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Diabetic Meal Plan For One Person

Diabetes Diet: Create Your Healthy-eating Plan

Diabetes Diet: Create Your Healthy-eating Plan

Your diabetes diet is simply a healthy-eating plan that will help you control your blood sugar. Here's help getting started, from meal planning to exchange lists and counting carbohydrates. Definition A diabetes diet simply means eating the healthiest foods in moderate amounts and sticking to regular mealtimes. A diabetes diet is a healthy-eating plan that's naturally rich in nutrients and low in fat and calories. Key elements are fruits, vegetables and whole grains. In fact, a diabetes diet is the best eating plan for most everyone. Purpose If you have diabetes or prediabetes, your doctor will likely recommend that you see a dietitian to help you develop a healthy eating plan. The plan helps you control your blood sugar (glucose), manage your weight and control risk factors for heart disease, such as high blood pressure and high blood fats. When you eat excess calories and fat, your body responds by creating an undesirable rise in blood glucose. If blood glucose isn't kept in check, it can lead to serious problems, such as a dangerously high blood glucose level (hyperglycemia) and long-term complications, such as nerve, kidney and heart damage. You can help keep your blood glucose level in a safe range by making healthy food choices and tracking your eating habits. For most people with type 2 diabetes, weight loss also can make it easier to control blood glucose and offers a host of other health benefits. If you need to lose weight, a diabetes diet provides a well-organized, nutritious way to reach your goal safely. Diet details A diabetes diet is based on eating three meals a day at regular times. This helps your body better use the insulin it produces or gets through a medication. A registered dietitian can help you put together a diet based on your health goals, tas Continue reading >>

The Best 7-day Diabetes Meal Plan

The Best 7-day Diabetes Meal Plan

This 1,200-calorie meal plan makes it easy to follow a diabetes diet with healthy and delicious foods that help to balance blood sugar. The simple meals and snacks in this 7-day plan feature complex carbohydrates (think whole grains and fresh fruits and vegetables), lean protein and healthy fats. We limited refined carbohydrates (like white bread, white pasta and white rice) as well as added sugars, which can spike your blood sugar quickly. We've also cut back on saturated fats and sodium, as they can negatively impact your health if you eat too much. The carbohydrates are balanced throughout the day with each meal containing 2-3 carb servings (30-45 grams of carbohydrates) and each snack containing around 1 carb serving (15 grams of carbohydrates). The calorie and carbohydrate totals are listed next to each meal and snack so you can swap foods with similar nutrition in and out as you like. Eating with diabetes doesn't need to be difficult—choose a variety of nutritious foods, as we do in this meal plan, and add in daily exercise for a healthy and sustainable approach to managing diabetes. Day 1 Breakfast (294 calories, 41 g carbohydrates) • 1/2 cup oats cooked in 1/2 cup each 2% milk and water • 1 medium plum, chopped • 4 walnut halves, chopped Top oats with plum and walnuts. A.M. Snack (96 calories, 18 g carbohydrates) • 3/4 cup blueberries • 1/4 nonfat plain Greek yogurt Top blueberries with yogurt. Lunch (319 calories, 37 g carbohydrates) Turkey & Apple Cheddar Melt • 2 slices whole-wheat bread • 2 tsp. whole-grain mustard, divided • 1/2 medium apple, sliced • 2 oz. low-sodium deli turkey • 2 Tbsp. shredded Cheddar cheese, divided • 1 cup mixed greens Top one slice of bread with 1 tsp. mustard, apple, turkey and 1 Tbsp. cheese. Top the other Continue reading >>

Seven-day Type 2 Diabetes Meal Plan

Seven-day Type 2 Diabetes Meal Plan

Eating a diabetes-friendly diet can help keep your blood sugar levels under control. But it can be difficult to stick to a regular meal plan — unless you have a plan in place. Check out these 21 delicious, diabetes-friendly recipes to use for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. Remember to stay within your carbohydrate allowance by noting the carb content and serving size of the recipes. Also, be sure to balance your meals with lean protein and healthy plant fats. Breakfast: Cream Cheese-Stuffed French Toast This may sound too decadent for breakfast, but paired with scrambled egg whites, it can fit into a diabetes-friendly meal plan. Whole grain toast will help ensure you get your daily fiber too. Lunch: Salmon Salad with White Beans Salmon is one of the best sources of omega-3 fatty acids, and is also a delicious topper to workday salad. Dinner: Cuban-Marinated Sirloin Kabobs with Grilled Asparagus Spice things up with this flavorful skewer. Dried herbs and spices are a great way to pack a punch of flavor without adding unnecessary calories and fat. Breakfast: Apple Pie Oatmeal with Greek Yogurt Who wouldn’t like a slice of pie for breakfast? This oatmeal will leave your kitchen smelling like the flavors of fall, and your stomach happy and satisfied. Add some extra plain Greek yogurt on top for more protein. Lunch: Turkey-Cranberry Wraps Turkey and cranberry sauce isn’t just for Thanksgiving! This is an easy grab-and-go lunch that even your kids will enjoy. Note: This recipe may not be appropriate for all people with type 2 diabetes, because it contains 60 grams of carbs per serving. You can adjust the amount of cranberry sauce to lower the carb count. Dinner: Cilantro-Lime Tilapia with Spinach and Tomatoes Take a trip to the tropics with this fast fish dish. Breakfast Continue reading >>

A Low-cost Meal Plan

A Low-cost Meal Plan

**The meal prices shown above are based on those found at a large chain grocery store in the DC Metro Area during the month of December. The price per portion of the featured recipes was based on the price published the this month's featured cookbook: Diabetes Meals on $7 a Day or Less. Total cost of this meal plan is less than $7.00 for the entire day. Continue reading >>

Basic Diabetes Meal Plan

Basic Diabetes Meal Plan

Diabetes meal planning starts with eating a well-balanced diet that includes carbohydrates (carbs), protein, and fat. Carbs (found in starches, fruit, vegetables, milk/yogurt and sweets) turn into sugar (glucose) in the body. The body needs carbs for energy. Eating too many carbs can raise blood glucose levels too much, but it is important not cut out these foods. Eating too few carbs may cause your blood glucose to go too low. Eating a moderate amount of carbs at each meal, with a balanced intake of protein and fat, will help your blood glucose stay in a healthy range. Here are some tips to get you started. Your dietitian will give you more specific information when you meet with him or her. Limit your intake and portion sizes of high-sugar foods to 2 or 3 times a week or less. These include: Cakes (frosted, layer, plain), pies, and cookies Candy (hard tack, chocolate, nougats, etc.) Jelly, jam, and preserves Table sugar, honey, molasses, and syrup Regular ice cream, sherbet, regular and frozen yogurt, fruit ices, and Popsicles Regular soft drinks, fruit drinks (canned or concentrated), and drink mixes with sugar added Milkshakes, chocolate milk, hot cocoa mix Sugar coated cereals, granola, breakfast/snack bars Canned fruits with heavy syrup, dried fruit, fruit roll-ups, candied fruit Iced sweet breads, coffee cakes, breakfast rolls, and donuts Avoid the following: Table sugar, honey, molasses and syrup Regular soft drinks, fruit drinks (canned or concentrated), and drink mixes with sugar added Milkshakes, chocolate milk, hot cocoa mix Canned fruits with heavy syrup Eat 3 well-balanced meals a day and a small snack at night. Each meal should contain both carbs and protein. When planning meals, select a variety of foods from each food group, and watch your portion sizes Continue reading >>

3-day Diabetes Meal Plan: 1,200 Calories

3-day Diabetes Meal Plan: 1,200 Calories

Eating with diabetes doesn't need to be restrictive or complicated. Healthy eating is the cornerstone of managing diabetes, yet it can be a challenge figuring out what to eat to balance your blood sugar. Here we've created a delicious 3-day meal plan that makes it easier to follow a diabetes diet. In this plan you'll find a mix of nutritious foods including fiber-rich complex carbohydrates, like whole grains and fresh fruits and vegetables, lean protein sources, healthy fats and dairy. This plan limits the amount of foods with refined carbohydrates (think white bread, white rice and sugar), added sugars and saturated fats, which can negatively impact your health if you eat too much. The carbohydrates are balanced throughout the day with each meal containing 2-3 carb servings (30-45 grams of carbohydrates) and each snack containing around 1 carb serving (15 grams of carbohydrates). The calorie and carbohydrate totals are listed next to each meal and snack so you can swap foods with similar nutrition in and out as you like. Eating with diabetes doesn't need to be restrictive or complicated. Incorporating a variety of foods, as we do in this meal plan, is a healthy and sustainable approach to managing diabetes. Not sure if this is the right plan for you? Calculate your calorie level and find the diet meal plan that will work best for you. Day 1 Meal Prep Tip: Cook or set aside an extra 1/2 cup of black beans tonight at dinner to have for lunch on Day 2. Be sure to rinse canned beans to get rid of excess salt. Breakfast (298 calories, 32 grams carbohydrates) • 1 cup nonfat plain Greek yogurt • 1/2 cup blueberries • 1 1/2 Tbsp. chopped walnuts • 2 tsp. honey Top yogurt with blueberries, walnuts and honey. Note: We use a small amount of added sweetener, in this case h Continue reading >>

One Week Meal Plan For A Diabetic Diet

One Week Meal Plan For A Diabetic Diet

Diabetes is a disease characterized by dangerously high blood sugar levels. Diabetics must adhere to dietary restrictions to maintain healthy blood sugar levels. Before meals, the ideal target blood sugar level range is 70 to 130 and one to two hours after the start of your last meal, blood sugar levels should be less than 180. The American Diabetes Association recommends that diabetics consume a diet that consists of whole grains, fruits, vegetables, low-fat dairy products, beans, lean meat, poultry and fish. Planning weekly meals can help you include a variety of food groups in a way that keeps your blood sugar levels within target range. Speak with your doctor and dietitian about your weekly meal plan ideas. Video of the Day Every person has different dietary requirements. Your recommended daily calorie and nutrient needs depend upon your sex, weight and level of physical activity. Broadly speaking, women who would like to lose weight or do not exercise regularly should consume 1,200 to 1,600 calories each day, women that exercise regularly and men that do not exercise regularly should aim for 1,600 to 2,000 calories each day and women and men who exercise strenuously or work physically active jobs should get around 2,000 to 2,400 calories each day. Each meal should consist of two to five servings of carbohydrates and each snack should consist of one to two servings of carbohydrates; your diet should consist of 40 to 50 percent carbohydrates. The meal plans are for a diabetic who needs 1,600 calories per day. Work with your doctor or dietitian to determine how many calories you should aim for each day. Breakfast prepares you to meet the physical and mental challenges of your day. Whole grains, fruits and eggs are healthy breakfast choices. On a slow weekend morning, Continue reading >>

Easy Recipes: One-dish Dinners

Easy Recipes: One-dish Dinners

Diabetic Living / Diabetic Recipes / 30 Minute These yummy one-dish recipes are super easy to prepare and even easier to clean up. Made with a diabetic menu in mind, our meal-in-a-bowl recipes are nutritious and tasty, perfect for dinner tonight. This easy slow cooker meal is packed with protein -- and flavor. Chicken, corn, and carrots simmer with yummy spices, while homemade cornmeal dumplings make this one-pot meal extra tasty. Diabetes Recipes , Diabetic Meals , Popular Diabetic Recipes , Meals Made Easy This yummy meal-in-a-bowl recipe is great for using leftover beef steak or pot roast. Bonus: The lean beef brings 26 grams of protein per serving to the dinner. Diabetes Recipes , Diabetic Meals , Popular Diabetic Recipes , Meals Made Easy Orzo Chicken Salad with Avocado-Lime Dressing This healthy chicken recipe uses just six ingredients, and the DIY dressing is made with just four. Serve with red sweet pepper strips and no-sugar-added canned mandarin oranges. Diabetes Recipes , Diabetic Meals , Popular Diabetic Recipes , Meals Made Easy Learn the secrets to smart grocery shopping and food prep with our handy guide for cooking right. Find tasty ways to cut carbs (cauliflower crust!) and our favorite tricks for adding flavor with less salt and fat. Buy this special edition from Diabetic Living. Get your copy today! Continue reading >>

Meal Plans And Diabetes

Meal Plans And Diabetes

en espaolLos planes de alimentacin y la diabetes Kids with diabetes benefit from a healthy diet the same as everyone else. Although kids with diabetes don't have to follow a special diabetes diet, they may need to pay more attention to when they eat and how much is on their plates. Meal planning goals for kids with diabetes often are the same as those for other kids: They need foods that help them have overall good health, normal growth , and a healthy weight . But kids with diabetes also have to balance their intake of carbohydrates (carbs)with their insulin and activity levels to keep blood sugar levels under control, and they should eat foods that help keep the levels of lipids (fats like cholesterol and triglycerides) in the blood in a healthy range. Doing socan help prevent some of the long-term health problems that diabetes can cause. Kids with diabetes face the same food challenges as everyone else mainly, sticking with healthy eating habits. You need to know what's in the foods you're serving and eating. It's easy to guess what some foods contain, but others are more of a challenge. So look to food labels to find a food's ingredients, nutritional information, and calories. Be sure tolook for information oncarbs, which can affect blood sugar levels. Usually, they're clearly listed on food labels in grams. The two main forms of carbs are sugars and starches. Types of sugars include fructose (sugar found in fruit and some baked goods), glucose (the main sugar in our bodies that's also found in foods like cake, cookies, and soft drinks), and lactose (sugar found in milk and yogurt). Starches include vegetables like potatoes, corn, and peas; grains, rice, and cereals; and breads. The body breaks down or converts most carbs into glucose, which is absorbed into the bl Continue reading >>

Seven-day Diabetes Meal Plan: Options For Healthful Eating

Seven-day Diabetes Meal Plan: Options For Healthful Eating

A diabetes meal plan can help. A good meal plan can help people to meet their nutritional needs, eat an appropriate mix of foods, and lose weight if needed. A 7-day diabetes meal plan not only provides a week's worth of healthful eating, but it also makes shopping and cooking duties simpler and can help people save money. Two menus for 7 days The ideal diabetes meal plan will offer menus for three meals a day, plus two snacks. Plans tend to suggest consuming 1,500 to 1,800 calories a day. The number of calories people with diabetes need to eat each day will vary, depending on their activity level, height, and gender, and whether they're trying to lose, gain, or maintain their weight. The meal plans below provide a maximum of three servings of healthful, high-fiber carbohydrate choices at each meal or snack. Diet plans for weight loss Carrying excess weight puts additional stress on the body's ability to use insulin and regulate blood sugar levels. Unfortunately, close to 90 percent of people with type 2 diabetes are overweight, according to the Obesity Society. It is helpful for most people with diabetes to consider weight loss guidelines when developing a meal plan. Under the guidance of a doctor, many choose to follow a reduced calorie plan. Step-by-step guide to meals for a week These three practices can help people with diabetes enjoy a healthful, varied diet and successfully manage their blood sugar: balancing carbohydrates, proteins, and fat to meet dietary goals measuring portions accurately planning ahead With these ideas in mind, the following steps can help people with diabetes put together a healthful 7-day meal plan: note daily targets for calories and carbohydrates see how many portions of carbohydrates and other foods will meet those targets divide those p Continue reading >>

A Guide To Cooking For One

A Guide To Cooking For One

How to treat yourself right when dining on your own Everyone eats alone sometimes. Whether your usual companion is out of town for a few days or you live by yourself and often dine on your own, there's no need to resort to wolfing down a bowl of cereal over the kitchen sink when you could be eating in style. This month we offer tips and techniques for making single servings work, from planning to shopping to the final product. While it may seem at first like a lot of trouble to prepare a complete meal for one, the results are well worth it. Homemade dishes are usually more nutritious and economical than restaurant meals. Cooking well for yourself can also be an important way to make your own health and happiness a priority. In other words: You're worth it. It may also be helpful to think of preparing dinner less as a chore than as a way to relax and de-stress. You can try out different recipes at your leisure without the pressure of others' approval. And you get to choose your favorite foods, since you are the only one you have to please. Begin the process by setting the mood. Make an effort to establish a dividing line between the day's activities and dinnertime. Set a place at the table with your favorite linen. Turn off the television, turn on the music, light a candle or two, maybe have a glass of wineand enjoy taking care of yourself. Planning makes a huge difference when it comes to healthy eating. That's certainly true for big families, but it may be even more so for individuals and couples. Set a goal to plan menus for a week at a time. Don't like the idea of leftovers? Think of them as "planned overs" instead: A small roast prepared on a Sunday, for example, could serve as an open-face sandwich on Monday and a vegetable stir-fry with small amounts of beef on T Continue reading >>

6 Steps To Successful Diabetes Meal Planning

6 Steps To Successful Diabetes Meal Planning

By Jennifer Bowers Ph.D, RD Leave a Comment Just like any other worthwhile change, meal planning takes some time and energy in order to succeed. Dont settle for boring or redundant meals. And, dont settle for drive-thru burgers and pizza delivery. Meal planning allows you to personalize your nutritional intake and explore new foods. Have fun with meal planning and enjoy food with these simple steps. What is your biggest challenge? Grocery shopping ? Lack of culinary knowledge? Time for cooking on busy evenings? When you can pin point the struggle, you can tackle the problem head on. If your challenge is cooking time on weeknights, your strategy can be weekend meal prep. If you struggle with kitchen skills, pick simple tried-and-true recipes to start. If you despise grocery shopping, investigate the home delivery options available at several supermarket chains. Now that you have determined your challenge, you can move forward with that in mind. Similar to step one, but different in that you need to identify and describe your personal nutrition or eating goals . Do you want to lose weight? Do you need to tighten up the carbohydrate control of your meals? Do you want your family to eat more non-starchy vegetables? Now you can move forward with meal planning with your main goal in mind. Your goals might shift from week to week, as well. Perhaps one week your goal is to try a new vegetable, and the following week your goal involves cooking one large protein and using it in 3 different meals. The options are endless! For more informative articles see the following: 3. Choose Your Recipes/Meals for One Week The beauty of planning out one entire week at a time is viewing the variety. You can make chicken one night, salad main dish another night, build-your-own-tacos the third Continue reading >>

Eating For One Meal Plan

Eating For One Meal Plan

Before starting any healthy eating programme, please read how to choose your meal plan to make sure you follow the plan that's right for you. This nutritionally balanced meal plan is targeted at those who eat and cook for one - designed to save you time, money and food waste. Both calorie and carb counted for your convenience, it also contains at least five portions of fruit and veg per day. Please note that the full nutritional information and exact specifications for all meals and snacks is available in the PDF only, and not listed below. Dinner: Breaded pollock fillet with sweet potato wedges and peas Choose from snacks including fruit and nut bars , fruit and nuts. Lunch: Tuna, sweetcorn and red pepper toastie Dinner: Griddled chicken breast with sweet potato mash and roasted Mediterranean vegetables Choose from snacks including fruit and savoury popcorn . Breakfast: Wholemeal toast with reduced-sugar jam/marmalade Dinner: Fruity mince , baby new potatoes and broccoli Choose from snacks including yogurt, banana bread and hot chocolate. Dinner: Quorn vegetable stir-fry with noodles Choose from snacks including oatcakes and peanut butter, dried fruit and nuts. Lunch: Reduced-sugar beans on wholemeal toast Pudding: Reduced-fat chocolate mousse with raspberries Choose from snacks including nuts, dried fruit and fruit. Choose from snacks including fruit and banana bread . Breakfast: Scrambled eggs on wholemeal toast Dinner: Roast mackerel with curried coriander crust , baby new potatoes and broccoli Pudding: Stuffed baked apple and frozen raspberries Choose from snacks including summer berry smoothie , fruit and nut bars and yogurt. Planning meals for one person that are both healthy and affordable can seem like a huge task, especially when a lot of recipes are designed Continue reading >>

Your Diabetes Menu Plan

Your Diabetes Menu Plan

How do you get all the nutrition you need in a day while still being mindful of calories and carbs? The secret is to plan ahead. Meal planning depends on lots of things, like your taste preferences, medications, and activity level, says Jill Weisenberger, RDN, CDE, author of Diabetes Weight Loss -- Week by Week. But good general advice to follow is to keep your carbs consistent -- eat the same amount at breakfast, lunch, and dinner to keep blood sugar from spiking or dipping too low. Weisenberger recommends 45 grams as a target for the three main meals of the day. "If you go lower than 30 grams at a meal, it's going to be really hard to get all the nutrients you need, such as fiber and phytochemicals," the health-boosting nutrients in fruits and vegetables. This sample meal plan provides 1,400 calories. Supplement with healthy snacks to reach your personal calorie goals. If you're rushed in the mornings, make breakfast a snap with mix-and-match prepared items such as hardboiled eggs, nuts or seeds, a part-skim cheese stick, peanut butter, or yogurt for protein; toast, crispbread, or unsweetened instant oatmeal for whole grains; plus any kind of fruit -- dried fruit, a banana, an apple. Menu Avocado Toast and Egg Café au lait made with a half cup 1% milk Medium orange Avocado Toast and Egg This has to be one of the most satisfying, easy breakfasts around, thanks to a helping of fiber from the avocado and whole-grain bread. For an extra flavor kick, sprinkle with Cajun seasoning or smoked paprika. Makes 1 serving. Ingredients: 1 slice 100% whole grain bread 1/5 avocado 1 egg salt and pepper Directions: 1. Toast bread. Scoop out avocado and mash onto toast. Top with a poached or soft-boiled egg and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Per serving: 235 calories, 10 g protein, 19 Continue reading >>

Understanding How Food Affects Your Blood Sugar

Understanding How Food Affects Your Blood Sugar

Carbohydrates Blood glucose is affected most by carbohydrates. And insulin dosing is typically based on food intake, especially carbohydrates. Knowing what foods contain carbohydrates and the amount of carbohydrates in a meal is helpful for blood glucose control. You should aim to include carbohydrates in each meal. Carbohydrate sources like vegetables, fruits and whole grains (high fiber) are preferred over carbohydrate sources with added fats, sugars and salt. Proteins are a necessary part of a balanced diet and can keep you from feeling hungry. They also do not raise your blood glucose like carbohydrates. However, to prevent weight gain, use portion control with proteins. In people with Type 2 diabetes, protein makes insulin work faster, so it may not be a good idea to treat low blood sugar with protein shakes or mixes. Fats Fats are a necessary part of a balanced diet, especially healthy fats like olive oil and fatty fish. The five food groups Some people believe that a diabetes diagnosis means “goodbye” to good food. Not so. Having diabetes does not mean that you can no longer enjoy good food, or that you have to give up your favorite foods. Living with diabetes means eating regular, healthy meals from the following five food groups: Grains and starches Vegetables Fruits Milk & alternatives Meat & alternatives Making healthy food choices Your dietitian or diabetes educator can help you to develop an eating plan that is right for you and fits into your lifestyle. Here are some guidelines for healthy eating: Healthy eating for diabetes is healthy eating for the whole family. Enjoy having regular meals, starting with breakfast first, then lunch and dinner. Space meals no more than 6 hours apart. Eat a variety of foods in each meal, including healthy fats, lean mea Continue reading >>

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