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Diabetic Neuropathy Of The Hands

Diabetes And Your Hands

Diabetes And Your Hands

Did you know that diabetes can hurt, stiffen, and even disable your shoulders, wrists, fingers, and other joints? None of these conditions is well understood. So how can you prevent them and deal with them? Of course, people without diabetes can have joint issues, but having diabetes raises your risk. All of these conditions seem to be related to thickening or stiffening of connective tissues — the ligaments and tendons that hold our bodies together. These tissues are mostly made of collagen, a protein that should have some give and flow to it, like a soft rubber ball. When collagen stiffens, joints start to hurt and don’t work as well. Here are four of the more well known diabetes-related joint conditions: Frozen shoulder, also known as adhesive capsulitis, is a condition in which the range of motion of the shoulder joint is severely restricted. According to the American Diabetes Association, it affects 20% of people with diabetes and 5% of the general population. It usually starts with shoulder pain and inflammation and can progress to stiffness and near-complete immobility. Then it starts to resolve, and is usually gone within two years, especially with treatment. Diabetic stiff hand syndrome is a painless disorder caused by an increase in collagen in and just below the skin. It can sharply limit hand function. Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a painful condition caused by pressure on the median nerve, which passes into the hand through a narrow “tunnel.” If this tunnel is squeezed by thickening of ligaments or other structures, severe pain can result. CTS is often associated with typing or other repetitive work that keep wrists in unnatural positions. Trigger finger is a condition where one or more fingers curl up and are difficult to straighten. The tendons Continue reading >>

Diabetic Neuropathy

Diabetic Neuropathy

Print Overview Diabetic neuropathy is a type of nerve damage that can occur if you have diabetes. High blood sugar (glucose) can injure nerve fibers throughout your body, but diabetic neuropathy most often damages nerves in your legs and feet. Depending on the affected nerves, symptoms of diabetic neuropathy can range from pain and numbness in your extremities to problems with your digestive system, urinary tract, blood vessels and heart. For some people, these symptoms are mild; for others, diabetic neuropathy can be painful, disabling and even fatal. Diabetic neuropathy is a common serious complication of diabetes. Yet you can often prevent diabetic neuropathy or slow its progress with tight blood sugar control and a healthy lifestyle. Symptoms There are four main types of diabetic neuropathy. You may have just one type or symptoms of several types. Most develop gradually, and you may not notice problems until considerable damage has occurred. The signs and symptoms of diabetic neuropathy vary, depending on the type of neuropathy and which nerves are affected. Peripheral neuropathy Peripheral neuropathy is the most common form of diabetic neuropathy. Your feet and legs are often affected first, followed by your hands and arms. Signs and symptoms of peripheral neuropathy are often worse at night, and may include: Numbness or reduced ability to feel pain or temperature changes A tingling or burning sensation Sharp pains or cramps Increased sensitivity to touch — for some people, even the weight of a bed sheet can be agonizing Muscle weakness Loss of reflexes, especially in the ankle Loss of balance and coordination Serious foot problems, such as ulcers, infections, deformities, and bone and joint pain Autonomic neuropathy The autonomic nervous system controls your hea Continue reading >>

Diabetic Neuropathy Symptoms

Diabetic Neuropathy Symptoms

The symptoms of diabetic neuropathy depend on what type of neuropathy you have. Symptoms are dependent on which nerves have been damaged. In general, diabetic neuropathy symptoms develop gradually; they may seem like minor and infrequent pains or problems at first, but as the nerves become more damaged, symptoms may grow. Don’t overlook mild symptoms. They can indicate the beginning of neuropathy. Talk to your doctor about anything you notice—such as any pain, numbness, weakness, or tingling—even if it seems insignificant. Your pain may mean the control of your diabetes could be improved, which will can help slow down the progression of your neuropathy. Pain and numbness are also important warning signs to take very good care of your feet, so you can avoid wounds and infections that can be difficult to heal and even raise risk for amputation. 1 Peripheral Neuropathy Symptoms Peripheral neuropathy affects nerves leading to your extremities—the feet, legs, hands, and arms. The nerves leading to your feet are the longest in your body, so they are the most often affected nerves (simply because there’s more of them to be damaged). Peripheral neuropathy is the most common form of diabetic neuropathy. Peripheral neuropathy symptoms include: Pain Burning, stabbing or electric-shock sensations Numbness (loss of feeling) Tingling Muscle weakness Poor coordination Muscle cramping and/or twitching Insensitivity to pain and/or temperature Extreme sensitivity to even the lightest touch Symptoms get worse at night. 2, 3 Autonomic Neuropathy Symptoms The autonomic nervous system is in charge of the "involuntary" functions of your body. It keeps your heart pumping and makes sure you digest your food right—without you needing to think about it. Autonomic neuropathy symptoms i Continue reading >>

Can Diabetic Neuropathy Be Reversed?

Can Diabetic Neuropathy Be Reversed?

Diabetic neuropathy refers to nerve damage caused by diabetes. Neuropathy is a common condition impacting 60 to 70 percent of adults with diabetes. However, it mainly concerns those with uncontrolled blood sugar levels or those who have had diabetes for more than 25 years. The nerve damage caused by diabetic neuropathy is irreversible but there are ways to lessen symptoms and prevent further harm. Contents of this article: What is diabetic neuropathy? Diabetic neuropathy is a family of progressive nerve disorders related to type 1 and 2 diabetes. Although research is still taking place on this type of nerve damage, doctors think that blood sugars may damage nerve cells by impairing nerve fibers and reducing or confusing signaling. However, nerve damage is likely to be caused by a combination of factors, such as how the immune system functions, genetics, smoking, or alcohol use. Neuropathy can cause a range of symptoms, including pain, loss of sensation, numbness, tingling, and muscle weakness. Although neuropathy can occur wherever there are nerves, it tends to affect the legs and feet. Those with diabetic neuropathy tend to: have poor blood sugar control be over the age of 40 be overweight or obese have had diabetes for at least 10 to 25 years, depending on the severity Types Diabetic neuropathy is typically divided into four categories depending on which nerves are affected. Peripheral neuropathy Nerve damage that impacts the ability of the peripheral nerves to sense things, such as temperature and touch. Peripheral neuropathy most commonly affects the arms, hands, legs, feet, and toes, often causing pain or loss of feeling. It is the most common form of diabetic neuropathy. Proximal neuropathy Nerve damage resulting in pain in the hips, thighs, pelvis, and buttocks. Continue reading >>

What Is Peripheral Neuropathy?

What Is Peripheral Neuropathy?

Peripheral neuropathy refers to a problem with the peripheral nerves. These nerves send messages from the central nervous system, the brain and the spinal cord to the rest of the body. The peripheral nerves tell the body when, for example, the hands are cold. It can lead to tingling, prickling, numbness, and muscle weakness in various parts of the body. Peripheral neuropathy can affect a range of different nerves, so it can impact a variety of locations in different ways. It can affect a single nerve, or several nerves at the same time. It is also associated with a number of different underlying medical conditions. Sometimes there is no identifiable cause. It affects some 20 million people in the United States (U.S.). Here are some key points about peripheral neuropathy. More detail is in the main article. Neuropathy is a common complication of a number of different medical conditions. It can involve the autonomic nerves, the motor nerves, and the sensory nerves. Sometimes it affects a single nerve or nerve set, for example, in Bell's Palsy, which affects a facial nerve. Physical trauma, repetitive injury, infection, metabolic problems, and exposure to toxins and some drugs are all possible causes. Treatment Treatment either targets the underlying cause, or it aims to provide symptomatic pain relief and prevent further damage. In the case of diabetic neuropathy, addressing high blood sugars can prevent further nerve damage. For toxic causes, removing the exposure to a suspected toxin, or stopping a drug, can halt further nerve damage. Medications can relieve pain and reduce burning, numbness, and tingling. Drug treatment for neuropathic pain Medications that may help include: Opioid painkillers come with warnings about safety risks. Doctors can also prescribe skin patch Continue reading >>

Tips For Treating Diabetic Nerve Pain

Tips For Treating Diabetic Nerve Pain

Diabetes can cause long-term problems throughout your body, especially if you don’t control your blood sugar effectively, and sugar levels remain high for many years. High blood sugar can cause diabetic neuropathy, which damages the nerves that send signals from your hands and feet. Diabetic neuropathy can cause numbness or tingling in your fingers, toes, hands, and feet. Another symptom is a burning, sharp, or aching pain (diabetic nerve pain). The pain may be mild at first, but it can get worse over time and spread up your legs or arms. Walking can be painful, and even the softest touch can feel unbearable. Up to 50 percent of people with diabetes may experience nerve pain. Nerve damage can affect your ability to sleep, decrease your quality of life, and can also cause depression. Damaged nerves can’t be replaced. However, there are ways that you can prevent further damage and relieve your pain. First, control your blood sugar so the damage doesn’t progress. Talk to your doctor about setting your blood sugar goal, and learn to monitor it. You may be asked to lower your blood sugar before meals to 70 to 130 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) and your blood sugar after meals to less than 180 mg/dL. Use diets, exercise, and medications to decrease your blood sugar to a healthier range. Monitor other health risks that can worsen your diabetes, such as your weight and smoking. Ask your doctor about effective ways to lose weight or quit smoking, if necessary. Your doctor might suggest trying an over-the-counter pain reliever, such as acetaminophen (Tylenol), aspirin (Bufferin), or ibuprofen (Motrin IB, Advil), which are available without a prescription but can cause side effects. Use a low dose for a short time to control your symptoms. Other options exist for stronger Continue reading >>

Hand And Wrist Conditions

Hand And Wrist Conditions

Tweet A number of joint disorders affecting the hands exist which have a link with diabetes. Unlike diabetes related conditions of the foot, diabetic hand problems are generally less serious and hand amputation is unlikely. However, it pays to be aware of the conditions to be able to treat them before they develop and cause pain, discomfort or limited mobility. Diabetic hand syndrome (cheiroarthropathy) Diabetic hand syndrome, also known as stiff hand syndrome and by its formal name cheiroarthropathy, is characterised by an inability to straighten joints in the hand. A typical diagnostic technique is to hold one’s hands together, palm to palm, in the ‘prayer position’. Those who cannot touch each of the joints of each hand together may have diabetic hand syndrome. Treatments may include stretching or strengthening exercises of the hand. Dupuytren's contracture Dupuytren's contracture, like diabetic hand syndrome, also prevents the fingers (often one finger) being fully extended. Most often it is the fourth and fifth fingers that are affected. Dupuytren's contracture is a result of small lumps or nodules on connective tissue of the palm of the hand causing the tissue to gradually shorten over time. Treatment will usually involve surgery which, in less serious cases, should allow full functioning of the affected finger afterwards. Tenosynovitis (trigger finger) Tenosynovitis affects the tendons and is most prevalent in the hand and wrist. The tendons move through a tunnel of tissue and when the tendons get inflamed they can start to catch on the inside of their tunnel causing which prevents the fingers, for instance, moving smoothly and can cause the finger to lock into one position. If the tendons repeatedly catch like this it can cause them to become more inflamed Continue reading >>

Peripheral Neuropathy Symptoms In Hands & Fingers

Peripheral Neuropathy Symptoms In Hands & Fingers

Welcome to Health Clover for Good Fortune in Health Peripheral Neuropathy Symptoms in Hands & Fingers Peripheral neuropathy is a debilitating disease that causes a severe impact on the quality of life of its sufferers. Neuropathy refers to a disease of the nerves, and about one third of peripheral neuropathy cases are caused by the uncontrolled blood sugar levels of diabetes mellitus. It takes a long period of time, usually years, for diabetes to cause nerve damage sufficient to produce the initial symptoms of peripheral neuropathy. Neuropathy is a progressive disease that will spread to the rest of the body and become autonomic neuropathy if its underlying cause is not diagnosed and treated quickly and proficiently. My personal experience with tingling, burning, prickling, and numbness in the hands and fingers. The initial symptoms are a tingling or burning sensation in the extremities, usually the feet but in a lesser percentage of people it begins in the hands or fingers. In my personal experience with diabetic peripheral neuropathy, the symptoms first manifested themselves in my hands and not in my feet. When I went to the doctor, they were initially unsuspecting of neuropathy because of my age and relatively normal weight, plus my lack of a history with diabetes and uncontrolled blood sugar levels. They suspected that the pain was caused by over-exertion or strain of some kind although I intuitively knew that that was not the case. It took several more weeks of persistent pain and trips to the hospital with the accompanying lab tests before it was determined that I had a blood sugar level that, while not extreme, fell in the diabetic range and was most likely causing the numbness and tingling in my hands. I knew that I desperately did not want to live with this ho Continue reading >>

Peripheral Neuropathy And Diabetes

Peripheral Neuropathy And Diabetes

Pain. Tingling. Numbness. If you have a type of nerve damage from diabetes called diabetic peripheral neuropathy, chances are you've experienced these symptoms, especially in your hands and feet. The discomfort can affect your mood, sleep, and overall quality of life. Prescription medications can help. But research shows that they only ease the pain by about 30% to 50%. How can you bridge the gap? Learn how you can get relief now -- and prevent the condition from getting worse down the road. If don't manage your diabetes, your blood glucose levels get too high. Over time, excess blood sugar can damage your peripheral nerves. These connect your brain and spinal cord to the rest of your body. That could set the stage for diabetic neuropathy. If you bring your blood sugar into the healthy range (a hemoglobin A1C reading of 7% or lower), you'll reduce your risk of nerve damage by 60%, according to research from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. "Healthy blood sugar levels can slow the process and ease the pain of diabetic neuropathy," says Aaron I. Vinik, MD, PhD, the director of the research and neuroendocrine unit at Eastern Virginia Medical School. How can you keep your blood sugar in check? First, talk to your doctor. "A rapid drop can actually make the pain worse," Vinik says. Your doctor can suggest changes to gently bring your levels down into the healthy zone, like: Eat a diet high that's in fruits, vegetables, low-fat dairy, and whole grains; contains a moderate amount of fish, poultry, nuts, and beans; and has a very low amount of red meat. Manage your stress levels. Exercise for at least 30 minutes, 5 days a week. If your doctor prescribes medication for your blood sugar, take it as recommended. Acetaminophen, aspirin, ibuprofe Continue reading >>

Peripheral Neuropathy

Peripheral Neuropathy

What is peripheral neuropathy? Peripheral neuropathy is disorder of nerve(s) apart from the brain and spinal cord. Patients with peripheral neuropathy may have tingling, numbness, unusual sensations, weakness, or burning pain in the affected area. Oftentimes, the symptoms are symmetrical and involve both hands and feet. Because the symptoms are often present in the areas covered by gloves or stockings, peripheral neuropathy is often described as having a “glove and stocking” distribution of symptoms. Peripheral neuropathy can involve different nerve types, including motor, sensory, and autonomic nerves. Peripheral neuropathy can also be categorized by the size of the nerve fibers involved, large or small. Neuropathy can present with many differing symptoms, including numbness, pain of different types, weakness, or loss of balance, depending on the type of nerve involved. Because the autonomic nerves control bodily functions that we do not consciously think of, such as heart rate, digestion, and emptying of the bowel and bladder, autonomic neuropathy manifests with symptoms affecting the loss of control of these functions. Symptoms may include problems with blood pressure, voiding, passage of stools (diarrhea, or constipation), heart rate, or sweating. Cranial neuropathy is similar to peripheral neuropathy, except that the cranial nerves are involved. Any of the cranial nerves can be involved. One of the more common causes of cranial neuropathy is loss of blood flow from the optic artery to the optic nerve, causing ischemic optic neuropathy. Amyloidosis is one of the more common causes of this rare disorder. Specific nerves can be involved in neuropathy. When a specific nerve is involved, the symptoms are limited to the distribution of that nerve. The most commonly i Continue reading >>

Nerve Damage (diabetic Neuropathies)

Nerve Damage (diabetic Neuropathies)

What are diabetic neuropathies? Diabetic neuropathies are a family of nerve disorders caused by diabetes. People with diabetes can, over time, develop nerve damage throughout the body. Some people with nerve damage have no symptoms. Others may have symptoms such as pain, tingling, or numbness—loss of feeling—in the hands, arms, feet, and legs. Nerve problems can occur in every organ system, including the digestive tract, heart, and sex organs. About 60 to 70 percent of people with diabetes have some form of neuropathy. People with diabetes can develop nerve problems at any time, but risk rises with age and longer duration of diabetes. The highest rates of neuropathy are among people who have had diabetes for at least 25 years. Diabetic neuropathies also appear to be more common in people who have problems controlling their blood glucose, also called blood sugar, as well as those with high levels of blood fat and blood pressure and those who are overweight. What causes diabetic neuropathies? The causes are probably different for different types of diabetic neuropathy. Researchers are studying how prolonged exposure to high blood glucose causes nerve damage. Nerve damage is likely due to a combination of factors: metabolic factors, such as high blood glucose, long duration of diabetes, abnormal blood fat levels, and possibly low levels of insulin neurovascular factors, leading to damage to the blood vessels that carry oxygen and nutrients to nerves autoimmune factors that cause inflammation in nerves mechanical injury to nerves, such as carpal tunnel syndrome inherited traits that increase susceptibility to nerve disease lifestyle factors, such as smoking or alcohol use What are the symptoms of diabetic neuropathies? Symptoms depend on the type of neuropathy and which Continue reading >>

Symptoms Of Neuropathy Affecting The Feet Or The Hands

Symptoms Of Neuropathy Affecting The Feet Or The Hands

Home » Related Health Issues » Diabetic Neuropathy » Symptoms of Neuropathy Affecting The Feet or The Hands Diabetic Neuropathy What is Diabetic Neuropathy? Neuropathy Affecting The Feet Advice on Cutting Your Toenails Symptoms of Neuropathy Affecting Your Feet and Hands Heel Fissures Charcot Foot Wrong Sized Shoes Neuropathy and Antidepressants Diabetic Holiday Foot Syndrome Patient and Family Carer Experience Diabetes and Hearing Loss May be Due to Neuropathy Gastroparesis Symptoms of Neuropathy Affecting The Feet or The Hands Tingling or buzzing in the feet [called parathesia] that is often worse at night making sleep difficult. Pins and needles [called dyesthesia] which can become intense pain or an intense burning sensation and is described by some people as a painful numbness. It can be intermittent or constant according to how much nerve damage there is and which nerves are affected. Muscle pain. This is different from the above in that it is more diffuse and more like cramp. Loss of temperature perception – the hands and feet are less sensitive to heat and can be very sensitive to cold. Exaggerated sensitivity in the skin [called hyperesthesia] – an unpleasant sensitivity to skin stimulation, just wearing socks or tights can be very irritating to the skin. It seems like an allergic reaction but there are no changes in the appearance of the skin and nothing to actually see. Just minor damage to the skin can be very painful. Ways of dealing with loss of pain sensation Correct fitting shoes – clearly it is important to have comfortable, correct fitting shoes. Your chiropodist can advise about this. In an article by Rosemary Murray, a nurse with diabetic neuropathy [American Journal of Nursing, Nov 1993] describes her rules about shoes: The most comfortable Continue reading >>

Types Of Neuropathy In Hands, Legs & Feet Premier Physical Therapy

Types Of Neuropathy In Hands, Legs & Feet Premier Physical Therapy

Nerve pain can leave people unable to perform day-to-day activities and can seriously hinder peoples quality of life. Unfortunately, this type of pain can take time to diagnose and pinpoint, which is why it is important to see your doctor at the first sign of symptoms. The sooner you can catch nerve damage the better your chances are at preventing or minimizing neuropathic pain. Neuropathy is a broad diagnosis covering different, more specific causes and Neuropathy diagnoses. You may have read our blog What Is Neuropathy and discovered that you do in fact have symptoms on Neuropathy. Here, well go more in detail about the types of Neuropathy that you may have. Peripheral Neuropathy (Non-Diabetic Neuropathy) Peripheral Neuropathy creates the pain symptoms of numbness, burning, tingling, etc in your extremities, most commonly hands and feet. However, it can include arms, feet, fingers, hands, legs, and toes. Peripheral Neuropathy means the nerve damage occurred to the peripheral nervous system, which affects the nerves on the outside of the spine and brain. Mononeuropathy Nerve damage, pain, and malfunctions on a singular nerve or nerve trunk. Some examples of Mononeuropathy are Carpel Tunnel, Sciatic Nerve Dysfunction, Femoral Nerve Dysfunction and Cubital Tunnel Syndrome. Unlike most neuropathies, this one is most often caused by injury. Diabetic Neuropathy Diabetic Neuropathy is non-reversible damage to the nervous system because of Diabetes. The damage creates malfunctions in the nerves which translates to burning, tingling, numbness, and weakness in the extremities (primarily hands and feet). Some estimate Diabetes Patients suffer from Neuropathy 50-70% of the time. The better a patient can manage their Diabetes the more they will be able to manage their Neuropathy. Continue reading >>

Peripheral Neuropathy And Diabetes

Peripheral Neuropathy And Diabetes

Peripheral neuropathy is nerve damage caused by chronically high blood sugar and diabetes. It leads to numbness, loss of sensation, and sometimes pain in your feet, legs, or hands. It is the most common complication of diabetes. About 60% to 70% of all people with diabetes will eventually develop peripheral neuropathy, although not all suffer pain. Yet this nerve damage is not inevitable. Studies have shown that people with diabetes can reduce their risk of developing nerve damage by keeping their blood sugar levels as close to normal as possible. What causes peripheral neuropathy? Chronically high blood sugar levels damage nerves not only in your extremities but also in other parts of your body. These damaged nerves cannot effectively carry messages between the brain and other parts of the body. This means you may not feel heat, cold, or pain in your feet, legs, or hands. If you get a cut or sore on your foot, you may not know it, which is why it's so important to inspect your feet daily. If a shoe doesn't fit properly, you could even develop a foot ulcer and not know it. The consequences can be life-threatening. An infection that won't heal because of poor blood flow causes risk for developing ulcers and can lead to amputation, even death. This nerve damage shows itself differently in each person. Some people feel tingling, then later feel pain. Other people lose the feeling in fingers and toes; they have numbness. These changes happen slowly over a period of years, so you might not even notice it. Because the changes are subtle and happen as people get older, people tend to ignore the signs of nerve damage, thinking it's just part of getting older. But there are treatments that can help slow the progression of this condition and limit the damage. Talk to your doctors Continue reading >>

What Is Diabetic Hand Syndrome?

What Is Diabetic Hand Syndrome?

I fielded a question earlier this week on my Facebook page in regards to a fellow type 1 diabetic having diabetic hand pain and issues with their hands being stiff and they seemed harder to move. Immediately carpal tunnel syndrome popped into my head, but after she brought this up to her doctor and they ruled out carpal tunnel, they moved on to another diagnosis. A condition called diabetic hand syndrome (DHS). Honestly, I’ve never heard of DHS but like most things that grab my attention and not knowing much about something, I decided to see what this was all about. So what is DHS? Let’s take a closer look! What Is Diabetic Stiff Hand Syndrome? So here we are, diabetic hand syndrome or as its more formerly know as, stiff hand syndrome or cheiroarthropathy. Stiff hand syndrome is one of the most common hand disorders for people with diabetes. Another common nerve and joint problem is Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS). Granted carpal tunnel is not caused by diabetes, but happens more often to people with diabetes, especially those who have diabetic neuropathy. Diabetic Hand Syndrome Symptoms Stiff Hand Syndrome is painless and can effect both type 1 and type 2 diabetics. It usually begins in your little finger. Then it spreads over time to your thumb. This stiffness then keeps you from being able to straighten your fingers fully. In addition, the skin on the back of your hand may also become thick, tight and waxy-looking. One way to tell if you have Stiff Hand Syndrome is to hold the palms of your hands together as if you are praying. If all of the skin and joints of your palms and fingers don’t touch, there is the possibility that you may have stiff hand Syndrome. What Causes Diabetes Hand Syndrome While it’s not fully known, doctors believe that multiple factors are Continue reading >>

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