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Diabetic Mastopathy Mammogram

Diabetic Mastopathy: An Entity Clinically Mimicking Malignancy; Review Of A Series Of Three Cases Anila K R, Chandramohan K, Koshy Sm, Jayasree K - Clin Cancer Investig J

Diabetic Mastopathy: An Entity Clinically Mimicking Malignancy; Review Of A Series Of Three Cases Anila K R, Chandramohan K, Koshy Sm, Jayasree K - Clin Cancer Investig J

Diabetic mastopathy is an unusual lesion affecting the breast of patients with longstanding diabetes mellitus (DM). This lesion presents as large hard masses, leading to clinical suspicion of malignancy, and may result in unnecessary surgeries. It is characterized histopathologically by sclerosing lymphocytic mastitis. During 1-year period from January 2016 to December 2016, we came across three cases of sclerosing lymphocytic mastitis. All were females with longstanding DM and presented with palpable, nontender, hard breast masses. Clinical impression was malignancy. They underwent imaging studies, fine needle aspiration cytology, and core needle biopsies before excision biopsy. The specimens consisted of firm-to-hard fibrotic masses with a grayish-white cut surface. Histopathology showed characteristic keloid-like sclerosing fibrosis, dense perilobular and intralobular lymphocytic infiltrates. Clinicopathological correlation will resolve these cases in most instances and aid in preventing radical surgical procedures. Imaging studies however may not be helpful in all cases. Keywords:Diabetic mastopathy, malignancy, mimicker, sclerosing lymphocytic mastitis Anila K R, Chandramohan K, Koshy SM, Jayasree K. Diabetic mastopathy: An entity clinically mimicking malignancy; review of a series of three cases. Clin Cancer Investig J 2018;7:23-5 Anila K R, Chandramohan K, Koshy SM, Jayasree K. Diabetic mastopathy: An entity clinically mimicking malignancy; review of a series of three cases. Clin Cancer Investig J [serial online] 2018 [cited2018 Apr 5];7:23-5. Available from: Diabetic mastopathy (DMP) was first described by Soler and Khardori as early as 1984. [1] They described it as a dense fibrous stromal proliferation of the breast in women with longstanding Type I diabetes Continue reading >>

Pathology Outlines - Lymphocytic Mastitis (mastopathy)

Pathology Outlines - Lymphocytic Mastitis (mastopathy)

Author: Hind Nassar, M.D. (see Authors page) Revised: 25 April 2018, last major update April 2010 Copyright: (c) 2002-2018, PathologyOutlines.com, Inc. Cite this page: Lymphocytic mastitis (mastopathy). PathologyOutlines.com website. Accessed May 9th, 2018. Uncommon finding associated with type I diabetes Also called lymphocytic mastopathy, diabetic mastopathy Called sclerosing lymphocytic mastitis / lobulitis if prominent fibrosis Often associated with type I / insulin dependent diabetes ( Diabetes Care 2002;25:121 , Hum Pathol 1994;25:819 , Hum Pathol 1992;23:780 ) or other autoimmune disease but may occur in type II diabetes or nondiabetes May occur in men ( Pathol Res Pract 1997;193:197 ) 50 year old woman with lymphoepithelioma-like carcinoma of the breast with associated sclerosing lymphocytic lobulitis ( Arch Pathol Lab Med 2001;125:669 ) 50 year old woman with a case of lymphocytic mastopathy ( Breast Cancer 2009;16:141 ) 51 year old diabetic woman with breast mass ( Case of the Week #337 ) 66 year old woman with diabetic (lymphocytic) mastopathy with exuberant lymphohistiocytic and granulomatous response ( Am J Surg Pathol 2006;30:1330 ) Excision but often recurs (30%, Am J Clin Pathol 2000;113:541 ) Clinically palpable mass, usually subareolar Continue reading >>

Diabetessisters

Diabetessisters

I have had Type 1 Diabetes for 35 years. My eldest daughter has had it for 21 years. She is 36 years old. Both of us are looking for information on Diabetic Mastopathy. Two weeks ago she went for a mammogram when she discovered a lump in her breast. The radiologist, GP and surgeon were all convinced that it was cancer and she had scans, a needle biopsy and finally, an op to have the lump removed. I cant express the feelings of dread with which we faced the 7 days from the mammogram to the final result. When it arrived we were told that none of them had ever had a patient with this condition and would have to do research etc. Apparently this condition was only discovered in 1980s in fact there was a woman n the 1990s who had both breasts removed as the doctors believed that she had breast cancer, only to discover that it was in fact Diabetic Mastopathy. I am so angry that no-one gave us any hope during that week and I feel that this condition should be added to the long list of possible diabetic complications that is available to the public. I believe that all diabetic women should be made aware of it, and if they discover a lump they should immediately see a doctor, but should bring the condition to the radiologists and GPs attention so many of them dont know about it. We would really appreciate any information about this, and if you know anyone else who has been through it. I have just discovered your site and itis amazing! What you have said sums up a great deal of what we know about Diabetic Mastopathy. Because the word cancer strikes fear in the heart of the most stalwart, anything that resembles cancer causes a rush of trying-to-help-action that may have varying degrees of actual helpfulness. The presence of reported Diabetic Mastopathy (DMP) varies by clinic, ran Continue reading >>

Diabetic Mastopathy: An Unusual Differential Diagnosis: A Case Report

Diabetic Mastopathy: An Unusual Differential Diagnosis: A Case Report

Diabetic mastopathy an unusual differential diagnosis: a case report * Simone EliasI; Marina Celli FranciscoII; Cludio KempIII; Beatriz Daou VerenhitachIV; Fabiano Celli FranciscoV; Maria del Carmen M. WolgienIV IPhD, MD, Mastologist, Diagnostic Unit, Division of Mastology, Universidade Federal de So Paulo/Escola Paulista de Medicina (Unifesp/EPM), So Paulo, SP, Brazil IIMD, Resident at Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Universidade Federal de So Paulo/Escola Paulista de Medicina (Unifesp/EPM), So Paulo, SP, Brazil IIIPhD, Associate Professor, Department of Gynecology, Head of Division of Mastology at Universidade Federal de So Paulo/Escola Paulista de Medicina (Unifesp/EPM), So Paulo, SP, Brazil IVMaster, Fellow PhD degree, Division of Mastology, Department of Gynecology at Universidade Federal de So Paulo/Escola Paulista de Medicina (Unifesp/EPM), So Paulo, SP, Brazil VMaster, MD, Radiologist at Hospital de Caridade So Braz de Porto Unio, Porto Unio, SC, Brazil. Diabetic mastopathy affects premenopausal women with longstanding type 1 diabetes mellitus. The diagnosis is based on clinical findings (uni or bilateral hardened, palpable mass) associated with radiological (increase in breast density), sonographic (marked posterior acoustic shadowing), and histopathological (fibrosis and perivascular and periductal lymphocytic infiltration) findings. This disease may clinically simulate a breast carcinoma. The case of a patient with diabetic mastopathy is reported. Keywords: Diabetic mastopathy; Diabetes mellitus; Breast benign disease. Breast is not classically included among organs affected by diabetic complications; however, a pathological manifestation defined as diabetic mastopathy may rarely occur (less than 1% of benign diseases)(1), affecting up to 13% of patients w Continue reading >>

Diabetic Mastopathy | Radiology Reference Article | Radiopaedia.org

Diabetic Mastopathy | Radiology Reference Article | Radiopaedia.org

Diabetic mastopathy manifests clinically as a large, painless, hard breast mass that is usually clinically indistinguishable from breast cancer .Multicentric or bilateral involvement is a relatively frequent phenomenon, often occurring in late stages of the disease. Other systemic complications of long-standing diabetes mellitus are common. It is a form of lymphocytic mastitis and stromal fibrosis. There is dense fibrosis, and predominantly B-cell lymphocytic infiltrate surrounding the ducts, lobules and vessels. Its exact pathogenesis is poorly understood and likely multifactorial, possibly relating to an immunologic reaction. It is considered a form of lymphocytic mastitis and is grouped with others immunologic breast diseases such as Hashimoto thyroiditis , Sjogren syndrome , and systemic lupus erythematosus . The most common mammographic findings are ill-defined masses or asymmetric densities . Such lesions are often masked by dense glandular tissue, making mammographic evaluation difficult. Ultrasound often reveals the most characteristic imaging findings of the disease: irregular hypoechoic masses with marked posterior acoustic shadowing. Sometimes sonographic features can mimic more sinister pathology such as breast malignancy 4. Reported MR imaging findings are variable, ranging from decreased diffuse contrast material enhancement to rapid, intense enhancement that is indistinguishable from breast carcinoma. Although surgical excision was usually performed in the past to exclude malignancy, core biopsy is currently accepted as adequate for the diagnosis of this disease.A fine needle aspiration (FNA) is not usually used as it does not provide enough cellular material for sufficient evaluation as well as being technically-difficult to perform due to lesions being Continue reading >>

Diabetic Mastopathy | Genetic And Rare Diseases Information Center (gard) An Ncats Program

Diabetic Mastopathy | Genetic And Rare Diseases Information Center (gard) An Ncats Program

Questions sent to GARD may be posted here if the information could be helpful to others. We remove all identifying information when posting a question to protect your privacy. If you do not want your question posted, please let us know. Submit a new question How is diabetic mastopathy diagnosed and treated? See answer I was diagnosed with diabetic mastopathy a few years ago and had a lumpectomy.Some of it was left behind, so not to cause disfigurement. Since that time Iexperiencebreast pain and throbbing a couple times a week. Isthis pain connected to my breast disorder? Do you think it has spread, or simply reoccurred in other areas of the breast? Is pain normal? I worry about it becoming malignant also. See answer Keyoung JA Zuurbier CA, Tsangaris TN, Azumi N, Makariou E. Diabetic Mastopathy. Applied Radiology. 2003; . Honda M, Mori Y, Nishi T, Mizuguchi K, Ishibashi M. Diabetic mastopathy of bilateral breasts in an elderly Japanese woman with type 2 diabetes: a case report and a review of the literature in Japan. Intern Med. Epub 2007 Sep 14; . Sotome K, Ohnishi T, Miyoshi R, Nakamaru M, Furukawa A, Miyazaki H, Morozumi K, Tanaka Y, Iri H. An Uncommon Case of Diabetic Mastopathy in Type II Non-Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus. Breast Cancer. 2006; . Accessed 10/15/2009. Tsung JS, Wang TY, Lin CK. Diabetic mastopathy in type II diabetes mellitus. J Formos Med Assoc. 2005; . Ely KA, Tse G, Simpson JF, Clarfeld R, Page DL. Diabetic mastopathy: a clinicopathologic review. Am J Clin Pathol. 2000 Apr; . What you need to know about breast cancer. National Cancer Institute. 2005 ; . Accessed 10/15/2009. Chan, CR et al. Diabetic Mastopathy. The Breast Journal. July 29, 2013; 19(5):533-538. . Andrews-Tang D, Diamond AB, Rogers L, Butler D. Diabetic Mastopathy: Adjunctive U Continue reading >>

Update: Diabetes Mastopathy, Twice A Year Mammogram

Update: Diabetes Mastopathy, Twice A Year Mammogram

Update: Diabetes Mastopathy, Twice a year Mammogram In 2008, I wrote about Diabetic Mastopathy , a condition that affects women who have lived with diabetes a longtime. The condition is still with me and for my breast care team, it has become more difficult to monitor. Last year, my doctor spotted another nodule and after a mammogram and an ultrasound, they could not check off that I was clear. It took both my doctor pointing and the ultrasound tech to narrow down which lump was the culprit for concern. The end result was another biopsy The problem now, is that I have had a surgical biopsy on both breasts, and more incisions leave more scar tissue making the mammogram harder to read and the ultrasound less effective. To reduce the amount of scaring, they decided on a core needle biopsy . The report was more dense fibrous tissue, and for me no question about this being another case of diabetic mastopathy! At my follow up appointment, Minna, my wonderful physicians assistant and lumpy breast hound, suggested that we bump up the ultra sound to twice a year. This lets Minnas eyes and fingers keep closer watch, until I hit menopause. While some people feel mammograms for diabetic mastopathy are pointless, what they offer my breast care team is a consistent history for looking for change. Its one part of a 3 part routine check up: look and feel, mammography and ultrasound and last resort biopsy. By increasing the visits to my breast care team, it also allows them to chart perimenopause changes as well. Perimenopause, or pre menopause, is when a womans body starts a hormonal flux as it shifts into menopause. Common symptoms are irregular periods for no apparent reason, hot flashes and night sweats and LUMPY BREASTS! Ok, so irregular has been my lifes story with everything! Si Continue reading >>

Diabetic Mastopathy Diagnosis

Diabetic Mastopathy Diagnosis

Diabetic mastopathy (DMP) is usually discovered by the patients themselves and they describe it as an irregular and painless lump. After informing their family physician, screening procedures for breast cancer will begin, which includes mammograms and breast ultrasound studies. Once imaging studies are over and if the findings are inconclusive, a biopsy is performed to confirm the findings and rule out breast cancer. Histological analysis is an important method that helps differentiate DMP from breast carcinoma. DMP lesions are of various sizes and can be present in any of the quadrants of the breast, though it is more common for them to appear in the subareolar region. Specific features of DMP are generally not clear from imaging studies, though a discrete mass with pronounced acoustic shadowing is evident in ultrasonograms. Also, mammograms can reveal homogenous and dense glandular tissue with no signs of microcalcification or architectural distortion. Unfortunately, radiologic and clinical studies do not help much in differentiating DMP from breast cancer. The radiographic features of DMP that may be used in the diagnosis of diabetic mastopathy are outlined below. Mammographic findings of breast masses usually show poorly defined lesions often surrounded by glandular tissue. This makes mammographic studies more difficult in the case of DMP. An ultrasound of the breast often reveals shapeless masses that are hypoechoic with clear posterior acoustic shadowing. Sonographic features often mimic features of more severe cases such as breast carcinoma. MRI of the breast leads to a range of findings from less diffuse contrast material enhancement to rapid, intense enhancement that is indistinguishable from breast carcinoma. Clinical findings are mostly inconclusive after im Continue reading >>

Diabetic Fibrous Breast Mastopathy - Moose And Doc

Diabetic Fibrous Breast Mastopathy - Moose And Doc

Diabetic Fibrous Mastopathy of the Breast Diabetic fibrous mastopathy is a condition characterized by the development of one or more breast lumps as a result of a long standing association with type I (insulin dependent) diabetes. (Diabetic fibrous mastopathy usually occurs in women with juvenile-onset diabetes) It mostly effects premenopausal women , but has been known to affect men as well. I just want to let you know that even though this page is getting somewhat old, I would still recommend on using it. However, I have created a newer version with more up-to-date information on Diabetic Fibrous Mastopathy of the Breast . In terms of its clinical and radio graphic appearance, diabetic fibrous mastopathy is virtually indistinguishable from breast cancer, so it is a welcome differential diagnosis when confirmed histologically. Other terms sometimes used for diabetic fibrous mastopathy include diabetic fibrous breast disease, lymphocytic mastitis , and lymphocytic mastopathy. Diabetic fibrous mastopathy is a reactive breast lesion, and is mainly composed of a combination of both fibrotic and inflammatory elements . Develops in 10% -15% of women with type I diabetes Essentially, a diabetic fibrous mastopathy lesion is a connective tissue overgrowth, usually with vasculitis , and some proliferation of duct epithelium. These kinds of breast changes are not typically associated with any increased risk of breast cancer. Breast lesions of all kinds occur in about one-half of all female patients with type I diabetes , and diabetic fibrous mastopathy is estimated to develop in about 13% of women with type I diabetes. These tumors take a long time to develop, however, on average 20 years after the first onset of this disease. Diagnosis of breast diabetic fibrous mastopathy Usua Continue reading >>

Treatment And Prognosis For Diabetic Mastopathy

Treatment And Prognosis For Diabetic Mastopathy

Treatment and Prognosis for Diabetic Mastopathy Diabetic mastopathy (DMP) is a breast-related complication seen in type 1 or 2 insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. This condition manifests as hard, fibrous masses in one breast or both breasts. These masses are non-cancerous and irregular in shape. Interestingly, DMP has also been reported in men. Clinical findings are mostly inconclusive in the case of DMP. The masses seen in this condition are large and painless and not easily differentiated from the ones seen in breast cancer. DMP masses are commonly present in both breasts, especially during the end stage of the disease. It is also usually accompanied by other complications of diabetes mellitus. A high blood glucose level that remains high has been suggested as a possible cause of the condition. However, the research to back this claim is not currently sufficient to support the suggestion. DMP is not a malignant or pre-malignant condition that leads to a terminal illness. It is considered as a self-limited condition which does not necessitate treatment, though the disease can recur. To date, no malignant transformation of DMP lumps have been reported. DMP is usually discovered by the patients themselves. They may describe it as an irregular and painless lump and inform their family physician, who will initiate the screening procedures for breast cancer. This includes mammograms and breast ultrasound studies, although the findings are usually inconclusive, and a biopsy needs to be performed to confirm the findings and rule out breast cancer. Core biopsy is highly recommended by doctors because the lesions and lumps can increase in size and number over time and this kind of biopsy is guided by ultrasound and removes tissue from the core part of the masses. Histologica Continue reading >>

Diabetic Mastopathy

Diabetic Mastopathy

1. DiabeticSenior Resident in Pathology, Rural Medical College, PIMS, Loni, India 2. Faculty in Radio-diagnosis, Rural Medical College, PIMS, Loni, India Corresponding Author: Dr. Smita.B.Sankaye Rural Medical College, PIMS (DU), Pravara Medical Trust. Loni, Maharashtra, India Email: [email protected] Diabetic mastopathy is the occurrence of lymphocytic mastitis and stromal fibrosis in men as well as women having long-standing diabetes. Clinical and radiological appearance can raise a suspicion of malignancy and result in unnecessary biopsy. As these lesions are known to recur; failure to recognise them can have devastating results. A case of diabetic mastopathy is therefore presented for the knowledge and benefit of all so that unnecessary surgery can be avoided. Keywords: Breast cancer, Breast mass, Mastopathy, Diabetic mastopathy, Diabetes mellitus, B-lymphocytes, Lymphocytic mastitis Diabetic mastopathy can clinically present as breast masses raising the suspicion of malignancy. A proper history, laboratory and imaging workup can establish the diagnosis in most cases. Proper counselling and periodic imaging follow-up can prevent unnecessary surgery in these cases and also save the patient from an ordeal as these lesions recur following surgery. Diabetic mastopathy (DMP) was first described by Soler and Khardori in 1984 as a constellation of clinical, radiological and histopathogical features found in dense fibrous masses of the breast. 1 It constitutes less than 1% of benign breast lesions. 2 The disease is associated with long-standing type 1 insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus [IDDM] as well as type 2 diabetes mellitus. 3 - 5 It clinically presents as multiple palpable painless breast masses. X-ray mammograms of these patients show focal or diffuse dense gla Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Mastopathy: Lumps, Bumps And Complications

Diabetes And Mastopathy: Lumps, Bumps And Complications

This is National Breast Cancer Awareness Month , and all across the country people are sharing various ways to " Save the ta-tas! " Well, that mantra doesn't just apply to cancer. There's something else the ta-tas need saving from: diabetes. Diabetic mastopathy is one of the more uncommon effects of diabetes, and it's rarely included in warning lists of potential diabetes complications. But it's real and it happens, so we're going to talk about it and give you the scoop as part of our 411 on D-complications series (with a new icon!). First of all, Googling the term "diabetic mastopathy" pulls up some pretty scary images... (yes, that's a warning!). But the stats help calm the nerves a bit. Occurring in about 13% of pre-menopausal women with type 1 diabetes, dabetic mastopathy is a benign (see: noncancerous) "fibrous breast mass." It mostly occurs in women (and sometimes men) who already have a pre-existing diabetes complication, like kidney disease or neuropathy. Several websites list "long-standing diabetes" as criteria as well, but that's a fairly loose term. Websites that do list a time frame usually say that women who've had diabetes 15-20 years or longer are at highest risk. However, that association might only exist because older women are the ones encouraged to self-monitor their breasts, and are more likely to discover a problem. Diabetic mastopathy is also a fairly recent discovery, with the first report of it appearing in 1984. So there isn't that much known about the condition. Recent DOC forums are full of women asking questions and sharing stories , but it doesn't appear that diabetic mastopathy is getting much attention from researchers, so these women are often left with very vague answers. Little information exists to support any particular cause for di Continue reading >>

Diabetic Mastopathy: A Report Of 5 Cases And A Review Of The Literature | Endocrinology | Jama Surgery | Jama Network

Diabetic Mastopathy: A Report Of 5 Cases And A Review Of The Literature | Endocrinology | Jama Surgery | Jama Network

Background Diabetic mastopathy is an unusual fibroinflammatory breast lesion that characteristically presents in premenopausal women with long-standing type 1 diabetes mellitus with multiple microvascular complications. The pathogenesis of this condition is believed to involve an autoimmune reaction to the accumulation of abnormal matrix induced by hyperglycemia. Clinicopathologic features include the development of dense keloidlike breast masses that are often recurrent or bilateral or both. Clinical distinction from a malignancy can be difficult. However, the benign nature of this lesion is easily recognized on histologic examination, and it is not associated with an increased incidence of epithelial or stromal neoplasia. Hypothesis A constellation of histopathologic and clinical features is necessary to make the diagnosis of diabetic mastopathy. Unnecessary surgery can be avoided in the clinical follow-up of patients with multiple, bilateral, and recurrent lesions. Patients and Methods Between December 1993 and December 1998, 5 premenopausal women with type 1 diabetes mellitus of 18 to 23 years' duration presented with nontender, palpable, firm-to-hard breast masses. To date, progression of the tumorlike proliferations has been bilateral and recurrent in 2 patients, bilateral in a third patient, and recurrent in a fourth. The fifth patient has developed neither bilateral nor recurrent lesions. Imaging studies did not in any patient demonstrate a focal lesion. All lesions were treated by either excisional (4 patients) or core (1 patient) biopsy. The resected specimens were examined histopathologically. Results Gross examination of the specimens showed firm masses with homogeneous tannish-white cut surfaces. They measured between 3.0 and 6.0 cm in maximum diameter. Mi Continue reading >>

Diabetic Mastopathy: Imaging Features And The Role Of Image-guided Biopsy In Its Diagnosis

Diabetic Mastopathy: Imaging Features And The Role Of Image-guided Biopsy In Its Diagnosis

Diabetic mastopathy: imaging features and the role of image-guided biopsy in its diagnosis Department of Radiology, Research Institute of Radiological Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea Correspondence to: Eun-Kyung Kim, MD, Department of Radiology, Research Institute of Radiological Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 50-1 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 03722, Korea Tel. +82-2-2228-2371 Fax. +82-2-393-3035 E-mail: [email protected] Received 2015 Sep 3; Revised 2015 Nov 9; Accepted 2015 Nov 10. Copyright 2016 Korean Society of Ultrasound in Medicine (KSUM) This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License ( ) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. The goal of this study was to evaluate the imaging features of diabetic mastopathy (DMP) and the role of image-guided biopsy in its diagnosis. Two experienced radiologists retrospectively reviewed the mammographic and sonographic images of 19 pathologically confirmed DMP patients. The techniques and results of the biopsies performed in each patient were also reviewed. Mammograms showed negative findings in 78% of the patients. On ultrasonography (US), 13 lesions were seen as masses and six as non-mass lesions. The US features of the mass lesions were as follows: irregular shape (69%), oval shape (31%), indistinct margin (69%), angular margin (15%), microlobulated margin (8%), well-defined margin (8%), heterogeneous echogenicity (62%), hypoechoic echogenicity (38%), posterior shadowing (92%), parallel orientation (100%), the absence of calcifications (100%), and the absence of vascularity (100%). Based on the US findings, 17 lesi Continue reading >>

Diabetic Mastopathy As A Radiographically Occult Palpable Breast Mass

Diabetic Mastopathy As A Radiographically Occult Palpable Breast Mass

Diabetic Mastopathy as a Radiographically Occult Palpable Breast Mass 1Department of General Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905, USA 2Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905, USA 3Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905, USA 4Department of Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905, USA Received 16 June 2011; Accepted 5 September 2011 Copyright 2011 Uma Thanarajasingam et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License , which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Diabetic mastopathy is an uncommon, benign disease of the breast that can occur in women with diabetes and clinically mimic breast cancer. We describe a patient with long-standing type 1 diabetes who presented with a palpable breast mass with negative imaging findings on mammography, ultrasonography, and breast MRI. Surgical biopsy and histopathology confirmed diabetic mastopathy. We use this case to highlight the recognition, radiographic features, pathology, and management of this benign breast condition and emphasize that, in diabetic patients, the differential diagnosis of a new breast mass should include diabetic mastopathy. Diabetic mastopathy is an uncommon, benign breast condition, seen in diabetic patients and can masquerade as breast cancer. This diagnostic possibility must be borne in mind during the evaluation of a patient with diabetes and a new breast lump. Soler and Khardori [ 1 ] were the first to describe an association between diabetes and breast disease that they termed fibrous disease of the breast, in a cohort of premenopausal, long-standing Type I diabetics, most of whom had diabetic compl Continue reading >>

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