diabetestalk.net

Diabetic Nerve Pain

Diabetic Nerve Pain

Diabetic Nerve Pain

Tweet Diabetic nerve pain is a syndrome that affects people with diabetes. This type of nerve pain can affect both type 1 and type 2 diabetes sufferers. Nerve pain, also known as neuropathic pain, is a result of one of the complications of diabetes, called peripheral neuropathy, or diabetic neuropathy. Why does diabetic nerve pain occur? Diabetic nerve pain most commonly occurs when a person with diabetes has prolonged spells of high blood sugar levels. It is thought that high blood glucose affects the nerves by damaging the blood vessels which supply them. High blood pressure, in addition to hyperglycemia, also has a detrimental effect on the nerves. Smoking and alcohol are also known to increase the risk of nerve pain occurring. Where does diabetic nerve pain typically occur? Diabetic nerve pain usually occurs in peripheral regions or extremities, such as feet and legs, hands and arms. Neuropathic foot pain is one of a number of conditions affecting the feet which are termed as problems of ‘the diabetic foot’. For this reason, people with diabetes are advised to undergo a foot examination once each year. A foot exam can help in two ways, by helping to diagnose new problems, such as diabetic neuropathy or circulation problems and it can also help to spot further complications of the foot such as wounds, blisters and a joint disorder known as charcot arthropathy or charcot foot. What are the symptoms of diabetic nerve pain? Diabetic nerve pain symptoms can include: Prickling or tingling feelings A burning sensation Sharp, stabbing or shooting pains in the aforementioned areas. These can range from mild to extreme. In serious cases the whole area may become numb. A condition known as dysesthesia can develop, in some people, which affects one’s sense of touch causin Continue reading >>

How To Deal With Nerve Pain If You Have Diabetes

How To Deal With Nerve Pain If You Have Diabetes

If you have diabetes , you know it well: Too much sugar isn’t good for you. People whose blood sugar is too high or difficult to control are more susceptible to cardiovascular disease, kidney damage, eye problems and other complications, including nerve damage (diabetic neuropathy). Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy “High blood sugar is toxic to your nerves,” says  Robert Bolash, MD , a specialist in Cleveland Clinic’s Department of Pain Management. “When a nerve is damaged, you may feel tingling, pins and needles, burning or sharp, stabbing pain.” Diabetic neuropathy typically starts in your toes, feet or ankles and creeps up your body as the condition worsens, he says. However, nerve damage also can affect your hands and wrists as well as your heart, digestive system, sex organs and more. Up to 70 percent of people with diabetes have some kind of neuropathy , reports the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) . “Anyone with diabetes can get nerve damage at any time,” says Dr. Bolash. “It’s most common in people whose blood sugar is poorly controlled and those who have had diabetes a long time.” According to the NIDDK, the highest rates of neuropathy are among people who have had diabetes 25 years or longer. To avoid getting diabetic neuropathy, control your blood sugar, keeping it as close to nondiabetic levels as possible, advises Dr. Bolash. The bad news about diabetic neuropathy is that it’s tough to reverse. It also can cause serious problems, especially in your feet. If you don’t feel blisters, sores or other foot injuries and don’t promptly care for them, you Continue reading >>

Nerve Pain

Nerve Pain

caused by diabetes, known as diabetic peripheral neuropathy, can be severe, constant, and hard to treat. It may start as a tingling feeling, followed by numbness and pain. But there are two key points that everyone with diabetes and peripheral neuropathy should know: Controlling your blood sugar can keep the pain from getting worse and improve your health. Medications can help relieve nerve pain, make you more comfortable, and improve your quality of life. If you have diabetes and peripheral neuropathy, talk to your doctor about how to manage your blood sugar levels. That may mean you need to take insulin. Once you're doing all you can to keep your blood sugar in check -- including diet, meal planning, exercise, and medication -- ask the doctor which pain treatment could best relieve the rest of your symptoms. There are many medications that can ease nerve pain and help you function at near-normal levels. But you may need to try several different types before you find the one that works best. Some people find relief right on drugstore shelves. Common pain relievers and some skin creams may help. It depends on how severe your pain is. Talk to your doctor before taking any product. Even over-the-counter medications can interact with other drugs or cause severe side effects. Here are some options: NSAIDs (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) reduce inflammation and relieve pain. Those available without a prescription include aspirin, ibuprofen, and naproxen. But NSAIDs are known to increase the risk of heart attack and stroke, especially when taken in high doses. They can also cause harmful side effects like stomach irritation and bleeding if you take them for a long time. Although the risk is low, they can also lead to kidney damage, which may be more likely in people wi Continue reading >>

7 Natural Diabetic Neuropathy Treatments That Work

7 Natural Diabetic Neuropathy Treatments That Work

Diabetes itself is extremely common, affecting about one in every three adults in the U.S., and diabetic neuropathy is one of the most likely complications to develop as a side effect because high blood sugar levels affect nerve fibers throughout the body. Neuropathy is a pathological condition that encompasses more than 100 different forms and manifestations of nerve damage, both in people with diabetes and those without. (1) Diabetic neuropathy (also sometimes called peripheral neuropathy) is the term for nerve damage caused by diabetes, a chronic condition that occurs when the body doesn’t use the hormone insulin properly. Neuropathy can form anywhere but is most likely to affect nerves running through the limbs, hands and feet. Not every person with diabetes symptoms develops complications such as neuropathy, but many do. In fact, up to 60 percent to 70 percent of all diabetics experience some form of neuropathy. For some people, only mild symptoms develop from nerve damage, such as tingling or numbness in the limbs. But for others, neuropathy causes a good amount of pain, digestive issues, problems with the heart and blood vessels, the inability to go about life normally, and even death if major organs are affected badly enough. Diabetic neuropathy can trigger a cascade of events that lead to even more serious complications. Just like with diabetes itself, there is no known “cure” for peripheral neuropathy, only ways to manage it and stop progression, similarly to the natural treatments for diabetes. It’s a dangerous problem to have, but fortunately most people are able to keep it under control by regulating their blood sugar levels, changing their diets and adopting healthier lifestyles overall, all of which help control their diabetes. 7 Natural Remedies Continue reading >>

Nerve Damage (diabetic Neuropathies)

Nerve Damage (diabetic Neuropathies)

What are diabetic neuropathies? Diabetic neuropathies are a family of nerve disorders caused by diabetes. People with diabetes can, over time, develop nerve damage throughout the body. Some people with nerve damage have no symptoms. Others may have symptoms such as pain, tingling, or numbness—loss of feeling—in the hands, arms, feet, and legs. Nerve problems can occur in every organ system, including the digestive tract, heart, and sex organs. About 60 to 70 percent of people with diabetes have some form of neuropathy. People with diabetes can develop nerve problems at any time, but risk rises with age and longer duration of diabetes. The highest rates of neuropathy are among people who have had diabetes for at least 25 years. Diabetic neuropathies also appear to be more common in people who have problems controlling their blood glucose, also called blood sugar, as well as those with high levels of blood fat and blood pressure and those who are overweight. What causes diabetic neuropathies? The causes are probably different for different types of diabetic neuropathy. Researchers are studying how prolonged exposure to high blood glucose causes nerve damage. Nerve damage is likely due to a combination of factors: metabolic factors, such as high blood glucose, long duration of diabetes, abnormal blood fat levels, and possibly low levels of insulin neurovascular factors, leading to damage to the blood vessels that carry oxygen and nutrients to nerves autoimmune factors that cause inflammation in nerves mechanical injury to nerves, such as carpal tunnel syndrome inherited traits that increase susceptibility to nerve disease lifestyle factors, such as smoking or alcohol use What are the symptoms of diabetic neuropathies? Symptoms depend on the type of neuropathy and which Continue reading >>

Diabetic Neuropathy Overview

Diabetic Neuropathy Overview

Diabetes can damage nerves throughout your body. In fact diabetic neuropathy (neuro- means nerves; -pathy means disease or suffering) is the most common, chronic complication of diabetes according to the American Diabetes Association.1 It affects 60-70% of people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes, according to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Disease. 2 Diabetic neuropathy can be extremely painful. It can also pave the way for health-threatening and even life-threatening problems including foot ulcers, amputations, heart attacks, digestion problems and difficulty recognizing low blood sugar episodes. While it cannot be cured, smart lifestyle steps may prevent diabetic neuropathy for some people and slow its progression for others. Medications and other approaches can treat symptoms, such as pain. And awareness—through steps like good foot care, regular foot exams and telling your doctor about other symptoms—can help prevent this blood-sugar-related nerve damage from spiraling into even more serious health issues. The best-known type of diabetic neuropathy is called diabetic peripheral neuropathy. It can cause burning, stabbing or electric-shock-type pain or tingling in your feet, legs, hands or arms. The pain may be worse at night; treatment options range from over-the-counter patches to prescription drugs. But there’s growing evidence that diabetes causes deeper nerve damage that affects more people with high blood sugar than experts once understood. Other types of diabetic neuropathy include: “Silent” diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Up to 50% of people with peripheral neuropathy have no pain3 and may not realize their feet are numb. 4 This boosts the risk for foot ulcers (if you don’t notice cuts or blisters, for example) 5 and inc Continue reading >>

Learn More About The Shooting, Burning, Pins And Needles Pain Of Diabetic Nerve Pain

Learn More About The Shooting, Burning, Pins And Needles Pain Of Diabetic Nerve Pain

LYRICA may cause serious, even life threatening, allergic reactions. Stop taking LYRICA and call your doctor right away if you have any signs of a serious allergic reaction. Some signs are swelling of your face, mouth, lips, gums, tongue, throat or neck or if you have any trouble breathing, or have a rash, hives or blisters. Drugs used to treat seizures increase the risk of suicidal thoughts or behavior. LYRICA may cause suicidal thoughts or actions in a very small number of people, about 1 in 500. Patients, family members or caregivers should call the doctor right away if they notice suicidal thoughts or actions, thoughts of self harm, or any unusual changes in mood or behavior. These changes may include new or worsening depression, anxiety, restlessness, trouble sleeping, panic attacks, anger, irritability, agitation, aggression, dangerous impulses or violence, or extreme increases in activity or talking. If you have suicidal thoughts or actions, do not stop LYRICA without first talking to your doctor. LYRICA may cause swelling of your hands, legs and feet, which can be serious for people with heart problems. LYRICA may cause dizziness and sleepiness. You should not drive or work with machines until you know how LYRICA affects you. Also, tell your doctor right away about muscle pain or problems along with feeling sick and feverish, or any changes in your eyesight including blurry vision or if you have any kidney problems or get dialysis. Some of the most common side effects of LYRICA are dizziness, blurry vision, weight gain, sleepiness, trouble concentrating, swelling of your hands and feet, dry mouth, and feeling “high.” If you have diabetes, tell your doctor about any skin sores. You may have a higher chance for swelling and hives if you are also taking angiote Continue reading >>

What Is Diabetic Nerve Pain?

What Is Diabetic Nerve Pain?

If you have diabetes and shooting, burning, pins and needles pain in your feet or hands, you could have painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy—also known as diabetic nerve pain. It is a common complication of diabetes. The most common cause is poorly controlled blood sugar over time. Diabetic nerve pain can take years to develop. In the early stages, you may have no signs at all, and then only start to feel a tingling or numbness in your feet. As it progresses, you may also feel the pain in your hands and it is often worse at night. This means that your nerves may be damaged for a long time before you experience painful symptoms. Nerve damage can’t be reversed, but controlling your blood sugar can help prevent further damage. Talk to your doctor if you experience any symptoms of diabetic nerve pain. Symptoms of diabetic nerve pain These are some of the most common symptoms of diabetic nerve pain: Shooting Burning Pins and needles Numbness Electric shock-like Throbbing Tingling Stinging Stabbing Radiating Sensitivity to touch How is diabetic nerve pain different from other pain? There are two types of pain—muscle pain or nerve pain. Both types of pain are your body’s way of telling you that something is wrong but each has its own cause, symptoms, and management. Muscle pain is a "protective" form of pain. It is caused by something specific like an injury or inflammation. The nerves in the injured muscle or joint send electric signals to the brain as a warning that damage has occurred and the activity you’re doing is causing harm. If you limit or stop the harmful activity, muscle pain can get better over time. Nerve pain is a "non-protective" form of pain. It occurs when your nerves are damaged by an injury or disease, such as diabetes. Your nerves send extra el Continue reading >>

Diabetic Nerve Pain: Causes

Diabetic Nerve Pain: Causes

View as slideshow Diabetes is a condition characterized by abnormally high blood sugar levels. Diabetic nerve pain (also called diabetic neuropathy) is a complication of diabetes that is more common in people who have had diabetes for more than 25 years. Researchers are still trying to elucidate how prolonged exposure to high blood sugar levels contributes to diabetic nerve pain. However, the exact cause of diabetic nerve pain is probably the result of a combination of factors, including: damage to the blood vessels that supply oxygen and other nutrients to the nerves nerve inflammation as a result of an overreactive immune system nerve damage as a result of trauma or a coexisting medical condition such as rheumatoid arthritis other metabolic factors such as abnormally high blood lipid levels, low insulin levels, or high blood pressure an inherited susceptibility to nerve damage lifestyle choices such as obesity, smoking or excessive alcohol use. Symptoms Of Diabetic Nerve Pain 60 to 70 percent of people with diabetes develop some form of neuropathy, although some may experience no symptoms at all. Nerve damage occurs slowly, over a number of years, and almost every organ system can be affected, including the digestive tract, heart, and sex organs. Pain and tingling, a numbness or a loss of feeling in the hands, arms, feet or legs is the most commonly reported symptom. Gastrointestinal symptoms, such as nausea, vomiting, indigestion, diarrhea or constipation may signal nerve damage to the gut but be wrongly attributed to some other cause. Other symptoms may include: a wasting of the muscles in the feet or hands dizziness or feeling faint when going from lying down or sitting to standing erectile dysfunction in men or vaginal dryness in women urination problems feeling g Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Effective Relief For Nerve Pain Steps Closer

Diabetes: Effective Relief For Nerve Pain Steps Closer

Drugs that block a protein called HCN2 may have the potential to provide much-needed relief for people with diabetes who have chronic nerve pain. So concludes a study by researchers from King's College London in the United Kingdom, who report their work in the journal Science Translational Medicine. Diabetes is a long-lasting disease that arises when the body either cannot use or does not make enough insulin, which is a hormone that helps cells to turn blood sugar into energy. The global burden of diabetes is rising. In 1980, around 4.7 percent of adults (108 million people) had diabetes. By 2014, this proportion had risen to 8.5 percent (422 million). Many people with the condition experience diabetic nerve pain - that is, a chronic disorder that results from diabetic neuropathy, which is a type of nerve damage caused by high blood sugar. Diabetic nerve pain is a complex condition with several symptoms that can include sharp shooting pains, tingling and prickling sensations, and extreme sensitivity to touch. The symptoms often start in the hands and feet before spreading up into the arms and legs. The pain can be so bad that it impairs mobility, causing people to gain weight, which worsens the effects of diabetes and so sets up a vicious cycle. Urgent need for effective treatments "As many as 1 in 4 diabetics suffer from nerve pain," comments senior author Peter McNaughton, a professor in the Wolfson Centre for Age-Related Diseases at King's College London. "Yet there are currently no effective treatments and people therefore typically must resign themselves to a life of continuous suffering." In their study paper, he and his colleagues also explain that the molecular biology of diabetic nerve pain is poorly understood, so they summarize what has been discovered so far Continue reading >>

Symptoms Of Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

Symptoms Of Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

Diabetic peripheral neuropathy is a condition caused by long-term high blood sugar levels, which causes nerve damage. Some people will not have any symptoms. But for others symptoms may be debilitating. Between 60 and 70 percent of people with diabetes have some form of neuropathy, according to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. Peripheral neuropathy, the most common form of diabetic neuropathy, affects the legs, feet, toes, hands, and arms. Many people do not know that they have diabetes. People unaware of their diabetes may not know what’s causing some of the unusual sensations they’re experiencing. Nerve damage is the result of high levels of blood glucose over long periods of time. It isn’t entirely clear why high glucose levels damage nerves. A number of factors may play a role in nerve fiber damage. One possible component is the intricate interplay between the blood vessels and nerves, according to the Mayo Clinic. Other factors include high blood pressure and cholesterol levels and nerve inflammation. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy usually first appears in the feet and legs, and may occur in the hands and arms later. A common symptom of diabetic peripheral neuropathy is numbness. Sometimes you may be unable to feel your feet while walking. Other times, your hands or feet will tingle or burn. Or it may feel like you’re wearing a sock or glove when you’re not. Sometimes you may experience sudden, sharp pains that feel like an electrical current. Other times, you may feel cramping, like when you’re grasping something like a piece of silverware. You also may sometimes unintentionally drop items you’re holding as a result of diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Walking with a wobbly motion or even losing your balance can res Continue reading >>

Diabetic Neuropathydiabetic Neuropathy Symptoms, Causes, Diagnosis, And Treatment

Diabetic Neuropathydiabetic Neuropathy Symptoms, Causes, Diagnosis, And Treatment

Diabetic neuropathy definition and facts Diabetes is thought to damage nerves as a result of prolonged elevated levels of blood glucose. Peripheral neuropathy most commonly causes: Autonomic neuropathy causes symptoms related to dysfunction of an organ system, such as: Diagnosis of diabetic neuropathy is usually done by a clinical exam. There is no cure for diabetic neuropathy, but treatments are available to manage the symptoms. Diabetic nerve pain may be controlled by medications such as tricyclic antidepressants, duloxetine (Cymbalta), or certain antiseizure medications. Keeping tight control of blood sugar levels is the best way to prevent diabetic neuropathy and other complications of diabetes. Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy: Improve Diabetes Nerve Pain What are the symptoms and signs of diabetic neuropathy? The symptoms and signs of diabetic neuropathy depend upon the type of neuropathy that is present. Signs and symptoms can also vary in severity among affected people. Signs and symptoms of diabetic peripheral neuropathy include: Numbness or tingling of the feet and lower legs Pain or burning sensations Loss of sensation in the feet or lower legs Sometimes, but less commonly, these symptoms can occur in the hands or arms Signs and symptoms of diabetic proximal neuropathy include: Pain, usually on one side, in the hips, buttocks, or thighs Signs and symptoms of diabetic autonomic neuropathy depend upon the organ system that is involved and can include: Feeling full after eating a small amount Inability to empty the bladder completely Decrease in vaginal lubrication in women Rapid resting heartbeat Signs and symptoms of diabetic focal neuropathy also depend upon the location of the affected nerve. The symptoms can appear suddenly. It usually does not cause a long t Continue reading >>

Diabetic Neuropathy Symptoms

Diabetic Neuropathy Symptoms

The symptoms of diabetic neuropathy depend on what type of neuropathy you have. Symptoms are dependent on which nerves have been damaged. In general, diabetic neuropathy symptoms develop gradually; they may seem like minor and infrequent pains or problems at first, but as the nerves become more damaged, symptoms may grow. Don’t overlook mild symptoms. They can indicate the beginning of neuropathy. Talk to your doctor about anything you notice—such as any pain, numbness, weakness, or tingling—even if it seems insignificant. Your pain may mean the control of your diabetes could be improved, which will can help slow down the progression of your neuropathy. Pain and numbness are also important warning signs to take very good care of your feet, so you can avoid wounds and infections that can be difficult to heal and even raise risk for amputation. 1 Peripheral Neuropathy Symptoms Peripheral neuropathy affects nerves leading to your extremities—the feet, legs, hands, and arms. The nerves leading to your feet are the longest in your body, so they are the most often affected nerves (simply because there’s more of them to be damaged). Peripheral neuropathy is the most common form of diabetic neuropathy. Peripheral neuropathy symptoms include: Pain Burning, stabbing or electric-shock sensations Numbness (loss of feeling) Tingling Muscle weakness Poor coordination Muscle cramping and/or twitching Insensitivity to pain and/or temperature Extreme sensitivity to even the lightest touch Symptoms get worse at night. 2, 3 Autonomic Neuropathy Symptoms The autonomic nervous system is in charge of the "involuntary" functions of your body. It keeps your heart pumping and makes sure you digest your food right—without you needing to think about it. Autonomic neuropathy symptoms i Continue reading >>

Diabetic Neuropathy

Diabetic Neuropathy

Print Overview Diabetic neuropathy is a type of nerve damage that can occur if you have diabetes. High blood sugar (glucose) can injure nerve fibers throughout your body, but diabetic neuropathy most often damages nerves in your legs and feet. Depending on the affected nerves, symptoms of diabetic neuropathy can range from pain and numbness in your extremities to problems with your digestive system, urinary tract, blood vessels and heart. For some people, these symptoms are mild; for others, diabetic neuropathy can be painful, disabling and even fatal. Diabetic neuropathy is a common serious complication of diabetes. Yet you can often prevent diabetic neuropathy or slow its progress with tight blood sugar control and a healthy lifestyle. Symptoms There are four main types of diabetic neuropathy. You may have just one type or symptoms of several types. Most develop gradually, and you may not notice problems until considerable damage has occurred. The signs and symptoms of diabetic neuropathy vary, depending on the type of neuropathy and which nerves are affected. Peripheral neuropathy Peripheral neuropathy is the most common form of diabetic neuropathy. Your feet and legs are often affected first, followed by your hands and arms. Signs and symptoms of peripheral neuropathy are often worse at night, and may include: Numbness or reduced ability to feel pain or temperature changes A tingling or burning sensation Sharp pains or cramps Increased sensitivity to touch — for some people, even the weight of a bed sheet can be agonizing Muscle weakness Loss of reflexes, especially in the ankle Loss of balance and coordination Serious foot problems, such as ulcers, infections, deformities, and bone and joint pain Autonomic neuropathy The autonomic nervous system controls your hea Continue reading >>

The Doctor-approved Guide To Diabetic Neuropathy Treatments

The Doctor-approved Guide To Diabetic Neuropathy Treatments

Preventing diabetic nerve pain Start with this blood sugar level guide to help manage your diabetes, because the adage that an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure rings true when it comes to diabetic neuropathy, says Caroline Messer, MD, an endocrinologist at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. High blood sugar increases the risk of all diabetes side effects including painful nerve damage, and that’s what leads to diabetic neuropathy treatment. “Keeping blood sugar—glucose—under tight control can help stave off nerve damage and pain,” she says. This means eating a careful diet, regular monitoring plus medications. “We can treat blood sugar with insulin or add on new classes of blood sugar-lowering drugs to bring glucose down to where it should be.” Preventing the condition requires the same lifestyle changes that you’d make for diabetes in general, including quitting smoking and keeping weight in the normal range, adds Gary W. Jay, MD, a clinical professor of neurology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. “Once you develop the pain, however, it’s not going to get better without treatment.” Want better control over your condition? Try this step-by-step plan to reverse diabetes. Diagnosing diabetic nerve pain What is diabetic neuropathy? The first symptom tends to be numbness and pain in your hands and feet, and this pain feels and acts differently than other types of pain. “It feels like burning electrical impulses are shooting through your feet and legs, and it is often symmetrical,” Dr. Messer says. Some people report numbness or pins and needles, she says. It also tends to occur at rest not during activity. By contrast, peripheral artery disease (PAD)—which also travels with diabetes—is worse with activity. “Es Continue reading >>

More in diabetes