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Diabetic Neuropathy Pictures

Non-diabetic Neuropathy Symptoms

Non-diabetic Neuropathy Symptoms

Neuropathy, also known as peripheral neuropathy, is a condition that causes numbness, pain, tingling and weakness, usually in the hands and feet. It may occur episodically or progress gradually over years. According to the Neuropathy Association (NA), 30 percent of cases evolve from diabetes, 30 percent from unknown causes and 40 percent from infections, autoimmune disorders, genetic factors, nutrient imbalances, tumors or toxins. Symptoms of neuropathy vary depending on type of neuropathy and which nerves are affected. Video of the Day Neuropathy causes damage to fibers that affect physical sensation, which causes nerve pain, tingling and numbness. Sensory damage may reduce a person's ability to determine the position of his joints and suffer from poor coordination. According to the University of Maryland Medical Center (UMMC), sensation symptoms frequently start within the feet and gradually progress toward the body's center as neuropathy worsens. Though sensory symptoms are common among diabetes-related neuropathy, it affects other forms as well. When neuropathy causes damage to fibers that affect a person's muscles, it can lead to physical weakness, loss of dexterity and reduced muscle mass. Muscle cramping or twitching, trouble swallowing or breathing, paralysis of affected body parts and reduced muscle control may also occur. According to the UMMC, these symptoms often lead to tripping, resultant injuries and difficulty executing tasks that require dexterity, such as buttoning a shirt, writing and opening jars and doors. Reduced nerve function in the hands may cause people to drop objects frequently. When leg muscles are weakened, people may struggle to run or walk or observe a sense of "heaviness" in the legs. Normally simple tasks such as climbing stairs may bec Continue reading >>

A New Method Of Analysis Of Standing Foot Pressure Images For Detection Of The Plantar Ulcers In Early-stage Diabetic Neuropathy.

A New Method Of Analysis Of Standing Foot Pressure Images For Detection Of The Plantar Ulcers In Early-stage Diabetic Neuropathy.

Abstract In this paper, studies are performed on a large number of diabetic patients belonging to different levels of plantar sensation loss, by analyzing the standing foot pressure images in the frequency domain. A new parameter, the power ratio (PR, the ratio of high frequency power to the total power in an image), is used to distinguish between foot pressure image patterns of diabetic neuropathic subjects (at different levels of sensation loss) and those of normal feet. The foot areas of the diabetic subjects are scanned in 10 specified areas using Semmes Weinstein's nylon monofilaments to quantify the diabetic neuropathy. A statistical study of the mean values of this parameter in different plantar areas of the feet for different levels of diabetic neuropathy indicates distinguishing trends. The result could help in the early detection of low-level sensation loss by establishing the threshold of the PR in a particular area above which there could be the possibility of plantar ulcer formation. This information could be utilized by orthopedic surgeons to devise early corrective methods to protect the feet from further damage due to plantar ulcers. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Proximal Neuropathy: Getting At The Root Of The Problemnew Insights Into Diagnosis And Treatment

Diabetic Proximal Neuropathy: Getting At The Root Of The Problemnew Insights Into Diagnosis And Treatment

Diabetic proximal neuropathy is among the most unusual and disabling forms of peripheral neuropathy, causing major suffering among affected individuals. Alternately referred to as lumbosacral radiculoplexus neuropathy, femoral neuropathy, diabetic neuropathic cachexia, or diabetic amyotrophy, the condition is characterized by severe, typically asymmetric leg pain and weakness, predominantly proximal to the muscles around the hip and knee. Although monophasic, diabetic proximal neuropathy is associated with prolonged morbidity due to relentless pain and focal weakness, according to Anthony J. Windebank, MD, Professor of Neurology at the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine in Rochester, MN. “Because patients usually improve with time, physicians may underappreciate their pain and suffering. At the peak of their illness, patients are typically confined to a wheelchair and even if mobile, unable to work. Even after recovery, most are left with residual weakness.” Complicating the situation, experts told Neurology Today, is that the symptoms often mimic those of other, more common illnesses, which can result in misdiagnosis and unnecessary, inappropriate treatments. Despite numerous studies, the underlying pathogenesis of diabetic proximal neuropathy is still not clearly understood. But research done in the last few years is providing new insights into its natural history, diagnosis, and treatment. AN ABRUPT ONSET Diabetic proximal neuropathy often begins so abruptly that patients can recall the exact day the symptoms began, Dr. Windebank said. “The disease develops acutely, reaches a plateau, and gradually improves over time.” The initial pain can be sharp or lancinating, or deep or burning, said P. James B. Dyck, MD, Consultant of Neurology and Co-Director of the Perip Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Peripheral Neuropathy: To Walk Or Not To Walk?

Type 2 Diabetes And Peripheral Neuropathy: To Walk Or Not To Walk?

It is now well known that engaging in light to moderate physical activity on a regular basis is of significant value for most people that have either Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes. In fact the American Diabetes Association recommends that people with diabetes should get a minimum of 150 minutes of light to moderate exercise per week including aerobic and resistance training. What the ADA says... It has also been recommended that people with peripheral diabetic neuropathy that have reduced or absent feeling in their feet should not engage in any form of weight bearing exercise activity. The American Diabetes Association recommends that people with diabetes-related peripheral neuropathy should limit the amount of weight-bearing physical activity they perform due to their increased risk of foot ulcers and amputation (1, 2). This is based on the fact that with peripheral neuropathy there is either a decreased ability or total inability in the feet to feel pain or discomfort. As an example, standing barefoot on hot asphalt maybe in a parking lot in the middle of the summer would be very uncomfortable for someone with normal sensation in their feet, however go unnoticed for someone with peripheral neuropathy. Similarly, the person with peripheral neuropathy may develop a painful nickel-sized blister after walking too far or when wearing new shoes and not even feel it. Without daily inspection of the ankles and feet (which a lot of people do not do) this blister could go unnoticed for days resulting in a potentially infected, slow to heal, or non-healing wound. In the worst case this could lead to an amputation. All of this is the result of losing what is called the protective sensation in the feet. In the absence of peripheral neuropathy whenever there is insult to the foot or fe Continue reading >>

What Is Neuropathy Treatment?

What Is Neuropathy Treatment?

A A A Neuropathy (cont.) All exams and tests performed depend on the clinical presentation of the symptoms of the patient with suspected neuropathy. The diagnosis of neuropathy and its cause involve a thorough medical history and physical examination to help your health care professional determine the cause and severity of neuropathy. A neurological examination, testing the reflexes and function of sensory and motor nerves, is an important component of the initial examination. Although there are no blood tests that are specific for determining whether of not neuropathy is present, when neuropathy is suspected, blood tests are often used to check for the presence of diseases and conditions (for example, diabetes or vitamin deficiencies) that may be responsible for nerve damage. Imaging studies such as X-rays, CT scans, and MRI scans may be performed to look for sources of pressure on or damage to nerves. Specific tests of nerve function include: Electromyography (EMG) is a test that measures the function of the nerves. For this test a very thin needle is inserted through the skin into the muscle. The needle contains an electrode that measures the electrical activity of the muscle. A nerve conduction velocity test (NCV) measures the speed at which signals travel through the nerves. This test is often done with the EMG. In the NCV test, patches containing surface electrodes are placed on the skin over nerves at various locations. Each patch gives off a very mild electrical impulse, which stimulates the nerve. The electrical activity of the nerves is measured and the speed of the electrical impulses between electrodes (reflecting the speed of the nerve signals) is calculated. In some cases, a nerve biopsy may be recommended. A biopsy is the surgical removal of a small piece Continue reading >>

The Shocking Images That Reveal What Diabetes Can Do To Your Feet In Just 10 Days

The Shocking Images That Reveal What Diabetes Can Do To Your Feet In Just 10 Days

50-year-old man developed lesions on his feet after new shoes rubbed The small lesions quickly escalated into a full-blown infection - within days his right foot was black, weeping pus and in urgent need of surgery Every 30 seconds, a diabetic person in the world has a lower limb amputated This means patients don't feel blisters and are more likely to get infections These gruesome pictures show the horrific damage diabetes can do to the body in just a matter of days. They were taken by a 50-year-old man who had developed lesions on his feet after his new shoes rubbed. The man, who was obese, had no idea he was suffering from diabetes, doctors said. The small lesions quickly escalated into a full-blown infection - within days his right foot was black, weeping pus and in urgent need of surgery. His story, reported in the New England Journal of Medicine, highlights the devastating impact diabetes can have on all parts of the body - especially the feet. Every 30 seconds, someone in the world with the condition has a lower limb amputated, according to the charity Diabetes UK. People with diabetes are more likely to be admitted to hospital with a foot ulcer than with any other complication. This is because the condition can lead to poor circulation and reduced feeling in the feet - meaning patients such as this man don't feel when their feet are sore or being rubbed by something, This means they might develop a blister or minor burn without realising it, increasing the likelihood of a wound developing and then becoming infected. Poor circulation also means that wounds don't heal as well - and are more likely to become infected. Reporting on the case, the doctors, from the University Hospitals of Geneva, Switzerland, said the patient arrived at hospital 10 days after the infec Continue reading >>

Patient Education: Diabetic Neuropathy (beyond The Basics)

Patient Education: Diabetic Neuropathy (beyond The Basics)

DIABETIC NEUROPATHY OVERVIEW Neuropathy is the medical term for nerve damage. Neuropathy is a common complication of type 1 and type 2 diabetes; up to 26 percent of people with type 2 diabetes have evidence of nerve damage at the time that diabetes is diagnosed [1]. A generalized type of neuropathy, known as polyneuropathy, is the most common type of diabetic neuropathy. Other types of neuropathy can also affect people with diabetes, but will not be discussed here. Signs and symptoms of diabetic neuropathy include loss of sensation and/or burning pain in the feet. Early detection of diabetes and tight control of blood sugar levels may reduce the risk of developing diabetic neuropathy. Treatments for diabetic neuropathy are available, and include several elements: control of blood glucose levels, prevention of injury, and control of painful symptoms. DIABETIC NEUROPATHY RISK FACTORS In people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes, the biggest risk factor for developing diabetic neuropathy is having high blood sugar levels over time. Other factors can further increase the risk of developing diabetic neuropathy, including: Coronary artery disease Increased triglyceride levels Smoking High blood pressure DIABETIC NEUROPATHY SYMPTOMS The most common symptoms of diabetic neuropathy include pain, burning, tingling, or numbness in the toes or feet, and extreme sensitivity to light touch. The pain may be worst at rest and improve with activity, such as walking. Some people initially have intensely painful feet while others have few or no symptoms. Diabetic neuropathy usually affects both sides of the body. Symptoms are usually noticed first in the toes. If the disease progresses, symptoms may gradually move up the legs; if the mid-calves are affected, symptoms may develop in the hands. Continue reading >>

How To Treat Neuropathy In Feet

How To Treat Neuropathy In Feet

Expert Reviewed Neuropathy is a disease affecting the peripheral nervous system (PNS). Your PNS controls body movements, sensations, and automatic functions like blood pressure and sweating. If your nerves are damaged, a variety of symptoms may appear depending on the type of nerves that are damaged. Neuropathy in feet affects 2.4% of the population and 8% of people over age 55 experience the disease.[1] Diabetes is a leading cause, but neuropathy can be inherited or caused by infections, other diseases, and trauma. For this reason, it's important to work with your doctor to manage treatment. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetic retinopathy is damage to the retina at the back of the eye from long-term high blood sugar levels in people with diabetes. Left untreated, diabetic retinopathy can affect a person's vision and can lead to blindness. Everyone with diabetes should attend annual NHS eye screening to check for signs of damage to the retina. This is done using a special camera to take pictures of the back of the eye. The retina and diabetes Too much blood sugar can damage the blood vessels in the back of the eye, preventing the retina from receiving the appropriate amount of nutrients it needs to maintain vision. The retina is light-sensitive nerve tissue at the back of the eye. As light enters the front of the eye, the retina converts the light rays into electrical impulses that travel along the optic nerve to part of the brain called the visual cortex. The brain then combines images sent from both eyes to interpret them as a single, three-dimensional image. This allows us to perceive depth and distance. Without the retina, the eye cannot communicate with the brain, making vision impossible. Diabetic retinopathy occurs when diabetes damages the tiny blood vessels in the retina. In the early stages of diabetic retinopathy, called non-proliferative retinopathy, these blood vessels leak fluid and distort sight. In the more advanced stage of diabetic retinopathy, called proliferative retinopathy, fragile new blood vessels grow around the retina and in the vitreous humour - a clear substance that fills the eye. If left untreated, these blood vessels may bleed, clouding vision or detaching the retina. Anyone with diabetes - either type 1 or type 2 diabetes - is at risk of developing diabetic retinopathy. However, the type of diabetes a person has, how often their blood sugar fluctuates, Continue reading >>

Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetic Retinopathy

On this page: Diabetes and diabetic retinopathy • DR symptoms • Types of diabetic eye disease • Who gets diabetic retinopathy? • Minorities and diabetic eye disease • When is DR a disability? • Eye exam assistance program • Prevention • Diabetic retinopathy videos Diabetic retinopathy — vision-threatening damage to the retina of the eye caused by diabetes — is the leading cause of blindness among working-age Americans. The good news: Diabetic retinopathy often can be prevented with early detection, proper management of your diabetes and routine eye exams performed by your optometrist or ophthalmologist. According to the International Diabetes Federation (IDF), the United States has the highest rate of diabetes among 38 developed nations, with approximately 30 million Americans — roughly 11 percent of the U.S. population between the ages of 20 and 79 — having the disease. About 90 percent of Americans with diabetes have type 2 diabetes, which develops when the the body fails to produce enough insulin — a hormone secreted by the pancreas that enables dietary sugar to enter the cells of the body — or the body becomes resistant to insulin. This causes glucose (sugar) levels in the bloodstream to rise and can eventually damage the eyes, kidneys, nerves or heart, according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA). Risk factors for type 2 diabetes include obesity, an unhealthful diet and physical inactivity. Unfortunately, the prevalence of obesity and type 2 diabetes has increased significantly in the United States over the past 30 years. According to data released by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in December 2015, there were 1.4 million new cases of diabetes reported in the U.S. in 2014. Though this annual number is d Continue reading >>

Diabetic Leg Pain And Peripheral Arterial Disease

Diabetic Leg Pain And Peripheral Arterial Disease

Cramping, pain, or tiredness in the legs when walking or climbing stairs — these may not sound like symptoms of a serious condition. In fact, many people believe that they are normal signs of aging. But they can be signs of peripheral arterial disease, a severe condition that can lead to gangrene and amputation if left untreated. So if you have these symptoms, be sure to tell your doctor. Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a condition in which arteries leading to the legs and feet (or in some cases the arms) become clogged with fatty deposits called plaque, resulting in reduced or blocked blood flow to these areas. It affects between 8 million and 12 million Americans, and people with diabetes are more likely to develop PAD than the general population. PAD is also known as peripheral vascular disease (PVD), leg atherosclerosis, or simply poor circulation. PAD and diabetes Anyone can develop PAD, but people with diabetes, especially those with Type 2 diabetes, have a higher risk of developing it because of a series of bodily changes associated with diabetes, including insulin resistance, a higher level of blood fats, and an increase in blood pressure. All of these contribute to arteries becoming clogged with fatty deposits, leading to the hardening and narrowing of these blood vessels. Having diabetes also increases the risk of developing neuropathy, or nerve damage, as a result of high blood glucose. Neuropathy can cause decreased sensation in the feet and legs, which can cause a person not to notice small injuries to the foot, such as blisters or cuts. If a person continues to walk on an injury, it is likely to enlarge and get infected. The combination of PAD and neuropathy is particularly dangerous because when blood flow to the feet is reduced, the body has a har Continue reading >>

Diabetic Neuropathy Clinical Presentation

Diabetic Neuropathy Clinical Presentation

History In type 1 diabetes mellitus, distal polyneuropathy typically becomes symptomatic after many years of chronic prolonged hyperglycemia. Conversely, patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus may present with distal polyneuropathy after only a few years of known poor glycemic control; sometimes, these patients already have neuropathy at the time of diagnosis. Since diabetic neuropathy can manifest as a wide variety of sensory, motor, and autonomic symptoms, a structured list of symptoms can be used to help screen all diabetic patients for possible neuropathy. Sensory symptoms Sensory neuropathy usually is insidious in onset and shows a stocking-and-glove distribution in the distal extremities. Sensory symptoms may be negative or positive, diffuse or focal. Negative sensory symptoms include feelings of numbness or deadness, which patients may describe as being akin to wearing gloves or socks. Loss of balance, especially with the eyes closed, and painless injuries due to loss of sensation are common. Positive symptoms may be described as burning, prickling pain, tingling, electric shock–like feelings, aching, tightness, or hypersensitivity to touch. Motor symptoms Motor problems may include distal, proximal, or more focal weakness. In the upper extremities, distal motor symptoms may include impaired fine hand coordination and difficulty with tasks such as opening jars or turning keys. Foot slapping and toe scuffing or frequent tripping may be early symptoms of foot weakness. Symptoms of proximal limb weakness include difficulty climbing up and down stairs, difficulty getting up from a seated or supine position, falls due to the knees giving way, and difficulty raising the arms above the shoulders. In the most common presentation of diabetic neuropathy with symmetrical Continue reading >>

How Can Diabetes Affect My Feet?

How Can Diabetes Affect My Feet?

Chronically high blood sugar (glucose) levels can be associated with serious complications in people who have diabetes. The feet are especially at risk. Two conditions called diabetic neuropathy and peripheral vascular disease can damage the feet (and other areas of the body) in people who have diabetes. What is diabetic neuropathy? Chronically high sugar levels associated with uncontrolled diabetes can cause nerve damage that interferes with the ability to sense pain and temperature. This so-called "sensory diabetic neuropathy" increases the risk a person with diabetes will not notice problems with his or her feet. Nearly 10% of people with diabetes develop foot ulcers due to peripheral vascular disease and nerve damage. People with diabetes may not notice sores or cuts on the feet, which in turn can lead to an infection. Nerve damage can also affect the function of foot muscles, leading to improper alignment and injury. What is peripheral vascular disease? Diabetes is associated with poor circulation (blood flow). Inadequate blood flow increases the healing time for cuts and sores. Peripheral vascular disease refers to compromised blood flow in the arms and legs. Poor blood flow increases the risk that infections will not heal. This, in turn, increases the risk of ulcers and gangrene, which is tissue death that occurs in a localized area when there is an inadequate blood supply. What are common foot problems of people with diabetes? The following images show common foot problems that anyone can get; however, those with diabetes are at increased risk for serious complications associated with these conditions, including infection and even amputation. Athlete's foot Fungal infection of the feet is called athlete's foot. Cracked skin, itching, and redness are associated w Continue reading >>

Diabetic Neuropathydiabetic Neuropathy Symptoms, Causes, Diagnosis, And Treatment

Diabetic Neuropathydiabetic Neuropathy Symptoms, Causes, Diagnosis, And Treatment

Diabetic neuropathy definition and facts Diabetes is thought to damage nerves as a result of prolonged elevated levels of blood glucose. Peripheral neuropathy most commonly causes: Autonomic neuropathy causes symptoms related to dysfunction of an organ system, such as: Diagnosis of diabetic neuropathy is usually done by a clinical exam. There is no cure for diabetic neuropathy, but treatments are available to manage the symptoms. Diabetic nerve pain may be controlled by medications such as tricyclic antidepressants, duloxetine (Cymbalta), or certain antiseizure medications. Keeping tight control of blood sugar levels is the best way to prevent diabetic neuropathy and other complications of diabetes. Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy: Improve Diabetes Nerve Pain What are the symptoms and signs of diabetic neuropathy? The symptoms and signs of diabetic neuropathy depend upon the type of neuropathy that is present. Signs and symptoms can also vary in severity among affected people. Signs and symptoms of diabetic peripheral neuropathy include: Numbness or tingling of the feet and lower legs Pain or burning sensations Loss of sensation in the feet or lower legs Sometimes, but less commonly, these symptoms can occur in the hands or arms Signs and symptoms of diabetic proximal neuropathy include: Pain, usually on one side, in the hips, buttocks, or thighs Signs and symptoms of diabetic autonomic neuropathy depend upon the organ system that is involved and can include: Feeling full after eating a small amount Inability to empty the bladder completely Decrease in vaginal lubrication in women Rapid resting heartbeat Signs and symptoms of diabetic focal neuropathy also depend upon the location of the affected nerve. The symptoms can appear suddenly. It usually does not cause a long t Continue reading >>

Www.lifescript.com/health/centers/diabetes_2/articles/are_you_using_your_diabetes_medications_safely

Www.lifescript.com/health/centers/diabetes_2/articles/are_you_using_your_diabetes_medications_safely

or Thiazolidinediones) Who can use them: People with type 2 diabetes or metabolic ... or thiazolidinediones are the most notorious of all the diabetic drugs on the ... confusion, depression, neuropathy, muscle cramps, memory loss, depression, mouth sores, diarrhea, constipation ... Continue reading >>

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