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Pre Diabetes Diet Plan

Pre Diabetes Diet Plan

It’s estimated that almost 50% of the American population has diabetes or prediabetes – a condition where blood sugar is higher than normal levels. It is accompanied by insulin resistance, a risk factor for full-blown diabetes, and other health complications. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) data estimates the recent prevalence of total diabetes, diagnosed diabetes and undiagnosed diabetes’ US trends to be 12-14% among US adults. So, neither should you shrug off your doctor’s advice, nor should you be taking your elevated blood sugar levels lightly. Generally, the power of a pre-diabetes diet plan, for getting those numbers back on track, is underestimated. Prediabetes is diagnosed when fasting blood sugar levels range from 100 to 125 mg/dl, or hemoglobin A1C levels range from 5.7 to 6.4%. One needs to undergo regular prediabetes tests to be sure. But, with the right pre-diabetes diet plan, one starts to feel the difference in their energy levels soon enough. MORE: Take the Prediabetes Risk Test This is a chance to take control. Simple and daily lifestyle changes, like a balanced diet and regular exercise, that help you lose weight go a long way towards warding off the risk of progressing to full-blown type 2 diabetes. Pre-Diabetes Diet Plan: Changes You Need To Make Today If you already have pre-diabetes, you are likely to develop type 2 diabetes (T2D) within the next 10 years unless you make some changes, starting from today. It’s time to adopt a new pre-diabetes diet plan built on some basic principles: Don’t Skip Breakfast You may barely make it to office on time, but that doesn’t mean you skip breakfast. That means you wake up earlier! A healthy breakfast starts your day on the right note. It gives your metabolism the kick-sta Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet Plan: Guidelines, Tips & Sample Menu

Diabetes Diet Plan: Guidelines, Tips & Sample Menu

Living with type 2 diabetes is not an easy feat. Add to that the hype around ‘Clean Eating’ which can easily overwhelm any diabetic with all the restrictions it poses. It’s true that living well with diabetes type 2 starts with the right diet plan. However, it doesn’t have to be an everyday challenge to figure out what to eat to keep your blood sugar levels balanced. Let’s look at what should be a good diet plan for diabetics. The Basics Of A Good Diabetes Diet Plan A Mix of Nutritious & Natural Foods Let me simplify this. A good type 2 diabetes diet plan ensures that you get: Adequate amount of fiber-rich whole grains Fresh fruits and vegetables Organic lean cuts of organic meats, and A good amount of healthy fats from sources like fatty fish, avocados, coconut oil and grass-fed butter The basics of a diabetes diet plan are simple. Smoke out all hidden sugars from your diet, cut back on carbohydrates, add more fiber to your diet and choose the fats you eat wisely. Minimum Carbohydrates It’s imperative that you understand it’s not just sugars that are responsible for elevated blood sugar. All carbohydrates get broken down into sugars. For this reason, choosing the right source of carb is an essential part of your diabetes diet plan. Vegetables and fruits are the right sources of carbs for any diabetic. Refined carbohydrates with a high glycemic index are best avoided, as the body readily transforms them into simple sugars. When choosing grains, complex carbohydrates are better choices. Brown rice, quinoa, barley, steel-cut oats, whole-wheat breads, buckwheat, and millets are some examples of complex carbohydrates. Here at Sepalika, we highly recommend a LCHF or Low Carb-High Fat diet to reverse diabetes, coupled with intermittent fasting. Together, these h Continue reading >>

Everything You Need To Know About A Diabetic Diet

Everything You Need To Know About A Diabetic Diet

Not only are 86 million Americans prediabetic, but 90% of them don't even know they have it, the Centers for Disease Control reports. What's more, doctors diagnose as many as 1.5 million new cases of diabetes each year, according to the American Diabetes Association. Whether you're at risk, prediabetic or following a diabetic diet as suggested by your doctor, a few simple strategies can help control blood sugar and potentially reverse the disease entirely. Plus, implementing just a few of these dietary changes can have other beneficial effects like weight loss, all without sacrificing flavor or feeling deprived. First, let's start with the basics. What is diabetes? There are two main forms of diabetes: type 1 and type 2. Type 1 is an autoimmune disease that's usually diagnosed during childhood. Environmental and genetic factors can lead to the destruction of the beta cells in the pancreas that produce insulin. That's the hormone responsible for delivering glucose (sugar) to your cells for metabolism and storage. In contrast, type 2 diabetes is often diagnosed in adulthood and caused by a variety of lifestyle factors like obesity, physical inactivity and high cholesterol. Typically, type 2 diabetics still have functioning beta cells, meaning that they're still producing insulin. However, the peripheral tissues become less sensitive to the hormone, and the liver produces more glucose, causing high blood sugar. When left unmanaged, type 2 diabetics may stop producing insulin altogether. While you may have some symptoms of high blood sugar (nausea, lethargy, frequent thirst and/or urination), a clinical diagnosis of diabetes or prediabetes requires a repeat test of your blood sugar levels. How does a diabetic diet help? Unlike many other health conditions, the incredible th Continue reading >>

Diabetic Diet

Diabetic Diet

If you have diabetes, your body cannot make or properly use insulin. This leads to high blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels. Healthy eating helps keep your blood sugar in your target range. It is a critical part of managing your diabetes, because controlling your blood sugar can prevent the complications of diabetes. A registered dietitian can help make an eating plan just for you. It should take into account your weight, medicines, lifestyle, and other health problems you have. Healthy diabetic eating includes Limiting foods that are high in sugar Eating smaller portions, spread out over the day Being careful about when and how many carbohydrates you eat Eating a variety of whole-grain foods, fruits and vegetables every day Eating less fat Limiting your use of alcohol Using less salt NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Continue reading >>

Basic Diabetes Meal Plan

Basic Diabetes Meal Plan

Diabetes meal planning starts with eating a well-balanced diet that includes carbohydrates (carbs), protein, and fat. Carbs (found in starches, fruit, vegetables, milk/yogurt and sweets) turn into sugar (glucose) in the body. The body needs carbs for energy. Eating too many carbs can raise blood glucose levels too much, but it is important not cut out these foods. Eating too few carbs may cause your blood glucose to go too low. Eating a moderate amount of carbs at each meal, with a balanced intake of protein and fat, will help your blood glucose stay in a healthy range. Here are some tips to get you started. Your dietitian will give you more specific information when you meet with him or her. Limit your intake and portion sizes of high-sugar foods to 2 or 3 times a week or less. These include: Cakes (frosted, layer, plain), pies, and cookies Candy (hard tack, chocolate, nougats, etc.) Jelly, jam, and preserves Table sugar, honey, molasses, and syrup Regular ice cream, sherbet, regular and frozen yogurt, fruit ices, and Popsicles Regular soft drinks, fruit drinks (canned or concentrated), and drink mixes with sugar added Milkshakes, chocolate milk, hot cocoa mix Sugar coated cereals, granola, breakfast/snack bars Canned fruits with heavy syrup, dried fruit, fruit roll-ups, candied fruit Iced sweet breads, coffee cakes, breakfast rolls, and donuts Avoid the following: Table sugar, honey, molasses and syrup Regular soft drinks, fruit drinks (canned or concentrated), and drink mixes with sugar added Milkshakes, chocolate milk, hot cocoa mix Canned fruits with heavy syrup Eat 3 well-balanced meals a day and a small snack at night. Each meal should contain both carbs and protein. When planning meals, select a variety of foods from each food group, and watch your portion sizes Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet, Eating, & Physical Activity

Diabetes Diet, Eating, & Physical Activity

Nutrition and physical activity are important parts of a healthy lifestyle when you have diabetes. Along with other benefits, following a healthy meal plan and being active can help you keep your blood glucose level, also called blood sugar, in your target range. To manage your blood glucose, you need to balance what you eat and drink with physical activity and diabetes medicine, if you take any. What you choose to eat, how much you eat, and when you eat are all important in keeping your blood glucose level in the range that your health care team recommends. Becoming more active and making changes in what you eat and drink can seem challenging at first. You may find it easier to start with small changes and get help from your family, friends, and health care team. Eating well and being physically active most days of the week can help you keep your blood glucose level, blood pressure, and cholesterol in your target ranges prevent or delay diabetes problems feel good and have more energy What foods can I eat if I have diabetes? You may worry that having diabetes means going without foods you enjoy. The good news is that you can still eat your favorite foods, but you might need to eat smaller portions or enjoy them less often. Your health care team will help create a diabetes meal plan for you that meets your needs and likes. The key to eating with diabetes is to eat a variety of healthy foods from all food groups, in the amounts your meal plan outlines. The food groups are vegetables nonstarchy: includes broccoli, carrots, greens, peppers, and tomatoes starchy: includes potatoes, corn, and green peas fruits—includes oranges, melon, berries, apples, bananas, and grapes grains—at least half of your grains for the day should be whole grains includes wheat, rice, oats, co Continue reading >>

One Week Meal Plan

One Week Meal Plan

C = carbohydrates servings/exchanges P = protein servings/exchanges F = fat servings/exchanges Day One Breakfast 1 cup cooked oatmeal made with water (2 C) 2 walnuts, chopped (1 F) 1 poached egg (1 P) Cinnamon Lunch 2 slices whole-wheat bread (2 C) 3 ounces turkey, tuna or other lean protein (3 P) Lettuce, tomato Mustard Snack Baked apple (1 C) 4 walnuts, chopped (2 F) Dinner Salad with 2 tsp. olive oil plus vinegar (2 F) 1 medium size sweet potato (2 C) 1 cup broccoli, steamed with ½ cup no-salt canned diced tomatoes (1 C) 5 ounces salmon, grilled with garlic and 1 Tbsp. of light teriyaki sauce (5 P) Snack 1 fruit (1 C) 6 almonds, slivered (1 F) Day Two Breakfast 1 ½ cups Wheatena made with water (3 C) 1 fruit (1 C) 2 walnuts, chopped (1 F) Cinnamon Lunch 1 large slice pizza plain or with vegetables (2 C) (2 P) (2 F) Snack 1 fruit (1 C) ¼ cup cottage cheese (1 P) Dinner 6 ounces fish, poultry, or lean meat (6 P) 3 cups vegetables (2 C) 1 slice low-fat cheese melted on top (1 P) 2 Tbsp. avocado (1 F) Snack 2 fruits (2 C) 12 almonds (2 F) Day Three Breakfast 1 cup cooked Wheatena or grits or oatmeal (2 C) 4 walnuts, chopped (2 F) 1 slice whole grain bread (1C) ¼ cup 1% cottage cheese or 1 slice low-fat cheese (1P) Lunch Large salad: 3 cups salad/veggies (1 C) Add 4 ounces shrimp (4 P) 2-4 Tbsp low-fat dressing (2F) 1 small roll (1C) Snack 12 ounces low-sodium V8 or tomato juice (1 C) Dinner Large Salad (1 C) 4 ounces of chicken (4 P) 2 Tbsp. light dressing (1 F) 1 fruit (1 C) Snack 1 fruits (1 C) 6 cashews (1 F) Day Four Breakfast 1 slice whole-grain bread (1 C) ½ cup fat-free or 1% cottage cheese (2 P) 1 cup fresh fruit (1 C) Lunch 2 slices rye bread (2 C) 2 slices low-fat cheese (2 P) or 2 ounces turkey, tuna, salmon 2 slices tomato Snack 3-4 cups of popcorn (1 C) Continue reading >>

Treatment Of Diabetes: The Diabetic Diet

Treatment Of Diabetes: The Diabetic Diet

The mainstays of diabetes treatment are: Working towards obtaining ideal body weight Following a diabetic diet Regular exercise Diabetic medication if needed Note: Type 1 diabetes must be treated with insulin; if you have type 2 diabetes, you may not need to take insulin. This involves injecting insulin under the skin for it to work. Insulin cannot be taken as a pill because the digestive juices in the stomach would destroy the insulin before it could work. Scientists are looking for new ways to give insulin. But today, shots are the only method. There are, however, new methods to give the shots. Insulin pumps are now being widely used and many people are having great results. In this Article Working towards obtaining ideal body weight An estimate of ideal body weight can be calculated using this formula: For women: Start with 100 pounds for 5 feet tall. Add 5 pounds for every inch over 5 feet. If you are under 5 feet, subtract 5 pounds for each inch under 5 feet. This will give you your ideal weight. If you have a large frame, add 10%. If you have a small frame, subtract 10%. A good way to decide your frame size is to look at your wrist size compared to other women's. Example: A woman who is 5' 4" tall and has a large frame 100 pounds + 20 pounds (4 inches times 5 pounds per inch) = 120 pounds. Add 10% for large frame (in this case 10% of 120 pounds is 12 pounds). 120 pounds + 12 pounds = 132 pounds ideal body weight. For men: Start with 106 pounds for a height of 5 foot. Add 6 pounds for every inch above 5 foot. For a large frame, add 10%. For a small frame, subtract 10%. (See above for further details.) Learn More about Treating Type 2 Diabetes The Diabetic Diet Diet is very important in diabetes. There are differing philosophies on what is the best diet but below is Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Diet

Type 1 Diabetes Diet

Type 1 diabetes diet definition and facts In Type 1 diabetes the pancreas can do longer release insulin. The high blood sugar that results can lead to complications such as kidney, nerve, and eye damage, and cardiovascular disease. Glycemic index and glycemic load are scientific terms used to measure he impact of a food on blood sugar. Foods with low glycemic load (index) raise blood sugar modestly, and thus are better choices for people with diabetes. Meal timing is very important for people with type 1 diabetes. Meals must match insulin doses. Eating meals with a low glycemic load (index) makes meal timing easier. Low glycemic load meals raise blood sugar slowly and steadily, leaving plenty of time for the body (or the injected insulin dose) to respond. Skipping a meal or eating late puts a person at risk for low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). Foods to eat for a type 1 diabetic diet include complex carbohydrates such as brown rice, whole wheat, quinoa, oatmeal, fruits, vegetables, beans, and lentils. Foods to avoid for a type 1 diabetes diet include sodas (both diet and regular), simple carbohydrates - processed/refined sugars (white bread, pastries, chips, cookies, pastas), trans fats (anything with the word hydrogenated on the label), and high-fat animal products. Fats don't have much of a direct effect on blood sugar but they can be useful in slowing the absorption of carbohydrates. Protein provides steady energy with little effect on blood sugar. It keeps blood sugar stable, and can help with sugar cravings and feeling full after eating. Protein-packed foods to include on your menu are beans, legumes, eggs, seafood, dairy, peas, tofu, and lean meats and poultry. The Mediterranean diet plan is often recommended for people with type 1 diabetes because it is full of nut Continue reading >>

Your Diabetes Menu Plan

Your Diabetes Menu Plan

How do you get all the nutrition you need in a day while still being mindful of calories and carbs? The secret is to plan ahead. Meal planning depends on lots of things, like your taste preferences, medications, and activity level, says Jill Weisenberger, RDN, CDE, author of Diabetes Weight Loss -- Week by Week. But good general advice to follow is to keep your carbs consistent -- eat the same amount at breakfast, lunch, and dinner to keep blood sugar from spiking or dipping too low. Weisenberger recommends 45 grams as a target for the three main meals of the day. "If you go lower than 30 grams at a meal, it's going to be really hard to get all the nutrients you need, such as fiber and phytochemicals," the health-boosting nutrients in fruits and vegetables. This sample meal plan provides 1,400 calories. Supplement with healthy snacks to reach your personal calorie goals. If you're rushed in the mornings, make breakfast a snap with mix-and-match prepared items such as hardboiled eggs, nuts or seeds, a part-skim cheese stick, peanut butter, or yogurt for protein; toast, crispbread, or unsweetened instant oatmeal for whole grains; plus any kind of fruit -- dried fruit, a banana, an apple. Menu Avocado Toast and Egg Café au lait made with a half cup 1% milk Medium orange Avocado Toast and Egg This has to be one of the most satisfying, easy breakfasts around, thanks to a helping of fiber from the avocado and whole-grain bread. For an extra flavor kick, sprinkle with Cajun seasoning or smoked paprika. Makes 1 serving. Ingredients: 1 slice 100% whole grain bread 1/5 avocado 1 egg salt and pepper Directions: 1. Toast bread. Scoop out avocado and mash onto toast. Top with a poached or soft-boiled egg and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Per serving: 235 calories, 10 g protein, 19 Continue reading >>

Diabetic Menu

Diabetic Menu

Many people go through life in a carefree manner; indulging in their passions and whatever foods they want. Sometimes, though, a serious medical diagnosis can snap us back to reality, and force us to realize that we need to pay attention to our health, and perhaps most importantly, what we eat. Thousands of Americans face this unfortunate reality each day after their health care professional explains to them that they have diabetes. Although living with diabetes is not fatal, it can lead to extremely serious secondary complications if the disease is not detected and treated properly. If you are diabetic and don't follow a proper diabetic menu, things will only get worse for you. Someone who doesn't follow a proper diabetic diet, and eats whatever they want could end up suffering from a heart attack, developing gangrene, or even blindness. These are horrible complications, but they can be completely avoided. If you don't want these complications to become a reality, it's important that you eat the right diet. So, what type of foods can you expect on a diabetic menu? Contrary to popular belief, if you have diabetes, you can still eat a variety of different foods. You just need to pay really close attention to nutrition. It's important that you consult with your physician before you start any type of diet. He or she can recommend the proper amounts of nutrients you should include in your diet, especially when it comes to carbohydrates. Carbohydrates are linked to the blood glucose levels in your body, which is related to insulin. For many diabetics, insulin levels need to be monitored closely, as they have a direct effect on your health. In addition to watching your carbohydrate intake, you will likely need to watch your sugar intake too. As a substitute to sweeten your te Continue reading >>

Lunch Menu For A Diabetic

Lunch Menu For A Diabetic

Following a diabetic meal plan isn't about being deprived, assures the American Diabetes Association. Instead, you make informed choices about what foods can enhance your health while helping you control weight and blood sugar. All healthy diets should include grains, fruits, vegetables, lean protein sources and calcium-rich foods daily. A diabetic menu -- including one for lunchtime -- emphasizes certain foods from each of these categories. Ask your doctor or a nutritionist if you need help developing a diabetic-friendly meal plan that fits your lifestyle. Video of the Day The ADA recommends that about half of a healthy diabetic meal should consist of nonstarchy vegetables. These have fewer total carbohydrates and more fiber than starchy vegetables such as corn or potatoes, meaning they won't cause dramatic spikes in your blood sugar level. Nonstarchy vegetable choices include asparagus, cucumbers, mushrooms, tomatoes, all types of lettuce, cabbage and carrots. A typical lunch for a diabetic might start with a large salad of mixed greens and chopped, raw vegetables, topped with a sugar-free vinaigrette. About 25 percent of the ideal lunch for a diabetic should be grains or high-starch vegetables, beans or legumes. Skip products made with refined grains like white-flour bread or white rice in favor of whole grain items such as whole-wheat bread, whole-grain pasta, brown rice, oatmeal, barley or quinoa, all of which have a low glycemic index and can help keep your blood sugar level steady. Along with your lunch salad, try seasoned black beans wrapped into a whole-wheat tortilla along with your choice of vegetables. A rich source of protein should take up the remaining 25 percent of a healthy diabetic lunch. Choose skinless poultry, fish, shellfish, nuts and seeds, soy pr Continue reading >>

Understanding How Food Affects Your Blood Sugar

Understanding How Food Affects Your Blood Sugar

Carbohydrates Blood glucose is affected most by carbohydrates. And insulin dosing is typically based on food intake, especially carbohydrates. Knowing what foods contain carbohydrates and the amount of carbohydrates in a meal is helpful for blood glucose control. You should aim to include carbohydrates in each meal. Carbohydrate sources like vegetables, fruits and whole grains (high fiber) are preferred over carbohydrate sources with added fats, sugars and salt. Proteins are a necessary part of a balanced diet and can keep you from feeling hungry. They also do not raise your blood glucose like carbohydrates. However, to prevent weight gain, use portion control with proteins. In people with Type 2 diabetes, protein makes insulin work faster, so it may not be a good idea to treat low blood sugar with protein shakes or mixes. Fats Fats are a necessary part of a balanced diet, especially healthy fats like olive oil and fatty fish. The five food groups Some people believe that a diabetes diagnosis means “goodbye” to good food. Not so. Having diabetes does not mean that you can no longer enjoy good food, or that you have to give up your favorite foods. Living with diabetes means eating regular, healthy meals from the following five food groups: Grains and starches Vegetables Fruits Milk & alternatives Meat & alternatives Making healthy food choices Your dietitian or diabetes educator can help you to develop an eating plan that is right for you and fits into your lifestyle. Here are some guidelines for healthy eating: Healthy eating for diabetes is healthy eating for the whole family. Enjoy having regular meals, starting with breakfast first, then lunch and dinner. Space meals no more than 6 hours apart. Eat a variety of foods in each meal, including healthy fats, lean mea Continue reading >>

Diabetic Plan

Diabetic Plan

Keep your carb intake in check while enjoying simple and flavorful meals your entire family will love. Eating smart with diabetes doesn't have to be complicated. With the eMeals Diabetic plan, enjoy easy to prepare, good for you recipes that take the stress out of planning carb-smart meals. Choose a Plan Continue reading >>

The Best And Worst Foods To Eat In A Type 2 Diabetes Diet

The Best And Worst Foods To Eat In A Type 2 Diabetes Diet

Following a type 2 diabetes diet doesn’t mean you have to give up all the things you love — you can still enjoy a wide range of foods and, in some cases, even help reverse type 2 diabetes. Indeed, creating a diet for diabetes is a balancing act: It includes a variety of healthy carbohydrates, fats, and proteins. The trick is ultimately choosing the right combination of foods that will help keep your blood sugar level in your target range and avoid big swings that can cause diabetes symptoms — from the frequent urination and thirst of high blood sugar to the fatigue, dizziness, headaches, and mood changes of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). The Basics of the Type 2 Diabetes Diet: What Should You Eat? To follow a healthy diet for type 2 diabetes, you must first understand how different foods affect your blood sugar. Carbohydrates, which are found to the largest degree in grains, bread, pasta, milk, sweets, fruit, and starchy vegetables, are broken down into glucose in the blood faster than other types of food, which raises blood sugar, potentially leading to hyperglycemia. Protein and fats do not directly impact blood sugar, but both should be consumed in moderation to keep calories down and weight in a healthy range. To hit your blood sugar level target, eat a variety of foods but monitor portions for foods with a high carbohydrate content, says Alison Massey, RD, CDE, the director of diabetes education at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore. “[Foods high in carbohydrates] have the most impact on blood sugar level. This is why some people with diabetes count their carbohydrates at meals and snacks,” she says. How Many Carbs Can You Eat If You Have Diabetes? According to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), you can calculate Continue reading >>

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