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Diabetic Mediterranean Diet Meal Plan

Type 1 Diabetes Diet

Type 1 Diabetes Diet

Type 1 diabetes diet definition and facts In Type 1 diabetes the pancreas can do longer release insulin. The high blood sugar that results can lead to complications such as kidney, nerve, and eye damage, and cardiovascular disease. Glycemic index and glycemic load are scientific terms used to measure he impact of a food on blood sugar. Foods with low glycemic load (index) raise blood sugar modestly, and thus are better choices for people with diabetes. Meal timing is very important for people with type 1 diabetes. Meals must match insulin doses. Eating meals with a low glycemic load (index) makes meal timing easier. Low glycemic load meals raise blood sugar slowly and steadily, leaving plenty of time for the body (or the injected insulin dose) to respond. Skipping a meal or eating late puts a person at risk for low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). Foods to eat for a type 1 diabetic diet include complex carbohydrates such as brown rice, whole wheat, quinoa, oatmeal, fruits, vegetables, beans, and lentils. Foods to avoid for a type 1 diabetes diet include sodas (both diet and regular), simple carbohydrates - processed/refined sugars (white bread, pastries, chips, cookies, pastas), trans fats (anything with the word hydrogenated on the label), and high-fat animal products. Fats don't have much of a direct effect on blood sugar but they can be useful in slowing the absorption of carbohydrates. Protein provides steady energy with little effect on blood sugar. It keeps blood sugar stable, and can help with sugar cravings and feeling full after eating. Protein-packed foods to include on your menu are beans, legumes, eggs, seafood, dairy, peas, tofu, and lean meats and poultry. The Mediterranean diet plan is often recommended for people with type 1 diabetes because it is full of nut Continue reading >>

Low-carb Mediterranean Diet

Low-carb Mediterranean Diet

© 2010 Steve Parker, M.D. After a year of intense research and analysis, version 2.0 of the Low-Carb Mediterranean Diet is ready. It’s a work in progress that may be improved periodically. Check back for updates. Precautions and Disclaimer The ideas and suggestions in this document are provided as general educational information only and should not be construed as medical advice or care. Information herein is meant to complement, not replace, any advice or information from your personal health professional. All matters regarding your health require supervision by a personal physician or other appropriate health professional familiar with your current health status. Always consult your personal physician before making any dietary or exercise changes. Steve Parker, M.D., and pxHealth disclaim any liability or warranties of any kind arising directly or indirectly from use of this diet. If any medical problems develop, always consult your personal physician. Only your physician can provide you medical advice. You should not follow this diet if you are a child, pregnant or lactating, have alcoholism or history of alcohol abuse, have abnormal liver or kidney function, or have gout or a high uric acid blood level. If you take medications for high blood pressure or diabetes, they may need to be stopped or reduced by your personal physician. Introduction The Low-Carb Mediterranean Diet is designed specifically for people who have one or more of the following conditions: Metabolic syndrome Excess body weight they want to lose with a low-carb Mediterranean-style diet Diabetes and prediabetes always involve impaired carbohydrate metabolism; metabolic syndrome and simple excess weight often do, too. Over time, excessive carbohydrate consumption can turn overweight and metabolic s Continue reading >>

The Mediterranean Diet And Diabetes

The Mediterranean Diet And Diabetes

If you have diabetes or are pre-diabetic, a diabetic eating plan is very important to maintain a healthy life. The recommended diet plan below is nutrient rich and low in fat and calories. A common eating mistake many diabetics make is skipping meals then overeating. A Sample Diet Plan A diabetic eating schedule may be four to six small meals over the course of a day. Eating small portions, many times over the day could be easier for the body to metabolize the vitamins, minerals and sugars. 1 slice toasted whole wheat bread with 1 teaspoon margarine 1/4 cup egg substitute or cottage cheese 1/2 cup oatmeal 1/2 cup skim milk 1/2 small banana Lunch: (535 calories, 75 grams carbohydrate) 1 cup vegetable soup with 4-6 crackers 1 turkey sandwich (2 slices whole wheat bread, 1 ounce turkey and 1 ounce low-fat cheese, 1 teaspoon mayonnaise) 1 small apple Dinner: (635 calories, 65 grams carbohydrate) 4 ounces broiled chicken breast with basil and oregano sprinkled on top 2/3 cup cooked brown rice 1/2 cup cooked carrots 1 small whole grain dinner roll with 1 teaspoon margarine Tossed salad with 2 tablespoons low-fat salad dressing 4 unsweetened canned apricot halves or 1 small slice of angel food cake Snacks: (Each has 60 calories or 15 grams carbohydrate. Pick two per day.) 16 fat-free tortilla chips with salsa 1/2 cup artificially sweetened chocolate pudding 1 ounce string cheese plus one small piece of fruit 3 cups lite popcorn Best Foods to Eat Grains and Starchy Vegetables Foods with a glycemic index lower than 55 are considered low glycemic foods, and are usually excellent choices. You may be surprised to hear that whole grains like brown rice are ideal starchy food choices, whereas beets, pumpkin, sweet potatoes and white potatoes are not. Glycemic Index of Cereals Kellogg Continue reading >>

Mediterranean Diet For Heart Health - Mayo Clinic

Mediterranean Diet For Heart Health - Mayo Clinic

If you're looking for a heart-healthy eating plan, the Mediterranean diet might be right for you. The Mediterranean diet incorporates the basics of healthy eating plus a splash of flavorful olive oil and perhaps a glass of red wine among other components characterizing the traditional cooking style of countries bordering the Mediterranean Sea. Most healthy diets include fruits, vegetables, fish and whole grains, and limit unhealthy fats. While these parts of a healthy diet are tried-and-true, subtle variations or differences in proportions of certain foods may make a difference in your risk of heart disease. Research has shown that the traditional Mediterranean diet reduces the risk of heart disease. The diet has been associated with a lower level of oxidized low-density lipoprotein ( LDL ) cholesterol the "bad" cholesterol that's more likely to build up deposits in your arteries. In fact, a meta-analysis of more than 1.5 million healthy adults demonstrated that following a Mediterranean diet was associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular mortality as well as overall mortality. The Mediterranean diet is also associated with a reduced incidence of cancer, and Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. Women who eat a Mediterranean diet supplemented with extra-virgin olive oil and mixed nuts may have a reduced risk of breast cancer. For these reasons, most if not all major scientific organizations encourage healthy adults to adapt a style of eating like that of the Mediterranean diet for prevention of major chronic diseases. 2009 Oldways Preservation and Exchange Trust The Mediterranean diet traditionally includes fruits, vegetables, pasta and rice. For example, residents of Greece eat very little red meat and average nine servings a day of antioxidant-rich fruits and v Continue reading >>

5 Awesome Mediterranean Meal Plans

5 Awesome Mediterranean Meal Plans

Ive encountered my fair share of diets and Ive even investigated a few on this site already, but one thats always fascinated me is the Mediterranean diet. Although, I hate to even call it a diet since its really more of a lifestyle than a food regime. When I think of the word diet I almost automatically assume there are some restrictions and limitations ahead. However, with the Mediterranean diet, it never actually feels like youre missing out on anything thanks to the variety of tasty food options available. In todays post, Ill show you exactly what the Mediterranean diet looks like, what the research shows about it, and how to incorporate this lifestyle into your weekly meal planning . Originally dating back to the 1970s, the Mediterranean diet was first introduced by an American scientist by the name of Ancel Keys and his wife, Margaret Keys, a chemist. Unfortunately, the diet didnt take off until about 20 years later in the 1990s. When Ancel first introduced the notion of the Mediterranean diet, he suggested that by following the dietary patterns of people living in Greece, Italy, and Spain, you could improve your overall health. According to the original theories , by implementing a diet rich in healthy fats you may even reduce your risk of health issues like cardiovascular disease . According to the Mayo Clinic , the following guidelines are used when following the Mediterranean diet. Consume meats and sweets on a less frequent basis than most of us are used to Consume moderate amounts of poultry, eggs, cheese, and yogurt Choose fish and seafood at least twice a week, if not more Include fruits, veggies, whole grains, olive oil, beans, nuts, legumes, seeds, herbs, and spices in as many of your meals as possible Thanks to the geographical location of the Mediterra Continue reading >>

Is The Mediterranean Diet Best For Diabetes?

Is The Mediterranean Diet Best For Diabetes?

Is the Mediterranean Diet Best for Diabetes? Research shows the heart-healthy Mediterranean diet is also beneficial for people with type 2 diabetes. Find out how this approach can improve your blood sugar and help you lose weight. Sign Up for Our Living with Diabetes Newsletter Thanks for signing up! You might also like these other newsletters: Sign up for more FREE Everyday Health newsletters . Years of research shows that this way of eating offers advantages for people living with type 2 diabetes. Following a Mediterranean diet can help people with type 2 diabetes improve blood sugar control and lose weight, all the while satisfying the taste buds with fresh, flavorful ingredients. The diet which gets its name from the traditional eating and cooking patterns of people in countries bordering the Mediterranean Sea has long been studied for its heart health benefits , but research also suggests this approach can offer advantages for people living with type 2 diabetes. In a study published in March 2013 in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition , researchers in the United Kingdom compared the Mediterranean diet to vegetarian, vegan, low-carbohydrate, high-protein, high-fiber, and low-glycemic index diets, and found that the Mediterranean diet came out on top. Study participants following Mediterranean, low-glycemic index, low-carbohydrate, and high-protein diets all experienced better blood sugar control, as was indicated by their lower A1C scores. (A1C is a measure of average blood sugar levels over a three-month period.) However, people following the Mediterranean diet saw significant additional benefits they lost the most weight and saw improved cardiovascular health, including better cholesterol levels. "The Mediterranean diet is rich in fruits and vegetables, an Continue reading >>

A Mediterranean Diet Meal Plan

A Mediterranean Diet Meal Plan

Looking to eat healthy but still enjoy delicious foods youll want to eat again and again? The Mediterranean dietbased on lots of fresh fruits and vegetables, whole grains, beans, legumes, nuts, olive oil, fish, and small amounts of yogurt and cheeseis one of the healthiest ways of eating in the world. Thanks to its tasty foods and flavors, its also a way of eating that you can sustain for the rest of your life. Hundreds of scientific studies show that people who closely follow a Mediterranean diet experiencemany health benefits, from better heart and bone health and reduced risk of stroke and diabetes to longer lifespan.One recent study even linked the Mediterranean diet with less age-related brain shrinkage . Its one thing to know all of the benefits of the Mediterranean diet, and a completely different challenge to put it into action. Here are a few Mediterranean swaps for each meal of the day to get started: Like breakfasts in many parts of the world, breakfasts in the Mediterranean vary depending on the day of the week. On the weekend, breakfast (or brunch) is an opportunity to gather with friends and family, relax, and enjoy a traditional savory spread. In parts of the Eastern Mediterranean, for example, you'd likely see flatbreads dipped in olive oil and sprinkled with za'atar (a Middle Eastern dried herb mix), a variety of soft and hard cheeses, hummus, fresh cucumber and tomato salad, olives, and pickled vegetables on the table. During the work week, breakfast in the Mediterranean is quick and light. Greek yogurt parfait with granola, fresh fruit, anda drizzle of honey on top The Oldways Breakfast 1-2-3 Plan, inspired by Mediterranean breakfasts, consolidates breakfast foods into three categories: A source of protein (like eggs or yogurt) Eating something (even Continue reading >>

What Is The Mediterranean Diet?

What Is The Mediterranean Diet?

Our Mediterranean diet guide for beginners has everything you need to know about this heart-healthy and totally delicious way to eat and live. Find sample meal plans, recipe ideas, shopping lists, and more. You may be familiar with the Mediterranean diet pyramid, but do you understand the science behind it? Full of diverse plant-based foods, healthy fats, whole grains, and yesthe occasional glass of red winethe Mediterranean diet is widely embraced by top medical professionals and experts. This age-old eating habit is deeply rooted in the coastal cuisines of Mediterranean countries such as Greece, Spain, Italy, France, and northern Africa. Doctors and medical professionals in United States are increasingly advocating a Mediterranean diet plan as research uncovers its many health benefits. A groundbreaking 2013 study by the University of Barcelona made the connection between the Mediterranean diet and cardiovascular health strikingly clear. Over 7,000 Spanish participantsmany of whom were overweight, smokers, or diabeticadopted a Mediterranean-style diet rich in healthy fats (olive oil or nuts) for nearly five years. After a comprehensive follow-up, surprised researchers ended the study early after observing a sharp improvement in participants health. The findings showed an absolute risk reduction, or a 30% decrease of cardiovascular disease among these high-risk individuals. The results, published in the New England Journal of Medicine, made news across the U.S. as evidence enough that everyone, from high-risk to healthy individuals, can benefit by eating Mediterranean diet foods. A perfect plate reflecting the Mediterranean diet is nutritionally balanced, diverse, and full of color, flavor, and texture. Its crisp, leafy greens; deep purple grapes; ruby-red salmon; vib Continue reading >>

Mediterranean Diet Meal Plan And Recipes

Mediterranean Diet Meal Plan And Recipes

Getting started on a new diet can be daunting. To help you, weve created a simple and easy-to-follow Mediterranean Diet Meal Plan. Following the Mediterranean diet meal plan can protect your health in a vast number of ways: reducing the risk of developing heart disease, type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, depression, obesity, Parkinsons disease, cancer, and more. But getting started on this program can seem overwhelming, especially if youre used to a steady diet of fast foods or processed foods. To support your healthy efforts, weve outlined a meal plan for you to follow. The staple foods of the Mediterranean diet include: Do you want to eat foods that help you feel better, stay slim, and avoid diet-related diseases? Do you want to be healthier by eating delicious super foods? If so, claim your FREE copy, right now, of the definitive nutrition guide on living a longer, healthier, happier life. Following the Mediterranean Diet can be best tackled by dividing foods into five categories: Vegetables (excluding starchy corn and potatoes) Unrefined whole grains (brown rice, steel cut oats, etc.) 4. Monthly (Eat 3 to 4 times per month or less.) 5. Rarely (Eat only on special occasions.) Saturated fats from red meat and dairy products (besides organic cheese and yogurt) This Mediterranean Diet Pyramid can help you better visualize the types and amounts of foods you should be eating: Now you know which foods you should be eating regularly, prepare your meal plan by using a weekly or monthly calendar. Look over the list of Mediterranean foods above and choose the items you like best. Here are three examples of daily meal plans to get you started: Dinner: Baked halibut on a bed of brown rice with a side of peppers and onions cooked in olive oil Snack: Sliced bell peppers and av Continue reading >>

Mediterranean Diet 101: A Meal Plan And Beginner's Guide

Mediterranean Diet 101: A Meal Plan And Beginner's Guide

Mediterranean Diet 101: A Meal Plan and Beginner's Guide Written by Kris Gunnars, BSc on July 25, 2017 The Mediterranean diet is based on the traditional foods that people used to eat in countries like Italy and Greece back in the year 1960. Researchers noted that these people were exceptionally healthy compared to Americans and had a low risk of many killer diseases. Numerous studies have now shown that the Mediterranean diet can cause weight loss and help prevent heart attacks, strokes, type 2 diabetes and premature death. There is no one "right" way to do this diet. There are many countries around the Mediterranean sea and they didn't all eat the same things. This article describes the diet that was typically prescribed in the studies that showed it to be an effective way of eating. Consider all of this as a general guideline, not something written in stone. The plan can be adjusted to individual needs and preferences. Eat: Vegetables, fruits , nuts, seeds, legumes, potatoes, whole grains, breads, herbs, spices, fish, seafood and extra virgin olive oil. Eat in moderation: Poultry, eggs , cheese and yogurt. Don't eat: Sugar-sweetened beverages, added sugars , processed meat, refined grains, refined oils and other highly processed foods. You should avoid these unhealthy foods and ingredients: Added sugar: Soda, candies, ice cream, table sugar and many others. Refined grains: White bread, pasta made with refined wheat, etc. Trans fats: Found in margarine and various processed foods. Refined Oils: Soybean oil, canola oil , cottonseed oil and others. Processed meat: Processed sausages, hot dogs, etc. Highly processed foods: Everything labelled "low-fat" or "diet" or looks like it was made in a factory. You MUST read ingredients lists if you want to avoid these unhealthy Continue reading >>

Recipes | Diabetic Mediterranean Diet

Recipes | Diabetic Mediterranean Diet

Jan over at The Low Carb Diabetic is getting me motivated to try a new vegetable: rutabaga. Click the link below for Jans post for more photos and recipes. The picture above shows what Americans know as rutabaga. The Scottish call it neeps and serve it with haggis. I know it as swede, a fairly recent root vegetable, which is thought to have originated around the 17th century in Bohemia. In 1620 a Swiss botanist described the root vegetable, believed to be a hybrid of the cabbage and the turnip. By 1664 it was growing in England. A good source of vitamin.C, fibre, folate and potassium. Its low in calories. Source: The Low Carb Diabetic: Swede / Rutabaga : How will you serve this low carb vegetable PS: If the copyright owner of the rutabaga photo wants me to take it down, contact Steve Parker, M.D., and it shall be done post haste. Indian woman cooking chapati, a type of wheat-based bread Chana dal is a particular legume popular in India. It seems to be a variety of chickpea. Dal is an Indian term for legumes: beans and peas. A serving of most legumes has a relatively high carbohydrate count, which could spike blood sugar too high if you have diabetes. David Mendosa has type 2 diabetes. As far as I know, hes still a vegetarian, but somehow manages to restrict dietary carbohydrates. He notes that regardless of carb grams, chana dal has very little effect on his blood sugar. Maybe thats because of relatively high fiber content. Chana dals glycemic index is only eight, which is very low, especially for a legume. You may be aware that a third or so of Indians in India are vegetarian of one stripe or another. Dals (legumes) are a very important source of protein for them. Dals are usually consumed with meals that include bread or rice. Chana dal is a Hindi word. The British E Continue reading >>

Modifying The Mediterranean Diet For Your Diabetic Meal Plan

Modifying The Mediterranean Diet For Your Diabetic Meal Plan

The so-called Mediterranean diet is a perfect example of a diet you can live with, not a diet you’ll go on — the Mediterranean diet is a general pattern of eating. A diet for effective diabetes management controls blood glucose averages, helps you manage body weight, and reduces risk factors for heart disease like cholesterol and blood pressure. Literally hundreds of studies have examined the health effects of the food and/or the Mediterranean lifestyle, which includes physical activity and stress reduction. Balancing grains, legumes, and fruit Dietary fiber is a key component of the Mediterranean diet, and the fiber comes along with carbohydrates and other key nutrients from unrefined grains, legumes (beans and peas), fresh fruits, and vegetables. One benefit of dietary fiber is simply making you feel full sooner and for a longer period between meals. That’s called satiety. Legumes — beans, chickpeas, peas, and lentils — are a key source of low-fat protein in a Mediterranean diet and are a rich source of soluble fiber. Soluble fiber helps reduce cholesterol, especially LDL (bad) cholesterol, a key risk factor for heart disease. Whole grain consumption is associated with lower blood pressure, even in relatively small amounts. High blood pressure along with diabetes is a double whammy for your kidneys, as well as a risk factor for heart disease and stroke. Fruits and vegetables in the Mediterranean diet also contribute to satiety and add an assortment of vitamins and nutrients to the mix. Fresh fruit is the dessert of choice, and the fruits and vegetables should be enjoyed without added sugar, fat, or salt (sodium). The dietary fiber from this fruit and vegetable part of the Mediterranean diet, as well as from legumes and grains, can benefit your health in anot Continue reading >>

Mediterranean Meal Plan

Mediterranean Meal Plan

Before starting any healthy eating programme, please read how to choose your meal plan to make sure you follow the plan that's right for you. This nutritionally balanced meal plan is suitable for those wishing to follow a Mediterranean-style diet including lots of fresh ingredients from lean meat and fish to fruits, vegetables and olive oil. It's both calorie and carb counted for your convenience, and contains at least five portions of fruit and veg per day. Please note that the full nutritional information and exact specifications for all meals and snacks is available in the PDF only, and not listed below. Choose from snacks including fruit, nuts and low-fat yogurt. Choose from snacks including fruit and oatcakes and low-fat cottage cheese. Choose from snacks including fruit, low-fat yogurt, nuts and oatcakes with mushroom pate . Choose from snacks including warm exotic fruit salad , low-fat yogurt, oatcakes with beetroot hummus and fruit. Choose from snacks including fruit, low-fat yogurt, nuts and spicy roasted chickpeas . Dinner: Aubergine and courgette Parmesan bake with green salad Choose from snacks including fruit. low-fat yogurt and oatcakes with cottage cheese and cucumber. Pudding: Warm exotic fruit salad with low-fat yogurt Choose from snacks including nuts, oatcakes with peanut butter and spicy roasted chickpeas . The Mediterranean diet is associated with lower rates of heart disease. Although the majority of studies on this diet have taken place in Mediterranean countries, there is evidence that the Mediterranean-style diet can promote weight loss, improve blood glucose control and help reduce cardiovascular risk in people with Type 2 diabetes. This is a diet largely based on plant foods and therefore includes a lot of fruits and vegetables, beans and pul Continue reading >>

The Mediterranean Diabetes Cookbook

The Mediterranean Diabetes Cookbook

2011 NAUTILUS SILVER AWARD WINNER! Diabetic Mediterranean recipes - fabulous for people with type 2 diabetes. Rich in lean meats, healthy fiber, omega-3 fatty acids and antioxidants! The Mediterranean style of cooking has been medically proven to be good for people with diabetesand for good reason. Rich in heart-healthy fiber, nutrients, omega-3 fatty acids, and antioxidants, this delicious diet of fruits, vegetables, lean meats and whole-grains can help lower blood pressure and risk for heart disease all beneficial for people with type 2 diabetes. Based on traditional recipes from Italy, Turkey, Egypt, Morocco, and many other Mediterranean countries, this collection of delicious meals provides a time-tested tradition of healthy eating. The Mediterranean Diabetes Cookbook features: Over 200 healthful and delicious Mediterranean recipes Numerous healthy living and cooking tips throughout the book Eight pages of color photographsImagine cooking without sacrificing flavor, using healthful, fresh ingredients..... Paired with the moderate Mediterranean lifestyle, enjoy delicious, traditional, and naturally diabetes-friendly dishes. Leave behind the tired, watered-down diabetes recipes crowding out taste in your other cookbooks and regain the joys of eating. Winner of the 2011 NAUTILUS SILVER AWARD in the category: Food/Cooking/Healthy Eating I`ve tried it and it`s really awesome. I found out about this site from a blog, and a bought this book... What can I say, really delicious receipes!!!! 2 people found this review helpful. Was this review helpful for you? Amy Riolo teaches you all about Mediterranean culture while giving you delicious recipes to serve to you and your loved ones. One of the best diabetes cookbooks published since the discovery of insulin (thank you, Dr. B Continue reading >>

Mediterranean Diet Helps Control Diabetes

Mediterranean Diet Helps Control Diabetes

Mediterranean Diet Helps Control Diabetes Low-Carbohydrate Mediterranean Diet Better Than Low-Fat Diet at Managing Diabetes Aug. 31, 2009 -- Eating a Mediterranean-style diet may help people with type 2 diabetes keep their disease under control without drugs better than following a typical low-fat diet. A new study from Italy shows that people with type 2 diabetes who ate a Mediterranean diet rich in vegetables and whole grains with at least 30% of daily calories from fat (mostly olive oil) were better able to manage their disease without diabetes medications than those who ate a low-fat diet with no more than 30% of calories from fat (with less than 10% coming from saturated fat choices). After four years, researchers found that 44% of people on the Mediterranean diet ended up requiring diabetes medications to control their blood sugars compared with 70% of those who followed the low-fat diet. Its one of the longest-term studies of its kind, and researchers, including Katherine Esposito, MD, of the Second University of Naples, say the results reinforce the message that benefits of lifestyle interventions should not be overlooked." In the study, researchers randomly assigned 215 overweight people recently diagnosed with type 2 diabetes who had never been treated with diabetes medications to either a Mediterranean-style diet or a low-fat diet. The Mediterranean diet was rich in vegetables and whole grains and low in red meat, which was replaced with fish or poultry. Overall, the diet consisted of no more than 50% of daily calories from carbohydrates and no less than 30% of calories from fat. The low-fat diet was based on American Heart Association guidelines and was rich in whole grains and limited in sweets with no more than 30% of calories from fat and 10% from satura Continue reading >>

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