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Diabetic Neuropathy Foot Pain Relief

Treatment For Diabetes Nerve Pain

Treatment For Diabetes Nerve Pain

Diabetic peripheral neuropathy is the term for nerve pain caused by diabetes. The symptoms can range from tingling to numbness and pain. Treatment for diabetes nerve pain may including tackling the symptoms themselves, as well as making sure diabetes is as well managed as possible. Good blood glucose control is the single most important factor in preventing neuropathy, slowing its progress once you have it, and relieving many symptoms. Over-the-counter pain relievers for diabetes nerve pain Some people find relief for mild diabetes nerve pain on their pharamcist's shelves. Common pain relievers and some topical creams may help, depending on the severity of pain. Anyone with diabetes should talk to their doctor before taking any medication. Even over-the-counter medications can interact with other medications or cause severe side effects in people with diabetes. Here are some over-the-counter pain relief options to consider: NSAIDs (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs). These drugs reduce inflammation and relieve pain. NSAIDs available without a prescription include aspirin and ibuprofen. But NSAIDs can cause harmful side effects such as stomach irritation and bleeding in some people if taken for weeks or months. When taken long-term they can also lead to kidney and liver damage, which may be more likely in people with diabetes. Paracetamol and other over-the-counter medicines containing paracetamol relieve diabetes nerve pain without reducing inflammation. These medications do not cause the stomach irritation that NSAIDs do. However, taking more paracetamol than recommended can lead to liver damage. It is important to read labels and check with your pharmacist if you have concerns. Other topical creams. Salicylate is a chemical similar to aspirin, and is found in some Continue reading >>

How To Deal With Nerve Pain If You Have Diabetes

How To Deal With Nerve Pain If You Have Diabetes

If you have diabetes , you know it well: Too much sugar isn’t good for you. People whose blood sugar is too high or difficult to control are more susceptible to cardiovascular disease, kidney damage, eye problems and other complications, including nerve damage (diabetic neuropathy). Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy “High blood sugar is toxic to your nerves,” says  Robert Bolash, MD , a specialist in Cleveland Clinic’s Department of Pain Management. “When a nerve is damaged, you may feel tingling, pins and needles, burning or sharp, stabbing pain.” Diabetic neuropathy typically starts in your toes, feet or ankles and creeps up your body as the condition worsens, he says. However, nerve damage also can affect your hands and wrists as well as your heart, digestive system, sex organs and more. Up to 70 percent of people with diabetes have some kind of neuropathy , reports the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) . “Anyone with diabetes can get nerve damage at any time,” says Dr. Bolash. “It’s most common in people whose blood sugar is poorly controlled and those who have had diabetes a long time.” According to the NIDDK, the highest rates of neuropathy are among people who have had diabetes 25 years or longer. To avoid getting diabetic neuropathy, control your blood sugar, keeping it as close to nondiabetic levels as possible, advises Dr. Bolash. The bad news about diabetic neuropathy is that it’s tough to reverse. It also can cause serious problems, especially in your feet. If you don’t feel blisters, sores or other foot injuries and don’t promptly care for them, you Continue reading >>

Peripheral Neuropathy And Diabetes

Peripheral Neuropathy And Diabetes

Pain. Tingling. Numbness. If you have a type of nerve damage from diabetes called diabetic peripheral neuropathy, chances are you've experienced these symptoms, especially in your hands and feet. The discomfort can affect your mood, sleep, and overall quality of life. Prescription medications can help. But research shows that they only ease the pain by about 30% to 50%. How can you bridge the gap? Learn how you can get relief now -- and prevent the condition from getting worse down the road. If don't manage your diabetes, your blood glucose levels get too high. Over time, excess blood sugar can damage your peripheral nerves. These connect your brain and spinal cord to the rest of your body. That could set the stage for diabetic neuropathy. If you bring your blood sugar into the healthy range (a hemoglobin A1C reading of 7% or lower), you'll reduce your risk of nerve damage by 60%, according to research from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. "Healthy blood sugar levels can slow the process and ease the pain of diabetic neuropathy," says Aaron I. Vinik, MD, PhD, the director of the research and neuroendocrine unit at Eastern Virginia Medical School. How can you keep your blood sugar in check? First, talk to your doctor. "A rapid drop can actually make the pain worse," Vinik says. Your doctor can suggest changes to gently bring your levels down into the healthy zone, like: Eat a diet high that's in fruits, vegetables, low-fat dairy, and whole grains; contains a moderate amount of fish, poultry, nuts, and beans; and has a very low amount of red meat. Manage your stress levels. Exercise for at least 30 minutes, 5 days a week. If your doctor prescribes medication for your blood sugar, take it as recommended. Acetaminophen, aspirin, ibuprofe Continue reading >>

Diabetic Neuropathydiabetic Neuropathy Symptoms, Causes, Diagnosis, And Treatment

Diabetic Neuropathydiabetic Neuropathy Symptoms, Causes, Diagnosis, And Treatment

Diabetic neuropathy definition and facts Diabetes is thought to damage nerves as a result of prolonged elevated levels of blood glucose. Peripheral neuropathy most commonly causes: Autonomic neuropathy causes symptoms related to dysfunction of an organ system, such as: Diagnosis of diabetic neuropathy is usually done by a clinical exam. There is no cure for diabetic neuropathy, but treatments are available to manage the symptoms. Diabetic nerve pain may be controlled by medications such as tricyclic antidepressants, duloxetine (Cymbalta), or certain antiseizure medications. Keeping tight control of blood sugar levels is the best way to prevent diabetic neuropathy and other complications of diabetes. Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy: Improve Diabetes Nerve Pain What are the symptoms and signs of diabetic neuropathy? The symptoms and signs of diabetic neuropathy depend upon the type of neuropathy that is present. Signs and symptoms can also vary in severity among affected people. Signs and symptoms of diabetic peripheral neuropathy include: Numbness or tingling of the feet and lower legs Pain or burning sensations Loss of sensation in the feet or lower legs Sometimes, but less commonly, these symptoms can occur in the hands or arms Signs and symptoms of diabetic proximal neuropathy include: Pain, usually on one side, in the hips, buttocks, or thighs Signs and symptoms of diabetic autonomic neuropathy depend upon the organ system that is involved and can include: Feeling full after eating a small amount Inability to empty the bladder completely Decrease in vaginal lubrication in women Rapid resting heartbeat Signs and symptoms of diabetic focal neuropathy also depend upon the location of the affected nerve. The symptoms can appear suddenly. It usually does not cause a long t Continue reading >>

Diagnosis

Diagnosis

Print Diabetic neuropathy is usually diagnosed based on your symptoms, your medical history and a physical exam. During the exam, your doctor is likely to check your muscle strength and tone, tendon reflexes, and sensitivity to touch, temperature and vibration. Your doctor may also conduct tests that include: Filament test. Sensitivity to touch may be tested using a soft nylon fiber called a monofilament. Nerve conduction studies. This test measures how quickly the nerves in your arms and legs conduct electrical signals. It's often used to diagnose carpal tunnel syndrome. Electromyography (EMG). Often performed along with nerve conduction studies, electromyography measures the electrical discharges produced in your muscles. Quantitative sensory testing. This noninvasive test is used to assess how your nerves respond to vibration and changes in temperature. Autonomic testing. If you have symptoms of autonomic neuropathy, your doctor may request special tests to look at your blood pressure in different positions and assess your ability to sweat. The American Diabetes Association recommends that all people with diabetes have a comprehensive foot exam — either by a doctor or by a foot specialist (podiatrist) — at least once a year. In addition, your feet should be checked for sores, cracked skin, calluses, blisters, and bone and joint abnormalities at every office visit. Treatment Diabetic neuropathy has no known cure. Treatment for diabetic neuropathy focuses on: Slowing progression of the disease Relieving pain Managing complications and restoring function Slowing progression of the disease Consistently keeping blood sugar within a target range can help prevent or delay the progression of diabetic neuropathy and may even improve some of the symptoms you already have. Continue reading >>

What Can I Do For Numb, Painful Feet And Legs?

What Can I Do For Numb, Painful Feet And Legs?

My husband was diagnosed with diabetes almost a year ago. At first he was experiencing numbness in his feet. Over the past few months, he began having pain as well, sometimes as far up his leg as his calf. What can we do to help these symptoms? I have read that vitamin E and even flaxseed oil are good for the circulation. Would those be helpful? Continue reading >>

10 Ways To Reduce And Relieve Diabetic Neuropathy Pain | Footfiles

10 Ways To Reduce And Relieve Diabetic Neuropathy Pain | Footfiles

Moisturizing TricksThat Keeps Diabetic Skin Soft Soaking in a warm bath or indulging in a foot soak is relaxing for your entire body, and it has the added benefit of improving circulation, which can instantly relieve pain associated with peripheral neuropathy. But because diabetes can cause loss of sensation, including the ability to feel hot and cold, you should use a thermometer or the help of a friend or loved one to check the water temperature before diving in. Research has shown that vitamin D, which your skin naturally produces in response to sunlight, may help relieve symptoms ofneuropathy and diabetic foot pain. Its difficult to get enough of the essential nutrient from sun exposure and diet, however, so doctors recommend taking a daily dose of a vitamin D supplement (600 to 800 IU), which studies have shown can significantly reduce peripheral neuropathy symptoms in as little as two months. Incorporate A B Vitamin Complex Into Your Daily Routine In addition to inspecting your feet on a daily basis, you may want to try adding a B vitamin complex into your routine. A lack of B12 has been linked to nerve damage, and B6 assists the brain in its production of chemicals that send information through our bodies. It might sound counterintuitive to work out the limbs that are causing you pain, but exercise actually has several pain-relieving benefits for those suffering from diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Exercise helps control blood sugar levels, which slows nerve damage and therefore helps decrease nerve pain. Physical activity increases circulation, which reduces nerve pain. Exercise boosts your mood and is a natural stress reliever, which helps relieve some of the discomfort. If activities such as jogging and traditional sports are too painful, try activities with Continue reading >>

7 Natural Diabetic Neuropathy Treatments That Work

7 Natural Diabetic Neuropathy Treatments That Work

Diabetes itself is extremely common, affecting about one in every three adults in the U.S., and diabetic neuropathy is one of the most likely complications to develop as a side effect because high blood sugar levels affect nerve fibers throughout the body. Neuropathy is a pathological condition that encompasses more than 100 different forms and manifestations of nerve damage, both in people with diabetes and those without. (1) Diabetic neuropathy (also sometimes called peripheral neuropathy) is the term for nerve damage caused by diabetes, a chronic condition that occurs when the body doesn’t use the hormone insulin properly. Neuropathy can form anywhere but is most likely to affect nerves running through the limbs, hands and feet. Not every person with diabetes symptoms develops complications such as neuropathy, but many do. In fact, up to 60 percent to 70 percent of all diabetics experience some form of neuropathy. For some people, only mild symptoms develop from nerve damage, such as tingling or numbness in the limbs. But for others, neuropathy causes a good amount of pain, digestive issues, problems with the heart and blood vessels, the inability to go about life normally, and even death if major organs are affected badly enough. Diabetic neuropathy can trigger a cascade of events that lead to even more serious complications. Just like with diabetes itself, there is no known “cure” for peripheral neuropathy, only ways to manage it and stop progression, similarly to the natural treatments for diabetes. It’s a dangerous problem to have, but fortunately most people are able to keep it under control by regulating their blood sugar levels, changing their diets and adopting healthier lifestyles overall, all of which help control their diabetes. 7 Natural Remedies Continue reading >>

Medications To Treat Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

Medications To Treat Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

Medications are used to control the pain associated with peripheral diabetic neuropathy. Unfortunately, at this time, there aren’t any medications to treat and prevent diabetic nerve pain (another name for diabetic neuropathy); the only way to do that is through careful control of blood glucose levels. There are many medication options to relieve pain associated with peripheral nerve damage. You should work carefully with your doctor to figure out what medications are best for you. If you’d like to learn more about treatments for the other types of diabetic neuropathy, this section of the article reviews treatment options for autonomic, proximal, and focal neuropathy. Medication Warning Because of the possible interactions and side effects, always discuss medications with your doctor—even if they’re “just” over-the-counter. This is particularly important when you have diabetes because these over-the-counter medications may have interactions with other medications you’re using. Over-the-counter Medications for Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy For people in the early stages of diabetic neuropathy—when the pain isn’t severe—over-the-counter medications may be enough to relieve the pain. However, people with more advanced nerve damage may not find over-the-counter medications helpful. For diabetic neuropathy, you may want to try: Acetaminophen: This is a painkiller, also known as an analgesic. Tylenol is an example of acetaminophen, and it works by blocking pain messages to the brain. In essence, acetaminophen makes it harder for the “pain” signal to travel through the nerves and to the brain, and therefore, the brain doesn’t know that it should be feeling pain. Possible side effects include liver damage, but that’s after taking large quantities fo Continue reading >>

Treatment Of Painful Diabetic Neuropathy

Treatment Of Painful Diabetic Neuropathy

Go to: Assessment and diagnosis The diagnosis of PDN is primarily clinical, based on a history of neuropathic pain and confirmatory examination findings, establishing deficits associated with neuropathy. Although one might argue that confirming neuropathy using tests which assess large fibre deficits (loss of sensation, monofilament exam, reflexes) are not relevant to painful symptoms which are driven principally by small fibre damage. Patients report intermittent or continuous symptoms of pain described as burning, stabbing, tingling, numb, hot, cold or itching in a distal-to-proximal ‘glove-and-stocking’ distribution, usually beginning in the feet. The pain is typically symmetrical and worsens at night. Abnormal sensory perception, such as reduced or heightened perception of hot, cold, touch or pin-prick sensation, or allodynia, may be present on examination [Callaghan et al. 2012a]. Neuropathic pain scales have been devised to aid diagnosis and these may also provide insight into the severity of the patient’s symptoms [Papanas and Ziegler, 2011]. The Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument (MNSI) and Neuropathy Disability Score (NDS) are designed to assess neuropathic impairment and can act as screening tools for DSPN [Feldman et al. 1994; Weintrob et al. 2007]. The severity of pain in PDN can be assessed through pain scores such as the Brief Pain Inventory and the Neuropathic Pain Questionnaire (NPQ) [Cleeland and Ryan, 1994; Krause and Backonja, 2003]. The NPQ can also be used to follow up patients along with the Neuropathic Pain Symptom Inventory, a 10-item questionnaire to quantify and evaluate symptoms of neuropathic pain [Kelly et al. 2005]. In addition, the quality of life can be assessed through neuropathy-specific quality of life scores such as the Ne Continue reading >>

Home Remedies For Diabetic Foot Pain

Home Remedies For Diabetic Foot Pain

My husband's feet are getting painful, swollen, and numb due to his diabetes. Even if he gets medicine for diabetes this pain never stops. Please tell me if someone knows of or has experience with some home remedies for this pain and numbness. Your suggestions would be highly appreciated. By smile Answers No please, stop! Do not use ice on diabetic numb or swollen feet! If his blood sugars are uncontrolled and running too high, that in itself can cause severe neurological pain & numbness in the extremities! There's no home remedy for that EXCEPT tight blood sugar control! 1) Get him to the doc! Have his Ha1C checked! Have swelling & pain & numbness thoroughly evaluated! Don't treat this lightly, this could be life threatening! Does he have hardening of the arteries? CHF? Any other heart conditions? Kidney disease? Has he had his brachial BP checked in his ankles lately? There could be many reasons for the swollen feet too! Edema can be due to many causes. I have been Type 1 diabetic for 30 years, and used to get neuropathy pains in both feet and legs, hands & arms too. I was put on prescription Neurontin (generic version tho, Gabapentin) for about 10 years & increased up to 300mg twice a day. That worked great, but since I have cut out all white carbs, eat lots of fatfree salads, fresh veggies & fruits (at least 5 servings a day), lean meats--follow the American Heart Association diet basically - extra light olive oil, all antioxidant & anti-inflammatory foods, no junk foods, no fast foods, no sat fats or trans fats, no processed foods, no nitrates. For over 2 years now, I have stopped the Neurontin altogether within the past year, and lowered my HA1C to 7, but being on an insulin pump, I want to get it lower, 6.5%. I feel the best now than I have in 30 yrs! The neuropa Continue reading >>

Tips For Treating Diabetic Nerve Pain

Tips For Treating Diabetic Nerve Pain

Diabetes can cause long-term problems throughout your body, especially if you don’t control your blood sugar effectively, and sugar levels remain high for many years. High blood sugar can cause diabetic neuropathy, which damages the nerves that send signals from your hands and feet. Diabetic neuropathy can cause numbness or tingling in your fingers, toes, hands, and feet. Another symptom is a burning, sharp, or aching pain (diabetic nerve pain). The pain may be mild at first, but it can get worse over time and spread up your legs or arms. Walking can be painful, and even the softest touch can feel unbearable. Up to 50 percent of people with diabetes may experience nerve pain. Nerve damage can affect your ability to sleep, decrease your quality of life, and can also cause depression. Damaged nerves can’t be replaced. However, there are ways that you can prevent further damage and relieve your pain. First, control your blood sugar so the damage doesn’t progress. Talk to your doctor about setting your blood sugar goal, and learn to monitor it. You may be asked to lower your blood sugar before meals to 70 to 130 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) and your blood sugar after meals to less than 180 mg/dL. Use diets, exercise, and medications to decrease your blood sugar to a healthier range. Monitor other health risks that can worsen your diabetes, such as your weight and smoking. Ask your doctor about effective ways to lose weight or quit smoking, if necessary. Your doctor might suggest trying an over-the-counter pain reliever, such as acetaminophen (Tylenol), aspirin (Bufferin), or ibuprofen (Motrin IB, Advil), which are available without a prescription but can cause side effects. Use a low dose for a short time to control your symptoms. Other options exist for stronger Continue reading >>

Diabetic Foot Pain

Diabetic Foot Pain

by Kenneth B. Rehm, DPM Includes photo of Dr. Kenneth B. Rehm, DPM Diabetes is one of the most common reasons people seek relief for painful feet. With diabetes, four types of foot problems may arise in the feet. Nerve Problems due to Diabetes The most common contributor to diabetic foot pain is a nerve problem called Peripheral Neuropathy. This is where the nerves are directly affected by the disease process. There are basically three types of peripheral neuropathy: sensory, motor, and autonomic neuropathy. A large percentage of pain diabetic patients complain of is due to sensory neuropathy. This can show up as "sensitive pain," where the amount of pain is not proportional to the amount of insult that is causing it. For instance, just touching the skin or putting a sheet over your feet in bed could be painful. This can be present at the same time as numbness in the feet. Sensory neuropathy symptoms can include burning, tingling or a stabbing pain. Relief is foremost on someone's mind when painful neuropathy has raised its ugly head. The first thing to do is to check your blood sugar for the past several weeks to see if there has been a trend toward high blood sugar (Editor's Note: The A1c test is traditionally employed to determine this, and should be repeated about every three months.) Persistent high blood sugar can contribute to this type of pain. Massaging your feet with a diabetic foot cream, or using a foot roller, often takes the edge off the pain. Vitamin B preparations are often recommended; and there are a variety of prescription medications that do work. Using cushioned, supportive shoes and foot support inserts is always needed to protect the feet from the pounding, rubbing and irritating pressures that contribute to neuropathic pain. Motor neuropathy can Continue reading >>

Ten Ways To Treat Diabetic Neuropathy At Home

Ten Ways To Treat Diabetic Neuropathy At Home

TEN WAYS TO TREAT DIABETIC NEUROPATHY AT HOME Millions of people suffer with diabetic neuropathy. Millions of people suffer with diabetic neuropathy. Medicines treating this condition can only decrease the nerve pain to about 50 percent. Because of this and the fact that many people do not like the side effects of the drugs, people are finding alternative methods for treating neuropathy. Experts say the trend toward self-care is a good thing and there are many things that you can do at home to help yourself decrease nerve pain. Diabetic neuropathy is the result of nerve damage caused by the toxic effects of high blood sugars and poor circulation. As the condition progresses, numbness occurs in the feet, hands, and legs. Damage to the nerves can also cause them to misfire, causing extreme pain during simple touch responses or for no reason at all. People describe the pain as burning, electrical shocks or pins and needles. About 25 percent of diabetics report pain ranging from annoying to debilitating. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy is a complication of diabetes and the people dealing with the pain from this condition need to try other remedies than just medicines to help them manage the pain. Here are the top ten strategies for managing diabetic neuropathy at home. Some you may have heard about, some are new surprises. When it comes managing the pain of diabetic neuropathy, nothing beats controlling the blood sugar. Doctors would agree that this is the No. 1 strategy and is probably the whole top ten. After all, it is the toxic effects of high blood sugar that brings on the pain associated with neuropathy. Studies have shown that diabetic patients who religiously control their blood sugar levels stop the nerve damage and improve the pain from neuropathy. In fact, some d Continue reading >>

Diabetic Neuropathy—the Agony Of Da Feet

Diabetic Neuropathy—the Agony Of Da Feet

[Editor’s note: In recognition of American Diabetes Month, Harvard Health Publications is collaborating with MSN.com on its Stop Diabetes initiative. Today’s post, published on World Diabetes Day, is the first of several focusing on this all-too-common disorder.] People tend to think of diabetes as a silent, painless condition. Don’t tell that to the millions of folks with diabetes-induced tingling toes or painful feet. This problem, called diabetic neuropathy, can range from merely aggravating to disabling or even life threatening. It’s something I have first-hand (or, more appropriately, first-foot) knowledge about. High blood sugar, the hallmark of diabetes, injures nerves and blood vessels throughout the body. The first nerves to be affected tend to be the smallest ones furthest from the spinal cord—those that stretch to the toes and feet. Diabetic neuropathy affects different people in different ways. I feel it as a tingling in my toes. Moving my feet and wiggling my toes helps the tingling disappear for a while. Others have it much worse. Diabetic neuropathy can cause a constant burning feeling in the feet; sharp pain that may be worse at night; and extreme sensitivity to touch, making the weight of a sheet unbearable. It can be sneaky, too, and completely rob the feet of their ability to sense pain. The truly scary thing about diabetic neuropathy is a 10-letter word we usually associate with horrific accidents or Civil War battlefields—amputation. When sensory nerves in the feet become damaged, a blister, cut, or sore can go unnoticed, allowing time for the wound to become infected. Infections that cause tissue to die (gangrene) and that spread to the bone may be impossible to treat with cleansing and antibiotics. Diabetes accounts for about 70,000 lo Continue reading >>

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