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Diabetic Mashed Potatoes And Cauliflower

Mashed Potatoes On A Diabetic Diet

Mashed Potatoes On A Diabetic Diet

According to the North Carolina Potato Association, the average adult consumes about one potato each day, and potatoes are the second most consumed food in America after dairy products. A side of mashed potatoes with a meal may be an American staple, but if you have diabetes, you may be concerned about the carbohydrate content of this popular side dish. You can include mashed potatoes as part of your diabetic diet, and preparation and serving size will help you keep your blood sugar under control. Video of the Day Carbohydrates and Mashed Potatoes Diabetes occurs when your body cannot effectively control your blood sugar levels. Carbohydrates affect blood sugar, so the American Diabetes Association's meal plan recommends that people with diabetes limit their carbohydrate intake to 45 percent of their total calories, or 45 to 60 grams of carbohydrates per meal. Fruit, vegetables, grains, breads and added sugar all contribute to the carbohydrate total of your meal. One cup of mashed potatoes prepared with whole milk provides 174 calories and 37 grams of carbohydrates, between 62 and 82 percent of the total carbohydrates recommended for an entire meal. Mashed potatoes also rate high on the glycemic index, a tool that measures a food's impact on blood sugar levels. Unprocessed, high-fiber foods, such as whole grains and most fruits and vegetables, tend to be low-glycemic foods because fiber slows the rate of blood sugar increase. Processing and cooking often increases the glycemic index of foods. High-glycemic foods have a rating of 70 or above. The University of Sydney’s glycemic index database reports that mashed potatoes have a glycemic index of 83. Instant mashed potatoes have a glycemic index of 87, according to Harvard Health Publications. If you follow the glycemic Continue reading >>

Easy Cauliflower Mashed “potatoes” Recipe

Easy Cauliflower Mashed “potatoes” Recipe

Ingredients Print Recipe 1 head cauliflower 1 clove garlic optional 1/8 cup skim milk You can also use plain yogurt or butter 1 pinch salt & pepper to taste 1 sprinkle paprika Servings: cups Units:MetricUS Imperial Votes: 23 Rating: 3.17 You: Rate this recipe! Carbs Per Serving:16g Prep Time:10minutes Cook Time:8minutes Passive Time:0minutes Course Side Dish, Vegetables Cuisine Chicken, Pork, Thanksgiving, Vegetarian Pre-heat your oven to 400 degrees. Steam or boil cauliflower (optionally with a clove of garlic) until tender. Cut the cauliflower into pieces and place in a blender with the milk, yogurt or butter. Season with salt and pepper and whip until smooth. To save time, you can use a hand-powered immersion blender. Pour cauliflower into small baking dish, sprinkle with paprika and bake in a 400 degree oven until bubbly. The recipe is enough to serve two to four people depending upon the size of the cauliflower. It can easily be doubled. Community members have shared a variety of variations you can use. Share yours in the comments: "I made this tonight with dinner. It was better than I expected. I think these actually might taste better than real mashed potatoes. I added fresh parmesan cheese and two spoonfuls of horseradish and blended it in the food processor. I sprinkled more parmesan on top along with some crushed, dried garlic before baking." - Melissa "I love it mashed & would like to share a tip that makes the texture thicker, which I like better. After steaming (or boiling) I place the cauliflower in a colander and gently press it with a masher to remove all the water. Next - return it to the kettle and mash it, then add whatever you prefer. I use S&P, then dot it with butter & put the lid back on - just like mashed potato's. Absolute favorite is to thicken Continue reading >>

Diabetic Friendly Cauliflower Mashed Potatoes

Diabetic Friendly Cauliflower Mashed Potatoes

Diabetic Friendly Cauliflower Mashed Potatoes Posted by Will Knight on Apr 7, 2016 12:01:29 PM Cauliflower mashed potatoes are a great way to sneak cruciferous veggies into traditional comfort food when you have a restricted diet. I had heard for a while that you can make mashed potatoes with cauliflower, but was always a little nervous to use entirely cauliflower! For these cauliflower mashed potatoes I used some red potatoes, and some cauliflower, and they came out delicious! The cauliflower actually really adds a nice flavor to the potatoes, without overpowering them. Make sure to use red or other waxy potatoes, because they are significantly lower on the Glycemic Index than other varieties. 4 Medium Red Potatoes (chopped with skin on) 1 12 Oz Bag Cauliflower (pre-washed and chopped) About 1/2 Cup of Broth (use your favorite kind) Boil the potatoes over medium heat, until theyre tender. Add the cauliflower, onions, and garlic for the last few minutes of boiling. When all of the veggies are tender remove them from the heat and drain them in a metal colander. Add the coconut oil, salt, pepper, and thyme, and mash by hand or with your immersion blender. If the cauliflower mashed potatoes are too dry, add more broth - one tablespoon at a time. Last but not least, enjoy! Continue reading >>

Mashed Cauliflower - -a Healthy Alternative That Totally Doesn't Suck!

Mashed Cauliflower - -a Healthy Alternative That Totally Doesn't Suck!

If you read this blog regularly, you know my wife was recently diagnosed with a very critical level of diabetes , which has resulted in us having to move into a new no/low carb, no/low sugar, no/low cholesterol, and no/low booze dietwhich has left both of us very unhappy. We are both huge fans of potatoes , pasta , rice , and bread (and booze ), so finding alternatives to these favorites has been very tough. No, Mr. Just-Trying-to-Help-Guy, tofu is NOT a perfect replacement for beef. Also tough has been all the well-meaning, trying-to-be-helpful people who are also on restricted diets (by Doctors orders or personal choice) who give their well-meaning, but totally wrong suggestions, insisting that tofu is as good as beef, kale is a good substitute for chicken, queeno is a perfectly good rice substitute, spaghetti squash is just like real pasta, or that turkey bacon is edible by anyone anywhere for any purpose. Sadly, all of you are wrong, and are either fooling yourselves, or are lying to us to make you feel better about your own terrible food options. So far, the only real substitutes for the awesomeness of real carbs that we have found that dont make us angry and bitter are shirataki noodles (lots of posts coming soon) as a substitute for most Asian noodle dishes (Italian pasta substitute? Not so much), and mashed cauliflower as a not-too-bad substitute for mashed potatoes. I wont lie to you and tell you that it is the same and equally awesome as potatoes, but it is a totally not terrible, completely edible, and even surprisingly tasty alternative that can totally not make you shake your fist at God for forcing you to eat it. This was particularly surprising to me, because Ive previously believed that I hated cauliflower in all of its forms, and have largely refused t Continue reading >>

Mashed Potatoes And Cauliflower With Sour Cream

Mashed Potatoes And Cauliflower With Sour Cream

Mashed Potatoes and Cauliflower with Sour Cream 12 ounces baking potatoes, peeled and cut into 1/2-inch cubes (about 2 1/2 cups) 1 1/4 pounds cauliflower, cut into 1-inch pieces (about 4 1/2 cups) Combine cauliflower and potatoes in large saucepan; cover with water. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat; simmer about 10 to 12 minutes or until vegetables are tender. Drain. Add sour cream, chives, salt, and pepper to saucepan. Using potato masher, mash until blended. Yield: 6 servings. Serving size: 1/2 cup. Calories: 83, Carbohydrates: 16 g, Protein: 4 g, Fat: 2 g, Saturated Fat: 1 g, Cholesterol: 7 mg, Sodium: 233 mg, Fiber: 3 g Exchanges per serving: 1/2 Bread/Starch, 2 Vegetable. Disclaimer Statements: Statements and opinions expressed on this Web site are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the publishers or advertisers. The information provided on this Web site should not be construed as medical instruction. Consult appropriate health-care professionals before taking action based on this information. Continue reading >>

The Hidden Secrets Of Using Cauliflower

The Hidden Secrets Of Using Cauliflower

Share: Often it is taught by dietitians that the healthiest vegetables to eat are those that are deep green, orange, and red. General advice is to eat colorful vegetables. Beware of this broad-spectrum advice as you might miss enjoying the magnificent, nutritious white cauliflower as well as the varieties that are colorful. This blog explores cauliflower and diabetes, nutrition benefits of dining on cauliflower, fun cauliflower facts, cautions, and three recipes for you to try. By the end of this article I’m sure you will be delighted and inspired about the hidden secrets of cauliflower. Cauliflower and Diabetes Most people with diabetes are encouraged to eat plenty of non-starchy vegetables. The American Diabetes Association recommends eating half of one’s plate or at least 3-5 servings of non-starchy vegetables per day. One serving is equal to ½ cup cooked or 1 cup raw. Non-starchy vegetables are encouraged because of the nutrition contributions they make to our diets. They are high in vitamins, minerals, fiber and phytochemicals. (1) I would like to encourage you to use cauliflower as part of this recommendation for people with diabetes! There is no hidden secret here! Nutritional benefits of Cauliflower As you can see from the food label, 1 cup of raw white cauliflower, contains only 25 calories with 2 grams of dietary fiber and 80% of the recommended daily amount of vitamin C. Hidden secrets of cauliflower not found on the nutrition label By eating cauliflower you get the benefit of an exceptional source of cancer fighting compounds that contain sulfur and nitrogen. These include Glucosinolates, which form isothiocyanates, indoles and sulforaphane. These substances help to decrease inflammation in the body and inhibit cancerous cell growth and induce cell deat Continue reading >>

Mashed Cauliflower

Mashed Cauliflower

Mashed cauliflower 4 -1 cup Servings Net carbohydrates 10g. Note: This has become a rage with people today that are watching their carbohydrates and calories. While that may be the reason I first made it, I just like the way it tastes. I don’t make it as a replacement for potatoes but just because it is so delicious on its own. My personal method is to treat it the same way I do mashed potatoes. This is a very elastic recipe. No two cauliflowers are the same size so you have to use your eye to make adjustments as you go along. I like fresh dill and parsley in this recipe. If you hate dill leave it out. If you want a super creamy texture, whip it longer than I advise below. If your doctor requests that you limit your salt, use the juice of 1/2 of a lemon in place of salt int the cooking water. 1 – large head of cauliflower 2-3 cloves of garlic, peeled and sliced thinly 1 – TBSP. Butter Enough salted water to cover the cauliflower by about 2 inches. 1 medium shallot 2 TBSP. butter Salt and pepper to taste (or as your doctor and you decide) 3 TBSP. BREAKSTONES sour cream (Low fat is fine) 3 TBSP. grated parmesan cheese 2 – tsp. fresh dill 2 – tsp. fresh parsley HOW TO PREPARE THIS RECIPE: Sauté shallots in the butter until just barley golden in color. Set aside. Bring salted water and garlic slivers to a boil. Cut cauliflower into florets. Add the butter and cauliflower to the water and cook for 9-10 minutes until the cauliflower is very soft. Drain and return to the heat to evaporate any excess moisture. Remove to a mixing bowl. Using a hand mixer, whip the cauliflower until it is smooth but not pureed. You (I) want it slightly chunky in texture. Add the sour cream, dill and parsley and whip until combined. Add the parmesan cheese and whip again until combined. Continue reading >>

Potatoes And Diabetes

Potatoes And Diabetes

Potatoes are another staple we've all grown to love over the years. BUT if you have diabetes, potatoes are a no no if you want to lower blood sugar and A1C. Why? Quite simply, they are a high carbohydrate food, and they are also high glycemic index as well, meaning they cause rapid rises in blood sugar. If you go searching out on the web, you will still see lots of diabetic recipes containing potatoes. There are thousands of recipes and meals out there promoted to be diabetic friendly, but they're not. Here you'll only find low carb recipes that are going to help you gain better control. So let's briefly explore some potato nutrition facts and then share some potato alternatives and a recipe you can try. Potato Nutrition Facts Potatoes range from 21 g carbs through to around 35 g carbs per one medium potato. There is such a wide range in carb count because it depends on the type of potato. Even at 21 g that's quite high for a single potato – chances are you'd probably want to eat more. It's also the same for glycemic index (GI) – it ranges from 60 right up to 95. Anything below 55 is considered a low GI, and the higher it gets over 55, the more rapidly it is going to send your blood sugar soaring. Even 60 is a high GI, and 95, well that's crazy high. So unfortunately, eating potatoes is not going to help you lower blood sugar or A1C and keep things under control. Sorry to be the bearer of the bad news if you didn't know this already. But there are some tasty alternatives. Sure, there's nothing quite like potato. But we can adapt and use other things – here comes cauliflower again! Cauliflower Cauliflower is a very adaptive, versatile vegetable – we talked about that recently in our rice alternatives post and hopefully you gave the cauliflower rice a try. Because Continue reading >>

Cauliflower Mashed Potatoes

Cauliflower Mashed Potatoes

Make this recipe for cauliflower mashed potatoes instead of regular mashed potatoes for a low-carb alternative. Easy to alter for paleo and vegan diets. For the LONGEST time, I had seen different bloggers sharetheirmashed cauliflower recipes and talk how they tasted just like real mashed potatoes . I mean were talking about MASHED POTATOES here. Smooth, heavy, delightfully creamy mashed potatoes. And with mashed cauliflower, instead? No way. But I kept seeing more and more people rave about them. Well, much to my surprise, it was true! Mashed cauliflower really does nicely replace mashed potatoes. Are they exactly the same? No, theyre not identical. But they are definitely good enough as a stand-in. And they are tasty. If, like me, you have been weary about trying mashed cauliflower potatoes, I hope I can help convince you to finally go for it. How To Make Cauliflower Mashed Potatoes Healthy Mashed potatoes arent typically high on the healthy foods lists for a number of reasons. Thats what makes these healthy cauliflower mashed potatoes such a great option. In order to make them healthier, I did the following in this recipe: replaced potatoes with cauliflower (which provides more fiber and protein for less calories) removed any cream, sour cream, or cream cheese These changes all help to make this mashed potato alternative healthier without sacrificing the flavor or texture. How To Make Cauliflower Mashed Potatoes Creamy If you find this cauliflower mashed potato recipe just not quite creamy enough, you can also add 1-2 tablespoons ofplain greek yogurt. This will help to make them creamier and also a little heavier, if thats how you prefer your mashed potatoes. Another way to make your cauliflower mashed potatoes as creamy as possible is to let the cauliflower cool dow Continue reading >>

Steak With Potato-cauliflower Mash

Steak With Potato-cauliflower Mash

Serving Size: 3 3/4ounces cooked meat, 2/3 cup mash, and 3 tablespoons sauce 1 8 - ounce can tomato sauce with roasted garlic 1 1 - pound boneless beef top sirloin steak, cut 1 inch thick Preheat broiler. In a small saucepan combine tomato sauce, vinegar, honey, chili powder, onion powder, and 1/8 teaspoon pepper. Bring to boiling; reduce heat. Simmer, uncovered, about 5 minutes or until slightly thickened. Set aside. Place steak on the unheated rack of a broiler pan. Broil 3 to 4 inches from heat for 15 to 17 minutes or until desired doneness (145 degrees F for medium rare; 160 degrees F for medium), turning once halfway through broiling time and brushing with tomato sauce mixture on both sides just before the last 3 minutes of broiling time. Meanwhile, in a large saucepan combine potatoes and garlic. Add enough water to cover potatoes. Bring to boiling; reduce heat. Simmer, covered, for 5 minutes. Add cauliflower; return to boiling. Reduce heat. Simmer, covered, about 10 minutes more or until vegetables are very tender. Drain in a colander set in sink. Shake to drain well. In a large bowl combine potato-cauliflower mixture, oil, salt, and 1/8 teaspoon pepper. Beat with an electric mixer on low speed until combined. Gradually beat in just enough milk to make potato-cauliflower mixture light and fluffy. Stir in the 2 tablespoons chives. Bring any remaining tomato sauce mixture to boiling; serve with steak and potato-cauliflower mixture. If desired, sprinkle with additional chives. PER SERVING: 295 cal., 8 g total fat (2 g sat. fat), 79 mg chol., 733 mg sodium, 27 g carb. (4 g fiber, 8 g sugars), 30 g pro. Lean Meat (d.e): 3; Vegetables (d.e): 2; Mark as Free Exchange (d.e): 0; Fat (d.e): 0.5; Starch (d.e): 1 Continue reading >>

Creamy Mashed Cauliflower

Creamy Mashed Cauliflower

Mashed potatoes have lots of carbs, but this satisfying alternative doesn’t. Ingredients 8 cups bite-size cauliflower florets (about 1 head) 4 cloves garlic, crushed and peeled 1/3 cup nonfat buttermilk (see Tip) 4 teaspoons extra-virgin olive oil, divided 1 teaspoon butter 1/2 teaspoon salt Freshly ground pepper to taste Snipped fresh chives for garnish Directions Place cauliflower florets and garlic in a steamer basket over boiling water, cover and steam until very tender, 12 to 15 minutes. (Alternatively, place florets and garlic in a microwave-safe bowl with 1/4 cup water, cover and microwave on High for 3 to 5 minutes.) Place the cooked cauliflower and garlic in a food processor. Add buttermilk, 2 teaspoons oil, butter, salt and pepper; pulse several times, then process until smooth and creamy. Transfer to a serving bowl. Drizzle with the remaining 2 teaspoons oil and garnish with chives, if desired. Serve hot. If you don’t have buttermilk you can use buttermilk powder prepared according to package directions. Or make “sour milk”: mix 1 tablespoon lemon juice or vinegar to 1 cup milk. Continue reading >>

Free Diabetic Recipe: Cauliflower-infused Half-mashed Potatoes

Free Diabetic Recipe: Cauliflower-infused Half-mashed Potatoes

FREE DIABETIC RECIPE: Cauliflower-Infused Half-Mashed Potatoes The versatility of cauliflower is vastly underrated. It may not look like much on its own, but when used as an ingredient, they can help turn run of the mill items into something special. Take this recipe for mashed potatoes, for instance. The presence of the cauliflower will help create a slightly different flavor and texture to the traditional side, but in a way that doesnt compromise the familiar integrity of the dish. As an added bonus, it turns the dish into a healthier, low-calorie accompaniment. Considering some of the items that mashed potatoes tend to get paired with, this facet of the dish is certainly nothing to ignore. Calories: 110,Fat: 4.5 g,Saturated Fat: 1.2 g,Cholesterol: 0 mg,Sodium: 160 mg,Carbohydrate: 16 g,Fiber: 2 g,Sugar: 2 g, Protein: 2 g 1 pound bag fingerling petite potatoes, sliced into 1-inch rounds with the skin on. Add potatoes to a large soup pot. Cover with cold water. Bring to a boil. Cook for 15 minutes. Add the cauliflower to a pot, return to a boil, and cook for an additional 5 minutes. Drain the potatoes and cauliflower. Return to pot. Add the rest of the ingredients and mash the resultant mixture with a potato masher. Mix with an electric mixer on low speed for approximately 1 minute. If you want to add a little kick to the potatoes, add a little garlic into the recipe. FOR RECIPES LIKE THIS, CLICK HERE TO GET OUR FREE DIABETIC COOKBOOK. Continue reading >>

Free Diabetic Recipe: Cauliflower Mashed Potatoes

Free Diabetic Recipe: Cauliflower Mashed Potatoes

FREE DIABETIC RECIPE: Cauliflower Mashed Potatoes We know mashed potatoes are a terrific side. If they werent, its highly doubtful that the term meat and potatoes would be part of the common vernacular. The only problem with this accompaniment is that its not exactly the heathiest side dish out there. This ingenious recipe aims to change this. Its secret is found in the power of the mighty cauliflower, which allows it to retain its proper volume even as it drops the calories and fat. The dish also has zero cholesterol, and because you end up keeping the potato skins intact, its also high in fiber. Most importantly, the dish delivers the kind of tremendous flavor youd want from a proper dollop of mashed potatoes, whether youre pairing it with meat or something else. Calories: 110Fat: 4.5 g,Cholesterol: 0 mg,Sodium: 160 mg,Carbohydrate: 16 g,Sugar: 2 g, Fiber: 2 g, Protein: 2 g 24 oz. bag of fingerling petite potatoes, cut into 1-inch rounds, skin on Add the potatoes to a large soup pot. Cover with cold water, bring to a boil, and cook for 15 minutes. Add the cauliflower to the pot, return to a boil, and cook for 5 additional minutes. Drain the potatoes and cauliflower and return to the pot. Add the rest of the ingredients and mash mixture with a potato masher. Mix in with an electric mixer on low-speed for about 1 minute. These will produce lumpy mashed potatoes. If you want smoother potatoes, run the mixture longer. FOR RECIPES LIKE THIS, CLICK HERE TO GET OUR FREE DIABETIC COOKBOOK. Continue reading >>

Creamy Mashed Cauliflower Recipe - Eatingwell

Creamy Mashed Cauliflower Recipe - Eatingwell

Place cauliflower florets and garlic in a steamer basket over boiling water, cover and steam until very tender, 12 to 15 minutes. (Alternatively, place florets and garlic in a microwave-safe bowl with cup water, cover and microwave on High for 3 to 5 minutes.) Place the cooked cauliflower and garlic in a food processor. Add buttermilk, 2 teaspoons oil, butter, salt and pepper; pulse several times, then process until smooth and creamy. Transfer to a serving bowl. Drizzle with the remaining 2 teaspoons oil and garnish with chives, if desired. Serve hot. Tip: No buttermilk? You can use buttermilk powder prepared according to package directions. Or make sour milk: mix 1 tablespoon lemon juice or vinegar to 1 cup milk. This came out perfect! I did exactly as directed except I added 2 tsp of salt instead of a 1/2 tsp and added about an 1/8 of a cup of freshly grated parmesan! It's delicious! Definitely a keeper. The first time I made it, I used a tiny bit of parmesan cheese,. Soo delicious! The second time, I didn't have any parmesan cheese, also, sooo delicious! Remarkably Good! I did not use a steamer, Just a large pot w/a lid, steamed it just like that w/ several cloves of garlic, squeezed them out of their lil shells DELICIOUS!!! I used 1 cup non dairy creamer 3 tbsp butter the garlic salt and olive oil... Did microwave then food processor as directed... YUMM. super smooth and creamy. LOVED IT.. thank you My whole family loved this even the picky ones, This is a keeper for us. Used 1 large clove of garlic, substituted sour cream for buttermilk, just drizzled in a little olive oil and it was perfect! Had no issue with residue in bottom of food processor. Be sure to drain well after steaming in microwave. Butter and sour cream processed very well for a really creamy textur Continue reading >>

Parmesan Mashed Cauliflower

Parmesan Mashed Cauliflower

Healthy Diabetic Cooking: 21 Diabetic Recipes for Healthy Eating In this FREE eCookbook, we'll show you some of our favorite diabetic recipes from healthy appetizers to mouth-watering main dishes to tasty, low sugar desserts. Bonus: Get our newsletter & special offers for free. We will not share or sell your email address. View our Privacy Policy Home > Vegetables > Parmesan Mashed Cauliflower You must be logged in to add a private note. Login | Register We are adding the recipe to your Recipe Box. You must be logged in to add a recipe. Login | Register Looking for diabetic Thanksgiving side dishes? These fake-out mashed potatoes will fool all your family and friends. Not only are they cheesy and delicious, but they're good for you, too! Place the cauliflower florets in a large pot and add just enough water to cover. Cover and cook over medium heat for 15 to 20 minutes, or until tender. Drain and place in a medium bowl. Add the remaining ingredients and beat with an electric mixer until mixture is well combined. For a quick-and-easy baked version, add 1/2 cup Parmesan cheese and 4 beaten eggs to the mixture and place in an 8-inch square baking dish that has been coated with nonstick cooking spray. Bake in a preheated 350 degrees F. oven for 30 to 40 minutes, or until golden and set. For more great healthy Thanksgiving recipe ideas, check out our collection of Healthy Thanksgiving Recipes: 20 Diabetic Recipes for Your Traditional Thanksgiving Menu . Continue reading >>

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