a suspected toxin, or stopping a drug, can halt further nerve damage. Medications can relieve pain and reduce burning, numbness, and tingling. Drug treatment for neuropathic pain Medications that may help include: Opioid painkillers come with warnings about safety risks. Doctors can also prescribe skin patch Continue reading >>

Metanx | Prescription Medical Food Product

Metanx | Prescription Medical Food Product

Share Your METANX Success Story and help others target at the source. Pain medications only mask pain. METANX capsules give your body the nutrients needed to improve blood flow and work naturally to help repair nerves. As a result of these nutrients, instead of just feeling better, your nerves damaged by diabetes can actually improve withMETANX. Because diabetic nerve damage takes years to develop, your body will need time to start feeling the benefits of METANX. It may take 2-3 months before you start feeling a difference. Signs of improvement may actually include pain or tingling sensations in areas of your body where you felt numbness before (most likely in your feet and/or hands). These sensations may indicate that METANX is addressing nutritional imbalances and improving the proper blood flow to facilitate nerve repair. Eventually, the pain and tingling may subside. Do not stop taking METANX without first talking to your doctor. The side effects of METANX are about the same as those of a placebo (a pill or liquid with no active medicine). In rare cases, METANX may cause mild stomach upset or rash. You may have experienced recent changes to your prescription coverage that may have increased your cost at your local pharmacy. If so, there is a program that can help you. The RxDirectPlus program guarantees that you will pay no more than $58/month*. Simply fill your prescription with our trusted mail order partner Brand Direct Health pharmacy. Brand Direct Health pharmacy will work with you to determine if your insurance company will cover your prescription to help lower your monthly cost. If your insurance company does not cover the cost of your prescription, Brand Direct Health pharmacy guarantees you will pay no more than $58/month*. This may be significantly less t Continue reading >>

The Rebuilder

The Rebuilder

,000 people all over the world have had success with the ReBuilder. "By the time most people reach this site they are feeling frustrated, discounted and a bit discouraged." I felt that way when I searched for a solution to my father's leg pain. It felt like we were getting "the bum's rush" when we visited the doctor. The visits were rushed and short, and all we were offered was the advice to "live with it. It's going to get worse over time. You'll likely wind up in a wheelchair." He even told him that his nerves were dead. He was prescribed expensive prescription pain meds that caused his thinking to become fuzzy and made his feet go numb. Sleeping was becoming a problem. He began to avoid planning social events because he could not predict his balance and gait. He stayed at home, losing more and more of his precious mobility every day." If this has been anywhere near your experience, then you have come to the right place. We can help you. Please read every thing on this site, and then if you have any questions please call us so we can help you. ReBuilder's built-in microprocessor measures several physiological functions of your nerves and automatically adjusts itself to your specific therapeutic needs beginning with the first healing signal. While sitting in your chair or in bed, this signal travels automatically from one foot, up the leg, across the nerve roots in the lower back, then down the other leg to the other foot . These signals produce a gentle buzzing feeling. These tingling impulses then reverse direction and go from one foot all the way back to the other. In this way, all the nerves from the lumbar area down to your feet are treated. When you first turn your ReBuilder on, it sets its output parameters for your physical mass by measuring the electrical ana Continue reading >>

Device Uses Nerve Stimulation To Ease Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy Pain

Device Uses Nerve Stimulation To Ease Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy Pain

Device Uses Nerve Stimulation to Ease Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy Pain About half of all those with diabetes suffer from diabetic peripheral neuropathy, a type of nerve damage that causes tingling, numbness and sometimes excruciating pain that can lead to serious problems. According to Dr. Shai Gonzani, President and CEO of the Boston-based pain device company NeuroMetrix, five to six million people in the United States suffer some form of diabetic peripheral neuropathy, and for those whose condition is accompanied by pain, it can be absolutely debilitating. Peripheral neuropathy is the most common complication of diabetes, said Dr. Gonzani in a recent radio interview. One of the long-term problems is that it severely damages a persons nerves, which causes many problems including the inability to feel the feet, severe pain or amputation, especially common risk when foot injuries go unnoticed because of numb feet. Sufferers can use treatments ranging from creams to prescription pain medications including opiates that carry the risk of addiction, but because pain is complex and personal, treatment can be complicated. Also, two different types of nerves are impacted by neuropathy Some nerves carry sensation, the ability to feel, and some nerves carry pain sensation, Gonzani said and both are affected differently by the condition. Because those treating diabetic peripheral neuropathy are working with two different types of nerves = when damaged one loses sensation, while the other triggers excruciating pain treatment is never one size fits all. For NeuroMetrix, a company founded as a spinoff from the Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology, and the challenge was to create a wearable medical device to help manage chronic pain. To do so, researchers took in Continue reading >>

Diabetic Neuropathies On The Rise

Diabetic Neuropathies On The Rise

Diabetic neuropathy is a type of nerve damage caused by diabetes. The most common symptoms are tingling, numbness, or pain in the hands, arms, feet, and legs. But there are other less common types of diabetic neuropathy, and a new study has found that two rare types of the condition are on the rise in the United States. These two types are small fiber neuropathy and autonomic neuropathy. Both occur when diabetes damages the small blood vessels that supply the nerves. When that happens, the nerves can begin to die for lack of oxygen and nutrients. In small fiber neuropathy, the damaged nerves are the ones that control sensations of pain and temperature. People who have it often feel pain in their feet a pain that eventually moves up their legs or develops in their hands. Autonomic neuropathy commonly affects involuntary body functions such as digestion, sexual function, urination, and sweat. It also affects blood pressure, which means that its most common symptom is lightheadedness, especially when standing up. According to Divpreet Kaur, MD, a neurologist at Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, The blood pressure drops so much when they stand up that they feel like they are going to pass out. The problem with these two neuropathies is that because they are uncommon, people dont know about them or arent able to recognize the symptoms. Dr. Kaur explains that not everyone with these symptoms necessarily has diabetic neuropathy, but anyone with diabetes or prediabetes who does experience them should tell his or her doctor. Once other causes have been ruled out, patients can be referred to the neuromuscular clinic for consultation or to the autonomic laboratory for further testing. Want to learn more about neuropathy? Read Coping With Painful Neuropathy, Diab Continue reading >>

Peripheral Neuropathy

Peripheral Neuropathy

What is peripheral neuropathy? Your peripheral nervous system connects the nerves from your brain and spinal cord, or central nervous system, to the rest of your body. This includes your: arms hands feet legs internal organs mouth face The job of these nerves is to deliver signals about physical sensations back to your brain. Peripheral neuropathy is a disorder that occurs when these nerves malfunction because they’re damaged or destroyed. This disrupts the nerves’ normal functioning. They might send signals of pain when there’s nothing causing pain, or they might not send a pain signal even if something is harming you. This can be due to: an injury systemic illness an infection an inherited disorder The disorder is uncomfortable, but treatments can be very helpful. The most important thing to determine is whether peripheral neuropathy is the result of a serious underlying condition. More than 100 different types of peripheral neuropathy exist. Each type has unique symptoms and specific treatment options. Peripheral neuropathies are further classified by the type of nerve damage involved. Mononeuropathy occurs when only one nerve is damaged. Polyneuropathies, which are more common, occur when multiple nerves are damaged. The three types of peripheral nerves are: sensory nerves, which connect to your skin motor nerves, which connect to your muscles autonomic nerves, which connect to your internal organs Peripheral neuropathy can affect one nerve group or all three. The symptoms of peripheral neuropathy include: tingling in the hands or feet a feeling like you’re wearing a tight glove or sock sharp, stabbing pains a weak, heavy feeling in the arms and legs, which sometimes may feel like your legs or arms lock in place regularly dropping things from your hands a bu Continue reading >>

Peripheral Neuropathy Fact Sheet

Peripheral Neuropathy Fact Sheet

What is peripheral neuropathy? How are the peripheral neuropathies classified? What are the symptoms of peripheral nerve damage? What causes peripheral neuropathy? How is peripheral neuropathy diagnosed? What treatments are available? What research is being done? Where can I get more information? What is peripheral neuropathy? An estimated 20 million people in the United States have some form of peripheral neuropathy, a condition that develops as a result of damage to the peripheral nervous system — the vast communications network that transmits information between the central nervous system (the brain and spinal cord) and every other part of the body. (Neuropathy means nerve disease or damage.) Symptoms can range from numbness or tingling, to pricking sensations (paresthesia), or muscle weakness. Areas of the body may become abnormally sensitive leading to an exaggeratedly intense or distorted experience of touch (allodynia). In such cases, pain may occur in response to a stimulus that does not normally provoke pain. Severe symptoms may include burning pain (especially at night), muscle wasting, paralysis, or organ or gland dysfunction. Damage to nerves that supply internal organs may impair digestion, sweating, sexual function, and urination. In the most extreme cases, breathing may become difficult, or organ failure may occur. Peripheral nerves send sensory information back to the brain and spinal cord, such as a message that the feet are cold. Peripheral nerves also carry signals from the brain and spinal cord to the muscles to generate movement. Damage to the peripheral nervous system interferes with these vital connections. Like static on a telephone line, peripheral neuropathy distorts and sometimes interrupts messages between the brain and spinal cord and the Continue reading >>

What Is Diabetic Neuropathy?

What Is Diabetic Neuropathy?

Diabetic neuropathy refers to the damage that affects the nerves of the body in people who have diabetes. It is a progressive disease, and symptoms worsen over a number of years. People who do not control their blood sugar levels and those who have high blood pressure, high blood cholesterol, or who are overweight are more susceptible. Neuropathy can affect any nerve in the body, but especially the nerves of the ganglia, the outside of the skull, the spinal cord, and those that impact the functioning of fundamental organs, such as the heart, bladder, intestines, and stomach. Problems can occur in the nerves that control the periphery, or outside, of the body, such as the feet and hands, those that control the automatic functions of the body, such as heart rate and digestion, or just one or a small group of nerves. Different nerves are affected in different ways. Around 60 percent to 70 percent of people with diabetes develop diabetic neuropathy, but symptoms may take 10 to 20 years to appear. The highest rates of neuropathy are found in patients who have been diagnosed with diabetes for 25 years or more. Types of diabetic neuropathy There are four main types of neuropathy, and they are: Peripheral neuropathy, which affects the feet and hands, is the most common form of diabetic neuropathy Autonomic neuropathy, affecting the nerves that control the involuntary functions of the body, like digestion Proximal neuropathy, which affects the legs Focal neuropathy, in which damage can occur in any nerve or any group of nerves. The symptoms of neuropathy depend on the nerves affected. A range of problems is associated with diabetic neuropathy. These include cardiovascular issues, intestinal problems such as constant diarrhea, nausea, and vomiting, weakness, muscle pain, and para Continue reading >>

Managing Neuropathy With Diabetes

Managing Neuropathy With Diabetes

Everyday Solutions are created by Everyday Health on behalf of our partners. More Information Content in this special section was created or selected by the Everyday Health editorial team and is funded by an advertising sponsor. The content is subject to Everyday Healths editorial standards for accuracy, objectivity, and balance. The sponsor does not edit or influence the content but may suggest the general topic area. Nerve damage from diabetes is a common complication. Find out what causes it and what you need to know about preventing or managing neuropathy. Nerve damage (neuropathy) is among the most common potential complications of type 2 diabetes . Diabetic neuropathy refers to nerve damage caused by diabetes, and it can impact quality of life and put you at greater risk of other dangerous diabetes complications. Thats why its important to know the symptoms and understand what preventing or managing neuropathy entails. The risk of neuropathy with diabetes increases with age, poor blood sugar control, and the number of years youve been living with diabetes. Five to 10 percent of people with diabetes have neuropathy at the time of their diagnosis, and about 50 percent will develop neuropathy within 10 to 20 years, says Ronald Kanner, MD, professor and chair of neurology at Hofstra North Shore-LIJ School of Medicine in New York City. The highest risk for neuropathy with diabetes is in people whove had diabetes for at least 25 years. Other risk factors that contribute to diabetic neuropathy include high cholesterol and obesity. Neuropathy with diabetes can occur anywhere in the body where there are nerves, but the first symptoms usually come from the long nerves that go out to your feet and hands. This is called peripheral neuropathy. The cause of diabetic neuropathy Continue reading >>

Blood Flow Patterns In Painful Diabetic Neuropathy.

Blood Flow Patterns In Painful Diabetic Neuropathy.

Blood flow patterns in painful diabetic neuropathy. Peripheral blood flow is known to be qualitatively increased in diabetic patients with neuropathy. We have measured the actual blood flow in the feet of diabetic patients with neuropathy using non-invasive mercury strain gauge plethysmography and Doppler sonogram techniques and shown that it is increased on average five times above normal at an ambient temperature of 20 degrees-22 degrees C. Moreover, reduction of this high flow by sympathetic arousal stimuli proved possible in those with severe painful neuropathy contrasting strongly with failure to reverse it in those with severe non-painful sensory neuropathy. Reduction of blood flow was associated with reduction in neuropathic pain. We studied 22 diabetic patients with severe sensory neuropathy and eight with painful neuropathy. High resting foot blood flows were demonstrated in both groups with neuropathy. The big toe flow in those with severe sensory neuropathy was 29.3 +/- 9.2 ml X min-1. 100 ml-1 (mean +/- SD) and in the painful neuropathy group, 25.9 +/- 7.5, compared with 5.2 +/- 2.4 ml X min-1 X 100 ml-1 in the non-diabetic control subjects (p less than 0.001). High foot skin temperatures were also recorded in the groups with neuropathy, reflecting the high blood flow. The subjects with painful neuropathy retained the ability to constrict peripheral blood vessels in response to arousal stimuli, and reduce peripheral flow on average by 32% compared with the patients with sensory neuropathy who responded on average by only 10%. The demonstration of a peripheral sympathetic defect, responsible for the high blood flow and the potential reversal of such flow in painful neuropathy may be important in our further understanding of the aetiology of such pain and its Continue reading >>

Diabetic Neuropathy

Diabetic Neuropathy

Print Overview Diabetic neuropathy is a type of nerve damage that can occur if you have diabetes. High blood sugar (glucose) can injure nerve fibers throughout your body, but diabetic neuropathy most often damages nerves in your legs and feet. Depending on the affected nerves, symptoms of diabetic neuropathy can range from pain and numbness in your extremities to problems with your digestive system, urinary tract, blood vessels and heart. For some people, these symptoms are mild; for others, diabetic neuropathy can be painful, disabling and even fatal. Diabetic neuropathy is a common serious complication of diabetes. Yet you can often prevent diabetic neuropathy or slow its progress with tight blood sugar control and a healthy lifestyle. Symptoms There are four main types of diabetic neuropathy. You may have just one type or symptoms of several types. Most develop gradually, and you may not notice problems until considerable damage has occurred. The signs and symptoms of diabetic neuropathy vary, depending on the type of neuropathy and which nerves are affected. Peripheral neuropathy Peripheral neuropathy is the most common form of diabetic neuropathy. Your feet and legs are often affected first, followed by your hands and arms. Signs and symptoms of peripheral neuropathy are often worse at night, and may include: Numbness or reduced ability to feel pain or temperature changes A tingling or burning sensation Sharp pains or cramps Increased sensitivity to touch — for some people, even the weight of a bed sheet can be agonizing Muscle weakness Loss of reflexes, especially in the ankle Loss of balance and coordination Serious foot problems, such as ulcers, infections, deformities, and bone and joint pain Autonomic neuropathy The autonomic nervous system controls your hea Continue reading >>

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